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West Virginia’s Unemployment Rate at 7.8% in January 2012

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West Virginia’s unemployment rate climbed four-tenths of a percentage point to 7.8% in January.

The number of unemployed state residents rose 2,400 to 61,600.

Total unemployment was down11,100 over the year.

Total non-farm payroll employment declined 16,100, with losses of 3,400 in the goods-producing sector and 12,700 in the service-providing sector.

Within the goods-producing sector, employment declines were led by a seasonal loss of 2,700 in construction.

Manufacturing employment dropped 700, while employment in mining and logging was unchanged. Within the service-providing sector, declines included 4,100 in government, 3,800 in trade, transportation, and utilities, 1,900 in educational and health services, 900 in leisure and hospitality, 900 in professional and business services, 500 in other services, 400 in financial activities, and 200 in information.

Since January 2011, total non-farm payroll employment has risen 19,200, with gains of 5,800 in the goods-producing sector and 13,400 in the service-providing sector.

Employment gains included 5,300 in government, 3,600 in leisure and hospitality, 3,400 in educational and health services, 3,200 in mining and logging, 2,900 in construction, 1,700 in professional and business services, 300 in other services, and 300 in trade, transportation, and utilities. Employment declines included 1,200 in financial activities and 300 in manufacturing. Information employment was unchanged over the year.

West Virginia’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate declined four-tenths of a percentage point to 7.4% in January, while the national rate declined two-tenths of a percentage point to 8.3%.

West Virginia on Track for Record Meth Lab Busts in 2012

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Police are seizing at least one methamphetamine lab a day in West Virginia.

WV State Police Lt. Mike Goff tells the Charleston Gazette that the state could break its record for meth lab seizures if that pace continues.

The record is 353 meth labs seized in 2005.

WV State Police data show that 59 labs have been seized in homes, hotels and vehicles since January 01, 2012.

Kanawha County led the state with 22 meth lab seizures, followed by Mason County with six.

Three labs each have been seized in Hardy, Nicholas and Webster counties.

Gilmer County Circuit Court Report – 02.27.12

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On Monday, February 27, 2012 Judge Richard A. Facemire presided over his regular monthly motion day in Gilmer County.


•  State of West Virginia vs. Kevin Curry

He entered a plea of guilty to count 3 of his indictment (with all remaining counts dismissed).

He was represented by Christina Flanagan of Buckhannon and will be sentenced on Monday, April 23, 2012 at 9:15 AM.


•  One juvenile was heard and reset for Monday, June 25, 2012 at 9:15 AM.

•  Another was reset for Thursday, March 08, 2012 at 9:00 AM.

•  Two juvenile cases were consolidated to be heard on Thursday, March 08, 2012 at 9:00 AM also.


•  In the civil case of Bobby Gene Roberts vs. Frank Masiarczyk

A case that was presumably settled last year, a status conference was held with Tom Smith (attorney for defendant) appearing in person, and Bernie Mauser (attorney for plaintiff) appearing by telephone.

Smith agreed to submit the release to Mauser for the third time and the matter would be disposed of.


•  State of West Virginia vs. Osmond Brown Jr.

He pled to count 1 of the indictment (with all remaining counts dismissed).

He was represented by Christina Flanigan and will be sentenced on Monday, April 23, 2012 at 10:00 AM.


•  State of West Virginia vs. Tim Furr

He was before the Court for revocation of his bond, which motion the Judge granted.

His bond had originally been $33,000.00 and Facemire reset his bond at $100,000.00 good and sufficient surety to be approved by the Clerk of this Court and home confinement hookup.

After Furr was unable to make bond, he was delivered to the Central Regional Jail.

He is represented by Drannon Adkins who works with Kevin Hughart of Sissonville.


•  State of West Virginia vs. Casey Cottrill

She pled to count 2 of her indictment (with all remaining counts dismissed) under a multi county plea agreement.

She was represented by Garth Beck of Clarksburg and will be sentenced on Monday, April 23, 2012 at 9:45 AM.


•  State of West Virginia vs. Amanda Smith

She pled no contest to count 1 of her indictment (with all remaining counts dismissed).

She was also represented by Garth Beck and will be sentenced on Monday, April 23, 2012 at 9:30 AM.


•  State of West Virginia vs. Amy Lamarti

She was sentenced to 1-5 years in the penitentiary upon her former plea of guilty, with said sentence being suspended and she was placed on probation for 5 years and given 6 months home confinement.

Her probation will be transferred to the state of New York and she must perform 100 hours of community service per year of probation.

She received no fine but must pay customary and usual court costs.

She must enroll in substance abuse classes and attend NA and AA and have full time employment.

Drannon Adkins was her attorney in the matter.


•  One expungement was heard and granted by Judge Facemire.


•  State of West Virginia vs. Karen Burns

She was before the Court for entry of plea.

However, Judge Facemire refused to take the plea and her case was continued until the March term of Court.

She was represented by Kevin Duffy of Clay.


•  A juvenile case was reset for Thursday, March 08, 2012 at 9:00 AM.


•  The civil case of Jay Lawrence Smith vs. Jean Butcher & Gilmer County Commission was before the Court and Judge Facemire dismissed the same with prejudice.

Judge Facemire informed Gerry Hough that he could file a defamation civil suit if he so desired.

Smith represented himself in the matter (pro se).


•  In the case of Gilmer County Commission vs. Union Gas Corp., after testimony by Gilmer County Assessor Gary Wolfe, Judge Facemire said the settlement was fair and accepted the same and the case was dismissed.


•  In the case of Frame vs. Frame, defense counsel, Timothy Butcher of Glenville, was before the Court with plaintiff’s attorney, Bill Richardson of Parkersburg, appearing by telephone for continuance of the trial.

After Judge Facemire directed depositions be completed by Friday, April 27, 2012, he ordered mediation to be completed by Monday, May 28, 2012 and set a status/scheduling conference for Monday, June 25, 2012 at 9:30 AM.

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GSC Accounting Students Offering Free Tax Return Assistance

The Department of Business at Glenville State College is once again offering free assistance for filing your basic federal and West Virginia income tax returns through a new IRS program called FAST (Free Assisted Self-service Tax preparation).

The GSC Department of Business partners with the Internal Revenue Service through the college’s Accounting 399 course.

GSC senior accounting majors, who are IRS certified, assist qualifying low to moderate income people (generally those making $57,000 or below) who need help preparing their basic Federal and West Virginia income tax returns.

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GSC Accounting seniors Brian Griffith and Stephanie Harper (right) assist
GSC junior Jillian Robison (center) with her tax returns under the guidance of
GSC Associate Professor of Business Cheryl McKinney.


The FAST experience is the IRS’ new ‘self-service’ option that is available to those with basic computer skills. Taxpayers will actually be preparing their own returns at a computer with assistance as needed from trained GSC accounting students. Once completed, federal and state returns may be electronically filed.

Taxpayers may choose either the TurboTax or TaxSlayer program based upon eligibility criteria.

Once an account is created at our site, it may be accessed from anywhere if additional information is needed before filing.

One distinguishing characteristic of FAST is that taxpayers may electronically file both federal and state returns at no charge. However, if you access one of the software programs directly without first going through the FAST site, there will be a charge for the state return.

Those who wish to receive this free tax assistance from the GSC FAST site should bring: a copy of their 2010 tax return, if available, wage and earning statements (Form W-2) from all employers, interest and dividend statements (Form 1099), any other relevant information or forms relating to income and expenses, social security cards for taxpayers and dependents, if available, and bank routing and account numbers for direct deposit/direct payment, if desired.

Also, students and anyone who received financial aid and/or paid tuition and fees must have a copy of the Tuition Statement (Form 1098-T) provide by the school before your tax return can be completed.

Those who cannot locate that document must request a duplicate copy or find it on their EdNet account. Form 1098-T should be in hand upon arrival at the FAST site so assistance can be given in a timely manner.

The GSC FAST site is located in Room 309B of the Heflin Administration Building (the Ernie Smith Computer Lab).

The FAST program allows for multiple taxpayers to be assisted.

The FAST site is open on Tuesdays from 4:30 - 6:30 PM and Wednesdays from 3:00 - 5:00 PM through April 11, 2012.

The Glenville State College Department of Business has been offering free tax return assistance to campus and community taxpayers for over sixteen years.

For more information about the GSC FAST program, contact Cheryl McKinney at 304.462.6263.

Gilmer Schools Coalition’s Mission

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Mission

Establish the best K-12 school system in West Virginia for Gilmer County’s children to provide them opportunities for superior educations.


Strategies for Mission Success

•  Clearly define roles, responsibilities, and authority of the Superintendent and School Board members to eliminate confusion and uncertainty in performing duties, and require State DOE training to be taken to familiarize the team with the details.

•  Require the Superintendent and Board members to receive State DOE training to enable them to develop and apply team skills in avoiding and resolving interpersonal conflicts with potential to detract from mission success.

•  Require the Superintendent and the Board to receive State DOE training pertaining to laws and regulations for hiring practices, budgeting, contracting and other activities for which the team is responsible.

•  Require the Superintendent and the Board to develop a 10-year mission plan with clearly defined milestones with pre-defined, measurable metrics for each stage for use to accurately monitor progress and to make plan modifications when necessary to achieve mission success.

•  Require the Superintendent and the Board to implement annual performance evaluations of all individuals in the County’s school system, including the Superintendent, with emphasis on documentation of opportunities for increased efficiency to achieve mission success.

•  Establish and strengthen parent and teacher associations at each school for collaborative involvement in contributing to mission success.

•  Require the Superintendent to submit an annual report to the public to document progress toward mission success to include plan modifications which may have been necessary to keep the mission on track.

ROANOKE: Stonewall Resort to Host Dance Weekend

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Following up on previously successful ballroom and Latin dance weekends, Stonewall Resort in Roanoke, WV, will welcome WV Dance Inc. back to the resort at the end of March.

The resort will host the dance weekend from Friday, March 30, to Sunday, April 01, 2012.

The weekend will include lessons in East Coast Swing and all different forms of Latin and ballroom dances.

There is no dress code for the weekend, but guests are encouraged to wear shoes with either a leather or suede sole to facilitate ease of movement.

The weekend package costs $285 per couple or $221.50 for singles, plus tax and resort fee, and includes all dance instruction, overnight lodging on Friday and Saturday nights and breakfast on Saturday and Sunday mornings.

For more information, call the resort at 888.278.8150 or go to www.stonewallresort.com.

More Americans Seeking Dental Treatment at the Emergency Room

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More Americans are turning to the emergency room for routine dental problems — a choice that often costs 10 times more than preventive care and offers far fewer treatment options than a dentist’s office, according to an analysis of government data and dental research.

Most of those emergency visits involve trouble such as toothaches that could have been avoided with regular checkups but went untreated, in many cases because of a shortage of dentists, particularly those willing to treat Medicaid patients, the analysis said.

The number of ER visits nationwide for dental problems increased 16% from 2006 to 2009, and the report released Tuesday by the Pew Center on the States suggests the trend is continuing.

In Florida, for example, there were more than 115,000 ER dental visits in 2010, resulting in more than $88 million in charges. That included more than 40,000 Medicaid patients, a 40% increase from 2008.

Many ER dental visits involve the same patients seeking additional care. In Minnesota, nearly 20% of all dental-related ER visits are return trips, the analysis said.

That is because emergency rooms generally are not staffed by dentists. They can offer pain relief and medicine for infected gums but not much more for dental patients. And many patients are unable to find or afford follow-up treatment, so they end up back in the emergency room.

“Emergency rooms are really the canary in the coal mine. If people are showing up in the ER for dental care, then we’ve got big holes in the delivery of care,“ said Shelly Gehshan, director of Pew’s children’s dental campaign. “It’s just like pouring money down a hole.

“It’s the wrong service, in the wrong setting, at the wrong time,“ she said.

The center in Washington, D.C., is a division of the nonprofit Pew Charitable Trusts.

Pew researchers analyzed hospital information from 24 states, data from the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and studies on dental care.

Not all states collect data on ER visits for dental care, but those that do reveal the trend, Gehshan said.

In 2009 alone:

— 56% of Medicaid-enrolled children nationwide received no dental care.

— South Carolina ER visits for dental-related problems increased nearly 60% from four years earlier.

— Tennessee hospitals had more than 55,000 dental-related ER visits — five times as many as for burns.

Using emergency rooms for dental treatment “is incredibly expensive and incredibly inefficient,“ said Dr. Frank Catalanotto, a professor at the University of Florida’s College of Dentistry who reviewed the report.

Preventive dental care such as routine teeth cleaning can cost $50 to $100, versus $1,000 for emergency room treatment that may include painkillers for aching cavities and antibiotics from resulting infections, Catalanotto said.

These infections can be dangerous, especially in young children, who may develop fevers and dehydration from preventable dental conditions. In Florida, for example, 200 children were hospitalized in 2006 for those types of infections, he said.

The recession has contributed to the trend, Catalanotto added. When a family member loses a job, dental care may take a back seat to food and other necessities.

Part of the problem is low Medicaid fees for dentists. In Florida, only about 10% of dentists participate in the state Medicaid program, he said.

The numbers also are rising in hospitals in Illinois, where dentists have complained about low Medicaid reimbursements.

Pekin Hospital in the central Illinois town of Pekin has seen a significant increase in ER patients with “very poor dental health,“ said Cindy Justus, the hospital’s ER nursing director. They include uninsured patients and drug abusers, and many are repeat patients.

“There’s just not a lot of options” for them, Justus said.

Shortages of dentists, especially in rural areas, have contributed to the problem, Gehshan said.

She said the Pew center is working with states to develop training for dental hygienists and other non-dentists in treating cavities and other uncomplicated procedures. Other potential steps include increasing water fluoridation and use of dental sealants.

Putting plastic sealants on molars can prevent cavities, but “children at the lowest risk are most likely to get them. It needs to be the opposite,“ Gehshan said.

WVIAC Men’s Tournament 2012 - Day One Review

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#4 WV Wesleyan 66, #13 Glenville State 43

WV Wesleyan posted a 66-43 victory over Glenville State in the first round of the WVIAC Tournament.

Raymont McElroy posted a game-high 24 points for the Bobcats in the win.

Colby Wohlleb and Reggie Chambers each accounted for 14 points while Travis Johnson garnered 10 points to go along with 9 rebounds.

Jamel Morris and Mark Walker each totaled 8 points for the Pioneers in the game.

Walker also grabbed 7 rebounds.

Kevin Gray added 7 points while Nate Cash accounted for 9 boards.


#2 Charleston 100, #15 Bluefield State 88

#3 Wheeling Jesuit 87, #14 Davis & Elkins 66

#5 Alderson-Broaddus 79, #12 Fairmont State 64

#6 Concord 106, #11 Ohio Valley 76

#7 Pitt-Johnstown 85, #10 Seton Hill 75

#9 Shepherd 77, #8 WV State 66

Gilmer County 4-H: IcyHot Challenge 2012 - 03.09.12

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Gilmer County Farm Bureau and WVU-Gilmer Extension Plant/Berry Sale 2012

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The Gilmer County Farm Bureau and WVU-Gilmer Extension now have their annual Plant/Berry Sale Order forms available.

Stop into the WVU-Gilmer Extension Office to pick up a form, or call 304.462.7061 for more information.

Orders will be accepted through Friday, March 09, 2012, and money will be collected when the order is placed.

Glenville: Benefit Dinner for Matthew Cottrill - 03.03.12

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G-Comm™: Making Sense of School Shootings

On February 27, 2012, a teenager—reportedly a victim of bullying and something of a social outcast—walked into a Cleveland high school and opened fire in the cafeteria, killing two students and wounding three others. The teenager, identified as T.J. Lane, has been taken into police custody. Now media pundits are speculating on who or what is to blame for this latest spate of violence.

Yet we’ve been caught in the grip of a cycle of school violence that started almost 20 years ago. It was February 1997 when a 16-year-old Alaskan boy pulled out a shotgun and killed his principal and another student. Two years later, on April 20, 1999, two teenagers, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, opened fire on classmates and teachers at Columbine High School, killing 12 students and one teacher and leaving 24 others wounded.

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Then, on October 10, 2006, a 13-year-old seventh grade boy, apparently fascinated with the 1999 Columbine High School bloodbath, carried an assault rifle into his Joplin, Missouri middle school. Dressed in a dark green trench coat and wearing a mask, he pointed the rifle at fellow students and fired a shot into the ceiling before the weapon jammed. This was no spur-of-the-moment act. It was a planned attack. The student’s backpack contained military manuals, instructions on assembling an improvised explosive device and detailed drawings of the school. Moments before he fired the rifle, the boy said to a school administrator: “Please don’t make me do this.”

The outbreak of school shootings that have taken place over the past two decades have forced school officials, public leaders and parents to search for ways to prevent further bloodshed. In their attempts to make the schools safer, students have been forced to deal with draconian zero tolerance policies, heightened security, routine locker checks, guard dogs, metal detectors and numerous other invasions of their property and privacy.

Despite the precautions (all of which have proven to be altogether ineffective), other student-led shooting sprees and bloodshed followed, culminating with the most recent incident. To be sure, the instinctive response to this latest school shooting will be to appease parents by adopting measures that provide the appearance of increased security. However, enacting tighter zero tolerance policies and installing more metal detectors in the schools will do little to advance the dialogue on why such shootings happen in the first place.

One thing is clear: there are no easy solutions. In fact, there’s so much that we don’t know about school shooters. For example, a 2002 U.S. Secret Service report on school violence, based on interviews with students who had planned and executed school shootings, found that there is no profile for a school shooter. Shooters come from many types of families and from all incomes, races and academic backgrounds. And there are no easy explanations—such as mental illness, drugs or video games—for their actions..

Moreover, as the Secret Service report found, the shooters plan their shootings in advance. They “did not snap.” According to the report, most shooters told their friends what they were planning. But the friends neither reported what they had been told nor tried to stop the shooters. And when the Secret Service asked former school shooters what they would have done if a teacher had asked them what was wrong, the shooters said they would have told the adult the truth, including their plans. But are we adults listening? As one school shooter recalls, “Most of them don’t care. I just felt like nobody cared. I just wanted to hurt them.”

In struggling to understand the teenage mind—and find some motivation for the rash of school shootings of the past several years—public leaders have targeted everything from the negative influence of movies to music to violent video games. Now the scapegoat seems to be bullying and peer pressure.

Evidently, something more sinister than disgruntled students is at work here. While there are conditions—such as peer pressure, low self-esteem, childhood abuse, etc.—that can trigger or facilitate violent behavior, we’re facing a crisis that goes much deeper, one that has as much to do with a lack of spirituality and morality as it does with education, relationships and culture.

Young people have unfortunately become the casualties of our age. They know that something is dreadfully wrong, but many adults, busy trying to make ends meet and keep pace with the demands of work and raising a family, often do not hear when the kids scream for help. For example, at least one in 10 young people now believe life is not worth living. A 2009 survey of 16- to 25-year-olds by the Prince’s Trust found “a significant core” for whom life had little or no purpose, especially among those not in school, work or training. More than a quarter of those polled felt depressed and were less happy than when they were younger. And almost “half said they were regularly stressed and many did not have anything to look forward to or someone they could talk to about their problems.“

Paul Brown, director of communications at the Prince’s Trust, noted that the study showed that there are thousands of young people who “desperately” need help: “Often, young people who feel they have reached rock bottom don’t know where to turn for help.“ Family relationships help, but too often because of the fractured modern family, little support can be found in the family setting.

Indeed, our young people are members of a lost generation—raised in a world where life has little to no value, the almighty dollar takes precedence and values are taught by primetime sitcoms and Saturday morning cartoons. They are being raised by television and the Internet and nourished on fast food. They are seeking comfort wherever they can find it—in sex, drugs, music, each other. They are searching for hope and finding few answers to their questions about the meaning of life.

More so than any previous generation, young people are growing up in an age of overwhelming mass media, mixed messages and multitasking. The average American child lives in a house with 2.9 TVs, 1.8 VCRs, 3.1 radios, 2.6 tape players, 2.1 CD players and a computer. Forty-two percent of American homes are “constant TV households,” meaning that a set is on most of the time. The average American watches television about four hours per day, and it consumes 40 percent of his or her free time.

Gone is the innocence of childhood. In a multitude of ways, children have been adultified, and their childhood is disappearing. Today’s young people often know more about sex, drugs and violence than their adult counterparts. By the year 2000, 25 percent of U.S. teens were involved with weapons; 70 percent admitted cheating on tests in school; more than 15 percent had shown up for class drunk; and five million children—including three-year-olds—were regularly left home alone to care for themselves. As University of Edinburgh professor Stuart Aitken writes, “In short, the sense of a so-called disappearance of childhood is, in actuality, about the loss of a stable, seemingly natural foundation for social life that is clearly linked not only to laments over the lost innocence of childhood, but also a growing anger at and fear of young people.”

No wonder life seems so meaningless to so many. According to a June 2009 study, 15 percent of American teens who were in 7th through 12th grades believe they will die before age 35—a perspective strongly linked to risky behavior. Activities related to such a pessimistic view of the future include attempting suicide, using illegal drugs, sustaining fight-related injuries that require medical care, engaging in unprotected sex, being arrested by the police and contracting HIV or AIDS.

Wherever these young people turn, life is chaotic—wars, violence, environmental crises, oil depletion and terrorism, to name a few. Children are confronted on a daily basis with issues, images and material of all sorts—abortion, drugs, alcohol, pornography—and preyed upon by sexual predators, marketing mavens, even the government. Although teenagers can cope with a number of emotional hazards, with each additional hazard introduced, their resilience—like soldiers in combat too long—diminishes to such an extent that breakdowns are imminent. As Cornell University professor James Gabarino recognizes, one of the key factors leading to violence is a “spiritual emptiness” that brings on a feeling of not being connected to anything, of having no limits for behavior and no reverence for life.

Dr. James P. Comer, professor of psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center, suggests that in order to treat the damage done to the next generation, “We’re going to have to work at systematically recreating the critical elements of community that once existed naturally. We can’t go back to the past, but there was a time when people cared about each other and would look out for each other.”

Is anyone listening?

~~  John Whitehead ~~

 

Alabama

Mobile 1 death in 2008
Madison 1 death in 2010
Huntsville 3 deaths in 2010

Alaska

Bethel 2 deaths in 1997

Arkansas


Jonesboro 5 deaths in 1998
Fayetteville 2 deaths in 2000
Conway 2 deaths in 2008

California

Fullerton 7 deaths in 1976
San Diego 2 deaths in 1979
Stockton 6 deaths in 1989
Olivehurst 8 deaths in 1992
Reseda 1 death in 1993
San Diego 3 deaths in 1996
Santee 2 deaths in 2001
El Cajon no deaths in 2001
Oxnard 1 death in 2008
San Bruno no deaths in 2009
Antioch no deaths in 2009

Colorado

Littleton 1 death in 1982
Littleton 15 deaths in 1999
Bailey 2 deaths in 2006
Jefferson County 0 deaths in 2010

Connecticut

Portland 1 death in 1982
Middletown 1 death in 2009

Delaware

Dover 1 death in 2007

Florida


Largo 1 death in 1988
Lake Worth 1 death in 2000
Fort Lauderdale 1 death in 2008

Georgia

Scottdale 1 death in 1996
Conyers no deaths in 1999
Atlanta 1 death in 2009

Illinois

Winnetka 1 death in 1988
Chicago 1 death in 1992
DeKalb 6 deaths in 2008

Iowa

Iowa City 6 deaths in 1991

Kansas


Goddard 1 death in 1985

Kentucky


Grayson 2 deaths in 1993
Paducah 3 deaths in 1997

Louisiana

New Orleans 1 death in 2003
Baton Rouge 3 deaths in 2008
Larose 1 deaths in 2009

Massachusetts

Great Barrington 2 deaths in 1993
Cambridge 1 death in 2009

Michigan

Mount Morris Township 1 death in 2000
Detroit 1 death in 2008
Dearborn 2 deaths in 2009

Minnesota

Cold Spring 2 deaths in 2003
Red Lake 8 deaths in 2005

Mississippi

Jackson 2 deaths in 1970
Pearly 2 deaths in 1997

Missouri

Manchester 2 deaths in 1983

Nevada


Reno no deaths in 2006

New Jersey


Florham 2 deaths in 2004

New York


Olean 3 deaths in 1974
Amityville 1 death in 1993
Manhattan no deaths in 2002
East Greenbush no deaths in 2004

North Carolina

Fayetteville no deaths in 1986
Greensboro 1 death in 1994
Hillsborough 1 death in 2006

Ohio

Kent 4 deaths in 1970
Wickliffe 1 death in 1994
Cleveland 1 death in 2003
Cleveland 1 death in 2007
Columbus 2 deaths in 2010

Oklahoma

Fort Gibson no deaths in 1999

Oregon


Springfield 2 deaths in 1998

Pennsylvania


State College 1 death in 1996
Edinboro 1 death in 1998
Red Lion 2 deaths in 2003
Nickel Mines 6 deaths in 2006

South Carolina

Orangeburg 3 deaths in 1968
Blackville 2 deaths in 1995

Tennessee

Lynnville 2 deaths in 1995
Jacksboro 1 death in 2005
Memphis no deaths in 2008
Knoxville 1 death in 2008

Texas

Austin 15 deaths in 1966
Amarillo no deaths in 1992

Vermont

Essex 2 deaths in 2006

Virginia


Chesapeake 1 death in 1988
Grundy 3 deaths in 2002
Blacksburg 33 deaths in 2007
Woodbridge 1 death in 2009

Washington

Moses Lake 3 deaths in 1996
Tacoma 1 death in 2007
Seattle 2 deaths in 2007
Tacoma 1 death in 2010

Wisconsin

Wauwatosa 1 death in 1993
Cazenovia 1 death in 2006

Gilmer County Commission: PUBLIC NOTICE - SPECIAL SESSION

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STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA,
COUNTY OF GILMER, TO-WIT:

            I, Brian Kennedy, President of the County Commission of Gilmer County, West Virginia, in concurrence with Charles D. Hess and Darrel W. Ramsey, Commissioners of said Commission hereby call and appoint a Special Session the County Commission of Gilmer County, to be held at the courthouse in said county on Wednesday, February 29, 2012 at 9:00 AM in the County Commission Chambers to transact the following business:

            To complete the business pending before the Board of Review and Equalization

            And to adjourn said Board for 2012, provided all business has been completed.

            Given under my hand this 7th day of February 2012.


                                          GILMER COUNTY COMMISSION
                                          Brian Kennedy, President

POSTED:
          February 28, 2012
          Jean Butcher, County Clerk

WV: The Legislature Today - February 27, 2012

Bon Appétit: Cajun Roast Beef

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Ingredients:

  2 teaspoons garlic, minced
  1/2 teaspoon prepared horseradish
  1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
  1 teaspoon dried thyme
  1/2 teaspoon salt
  1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  2 teaspoons Cajun seasoning
  2 tablespoons olive oil
  2 tablespoons malt vinegar
  2 pounds beef eye of round roast


Directions:

Stir the garlic, horseradish, hot pepper sauce, thyme, salt, pepper, Cajun seasoning, olive oil, and malt vinegar together in a bowl until thoroughly blended.

Pierce the beef roast all over with a meat fork. Place the roast in a large, resealable plastic bag.

Spoon in the marinade and turn the roast so it’s well coated.

Refrigerate overnight, turning occasionally if desired.

When ready to cook, place the roast in a slow cooker along with any remaining marinade.

Do not add water.

Roast on Low for 8 to 10 hours, or until desired doneness.

For medium-rare, a meat thermometer should read 135 degrees F (57 degrees C).

Remove from the slow cooker to a serving plate, and allow to rest 15 minutes before slicing across the grain.

Ask the Doctor: Flu Shot

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DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My wife and I are senior citizens who have heard from friends that the flu shot to be given this year is actually a combination of West Nile virus vaccine and the flu vaccine.
We were told that the combined shot has made quite a few people sick.
We were advised not to get it.
What is your advice on this? - T.M.

ANSWER: Whoever told you that is either misinformed or is pulling your leg.
The West Nile virus is not included in the flu vaccine.
I haven’t seen or heard of any more reactions from this year’s flu vaccine than has happened in the past.
Most reactions are a bit of swelling and redness at the site of injection.
A very few people develop a slight temperature and feel out of sorts for a day or two.
Even these minor reactions occur infrequently and ought not to scare you from having the shot.

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.

Daily G-Eye™: 02.29.12

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GSC Morris Stadium


Submit photos for this daily feature. You may select to have your name listed as well.
Send your photo(s) to “tellus@gilmerfreepress.net”

Stargazing - 02.29.12

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Today is Leap Day, an extra day added to (almost) every fourth February to keep the calendar aligned with the seasons.

The basic western calendar was enacted by Julius Caesar, with a tweak to the Leap Day rule by Pope Gregory XIII in the 16th century.


Leap Day

Thirty days has September, April, June, and November. All the rest…. well, you know the rest — and if you don’t, that’s what the Internet is for. But this little jingle reminds us how neat and orderly the modern calendar really is. Each month has a set number of days, and each year has a set number of months.

There’s just one little blip — a blip that appears today: Leap Day. It’s added to every fourth year to keep the calendar aligned with the seasons.

Earth’s annual march around the Sun takes 365 days and almost six hours, and those extra hours have to be accounted for to keep the calendar in sync with the seasons.

The basic calendar we use today was instituted by Julius Caesar — a system of 12 months, each with a fixed length, for a total of 365 days. Even in Caesar’s time, though, those six extra hours were well known. So an extra day was added to every fourth February, making the years average out to exactly 365-and-a-quarter days.

But the true year is actually a few minutes less than that. By the 16th century, those minutes had added up to a big difference. So Pope Gregory the 13th ordered a change in the calendar: Leap Day is dropped from three of every four “century” years — years that end with double zeroes.

Even this system isn’t perfect — it leaves an error of one day every 3300 years. Still, we’ve got quite a few centuries to go before anyone has to tinker yet again with the rules for Leap Day.

G-MM™: Meditation Moment - 02.29.12

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‘No sign will be given to this generation except the sign of Jonah.’

Taken as a whole, the liturgical readings for Lent highlight realities that lie at the very heart of our life as Christians—mercy, conversion, repentance, forgiveness, healing, enlightenment and the joy that flows from them.

These themes are illustrated in dramatic fashion in the Old Testament story of Jonah and the Ninevites.

Following their example in the weeks leading up to Easter, we may learn the truth of a claim that ‘fasting was ever the food of virtue’, especially if we ‘fill up what is wanting in our fasting with almsgiving to the poor’.

Reflecting on Jonah’s experience, the Cistercian mystic Thomas Merton, invites us to embrace the paradox that fullness of life in the resurrected Christ can only come through death to self.

Jonah 3:1-10. A broken, humbled heart, O God, you will not scorn—Ps 50(51):3-4, 12-13, 18-19. Luke 11:29‑32.

Rev. George Edward Lake

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Rev. George Edward Lake

Age 80, of Lexington, NC (formerly of West Union, WV), departed this life on Thursday, February 23, 2012, at his residence.

Funeral services will be 11:00 AM on Wednesday, February 29, 2012, at the West Union Baptist Church, 204 Cottage Ave., West Union, WV.

Burial will follow in the South Fork Baptist Church Cemetery near Summers (Doddridge County).

Friends called at the church from 4:00 to 8:00 PM on Tuesday, February 28, 2012.

McCullough-Rogers Funeral Home, Pennsboro, WV, is assisting the family with the arrangements.

02.29.12

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History on February 29, yyyy

Today is Wednesday, Feb. 29, the 60th day of 2012. There are 306 days left in the year. This is Leap Day.


Today’s Highlights in History:

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On Feb. 29, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (also known as the Kerner Commission) warned that racism was causing America to move “toward two societies, one black, one white—separate and unequal.“ The discovery of a “pulsar,“ a star which emits regular radio waves, was announced by Dr. Jocelyn Bell Burnell in Cambridge, England. At the Grammy Awards, the 5th Dimension’s “Up, Up and Away” won record of the year for 1967, while album of the year honors went to The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.“


On this date:

In 1504, Christopher Columbus, stranded in Jamaica during his fourth voyage to the West, used a correctly predicted lunar eclipse to frighten hostile natives into providing food for his crew.

In 1792, composer Gioachino Antonio Rossini was born in Pesaro, Italy.

In 1796, President George Washington proclaimed Jay’s Treaty, which settled some outstanding differences with Britain, in effect.

In 1892, the United States and Britain agreed to submit to arbitration their dispute over seal-hunting rights in the Bering Sea. (A commission later ruled in favor of Britain.)

In 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt appointed a seven-member commission to facilitate completion of the Panama Canal.

In 1908, the artist Balthus was born in Paris.

In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a second Neutrality Act as he appealed to American businesses not to increase exports to belligerents.

In 1940, “Gone with the Wind” won eight Academy Awards, including best picture of 1939; Hattie McDaniel won for best supporting actress, the first black performer so honored.

In 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower announced he would seek a second term of office.

In 1960, the first Playboy Club, featuring waitresses clad in “bunny” outfits, opened in Chicago.

In 1984, Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau announced he was stepping down after more than 15 combined years in power.

In 1996, Daniel Green was convicted in Lumberton, N.C., of murdering James R. Jordan, the father of basketball star Michael Jordan, during a 1993 roadside holdup. (Green and an accomplice, Larry Martin Demery, were sentenced to life in prison.) A Peruvian Boeing 737 crashed on approach to Arequipa, killing all 123 people on board.


Twelve years ago (2000):

George W. Bush won Republican presidential primaries in Virginia, Washington state and North Dakota, defeating John McCain; Vice President Al Gore crushed fellow Democrat Bill Bradley in Washington state.

Six-year-old Kayla Rolland was fatally shot by a fellow first-grader at Buell Elementary School in Mount Morris Township, Mich.

Sparky Anderson was elected to the baseball Hall of Fame along with Turkey Stearnes of the Negro leagues and 19th-century second baseman Bid McPhee.

Kathie Lee Gifford announced her intention to leave the syndicated morning show “Live with Regis & Kathie Lee.“


Eight years ago (2004):

Facing rebellion, Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigned and left for exile in the Central African Republic. (Aristide returned to Haiti in March 2011.)

“The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” won a record-tying 11 Academy Awards, including best picture; Sean Penn took the best-actor prize for “Mystic River” and Charlize Theron won best actress for “Monster.“

Playwright Jerome Lawrence died in Malibu, Calif., at age 88.


Four years ago (2008):

Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama accused rival Hillary Rodham Clinton of trying to “play on people’s fears to scare up votes” with a TV ad showing sleeping children and asking who would be more qualified to answer a national security emergency call at 3 AM.

WV Lottery - 02.28.12

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7-4-3


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5-1-8-9


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06-09-12-15-24-25


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06-15-29-39-51     Mega Ball: 36   Megaplier: x 3  

Death Toll Rises to 3 in Ohio School Shooting

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A Cleveland hospital says another student wounded in an Ohio high school shooting has died, bringing the death toll to three.

MetroHealth System said Tuesday that Demetrius Hewlin died Tuesday morning.

He had been in critical condition.

Hewlin was a student at Chardon High School.

He was among several shot by a gunman in the school cafeteria Monday morning.

Hewlin’s family says in a statement he was a happy young man who loved life and his family and friends.

The teenage suspect faces a juvenile court hearing Tuesday afternoon.

WVIAC Women’s Basketball Tournament 2012 - Day One Review

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#3 Glenville State 85, #14 Alderson-Broaddus 56

Glenville State used its high-powered offense to post an 85-56 victory over Alderson-Broaddus in the first round of the WVIAC Tournament.

Ginny Petties came off the bench to lead the Pioneers with a game-high 26 points and a game-best 11 rebounds in just 26 minutes of action.

Beth Deren and Jelena Elez each scored 12 points while Mishae Miles accounted for 11 points and 7 boards.

Aesha Peters pulled down 8 boards.

Danielle Woodmore garnered 9 points and 5 assists in the win.

Amanda Peoples registered a team-high 17 points for the Battlers in the loss.

Brittini Shriver scored 10 points off the bench in just 14 minutes of action.

Erica Brooks and Cayla Rhodes each scored 6.

Natalie Smith dished out 5 assists.

Glenville State will face #6 Davis & Elkins on Wednesday at 3:00 PM in the quarterfinals.


#2 Concord 85, #15 Wheeling Jesuit 57

#4 Shepherd 72, #13 Bluefield State 40

#5 Fairmont State 73, #12 Ohio Valley 66

#6 Davis & Elkins 66, #11 WV State 64

#10 Charleston 56, #7 Pitt-Johnstown 51

#9 West Liberty 71, #8 Seton Hill 62

GSC Students Help Complete Reclamation Project

Students and faculty from the Glenville State College Land Resources Department have recently helped complete a reclamation project in Barbour County, West Virginia.

The GSC Land Resource Department partnered with Pope LLC, an excavating company from Camden, West Virginia, to reclaim and restore a wetland area near Philippi, West Virginia.

Pope LLC was contracted by CNX Gas, a subsidiary of CONSOL Energy Incorporated, to reclaim the property.

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The GSC Land Resources Department received a $2,000 donation from Pope LLC.
(L-R) GSC Professor of Natural Resource Management and Department Chair Dr. Milan Vavrek,
GSC Academic Laboratory Instructional Assistant Tom Snyder, Bob Pope,
owner of Pope LLC, GSC senior Justin Sumpter, GSC senior Dustin Reed,
and GSC senior Chris Rogers.


CONSOL Energy is a leader in the natural gas industry and one of the largest independent natural gas exploration, development, and production companies in the United States.

Bob Pope, owner of Pope LLC, approached GSC about the possibility of getting students involved in the project.

Pope had developed a relationship with the GSC Land Resources Department faculty through his participation in their annual golf outing.

“I thought that it would be a great learning experience for students in the natural resource management classes to get some actual hands-on experience in the field, and their help certainly was beneficial to Pope LLC completing the project,“ said Bob Pope.

Twenty-three GSC students along with GSC Professor of Natural Resource Management and Department Chair Dr. Milan Vavrek and GSC Academic Laboratory Instructional Assistant Tom Snyder, planted over one thousand native trees and shrubs at the site.

Prior to their participation, the GSC students received health and safety training provided by CONSOL Energy.

They were also required to wear protective boots, gloves and hardhats that were provided by Pope LLC. The students were allowed to keep this equipment after the work was completed.

“Working on this project was a great learning exercise for us. It allowed us to use some of the techniques that we have been learning about in the classroom. The program here at GSC really prepares us for what we will be doing when we enter the workforce,“ said Justin Sumpter, a senior Natural Resource Management major from Pricetown in Lewis County, West Virginia.

To reward the hard work of the GSC students and faculty, Bob Pope and Pope LLC have donated $2,000 to the GSC Land Resources Department.

“We are extremely grateful for Pope’s generous donation to the department. We will put the money to good use to purchase equipment that we need to ensure that our students are the best trained in the field. We are also thankful for the opportunity that this project presented to let the students get their hands dirty and incorporate what they have learned from lectures and books into an actual live exercise,“ said Tom Snyder.

To learn more about the Glenville State College Natural Resource Management program, contact Vavrek at “Milan.Vavrek@glenville.edu” or 304.462.6375.

WVDNR Seeks Changes to Cut Female Deer Numbers

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The Division of Natural Resources is taking a new approach to reducing West Virginia’s deer population.

The agency wants hunters to kill more female deer in many areas of the state.

It is proposing hunting regulation changes to achieve that goal.

Proposed changes include creating a new three-day, late-October firearm season for antlerless deer and allowing hunters to take up to two deer a day, provided at least one is antlerless.

The Charleston Gazette reports that the DNR unveiled its new plan Sunday during the Natural Resources Commission’s quarterly meeting.

The commission sets the state’s hunting and fishing regulations.

Public meetings are planned around the state next month to gather input on the plan.

The commission will vote on the plan April 29, 2012.

WVIAC Women’s Basketball Awards - 2012

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Fairmont State University junior guard Kaitlin Snyder has been named the WVIAC’s Player of the Year, as voted on by the league coaches. Pitt-Johnstown guard Kaitlynn Fratz has been named the conference’s Freshman of the Year while Concord University’s Kenny Osborne has been tabbed the Coach of the Year.

Snyder, who was the 2011 Baisi Award winner, guided the Falcons to a fifth-place finish in the WVIAC regular-season standings. She keyed FSU to a seven-game winning streak down the stretch to propel the squad into fifth. The Falcons concluded the regular season with a 17-9 overall mark, including a 14-8 record against league competition.

Recently named an Academic All-American, Snyder picked up three WVIAC Player of the Week accolades on the year. She finished second in the WVIAC with her 21.8 points per contest. Snyder, a native of Charleston, WV, ranks fourth in steals (2.50) and made three-point baskets (2.46/game) while her 4.31 assists per game are sixth in the WVIAC. She also ranks sixth in three-point percentage (38.1%) and seventh in the league in free throw percentage at 79.4%. Snyder’s assist-to-turnover ratio is seventh best (1.45).

Fratz, a native of Accident, MD, concluded her rookie season in the league as the sixth-best scorer at 17.4 points per game.  Her 1.77 steals per outing put her 12th in the WVIAC. Fratz’s 1.65 three-point field goals made per night put her 14th in the conference standings. She picked up a WVIAC Player of the Week honor on December 20, 2011. Her play on the final day of the regular season helped UPJ earn the No. 7 seed in the WVIAC Tournament.

Osborne guided Concord University to a second-place finish after registering a 21-5 overall mark, including an 18-4 record against league competition. The award is the second for Osborne, who also took home the honor in 2003. Osborne coached three student-athletes that picked up all-conference accolades.

Four members of this year’s first-team all-conference selections are repeat first-team award winners. Lydia Bridenbaugh, Jamie Kaufman, Kaitlin Snyder and Tenisha Wilson were all on the first team a season ago.


Below are the 2011-12 WVIAC all-conference award winners.


First Team
Kayla Ayers (West Liberty College, Sr., G, 6-0, Parkersburg, WV)
Lydia Bridenbaugh (WV Wesleyan College, Sr., G, 5-10, Chillicothe, OH)
Jolysa Brown (Concord University, Sr., C, 6-0, Hinton, WV)
Kaitlin Fratz (Pitt-Johnstown, Fr., G, 5-4, Accident, MD)
Jamie Kaufman (WV Wesleyan College, Sr., F, 6-1, Damascus, MD)
Mishae Miles (Glenville State College, Sr., Fr, 6-0, Chicago, IL)
Erika Rousculp (Charleston University, So., C, 6-2, Worthington, OH)
Kaitlin Snyder (Fairmont State University, Jr., G, 5-7, Charleston, WV)
Tenisha Wilson (Glenville State College, Sr., G, 5-9, Chicago, IL)


Second Team
Camisha Alexander (Concord University, Sr., G, 5-4, Beckley, WV)
Paige Alviani (Seton Hill University, So., G, 5-8, Hopewell, PA)
Andrea Bertrand (Concord University, So., F., 5-11, Midlothian, VA)
Katie Biggs (Shepherd University, Sr., G, 5-9, Sykesville, MD)
Emily Daniel (Shepherd University, Jr., G, 5-8, Beaver, WV)
Hillary Southworth (West Liberty College, So., G, 5-10, Twinsburg, OH)
Page Turner (Davis & Elkins College, Jr., G, 5-6, Poquoson, VA)
Danielle Woodmore (Glenville State College, Sr., G, 5-5, Louisville, KY)


Honorable Mention
Amber Avery (Ohio Valley College, Sr., F, 5-9, Novi, MI)
Jasmine Blanton (WV State University, Jr., G, 5-8, Toledo, OH)
Charlene Diggs (Bluefield State College, Jr., G, 5-5, Beckley, WV)
Hailey Garrett (Fairmont State University, Fr., F, 6-0, Fairmont, WV)
Jorden Lykes (Davis & Elkins College, So., F, 5-10, Prince George, VA)
Amanda Peoples (Alderson-Broaddus College, Jr., G/F, 5-9, Morgantown, WV)
Cassy Sanderson (Wheeling Jesuit University, Sr., G, 5-8, Elizabeth, PA)


All-Freshman Team
Gabby Flinchum (Shepherd University, C, 6-3, North Potomac, MD)
Kaitlynn Fratz (Pitt-Johnstown, G, 5-4, Accident, MD)
Hailey Garrett (Fairmont State University, F, 6-0, Fairmont, WV)
Emily Lohr (Fairmont State University, F, 6-1, Stoystown, PA)
Emily Robinson (Wheeling Jesuit University, G, 5-6, Circleville, OH)


Player of the Year:
Kaitlin Snyder, Fairmont State University


Freshman of the Year:
Kaitlynn Fratz, Pitt-Johnstown


Coach of the Year:
Kenny Osborne, Concord University

1 Dead, 4 Wounded in Ohio High School Shooting

A teenager opened fire in the cafeteria at a suburban Cleveland high school Monday, February 27, 2012, killing one student and wounding four others before he was chased from the building by a teacher and captured a short distance away, authorities said.

A student who saw the attack up close said it appeared that the gunman targeted a group of students sitting together and that the one who was killed was gunned down while trying to duck under the cafeteria table.

A lawyer for the suspect’s family has identified him to a Cleveland television station as T.J. Lane and said Lane’s family is mourning “this terrible loss for their community.“

FBI officials would not comment on a motive. And Police Chief Tim McKenna said authorities “have a lot of homework to do yet” in their investigation of the shooting, which sent students screaming through the halls at the start of the school day at 1,100-student Chardon High.

 

 

An education official said the suspected shooter is a Lake Academy student, not a student at Chardon High. Brian Bontempo declined to answer any questions about the student. Bontempo is the superintendent of the Lake County Educational Service Center, which operates the academy.

The alternative school in Willoughby serves 7th through 12th grades. Students may have been referred to the school because of academic or behavioral problems.

The FBI said the suspect was arrested near his car a half-mile from Chardon. He was not immediately charged.

Teachers locked down their classrooms as they had been trained to do during drills, and students took cover as they waited for the all-clear in this town of 5,100 people, 30 miles from Cleveland. One teacher was said to have dragged a wounded student into his classroom to protect him. Another chased the gunman out of the building, police said.

Fifteen-year-old Danny Komertz, who witnessed the shooting, said Lane was known as an outcast who had apparently been bullied. But others disputed that.

“Even though he was quiet, he still had friends,“ said Tyler Lillash, 16. “He was not bullied.“

Robert Farinacci, a lawyer who is representing Lane and his family, told WKYC-TV that Lane “pretty much sticks to himself but does have some friends and has never been in trouble over anything that we know about.“

Long before official word came of the attack, parents learned of the bloodshed from students via text message and cellphone and thronged the streets around the school, anxiously awaiting word on their children.

Two of the wounded were listed in critical condition, and another was in serious condition.

“I looked up and this kid was pointing a gun about 10 feet away from me to a group of four kids sitting at a table,“ Komertz said. He said the gunman fired two shots quickly, and students scrambled for safety. One of them was “trying to get underneath the table, trying to hide, protecting his face.“

The slain student, Daniel Parmertor, was an aspiring computer repairman who was waiting in the cafeteria for the bus for his daily 15-minute ride to a vocational school. His teacher at the Auburn Career School had no idea why Parmertor, “a very good young man, very quiet,“ had been targeted, said Auburn superintendent Maggie Lynch.

Officers investigating the shooting blocked off a road in a heavily wooded area several miles from the school. Federal agents patrolled the muddy driveway leading to several spacious homes and ponds, while other officers walked a snowy hillside. A police dog was brought in. It wasn’t clear what they were looking for.

Teacher Joe Ricci had just begun class when he heard shots and slammed the door to his classroom, yelling, “Lockdown!“ to students, according to Karli Sensibello, a student whose sister was in Ricci’s classroom.

A few minutes later, Ricci heard a student moaning outside, opened the door and pulled in student Nick Walczak who had been shot several times, Sensibello said in an email. Ricci comforted Walczak and let him use his cellphone to call his girlfriend and parents, Sensibello said. She said her sister was too upset to talk.

Heather Ziska, 17, said she was in the cafeteria when she saw a boy she recognized as a fellow student come into the cafeteria and start shooting. She said she and several others immediately ran outside, while other friends ran into a middle school and others locked themselves in a teachers’ lounge.

“Everybody just started running,“ said 17-year-old Megan Hennessy, who was in class when she heard loud noises. “Everyone was running and screaming down the hallway.“

Farinacci said Lane’s family was “devastated” by the shootings and that they offered “their most heartfelt and sincere condolences” to Parmertor’s family and the families of the wounded students.

“This is something that could never have been predicted,“ Farinacci told WKYC-TV.

Rebecca Moser, 17, had just settled into her chemistry class when the school went into lockdown. The class of about 25 students ducked behind the lab tables at the back of the classroom, uncertain whether it was a drill.

Text messages started flying inside and outside the school, spreading information about what was happening and what friends and family were hearing outside the building.

“We all have cellphones, so people were constantly giving people updates - about what was going on, who the victims were, how they were doing,“ Moser said.

The school had no metal detectors, but current and past students said it had frequent security drills in case of a shooting.

Anxious parents of high school students were told to go to an elementary school to pick up their children.

Joe Bergant, Chardon school superintendent, said school was canceled Tuesday and grief counselors would be available to students and families.

“If you haven’t hugged or kissed your kid in the last couple of days, take that time,“ he said.

 

GFP - 02.28.2012
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G-Hype™: John Wm. Moss - Candidate for Gilmer County Commission 2012

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John Wm. Moss was born in July, 1960 in Weston, WV, and raised in Gilmer County all his life.  His father was John Moss Sr. who retired from the Department of Highways and passed in 2007.  John’s mother is Lucy Moss who retired from the Kinney Shoe Corp and currently resides at Cedar Grove Personal Care in Cedar Grove, WV.  His parents also owned and operated the Blue Ribbon Restaurant in Glenville for many years.

Moss has worked as a Police Officer serving the people of Gilmer County for the last 23 years and is currently the Police Chief for the City of Glenville.

He graduated from the Gilmer County High School in 1978 and married Pamela Hickman in 1982.  John and Pam have two children, Ashley Moss Smith and a son Travis John Moss, both of Glenville.

John began his career when hired as a Patrolman by the Glenville Police Department in 1989 and graduated from the WV State Police Academy in 1990.  He worked his way up from Patrolman to Sergeant, Sergeant to Deputy Sheriff, then on as Police Chief for the City of Glenville.

John says, “the most enjoyable aspect in Law Enforcement is meeting and talking with the people I comes into contact with”.

He also says, “he has fought hard to protect all personal or public property and enforce all City and State Laws of WV while still treating everyone equal.”

John and Pam reside on Spruce Run off of Cedar Creek on part of the Moss farm where John’s father and Grandfather once lived.

After work he enjoys walking his dog, hunting and taking care of the farm.

When Chief Moss was asked why he wants to be elected Gilmer County Commissioner he replied, “ I want to be there to vote on the issues for the people of Gilmer County, of what they want as a Majority, to be a representative for them in the County Commission,  serving only them,  not Politics.”

When notified of any complaints or concerns by the citizens, John says he will bring them to the Commission each month and make their opinions heard.

For an example he said, “If the people want the 911 Emergency Services back in Gilmer County, then I will fight for what the people want here in the County.

John Moss promises if elected, “I will never be a Politician, I am a people person.”

Calhoun-Gilmer Career Center: Letter To Parent - 02.28.12

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WV State Fair Scholarship Application Deadline Nears – 03.02.12

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The application deadline for the 2012 State Fair Scholarship program is Friday, March 02, 2012.

With support from the State Fair Endowment, five $1,000 (four year) scholarship awards will be made to individuals who have participated in one or more of the following areas at the State Fair:

• State Fair Junior Show—market animals, purebred animals and dairy;

• Equine Programs—State Fair’s Open Horse Show or Junior Horse and Pony Show; or

• 4-H and FFA Youth Exhibit Program—4-H and FFA Underwood Youth Center.

Applicants must be pursuing a vocational trade, associate or bachelor degree. All applicants must have participated in the junior livestock show, equine show or 4-H and FFA Youth exhibit program within the previous five years.

Applications are available online at www.statefairofwv.com or by contacting the State Fair office at 304-645-1090, email “cboo…@statefairofwv.com” or State Fair of West Virginia, P.O. Drawer 986, Lewisburg, WV 24901.

The 2012 State Fair is themed “Memories that grow ... year after year” and is scheduled August 10-18, 2012.

For more information, visit www.statefairofwv.com, or follow fair events on Facebook and Twitter.

WVDE Set To Seek Waiver from NCLB

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It is the right thing to do for students. That is how the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) is describing its decision to file for a Flexibility Waiver to No Child Left Behind (NCLB).

The WVDE announced on Monday that it will seek a NCLB Flexibility Waiver. The waiver will provide West Virginia with the flexibility needed as it continues to implement the Next Generation Content Standards and Objectives, expand the Teacher Evaluation Pilot and establish a high-quality accountability system that values individual student academic growth and supports schools.

“We spent a lot of time working with our state Board of Education, teachers, parents and other education experts to determine if filing for the Flexibility Waiver to NCLB was the right thing to do for students,” said state Superintendent of Schools Jorea Marple. “Without a waiver, West Virginia would be forced to continue to identify schools with inappropriate measures and labels. What we value in our education system is personalized learning. In other words, learning that engages students whether it’s the arts, world languages or career technical education, just to name a few. We also value student academic growth.”

While the writers of the NCLB had the right goals in mind, the laws’ one-size-fits-all approach has proven ineffective as a mechanism for accountability and, as a result, has discouraged state efforts to improve student achievement and make progress in education. For example, NCLB provides too simplistic a view of whether schools are meeting children’s needs. The way that NCLB measures proficiency is flawed because it fails to account for meaningful progress. NCLB evaluates schools based on whether students meet proficiency without regard to growth or improvement from year to year.

West Virginia fully expects that by 2014 no school in the state will meet the stringent NCLB requirement and therefore be labeled a failing school ultimately at risk of losing much needed federal funding.  In addition, the U.S. Department of Education has been very clear that any state that does not apply or receive a NCLB waiver will be held fully accountable under NCLB requirements.

“We are already beginning the work to convene educators and other stakeholders to develop the components of the NCLB Flexibility Waiver and we expect to file the waiver by Sept. 6, 2012,” added Marple. “Filing for the waiver will allow our state to continue its work on crafting a thoughtful, fair and constructive state accountability system. In addition, we fully expect our state’s waiver to align with our state’s long-range education priorities and goals.”

The new accountability system will

•  focus on assessing both student learning and growth, as well as the learning strategies employed in schools;

•  build capacity in schools and districts to provide evidence of improvement and engage parents and communities as key stakeholders in the improvement process;

•  provide differentiated identification and support systems; and

•  implement data-driven changes in order to improve the learning of all students.

In addition to filing for the Flexibility Request, the WVDE will request from the federal government that the current NLCB Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) targets are frozen for one year so that additional schools are not identified as failing.

WVIAC Men’s Basketball Awards 2012

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University of Charleston University senior guard PJ Reyes has been named the WVIAC’s Player of the Year as voted on by the league’s coaches. West Liberty Universityguard C.J. Hester picked up Freshman of the Year honors while West Liberty Universityhead coach Jim Crutchfield picked up his third consecutive Coach of the Year accolade and fourth overall.

Reyes, a 6’5” 190 lb. guard from Taylor, MI, propelled the Golden Eagles to a 23-5 overall record on the season, including an 18-4 mark in WVIAC play. He guided the squad to a No. 2 seed in the WVIAC Tournament and has UC as the No.3 team in the Atlantic Region heading into postseason play.

Reyes is fifth in the conference in scoring at 20.7 points per game. He is also in the top 10 of the league in blocked shots (ninth with 1.04 per outing). Reyes is 16th in the conference in rebounding average, grabbing 6.2 a night.  He is drained 50.2 percent of his shots on the season and is second on UC’s team in steals. Reyes has guided the Golden Eagles to 11 consecutive victories entering the WVIAC Tournament.

Hester, a 6’4” 200 lb. guard from West Miffin, PA, had a big impact for WLU this season. He ranked third on the Hilltoppers’ squad and 28th in the WVIAC with 14.6 points a game. He led the team with 8.8 boards per contest, tying him for third in the league. He also drained 60.9% of his attempts from the floor, which is the fourth best in the conference.

Crutchfield earned his fourth Coach of the Year honor after guiding WLU to its third straight league title and a 26-2 overall mark. The Hilltoppers were 21-1 in WVIAC play. For the second consecutive season, Crutchfield guided WLU to the top spot in the NABC Coaches Poll. Now in his eighth season, Crutchfield has led the Hilltoppers to at least 20 wins every year. WLU leads the nation in scoring at 103.3 points per outing. As a team, the Hilltoppers are netting 50.4% of their shots from the floor and outscore their opponents by 21 points per game.


First Team
Kurklin Bohanon (Alderson-Broaddus College, Jr., G, 6-3, 170, Cleveland, OH)
Steve Catich (Wheeling Jesuit University, Sr., F, 6-5, 210, Tyrone, PA)
Alex Falk (West Liberty University, Jr., G, 6-4, 180, Upper Sandusky, OH)
Cedric Harris (West Liberty University, So., G, 6-0, 175, Zanesville, OH)
Raymont McElroy (WV Wesleyan College, Sr., G/F, 6-2, 210, Milwaukee, WI)
Chad Moore (Shepherd University, Jr., F, 6-5, 195, Winchester, Va.)
Nick Novak (Pitt-Johnstown, Jr., G, 6-0, 180, Murrysville, PA)
PJ Reyes (Charleston University, Sr., G, 6-5, 190, Taylor, MI)
Kelsey Williams (WV Wesleyan College, Jr., F, 6-7, 224, Sandusky, OH)


Second Team
Javaughn Acree-Manuel (Concord University, Sr., G, 6-1, 180, Lansing, MI)
Nate Barnes (Alderson-Broaddus College, Sr., G, 5-10, 180, Cleveland, OH)
Steve Custis (Fairmont State University, Sr., G, 6-1, 170, Frederick, MD)
Chris Giles (Seton Hill University, r-Sr., G, 6-4, 185, West Mifflin, PA)
Patrick Grubbs (Pitt-Johnstown, Sr., F/C, 6-8, 280, Turtle Creek, PA)
Matt Miller (Seton Hill University, So., G, 6-4, 195, Arnold, MD)
Ben Siefert (Wheeling Jesuit University, Jr., G, 6-2, 190, Reynoldsburg, OH)
Isaac Thornton (Fairmont State University, Jr., G, 6-3, 180, Martinsburg, WV)


Honorable Mention
Kendall Allison (OH Valley College, Sr., F, 6-3, 190, Baltimore, MD)
Corey Bethea (WV State University, Sr., G, 6-3, 160, Philadelphia, PA)
Eladio Espinosa (Charleston University, Jr., G/F, 6-7, 225, Norlina, NC)
David Ford (WV State University,, Jr., G, 6-5, 225, Glen Burnie, MD)
Tim Hausfeld (West Liberty University, Jr., G, 5-7, 145, Toledo, OH)
C.J. Hester (West Liberty University, Fr., G, 6-4, 200, West Miffin, PA)
PJ Turner (Davis & Elkins College, Sr., G, 5-11, 180, Auburndale, FL)


All-Freshman Team
Austin Cunningham (OH Valley College, G, 6-2, 175, Vincent, OH)
Shawn Dyer (West Liberty University, G, 6-0, 168, Marion, OH)
C.J. Hester (West Liberty University, G, 6-4, 200, West Miffin, PA)
Chase Morgan (Bluefield State College, G, 5-11, 160, Beckley, WV)
Jamel Morris (Glenville State College, G, 6-3, 165, Gahanna, OH)


Player of the Year:
PJ Reyes, Charleston University


Freshman of the Year:
C.J. Hester, West Liberty University


Coach of the Year:
Jim Crutchfield, West Liberty University

New Mobile App Enables West Virginians to Report Suspicious Activity

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Governor Earl Ray Tomblin joined by West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Director Jimmy Gianato and West Virginia Intelligence Fusion Center Director Thom Kirk together announced a new mobile app, that enables West Virginians to submit tips concerning suspicious criminal and terrorist activity, is now available for smartphones.

“Through the use of innovative technology our citizens can download the new Suspicious Activity Reporting Application for free and help protect their own communities,” Governor Tomblin said. “With the assistance of our citizens, important information can quickly get into the hands of our law enforcement community allowing them to provide better protection. This is just another example of my administration’s commitment to helping keep our streets and citizens safer.”

Developed by West Virginia Interactive as a project of the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the West Virginia Intelligence Fusion Center, the app sends submitted information, including photos and texts, to the Fusion Center where the information can help authorities react to and prevent incidents from occurring. The previous methods of submitting suspicious or criminal activity by using the Fusion Center’s website or by calling them directly has now been enhanced by the implementation of this application.

“The longer you wait the less accurate eyewitness information becomes and evidence fades,” said Thom Kirk, Director of the Fusion Center. “Enabling the information to be sent at the time the activity is taking place will not only improve the accuracy of the report, but also improve the ability of the authorities to respond quickly.“

The free application is available for download from the iTunes App Store or Android Market and gives citizens the ability to:

• Capture a photo from the app or use one that already exists on the device

• Automatically find and use their location or enter an address

• Report detailed subject and vehicle descriptions

• Remain anonymous if preferred, or include contact information

“We’re excited about getting citizens involved in protecting their communities,” said WVDHSEM Director Jimmy Gianato. “We’re currently looking at our other services to see what else makes sense to move to the mobile platform.”

The mission of the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management is to ensure the protection of life and property by providing coordination, guidance, support and assistance to local emergency managers and first responders. For more information, visit www.dhsem.wv.gov.

The West Virginia Intelligence Fusion Center is a partnership between public and private entities. Through the cooperation of local, state, and federal law enforcement, public safety agencies, and the private sector, the fusion center is able to better protect the citizens of the United States against all hazards. For more information, visit www.fusioncenter.wv.gov.

The new Suspicious Activity Reporting Application was developed at no cost to the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management or West Virginia Intelligence Fusion Center through the state’s self-funded electronic government program, WV.gov. For more information about West Virginia’s electronic government program, visit: www.wv.gov/partner.

Dillon Beau Bush

Chris and Kayla Bush are pleased to announce the birth of their second child, a boy, named Dillon Beau Bush.

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Dillon Beau was born on Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at Thomas Memorial Hospital in South Charleston, WV.

He weighed in at 8 pounds, 2 ounces and was 21 inches long with a head full of light brown hair.

He was welcomed home by an older brother, C. Tyler Bush, age 4.

His father, Chris, is an operating engineer employed by Minnesota, Ltd.

His mother, Kayla, is a public accountant employed by Gray, Griffith & Mays, a.c. and is the former Kayla Ashley.

Maternal grandparents are Glenn and Tressa Ashley of Glenville, WV.

Maternal great-grandparents are Asel “Wimp” and Betty Byrd of Glenville, WV.

Also welcoming Dillon Beau are his very proud aunt Taylor “Buggy” and uncle Hunter Ashley.

Shining Star Pageant – 03.10.12 - Application Deadline February 29, 2012

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The Shining Star Pageant will be held at the Calhoun County Middle/High School Auditorium on Saturday, March 10, 2012 at 1:00 PM.

Girls 0-21 years old, can contact Kelli Collins at 304.481.0213 or by e-mail “pagntcrazy2@aol.com” for an application.

Entry fee and application deadline is February 29, 2012.

There will be a $5.00 door admission fee and concessions will be sold.

All proceeds are being donated to Minnie Hamilton Health Care for Colorectal Cancer Awareness.

Come enjoy an afternoon of pageant fun for a good cause.

============================

The Shining Star Pageant deadline is approaching fast.  If you would like to enter, call Kelli Collins at 304.354.9371 as soon as possible.

There is only 2 days left to submit your entry form and entry fee by February 29, 2012.

Help me make this event a success!

Let’s make a difference TOGETHER.

and Raise Colo-rectal Cancer Awareness!! 

Glenville: Flea Market - March 06-07, 2012

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Ron Paul: Economy Squeezed as Debt Accelerates

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Senator Jeff Sessions, ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee has pointed out that our per capita government debt is already larger than Greece’s.  Per person, our government owes over $49,000 compared to $38,937 per Greek citizen.  Our debt has just reached 101% of our Gross Domestic Product.  Our creditors see this and have quietly slowed down or stopped their lending to us.  As a result, the Federal Reserve has been outright monetizing debt as a way to patch things together and keep the economy on life support a little longer.  There is rapidly shrinking demand for our debt, and confidence in the dollar is falling.  This phenomenon is hidden only by the fact that confidence in all other fiat currencies is falling faster.

None of this seems to really alarm the administration, obviously, as they have just released a budget that accelerates spending and borrowing.  The reason the debt and deficits plague the economy, according to this administration, is that the American economy is not taxed enough.  Therefore, hidden in the fine print of the budget is a provision that ramps up the corporate dividends tax rate from its current 15% to 39.6%.  In addition, certain deductions and exemptions will be phased out; an additional 3.8% Obamacare investment tax surcharge will be tacked on, bringing the effective dividend tax rate to 44.8% in 2013.  Keep in mind, this is not just a tax on big business, this is a tax on anyone who depends on dividend income to live - retirees will be hit hard by these changes and dividend yielding stock prices will adjust downward rapidly to reflect their decreased value.

Not only this, but the Obama administration is worsening the uniquely American policy of taxing income of US based companies earned overseas.  No other country presumes to tax globally in this manner, so it amounts to a huge penalty for basing a company in the US.  Companies have been able to manage this penalty by deferring taxation until it is repatriated or by paying dividends.  What will happen to US based businesses with strong international ties if these allowances are abolished as the Obama administration proposes?  A massive wave of permanent capital flight will undoubtedly cause the already high levels of unemployment to rise.

Businesses are struggling and failing in this economy.  The government ultimately depends on a healthy business climate to provide jobs and a tax base.  It is penny wise and pound foolish to add to business tax burden in a misguided attempt to close the colossal gap between our government’s revenue and spending. Rather than crippling and absorbing more of our shrinking economy, government needs to be drastically cut - not in 10 years, but immediately.

Those who understand the underpinnings of the dollar and how the Federal Reserve works have known for some time that we are on an unsustainable course, that major chaos is in store if nothing is done quickly to reform things.  Politicians pay lip-service to reforms that never materialize or turn out to be at best small and meaningless, or at worst actively harmful.  It seems more and more inevitable that because the necessary changes would be too inconvenient for the elites to enact now, we will get them later Greek-style, through collapse and chaos.

Bon Appétit: Gumbo Style Chicken Creole

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Ingredients:

  1/4 cup oil for frying
  1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  1 green bell pepper, chopped
  1 onion, chopped
  2 cups cooked, chopped chicken breast meat
  1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes with green chile peppers, with liquid
  1 (4.5 ounce) can sliced mushrooms, drained
  2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  3 cloves garlic, minced
  1 teaspoon soy sauce
  1 teaspoon white sugar
  1/2 teaspoon salt
  1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  3 dashes hot sauce


Directions:

Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat.

Stir in flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes or until mixture is the color of a copper penny.

Reduce heat to low and stir in bell pepper and onion.

Cook 10 to 15 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally.

Add chicken, tomatoes with green chile peppers, mushrooms, parsley, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, soy sauce, sugar, salt, pepper and hot sauce.

Stir together, cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

Ask the Doctor: Nearsighted

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DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My husband is very nearsighted and has to wear thick glasses.
I’m not. I don’t wear glasses at age 50.
We have four children.
What are their chances of having to wear glasses? - E.P.

ANSWER: Nearsightedness (myopia) indicates that the eyes can see things that are near.
Nearsighted eyes don’t see distant objects clearly.
It’s a common eye condition, and genetic involvement in it is high.
If one parent is nearsighted, the children have a 24% chance of also being nearsighted.
If both parents are nearsighted, the children’s risk increases to 48%.

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible.

Daily G-Eye™: 02.28.12

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Submit photos for this daily feature. You may select to have your name listed as well.
Send your photo(s) to “tellus@gilmerfreepress.net”

Stargazing - 02.28.12

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Two distinctive star clusters follow the Moon as it descends the western sky this evening.

The dipper-shaped Pleiades cluster is close to the upper right of the Moon, with the V-shaped Hyades cluster farther to the upper left of the Moon.


Moon and Taurus

Two distinctive star clusters follow the Moon as it descends the western sky this evening. The dipper-shaped Pleiades cluster is close to the upper right of the Moon, with the V-shaped Hyades cluster farther to the upper left of the Moon.

Each cluster is a great family of stars — hundreds of them packed in a region that spans a few dozen light-years. The stars in each cluster share a common birth — the collapse of a giant cloud of interstellar gas and dust. And today, each cluster moves around the galaxy as a group, bound by the mutual gravity of its stars.

The Hyades is the closer of the two, at a distance of about 150 light-years. It includes all the bright stars in the V except orange Aldebaran, at the top left point of the V, which is only about half as far. The Pleiades is about three times farther than the Hyades, and includes all the stars that make up its tiny dipper.

Clusters like the Hyades and Pleiades are great scientific laboratories. All the stars in a cluster are the same age and the same distance, and they formed from the same mix of ingredients. The main difference is mass — some of the stars are small and lightweight, others are big and heavy. Seeing how these different weight classes have evolved helps astronomers develop better models of how all stars age.

Again, look for these two beautiful star clusters keeping company with the Moon as they drop down the western sky this evening.

G-MM™: Meditation Moment - 02.28.12

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Taste and see that the Lord is good.

To read the whole of today’s psalm is to savor God’s promises for his followers.

In the Our Father, that perfect prayer, Jesus seeks our closeness to him, our neighbors and the environment.

Jesus exhorts us to treat our neighbor as ourselves—‘Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive others.’

The Great challenges us further in very specific ways: ‘The bread you hold back belongs to the hungry; the coat you guard under locks belongs to the naked; the footwear mouldering in your closet belongs to those without shoes; the silver you keep in a safe place belongs to the needy.’

What a challenge! But God’s words have a powerful effect and the psalm promises that those who do, as well as hear, his word will go out in joy and bring the peace we all desire to this troubled world.

Isaiah 55:10-11. From all their afflictions God will deliver the just—Ps 33(34):4-7, 16-19. Matthew 6:7‑15.

Virginia Ruth Ruddlesden

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Virginia Ruth Ruddlesden

Age 96, of Parkersburg (formerly of Harrisville), departed this life on Friday, February 24, 2012, at Ohio Valley Health Care, Parkersburg.

Virginia was born June 08, 1915, in Gassaway, WV (Braxton County), a daughter of the late Elliott and Bertie Rutherford.

She spent her life as a homemaker for her family.

She was a member of the Vienna Wesleyan Church.

She greatly enjoyed making quilts and gardening.

She is survived by her children, Clyde Ruddlesden of Parkersburg, Ramona Longwell of Sardis, OH, and Donald Ruddlesden of Vienna, WV; brother, Kirk Rutherford of OH, along with several grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great grandchildren.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Maurice Dalton Ruddlesden; son, Dalton J Ruddlesden, and step-daughter, Dorothy.

Funeral services were 1:00 PM, Monday, February 27, 2012, at the Raiguel Funeral Home, Harrisville with the Pastor Jack Harris officiating.

Burial followed in the Harrisville IOOF Cemetery.

Friends called from 2:00 to 4:00 and 6:00 to 8:00 PM on Sunday at the funeral home.

Loretta Jean McKinney

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Loretta Jean McKinney

Age 40, of Route 1, Salem departed this life on Sunday, February 26, 2012.

She was born May 25, 1971 in Clarksburg a daughter of Ronald Britton Sr. and wife, Sarah, Alma and Betty Owens Hart and husband, Albin, Smithburg.

On October 24, 1992 she married Jefferey Ellis McKinney who survives.

Also surviving are one son, Tyler Jefferey McKinney, at home, three sisters, Angela Dawn Davis, Big Flint Community, Rhonda Sue Britton, Steubenville, OH, Jessica Ellen Blandori, West Union, four brothers, Kevin Wayne Britton, West Union, Dewayne Keith Britton, Salem, Mark Eugene Britton and Ronald Keith Britton both of West Union and several nieces and nephews. One brother, William Arthur Britton preceded her in death.

Mrs. McKinney had been a former employee of Doddridge County Senior Citizens as a Home Health Aide.

She was a member of Avon Community Church.

Funeral services will be conducted in the Spurgeon Funeral Home 212 Front St. West Union on Thursday, March 01, 2012 at 1:00 PM with Pastor Dave Masto, Pastor Robert Swiger and Pastor Calvin Robinson presiding.

Interment will follow in the Pt. Pleasant Cemetery, Oxford.

The family will receive friends in the funeral home chapel on Wednesday, February 29, 2012 from 2:00 to 8:00 PM and after 9:00 AM on Thursday until time of service.

Spurgeon Funeral Home is privileged to serve the McKinney family.

02.28.12

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History on February 28, yyyy

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 28, the 59th day of 2012. There are 307 days left in the year.


Today’s Highlight in History:

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On Feb. 28, 1942, the heavy cruiser USS Houston and the Australian light cruiser HMAS Perth came under attack by Japanese forces during the World War II Battle of Sunda Strait; both were sunk shortly after midnight. (The Houston lost 693 men while the Perth lost 353.)


On this date:

In 1844, a 12-inch gun aboard the USS Princeton exploded as the ship was sailing on the Potomac River, killing Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur, Navy Secretary Thomas W. Gilmer and several others.

In 1849, the California gold rush began in earnest as regular steamship service started bringing gold-seekers to San Francisco.

In 1861, the Territory of Colorado was organized.

In 1911, President William Howard Taft nominated William H. Lewis to be the first black Assistant Attorney General of the United States.

In 1951, the Senate committee headed by Estes Kefauver, D-Tenn., issued an interim report saying at least two major crime syndicates were operating in the US.

In 1953, scientists James D. Watson and Francis H.C. Crick announced they had discovered the double-helix structure of DNA, the molecule that contains the human genes.

In 1960, a day after defeating the Soviets at the Winter Games in Squaw Valley, Calif., the United States won its first Olympic hockey gold medal by defeating Czechoslovakia’s team, 9-4.

In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai issued the Shanghai Communique, which called for normalizing relations between their countries, at the conclusion of Nixon’s historic visit to China.

In 1975, more than 40 people were killed in London’s Underground when a subway train smashed into the end of a tunnel.

In 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was shot to death in central Stockholm. (The killing remains unsolved.)

In 1993, a gun battle erupted at a compound near Waco, Texas, when Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents tried to serve warrants on the Branch Davidians; four agents and six Davidians were killed as a 51-day standoff began.

In 1997, in North Hollywood, Calif., two heavily armed and armored robbers bungled a bank heist and came out firing, unleashing their arsenal on police, bystanders, cars and TV choppers before they were killed.


Ten years ago:

The body of a young girl found outside San Diego was positively identified as that of seven-year-old Danielle van Dam, who’d disappeared from her bedroom about a month earlier; a neighbor, David Westerfield, was later convicted of her murder and sentenced to death.

Hindus in western India retaliated for a train attack that claimed some 60 lives by setting fire to Muslims’ homes, then keeping firefighters away for hours.

Soap opera actress Mary Stuart, who had starred in “Search for Tomorrow” for some 35 years, died in New York at age 75.


Five years ago:

A federal judge in Miami ruled that suspected al-Qaida operative Jose Padilla was competent to stand trial on terrorism support charges, rejecting arguments that he was severely damaged by 3 1/2 years of interrogation and isolation in a military brig.

Wall Street rebounded fitfully from the previous session’s 416-point plunge in the Dow industrials as investors took comfort from comments by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke that he still expected moderate economic growth.

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. died in New York at age 89.


One year ago:

The United States and European allies intensified efforts to isolate Libya’s Moammar Gadhafi, redoubling demands for him to step down, questioning his mental state and warning that those who stayed loyal to him risked losing their wealth and facing prosecution for human rights abuses.

Actress and World War II pin-up bombshell Jane Russell died in Santa Maria, Calif., at age 89.

French actress Annie Girardot died in Paris at age 79.

WV Lottery - 02.27.12

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1-3-7


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0-5-7-2


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06-07-08-11-17-22

G-FYI™: Gilmer County Circuit Judge Dismisses the FOIA Lawsuit

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Update:  02.27.12 :

Today, Monday, February 27, 2012, the Gilmer County Circuit Judge Richard Facemeir dismissed with prejudice the lawsuit filed by the Gilmer County Prosecutor Gerry Hough on behalf of Gilmer County Commission, and Jean Butcher, the Gilmer County Clerk against Lawrence Smith from WV Record.

The lawsuit was filed because Smith had requested information under FOIA.

Decision was made by the Judge after Gerry Hough and Lawrence Smith made their presentation to the court.
The decision by the Judge means that the lawsuit may not be re-filed, and as such, it operates as an adjudication on the merits.

Details to follow…..


===========================================


Update - 02.26.12 :


Related Document 1

Related Document 2

Related Document 3


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During a special meeting last month, the Gilmer County Commission released the details of settlement in the third-party lawsuit Summit Community Bank filed in federal court against the Clerk’s Office for improperly recording lien information on properties in the Rivers’ View Subdivision.

Through its insurance company, the commission paid Summit $40,000.

The details came a month after Lawrence J. Smith, a contributor with The West Virginia Record in Charleston, filed a lawsuit here in Gilmer County to compel its release.

During its regularly scheduled meeting on January 10, 2012, the Gilmer County Commission agreed with the recommendation of Prosecutor Gerry Hough to settle Smith’s suit, then sue him for frivolously filing it.

During the meeting, Hough said, “It is necessary to do this because we cannot allow the press to make the county look bad.“

The Commission and Jean Butcher, the County Clerk made good on their threat by including a counterclaim in their answer to Smith’s FOIA lawsuit.

In their counterclaim, they asked sanctions be levied against Smith “in the amount of court costs and attorney fees, and any other sanctions it deems fit and proper.“

A hearing on the commission’s and Butcher’s motion for sanctions is scheduled for tomorrow Monday February 27, 2012 at 11:45 AM before Judge Richard Facemire.

Since the courtroom will be open to the public during this hearing, we hope you will attend to see the fate of open government, and freedom of the press in Gilmer County.

G F P - 02.27.2012
CommunityGilmer CountyGlenvilleCourt NewsFeaturesG-FYI™

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