GilmerFreePress.net

Nascar: Sylvania 300 – New Hampshire - Race 27 of 36 - 2010

image
image  image  image  image

Winner:
Clint Bowyer - Chevrolet - Cheerios / Hamburger Helper

Race leader Tony Stewart ran out of fuel as the white flag flew, opening the door for Clint Bowyer, who had just enough gas to hold off Denny Hamlin in New Hampshire.

Top 10:
01 33 Clint Bowyer Chevrolet Cheerios / Hamburger Helper
02 11 Denny Hamlin Toyota FedEx Small Business
03 01 Jamie McMurray Chevrolet McDonald’s
04 88 Dale Earnhardt Jr.  Chevrolet Amp Energy / National Guard
05 29 Kevin Harvick Chevrolet Shell / Pennzoil
06 24 Jeff Gordon Chevrolet National Guard Facebook / DuPont
07 00 David Reutimann Toyota Tums
08 39 Ryan Newman Chevrolet U.S. Army
09 18 Kyle Busch Toyota M&M’s
10 77 Sam Hornish Jr.  Dodge Mobil

Driver Standings - Sylvania 300:
01 Denny Hamlin 5230 Leader
02 Clint Bowyer 5195 -35
03 Kevin Harvick 5185 -45
04 Kyle Busch 5168 -62
05 Jeff Gordon 5155 -75
06 Kurt Busch 5144 -86
07 Jimmie Johnson 5138 -92
08 +1 Carl Edwards 5135 -95 27 2 0 6 14
09 -2 Greg Biffle 5122 -108 27 0 1 5 14
10—Jeff Burton 5118 -112 27 0 0 5 13

Daily G-Eye : 09.20.10

image

image


Submit photos for this daily feature. You may select to have your name listed as well.
Send your photo(s) to “tellus@gilmerfreepress.net”

Stargazing - 09.20.10

image

Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, is in good view right now.

It is lining up opposite the Sun, so it rises at sunset and remains in view all night.

It is brightest for the year, too; only the Moon and the planet Venus outshine it.

Meditation Moment - 09.20.10

image

‘Put the lamp on a lamp-stand, so people may see the light.’

In life we are drawn to and feel protected by light.
Light reveals the shape, the identity and the color of that which surrounds us.
When the dawning sun bathes the landscape in light we see emerge what the darkness of night kept hidden.
Light is truth. Light is faith.
In baptism, a small candle is lit from the bigger Pascal candle.
This soft, beautiful light, symbolising Christ’s light, is presented to us.
Although we extinguish the candle at the end of the ceremony, we are asked to keep burning the light of faith the candle signifies.
In baptism we are enlightened by Christ and we walk as children of the light.
May we always let our light not simply shine but grow brighter as our faith grows.
And may our light—Christ’s light—show a way for others.


Proverbs 3:27-34. Whoever does justice shall live on the Lord’s holy mountain—Ps 14(15):2-5. Luke 8:16-18.

Bessie Jane Keener

image

Bessie Jane Keener
Age 79, of Zanesville, Ohio died Thursday, September 16, 2010 at Genesis Hospice of Zanesville.

She was a daughter of the late Ed Hannah and Katherine Hayes, born on March 3, 1931 in Braxton County, WV.

She was loved and taken care of by her family, daughter, Jeannie (Chuck) Harmon; grandchildren, Kelly and Mike Harmon, Jeremy and Jazmyn Carpenter and other children and grandchildren, sons Darrell (Mary) Keener, Donald Hannah and daughters, Faye (Bryan) Prince and Wilma Workman; granddaughter, Chelle Parrish; grandson, Darrell E. Keener; great grandchildren, Michelle and Chris.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Cary Lee Keener.

Funeral services were held at Stump Funeral Home, Arnoldsburg, WV on Saturday, September 18 at 2:00 PM, with Rev. Tim Hickman officiated. Interment was in the Starcher Cemetery, Big Otter, WV.

Visitation was held 2 hours prior to the service at the funeral home.

09.20.10

image

Today - 09.20.yyyy

Today is Monday, Sept. 20, the 263rd day of 2010. There are 102 days left in the year.

Thought for Today: “Ninety-nine percent of the failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses.“ _ George Washington Carver, American botanist (1864-1943).

Today’s Highlight in History:

image

On Sept. 20, 1519, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan and his crew set out from Spain on five ships on a voyage to find a western passage to the Spice Islands in Indonesia. (Magellan was killed enroute, but one of his ships eventually circled the world.)

On this date:

In 1870, Italian troops took control of the Papal States, leading to the unification of Italy.

In 1873, panic swept the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in the wake of railroad bond defaults and bank failures.

In 1884, the National Equal Rights Party was formed during a convention of suffragists in San Francisco; the convention nominated Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood for president.

In 1947, former New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia died.

In 1958, Martin Luther King Jr. was seriously wounded during a book signing at a New York City department store when Izola Curry stabbed him in the chest. (Curry was later found mentally incompetent.)

In 1962, black student James Meredith was blocked from enrolling at the University of Mississippi by Gov. Ross R. Barnett. (Meredith was later admitted.)

In 1973, in their so-called “battle of the sexes,“ tennis star Billie Jean King defeated Bobby Riggs in straight sets, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3, at the Houston Astrodome.

In 1979, Jean-Bedel Bokassa (boh-KAH’-sah), self-styled head of the Central African Empire, was overthrown in a French-supported coup while on a visit to Libya.

In 1980, Spectacular Bid, ridden by Bill Shoemaker, ran as the only entry in the Woodward Stakes at Belmont Park in New York after three potential challengers dropped out in horse racing’s first walkover since 1949.

In 1984, a suicide car bomber attacked the U.S. Embassy annex in north Beirut, killing at least 14 people, including two Americans and 12 Lebanese.

Ten years ago:
•  Independent Counsel Robert Ray announced the end of the Whitewater investigation, saying there was insufficient evidence to warrant charges against President and Mrs. Clinton.
•  Former Soviet cosmonaut Gherman Titov died at age 65.

Five years ago:
•  The number of U.S. service members killed in Iraq topped 1,900. Rapidly strengthening Hurricane Rita lashed the Florida Keys and headed into the Gulf of Mexico.
•  Holocaust survivor and Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal died in Vienna, Austria, at age 96.
•  The Sacramento Monarchs won their first championship with a 62-59 victory over the Connecticut Sun in Game 4 of the WNBA Finals.

One year ago:
•  Blanketing most of the Sunday TV news shows, President Barack Obama said requiring people to get health insurance and fining them if they didn’t would not amount to a backhanded tax increase.
•  At the Emmy Awards, best drama and comedy series trophies went to repeat winners “Mad Men” and “30 Rock.“
•  The first game at the Cowboys Stadium set an NFL regular-season attendance record with a crowd of 105,121, and most of them went home disappointed after the New York Giants won, 33-31.

Today’s Birthdays:
Singer Gogi Grant is 86
Actress-comedian Anne Meara is 81
Actress Sophia Loren is 76
Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Taylor is 75
Rock musician Chuck Panozzo is 63
Hockey Hall of Famer Guy LaFleur is 59
Actress Debbi Morgan is 59
Jazz musician Peter White is 56
Actress Betsy Brantley is 55
Actor Gary Cole is 54
TV news correspondent Deborah Roberts is 50
Rock musician Randy Bradbury (Pennywise) is 46
Actress Kristen Johnston is 43
Rock singers Gunnar Nelson and Matthew Nelson are 43
Rock musician Ben Shepherd is 42
Actress-model Moon Bloodgood is 35
Actor Jon Bernthal is 34
Rock musician Rick Woolstenhulme (Lifehouse) is 31
Rapper Yung Joc is 28
Actor Aldis Hodge is 24

Lewis County: Domestic Situation Results in Son Killing Father

image

There has been a murder in Lewis County at Camden Station on Highways 33 near Weston, early Sunday morning about 3:30 AM.

Justin Gum Shot and ‘killed his father, who is the owner of the Fox’s Pizza Den in Weston.

Reportedly the murder occurred in their home as the result of a domestic situation.

Justin Gum is held in Central Regional Jail without bond.

GSC Star Player in Regional Jail

image

A GSC Star Football player, Antwan Lee Stewart is in Central Regional Jail this morning.

He was arrested for obstruction early this morning.

He is being held with no bail.

He recorded six catches for 86 yards and a score on Saturday against Seton Hill.

No further information is available at this time.

Gilmer County Board of Education Linkage Meeting Monday - 09.20.10

image


Linkage Meetings:
•  09.20.10 – Monday - Normantown Elementary School – 7:00 PM
•  10.04.10 – Monday - Troy Elementary School – 7:00 PM
•  10.07.10 – Thursday - Sand Fork Elementary School – 7:00 PM
•  10.18.10 – Monday - Glenville Elementary School - 7:00 PM
•  10.21.10 – Thursday - Gilmer County High School - 7:00 PM

Informational Meeting concerning the Proposed School Bond community meetings:
•  09.23.10 – Thursday - Sand Fork Community - 7:00 PM, Sand Fork Elementary School
•  10.14.10 – Thursday - Glenville Community - 7:00 PM, Glenville Elementary School

GFP - 09.19.2010
CommunityGilmer CountyGlenvilleNormantownSand ForkTroyEducation

Permalink - Link to This Article

~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~


Print This Article



WVDNR is Soliciting Public Comments on the Draft West Virginia Elk Management Plan‏

image

The West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (WVDNR) has made the Draft West Virginia Elk Management Plan available for public review and comment.

A copy of the draft plan can be found on the WVDNR’s website at the following address: www.wvdnr.gov/Publications/Draft_Elk_Plan.pdf.

Written comments from the public are encouraged and will be received by the WVDNR, Wildlife Resources Section, through October 31, 2010.

The need for the development of an Elk Management Plan in West Virginia has been elevated in recent years as a result of Kentucky’s active elk restoration program, which was initiated in 1997.

Kentucky’s elk management area encompasses 16 counties and borders the counties of Mingo and Wayne in West Virginia.

During the past few years, the WVDNR has received occasional elk sightings in several counties within the southern region of West Virginia.

“The WVDNR is proposing to establish an Elk Management Area that will encompass seven counties, or portions thereof, in the Southern Coal Fields region of the state,” according to Curtis I. Taylor, Chief of the WVDNR Wildlife Resources Section. “The Elk Management Plan allows for an elk population to become established within this designated area using a passive management approach. The draft plan also provides guidelines for future management actions relating to this species.”

Feasibility studies evaluating habitat quality and sociological issues relating to the potential for elk reintroduction in West Virginia were completed in 2005.

These studies, funded by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, identified the Southern Coal Fields region as a potential elk restoration area.

The WVDNR welcomes written comments on the Draft West Virginia Elk Management Plan.

These comments should be postmarked by October 31, 2010, and mailed to the following address: Public Comments - Elk Management Plan, Attn: Supervisor of Game Management, WVDNR, P.O. Box 67, Elkins, WV 26241.

Individuals seeking additional information relating to the plan should contact a wildlife biologist at their local WVDNR District Office or at the Elkins Operation Center.

Gilmer County Democrat Headquarters Hours‏

image

For the week of September 20, 2010, the Democratic Headquarters will be open the following hours:

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM

During this time, you may visit the headquarters and pick up campaign materials for democratic candidates.

The headquarters is located in Foodland Plaza in the former bank building.

We are also seeking volunteers to work the headquarters for additional hours.

Please contact Sandy Pettit at 304.462.5741 (days) or 304.462.8907(evenings) if you are interested in working!

Youth Waterfowl Season and Youth Small Game Season Dates Announced‏

image

West Virginia’s youth waterfowl season has been set for September 25, 2010, and the youth small game season is scheduled for October 2, 2010, according to Curtis I. Taylor, Chief of the Wildlife Resources Section of the Division of Natural Resources (DNR).

“These special youth hunts provide an excellent opportunity to introduce youngsters to our state’s strong hunting heritage,” said Taylor. “The mild days of early fall are a great time to be afield with our youth, and provide an excellent opportunity for experienced hunters to mentor our youngsters on the various aspects of hunting such as the safe handling of firearms, hunter ethics and wildlife conservation.”

Youth waterfowl hunters must be 15 years of age or younger on the day of the hunt to participate in the youth waterfowl season (Sept. 25, 2010). Resident youth hunters age 14 and younger are not required to have a hunting license. Those who have reached their 15th birthday must possess a valid state hunting license (A, XJ, XXJ, AB-L or A-L) and HIP registration card, or be a qualified resident landowner. Nonresident youth need to have an XXJ license and HIP registration card. All youth must be accompanied by a licensed adult at least 21 years of age.  Landowners over 15 years of age are not exempt from the requirement to carry a valid migratory bird hunting and conservation stamp, commonly called the duck stamp. The daily bag limit for the waterfowl hunt is the same as during the regular season with several species restrictions.

New for 2010, the youth small game season to be held on October 2, 2010 enables youth hunters to take any small game species which have a legal hunting season, excluding migratory game birds. Youth small game hunters must be 17 years of age or younger on the day of the hunt to participate in the youth small game season. All licensing requirements remain in effect for ages 15-17. Resident youth hunters age 14 and younger are not required to have a hunting license.  Nonresident youth need to have an XXJ license.  All youth must be accompanied by a licensed adult 21 years of age or older. The supervising adult may not hunt or carry a firearm or bow and must remain near enough to the youth to render advice and assistance. The daily bag limits for the youth small game season are the same as the bag limits for the statewide small game seasons.

For additional information, hunters should check the 2010-2011 West Virginia Hunting and Trapping Regulations and the 2010-2011 West Virginia Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations.

Recalls - 09.17.10

image

CHILDREN’S JACKETS
Burlington Coat Factory is recalling Hooded Jackets and Sweatshirts sold nationwide from January 1995 to September 2009. The hooded jackets and sweatshirts have drawstrings through the hood and/or waist which can pose a strangulation or entrapment hazard.
Consumers should remove the drawstrings from the sweatshirts to eliminate the hazard or return the garment to Burlington Coat Factory for a full refund or credit.
Consumers can also contact Burlington Coat Factory at 888.223.2628 between 8:30 AM and 6 PM ET Monday through Friday or visit www.burlingtoncoatfactory.com.


TEA SETS
The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf LLC is recalling tea sets sold nationwide from March 2010 to August 2010. Sparking from the metallic decorations on the tea sets can result if used in a microwave oven, posing a risk of fire.
This recall involves the Tea for One “Flourish” design tea pot set, which includes a stackable teapot and cup. The teapot and cup are white ceramic with matching metallic foil decorations on each. The tea cup is marked “Dishwasher and microwave safe” and “Made in China” on the bottom, in English and French.
Consumers should return the tea sets to The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf® stores for a full refund.
Consumers can also contact The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf® at 800.832.5323 / 800.TEA.LEAF between 9 AM and 5 PM PT Monday through Friday or visit  www.coffeebean.com.


CHUCK E. CHEESE’S TOYS
Chuck E. Cheese’s is recalling Light-up Rings and Star Glasses sold at their restaurants from April 2009 to August 2010. If crushed or pulled apart, the plastic casing can break into small pieces and possibly expose the batteries, posing an ingestion hazard to children. If ingested, the batteries may be damaging to the stomach, intestine, esophagus or nasal mucus membrane.
The rings were distributed as part of a promotional product offering or during parent-teacher association conventions. The ring measures 1 1/8 inches across and is made of plastic with a black elastic band. The ring comes in several colors – blue, green, purple, yellow, and pink.
The glasses were distributed as part of a birthday package. The glasses measure about 5 1/2 inches across by 2 1/2 inches tall and are made of red translucent plastic and have the words Chuck E. Cheese’s painted on the side.
Consumers should return the items to any Chuck E. Cheese’s to receive a refund.
Consumers can also contact Chuck E. Cheese’s at 888.778.7193 between 9 AM and 5 PM CT Monday through Friday or visit www.chuckecheese.com.


BUILDING SETS
Edushape Ltd. is recalling Giant Starbuilder and Giant Stars building sets sold nationwide from January 2007 to May 2010. Plastic knobs can break from the center of the star, posing a choking hazard.
This recall involves all Giant Starbuilders and Giant Stars building sets. The giant stars measure 5-inches in diameter and are made of opaque plastic. Each star has six knobs protruding from a ring-shaped center. The Giant Starbuilder set contains red, green, yellow and blue stars. The Giant Star building set contains red, green, yellow, blue, orange and pink stars.
Consumers should contact Edushape at 800.404.4744 between 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM ET Monday through Friday, or visit www.edushape.com for a replacement set or credit towards another Edushape product of equal or lesser value.


TOY BRACELETS AND BALLS
Fun Stuff Inc. is recalling Click Armband Bracelets, Klick Klick Balls and BoBo Balls sold nationwide from January 2009 to August 2010. The small balls on the end of the toy’s arms can detach, posing a choking hazard.
The recalled bracelets and balls are made of stretchy, rubber material with hard plastic, colorful balls attached at the end of the toy’s arms. The toys were sold with orange, green, pink, purple and blue colored balls. The BoBo balls have a flashing lighted ball encased in the stretchy material.
Consumers should the toys to the place of purchase or contact Fun Stuff at 888.386.7833 between 9 AM and 5 PM ET Monday through Friday or visit www.funstuffinc.net to receive a full refund.


MODEL AIRPLANE RECEIVERS
Horizon Hobby Inc. is recalling Spektrum Receivers Used with Model Airplane Gliders sold nationwide and in Canada from March 2009 to May 2010. The receiver can lose contact with the model airplane glider’s radio control while within normal radio range limits. If this happens, the glider can fall from the sky and hit consumers, posing a risk of injury.
This recall involves Spektrum AR6250 receivers designed for use with carbon fiber model gliders. Model number AR6250 can be found on the back of the packaging and on the front and back of the receiver. “Spektrum” is printed on the front of the receiver.
Consumers should contact Horizon Hobby at 877.504.0233 between 8 AM to 5 PM CT Monday through Saturday, between 12 noon and 7 PM CT Sunday, or visit www.horizonhobby.com for information on receiving a free replacement receiver.


COLEMAN CO. SPOTLIGHTS
The Coleman Company is recalling Coleman® WaterBeam™ 4D Water-Activated Floating Spotlights sold nationwide from January 2005 to June 2010. The lens assembly can come apart from the main housing of the spotlight with force and pose a risk of impact injuries.
The recalled spotlights are Coleman® water-activated hand-held spotlights, model number 5338-782 (orange) UPC 76501 222733, model number 5338-792 (yellow) UPC 76501 222753 and model number 2000000153 (blue/white) UPC 76501 226683. A white label is affixed to the inside of the spotlight lens with the model number and production date information printed on the label.
Consumers should contact Coleman at 800.835.3278 between 7 AM and 4:45 PM CT Monday through Friday or visit www.coleman.com for additional instructions on how to obtain a replacement light.


ALBEE BABY CRIBS
Albee Baby recalls C & T International/Sorelle Brand “Prescott” Cribs sold nationwide from July 2009 to October 2009. These cribs are re-labeled fixed-sided Simplicity cribs that contain tubular metal mattress-support frames. The mattress support frames can bend or detach, causing part of the mattress to drop, creating a space into which an infant or toddler can roll and become wedged, entrapped or fall out of the crib.
These are full-sized fixed-sided cribs sold in an oak finish, as 3-in-1 or 4-in-1 convertible cribs. “Sorelle Furniture” along with the company’s address, the crib’s model number and a manufacturer’s code are printed on a label attached to the headboard or footboard.
Consumers should contact Albee Baby at 877.692.5233 between 9 AM and 5 PM ET Monday through Friday or visit www.albeebaby.com for a replacement crib, store credit or refund.

National Weather Service Confirms Two Tornadoes in West Virginia

image

Officials with the National Weather Service in Charleston confirm two tornados touched down on Thursday evening in West Virginia.

The first confirmed touchdown is in the riddled community of Belleville in Wood County.  The Belleville twister was an EF3 storm in strength.  The maximum sustained winds of the storm were 160-miles an hour.  The storm’s path was two-and-a-half miles long and 300-yards wide.

A number of homes were destroyed or heavily to moderately damaged by the storm.  One person was killed and nearly a dozen more injured.

Damage was light to moderate in neighboring Wirt County where a second twister touchdown was confirmed on Friday.  The touchdown was near the community of Palestine and was an EF1 tornado.  Maximum sustained winds were 100-miles an hour for the Palestine twister.  The path was a mile long and about 100-yards wide.

Storm damage in Palestine was not nearly as severe since the touchdown was in a rural and mostly forested area.  Trees were the biggest victims of that storm, although a few out buildings and homes sustained minor to moderate damage from the event.

Weekly Horoscope: 09.19.10 - 09.25.10

image
Aries (Mar 21-Apr 19) - Don’t limit what you can do on the 19th because someone is trying to control you. Use a little Aries charm with a gentle push to get your way. Your work will be affected on the 20th 21st and 22nd if you aren’t cognizant of what everyone around you is doing. Take care of any pressing matters critically and without letting your emotions get in the way. It’s important to do what’s necessary and to move on as quickly as possible. Your emotions will be close to the surface on the 23rd and 24th people who depend on you or vice versa. Do your best to remain calm. A relationship will need a little extra attention on the 25th. You will have to take charge and make the first move.

image
Taurus (Apr 20-May 20) - Focus on travel relationships and socializing on the 19th and avoid anyone trying to get you to do something for nothing. You can make interesting gains on the 20th, 21st and 22nd if you partner with someone that has clout and can compliment what you have to offer. Opportunities will develop while networking or interacting with peers. Love will take an interesting turn if you are passionate. Use your imagination on the 23rd and 24th and you will attract interest from individuals in a position to help you get your idea up and running. A personal relationship will be enhanced on the 25th if you make special plans for two. Short trips will be romantic.

image
Gemini (May 21-Jun 20) - Organize and prepare for the jobs you have lined up on the 19th. You will find a unique way to offer a service based on one of your skills. Expect the unexpected on the 20th 21st and 22nd especially when dealing with older or younger relative. Don’t say something in the heat of the moment that you will live to regret. Kindness consideration and above all patience will be your guiding light. Help others on the 23rd and 24th and you will receive help in return. Serious effort will enhance your reputation. A passionate approach on the 25th to whatever you do or whomever you deal with will bring good results and the change that will help you reach long time goals.

image
Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22) - You may be reluctant to make a move on the 19th but bypassing your fear and making a move or alteration to your current living arrangements will do you good. The people you socialize or network with on the 20th 21st and 22nd will be able to help you far more then you anticipate. Massage your relationships ensuring that you will be considered for any opportunity to advance. Your emotions may cloud a decision you must make on the 23rd and 24th. Put your feelings aside and do what’s best for you and your family. Take a unique approach to what’s required of you on the 25th. Volunteering your help instead of being coerced into offering it will be more rewarding.

image
Leo (Jul 23-Aug 22) - Problems will arise between you and someone you love on the 19th if you are too aggressive. Kindness and consideration will be a much wiser approach. Concentrate on home family investments and making alterations to your living arrangements that will benefit you on the 20th, 21st and 22nd and you will find common ground with someone you want to have in your life for a long time. An opportunity that allows you greater freedom to travel is apparent on the 23rd and 24th. Don’t miss out because you cannot get along with the person offering you assistance. Make a creative and loving gesture on the 25th and you may be able to reunite with someone you miss.

image
Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22) - Take a break on the 19th and you will get a clear picture of the financial opportunities that exist. Don’t let an emotional attachment you have to someone stand in the way of your progress. Speak your mind and don’t hide your feelings on the 20th 21st and 22nd and you will resolve personal issues that will improve a relationship with someone you care for. Make your intentions known and they will become a reality. Don’t overspend or take on responsibilities that don’t belong to you on the 23rd and 24th. Set up a budget that will ensure financial security. An idea you have on the 25th will be conducive to making a little extra cash for a service you can provide.

image
Libra (Sep 23-Oct 22) - Express your feelings openly but not aggressively on the 19th. It’s how you explain your position intentions and goals that will determine negative or positive response. Put your best effort into whatever you pursue on the 20th 21st and 22nd. It will be your ability to express yourself visually that will attract the most attention. A closer bond with the person you work with is likely to develop. You’ll be pulled between what you should do and what you want to do on the 23rd and 24th. Don’t let your emotions trick you into making the wrong choice. Offer something special to someone you want to spend more time with on the 25th and you will get the response you want.

image
Scorpio (Oct 23-Nov 21) - Don’t take anything or anyone for granted on the 19th. As long as you are honest and open about your plans it shouldn’t concern you if someone faults you. You can make some stellar alterations in your life on the 20th 21st and 22nd that will be conducive to working from home and accomplishing more. Networking will bring about changes that will dictate a bright future and lots more opportunity. Expect to be pushed back if you push someone on the 23rd and 24th. Flexibility will be what’s required if you want to get along with your peers colleagues and friends. Anger and frustration will only hold you back on the 25th. You have to overcome any obstacle and move on.

image
Sagittarius (Nov 22-Dec 21) - You’ll be torn between personal and professional obligations on the 19th. Clear any decision you make with anyone and everyone that may be influenced by the choice you make. An emotional encounter on the 20th 21st and 22nd can lead to unforeseen changes that will affect your status as well as your current living arrangements. Impulsive action will not be easy to reverse. Think before you act. An addition burden on the 23rd and 24th will help you put things in perspective. Make domestic changes that will improve your surroundings. You may want to visit an exotic destination on the 25th but you should stick close to home and protect your possessions.

image
Capricorn (Dec 22-Jan 19) - Size up your financial situation on the 19th and make whatever changes required in order to secure your income and personal investments. An interesting approach to work or taking on an unusual project on the 20th 21st and 22nd will enable you to interact with people you have more in common with. Don’t limit the possibilities because of the responsibility to someone. You can do it all if you apply yourself. An emotional issue regarding a friend, relative or neighbor and money will surface on the 23rd and 24th if you don’t make it clear what you expect and when. A day trip on the 25th with someone you love will enable you to rekindle what you once had.

image
Aquarius (Jan 20-Feb 18) - Someone you have been trying to impress will question you on the 19th if you don’t stick to the truth. A magical moment and a revelation will lead you in a new direction on the 20th, 21st and 22nd. Love is in the stars and spending time exploring new people places and destinations will all be conducive to enhancing romance. Use your imagination on the 23rd and 24th when it comes to making money and you will come up with a serviceable idea that you can offer for a profit. Self-improvement projects will pay off. Be careful how you express what you want on the 25th. Someone is likely to be offended or treat you poorly due to a misunderstanding.

image
Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20) - Hidden matters, secret affairs and problems with institutions will crop up if you aren’t willing to share what you know on the 19th. A relationship will cause you to question your life on the 20th 21st and 22nd. Consider what you want and what you have and make the necessary adjustments. A property investment or move will be in your best interest. Follow your heart and you’ll make the right choice. Don’t waffle on the 23rd and 24th because you are looking out for someone else’s feelings. It’s time to put you first. An interesting business partnership will result in an interesting proposal on the 25th. Offer your suggestions and you will get good results.

NATIONAL and Local FEEDER & STOCKER CATTLE SUMMARY - WEEK ENDING 09.17.2010

image
RECEIPTS:       Auctions    Direct    Video/Internet     Total
This Week        287,900    36,700        85,300        409,900   
Last Week        198,600    34,900        10,900        244,400   
Last Year        283,200    53,000       141,400        477,600

Compared to last week, longtime weaned calves and yearlings weighing over 600 lbs sold steady to 3.00 lower.

Lighter-weight or unweaned steer calves traded weak to 4.00 lower, while heifer calf prices suffered the full brunt of this week’s pressure and sold fully 2.00-6.00 lower.

Heavier supplies of spring-born calves have afforded buyers the luxury of being more particular.

Some increased calf demand was noted near the winter wheat pasture grazing areas, but not enough to offset the increased numbers and the overall bearish nature that has overcome the feeder markets since late August.

Early corn harvest yields have been very disappointing and the idea that this year’s crop with fall well short of earlier estimates continues to pick up steam as the combines creep closer to the Corn Belt.

Cash and future prices of corn have steadily risen, showing no signs of a correction and Midwestern farmers are nearing a reality of 5.00/bu right out of the field.

Cattle feeders have backed off new purchases, despite a fed cattle market that has established itself just under 100.00.

Cost-of-gains have risen dramatically in just the last few weeks and contracts written for fall delivery cattle and those recently received are looking too high.

However, CME Live Cattle futures still hold hedging opportunities if feedlots had some notion of where feed costs will land.

Demand remains good for 6 weight yearlings that won’t finish until nearly spring, but heavier feeders are seeing less interest even though yearling supplies are dwindling and available offerings are overwhelmingly becoming calves.

Many cow/calf producers are opting to sell right off the cow as market prices are rapidly eroding and higher costs of supplemental feed are making retention and weaning less likely to pay off.

Dressed beef prices have retreated from late summer highs, but demand remains fairly good and exports are holding up amid limited supplies of market-ready fed cattle.

Prices of competing proteins also remain fairly expensive and this past week pork bellies broke all-time record prices as it seems that nearly all featured restaurant specials have a slice of bacon wrapped around them.

This week’s reported auction volume included 46% over 600 lbs and 43% heifers.

Auction Receipts:  287,900   Last Week:  198,600   Last Year:  283,200

Buckhannon Livestock, Buckhannon, WV
Weighted Average Report for Wednesday September 15, 2010

Cattle Receipts:  139

Slaughter cows made up 17% of the offering, slaughter bulls 6%,
replacement cows 12%, and feeders 66%.

The feeder supply included 31% steers, 45% heifers, and 23% bulls.

Near 10% of the run weighed over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    1    385-385    385       100.00         100.00
    1    350-350    350        75.00          75.00   RWF
    7    405-445    423     99.00-113.00     105.57
    3    448-448    448        92.00          92.00   RWF
    2    462-462    462        98.00          98.00
    1    455-455    455        85.00          85.00   RWF
   14    500-540    527     95.00-102.00      97.77
    4    565-597    589    100.00-103.00     100.72
    2    770-795    783     86.00-91.00       88.46
                             Small 1
    1    635-635    635        89.00          89.00
                             Medium and Large 2
    1    375-375    375        82.50          82.50
    1    465-465    465        85.00          85.00
    1    505-505    505        85.00          85.00
    4    555-570    559     90.00-94.00       91.02
    1    670-670    670        85.00          85.00
    1    720-720    720        86.00          86.00

Feeder Heifers                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    1    260-260    260       107.00         107.00
    2    345-345    345    100.00-104.00     102.00
   11    370-395    380     90.00-102.00      96.72
    1    395-395    395        68.00          68.00   RWF
    7    410-448    428     90.00-98.00       93.92
   18    462-495    477     90.00-98.00       94.19
   13    510-540    534     90.00-94.00       93.19
    2    550-580    565     88.00-94.00       90.92
    1    660-660    660        77.00          77.00
    4    715-725    723     78.00-90.00       87.03
    1    760-760    760        75.00          75.00
                             Small 1
    2    465-485    475     67.50-85.00       76.07
                             Medium and Large 2
    1    355-355    355        80.00          80.00
    1    455-455    455        73.00          73.00

Feeder Bulls                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    3    315-345    333     99.00-110.00     106.54
    1    360-360    360       107.50         107.50
    2    430-435    433    105.00-108.00     106.49
    6    455-482    475     96.00-105.00      99.13
    2    565-575    570     85.00-99.00       91.94
    1    640-640    640        84.00          84.00
    1    690-690    690        85.00          85.00
    1    835-835    835        72.00          72.00
                             Small 1
    1    370-370    370        80.00          80.00
    3    400-440    423     80.00-87.50       84.29
    1    495-495    495        75.00          75.00
    2    520-525    523     70.00-83.00       76.47
    3    555-585    568     65.00-71.00       68.62
                             Medium and Large 2
    1    395-395    395        90.00          90.00
    1    445-445    445        89.00          89.00
    1    480-480    480        87.00          87.00
    2    585-590    588     85.00-89.00       86.99
    1    665-665    665        80.00          80.00

Bred Cows                  Medium and Large 1 - 2 Young
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    3    950-1035   978    560.00-660.00     624.74   Per Head  1-3 Months Bred
    3   1000-1050  1017       600.00         600.00   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
    1    960-960    960       570.00         570.00   Per Head  7-9 Months Bred
    2   1200-1250  1225    630.00-770.00     698.57   Per Head  7-9 Months Bred
                            Medium and Large 1 - 2 Middle Aged
    2   1080-1150  1115    535.00-550.00     542.26   Per Head  1-3 Months Bred
    1   1200-1200  1200       640.00         640.00   Per Head  1-3 Months Bred
    4    900-1150  1005    400.00-665.00     555.16   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
    9   1220-1295  1251    600.00-790.00     680.44   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
                            Medium and Large 1 - 2 Aged
    1   1155-1155  1155       550.00         550.00   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred

Slaughter Cows                Breaker 70-80% Lean
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    1   1390-1390  1390        47.75          47.75
    3   1180-1290  1242     48.50-53.00       50.18   High Dressing
    1   1470-1470  1470        49.25          49.25
    1   1535-1535  1535        52.25          52.25   High Dressing
                               Boner 80-85% Lean
   17    945-1340  1197     42.00-45.75       43.87
    6   1100-1325  1224     45.75-48.00       46.47   High Dressing
    6    950-1170  1091     33.50-39.00       35.67   Low Dressing
    1   1530-1530  1530        45.00          45.00

Slaughter Bulls                Yield Grade 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    1   1610-1610  1610        50.00          50.00
                               Yield Grade 1-2
    4   1110-1450  1325     62.00-63.00       62.56
    1   1300-1300  1300        64.00          64.00   High Dressing
    2   1215-1255  1235     53.25-58.25       55.79   Low Dressing
    3   1650-2000  1783     59.75-64.50       61.96
    2   1515-1770  1643     44.50-59.00       52.31   Low Dressing

Cow Calf Pairs
 Head
    10           650.00-950.00

Baby Calves
 Head
    4            45.00-140.00

Weston Livestock, Weston, WV
Weighted Average Report for Saturday September 11, 2010

Cattle Receipts:747  Total: 850

Slaughter cows made up 10% of the offering, slaughter bulls 4%,
replacement cows 2%, other cows 1%, and feeders 83%.

The feeder supply included 44% steers, 42% heifers, and 14% bulls.

Near 26% of the run weighed over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    3    375-375    375    100.00-111.00     103.67
   13    416-428    421    108.00-120.00     115.30
    2    440-445    443     91.00-96.00       93.49   RWF
   32    500-500    500    105.50-116.00     111.08
    4    503-515    506    106.50-108.00     106.88   Smoke
   27    558-568    560    104.00-110.00     105.27
    3    583-583    583        90.00          90.00   RWF
    2    565-565    565        97.00          97.00   Exotic
   19    642-648    647       104.00         104.00
    4    650-695    680     90.00-103.00      97.60   Yearlings
   21    705-740    733     99.00-111.00     108.52   Yearlings
    5    750-795    769     99.00-106.00     102.18   Yearlings
   18    805-842    828     92.00-107.00     100.15   Yearlings
                             Medium and Large 2
    7    348-348    348       112.00         112.00
   13    409-409    409       121.00         121.00
    8    488-488    488       105.00         105.00
    2    515-530    523    100.00-104.00     101.97
    8    555-556    556     99.00-105.00      99.75
    2    680-680    680     99.00-100.00      99.50   Yearlings

Feeder Heifers                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    3    255-290    268    114.00-115.00     114.32
    8    348-348    348       112.50         112.50
    3    365-395    385     95.00-100.00      96.58   Smoke
   30    425-430    425     93.00-110.00     107.56
    4    428-430    429     90.00-97.00       93.51   RWF
    2    420-430    425     95.00-98.00       96.52   Exotic
   30    472-489    481     89.00-106.00      97.35
    2    490-490    490        85.00          85.00   RWF
    3    460-485    477     89.00-91.00       89.64   Exotic
   27    558-573    569     94.50-98.00       95.52
    4    559-559    559        84.00          84.00   RWF
    4    550-563    560     88.00-89.00       88.75   Exotic
   10    642-642    642        88.00          88.00
    6    650-662    660     83.00-96.00       85.13
                             Medium and Large 2
   14    335-335    335       107.00         107.00
   18    421-421    421        95.00          95.00
   11    480-480    480        85.00          85.00
    2    537-537    537        92.50          92.50   Yearlings
    3    572-572    572        92.00          92.00
    2    590-595    593     94.00-95.00       94.50   Yearlings
    8    600-635    625     86.00-95.00       87.52   Yearlings

Feeder Bulls                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    2    255-270    263    128.00-132.50     130.19
    2    335-345    340    110.00-111.00     110.51
    2    375-390    383     96.00-106.00     101.10
    3    428-430    429     90.00-107.00      95.68
    8    489-489    489       107.50         107.50
    2    495-495    495        85.00          85.00   RWF
    6    502-502    502       101.50         101.50
   10    571-573    571     93.00-95.50       95.00
    5    620-636    633     82.50-85.00       82.99
    2    638-638    638        83.50          83.50   Smoke
    2    722-722    722        88.00          88.00   Yearlings
    3    846-846    846        78.00          78.00   Yearlings
                             Medium and Large 2
    2    295-295    295    100.00-102.50     101.25
    3    345-345    345       107.00         107.00
    2    420-420    420       100.00         100.00
    4    510-510    510       100.00         100.00
    4    576-576    576        91.00          91.00
    2    805-805    805        77.00          77.00   Yearlings

Bred Cows                  Medium and Large 1 - 2 Young
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    3   1035-1100  1065    700.00-770.00     742.58   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
                            Medium and Large 1 - 2 Middle Aged
    2   1250-1295  1273    622.00-740.00     679.96   Per Head  7-9 Months Bred

Slaughter Cows                Boner 80-85% Lean
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
   10   1135-1365  1245     50.00-54.00       52.23
    6   1125-1355  1257     55.00-58.00       56.56   High Dressing
    6    930-1340  1162     47.00-50.00       49.12   Low Dressing
    6   1410-1710  1494     53.50-56.75       55.02
    3   1450-1645  1530     57.00-58.00       57.68   High Dressing
    4   1440-1560  1504     50.00-52.00       51.04   Low Dressing
                                Lean 85-90% Lean
   13    855-1345  1145     44.00-50.00       47.37
    5    930-1265  1114     35.00-42.00       38.94   Low Dressing

Heiferettes
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    7    920-1180  1032     63.00-71.50       67.46  

Slaughter Bulls                Yield Grade 1-2
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    2   1315-1420  1368     60.00-63.00       61.44   High Dressing
    2   1715-1865  1790     60.75-63.50       62.18
   15   1540-2130  1830     63.00-70.00       66.45   High Dressing

Cow Calf Pairs
 Head 10
        L&M1 Age 2-8 calf over 250lbs   850.00
        L&M2 Age 2-8 calf under 250lbs  700.00

Baby Calves Returned to the farm
  Head  5                      Beef             Dairy
             Newborn
             100-150lbs     93.00-98.00
             150-250lbs    100.00-108.00

Slaugther Lambs
  Head 21
            100-125lbs      109.00
             90-100lbs      136
Feeders Lambs
   Head 31
             75-90lbs    133.00-137.00
             45-60lbs       127.00

Slaughter Ewes
   Head 5        Fleshy   50.00

Goats
  Head 30          Selction 1          Selction 2
  Kids                
  20-40lbs                             30.00-37.50
  40-60lbs         
  Big Billies       142.50              112.50
  Sm Billies      100.00-107.00         60.00
  Big Nannies     125.50-130.00         85.00
  Sm Nannies        135.00              77.50
  Nannies w/kids   

Slaughter Hogs
 Head 7
         200-250lbs     69.00-73.00
         250-300lbs     50.00-55.00
         300-up         42.50

Sows
 Head 2      34.00-41.00

Jackson County Regional Livestock Market, Ripley, WV
Weighted Average Report for Saturday September 11, 2010

Cattle Receipts:  739

Slaughter cows made up 11% of the offering, slaughter bulls 2%,
replacement cows 4%, and feeders 82%.

The feeder supply included 34% steers, 40% heifers, and 26% bulls.

Near 29% of the run weighed over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    7    116-116    116       116.00         116.00
    5    255-295    279    126.00-134.00     129.89
    6    300-330    311    120.00-128.00     124.99
    2    350-380    365    115.00-123.00     118.84
    8    420-445    431    104.00-115.00     109.29
   27    450-485    469    107.00-122.00     114.54
    1    470-470    470        90.00          90.00   Smoke
   21    505-545    524    105.00-115.00     111.98
    3    528-528    528        91.00          91.00   Red
   10    550-595    569     97.00-110.00     106.40
   13    614-630    615    104.00-113.50     111.11
   32    650-695    675    104.00-113.00     111.14
    6    700-733    719     95.00-105.00     101.22
   19    750-770    764     91.00-104.00     100.67
    1    805-805    805        85.00          85.00
    4    807-807    807        92.00          92.00   RWF
    1    870-870    870        90.00          90.00
    1    930-930    930        87.00          87.00
                             Small 1
    1    415-415    415        86.00          86.00
    2    455-495    475     75.00-82.00       78.65
                             Medium and Large 2
    1    270-270    270       117.00         117.00
    1    320-320    320       110.00         110.00
    2    375-375    375     95.00-110.00     102.50
    6    405-445    418     88.00-98.00       94.76
    3    450-492    478    100.00-105.00     103.43
    2    462-462    462        83.00          83.00   RWF
    2    505-505    505       109.00         109.00
    2    550-570    560     97.00-98.00       97.49
    1    615-615    615       100.00         100.00
    1    680-680    680       106.00         106.00
                             Holstein Medium and Large 2
   14    609-609    609        70.00          70.00
    1   1135-1135  1135        71.00          71.00

Feeder Heifers                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
   10    200-247    233    114.00-125.00     116.05
    3    270-290    277    108.00-112.00     110.05
   10    300-330    315    103.00-110.00     106.00
   22    365-398    379    100.00-111.00     103.10
   36    400-445    426    100.00-109.00     104.29
   33    450-495    476     99.00-110.50     106.60
   18    500-540    526    100.00-112.00     105.95
    1    530-530    530        91.00          91.00   Fleshy
   14    552-595    568     96.00-108.00     102.03
   18    605-645    613     82.00-104.50      98.58
    1    630-630    630        84.00          84.00   Fleshy
   18    685-695    693     92.00-98.00       95.45
    2    835-835    835        90.00          90.00
    2    880-880    880        80.00          80.00
    5    950-980    963     72.00-82.00       75.24
                             Small 1
    2    415-440    428     75.00-80.00       77.43
    1    465-465    465        74.00          74.00
    1    510-510    510        72.00          72.00
    1    605-605    605        80.00          80.00
    3    978-978    978        74.00          74.00
                             Medium and Large 1 - 2
    1    430-430    430        90.00          90.00
                             Medium and Large 2
    3    275-285    280    104.00-108.00     105.67
    3    310-325    318     90.00-100.00      93.40
    6    365-390    383     89.00-101.00      95.50
    6    410-445    427     90.00-99.00       94.34
    1    425-425    425        88.00          88.00   RWF
    7    450-490    470     88.00-98.00       92.60
    2    525-530    528     71.00-95.00       83.06
    1    580-580    580        82.00          82.00
    3    655-675    663     75.00-78.00       75.99
    4    793-793    793        82.00          82.00
    1    810-810    810        69.00          69.00
    2    910-910    910        72.00          72.00

Feeder Bulls                Medium and Large 1
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    8    300-345    325    112.00-125.00     116.42
    9    375-396    387    100.00-114.00     104.61
   47    406-445    428    102.00-122.00     110.91
   17    452-498    477     82.00-115.00     106.65
   11    500-545    534     92.00-100.00      98.77
   14    550-585    568     95.00-110.00     102.30
    1    575-575    575        75.00          75.00   Red
    1    550-550    550        88.00          88.00   RWF
    9    605-625    614     94.00-106.00     101.99
    3    660-680    667        90.00          90.00
    1    705-705    705        86.00          86.00
    2    810-820    815     78.00-81.00       79.49
    1    890-890    890        79.00          79.00
    2    990-995    993     75.00-79.00       76.99
    1   1000-1000  1000        79.00          79.00
    1   1120-1120  1120        74.00          74.00
                             Small 1
    3    375-383    380     93.00-102.00      99.04
    2    455-470    463     83.00-93.00       87.92
    1    525-525    525        82.00          82.00
                             Medium and Large 2
    3    300-320    307     95.00-103.00      97.78
    1    385-385    385       100.00         100.00
    3    400-425    417        94.00          94.00
    7    455-482    474     80.00-97.00       88.76
    1    515-515    515        90.00          90.00
    3    593-593    593        85.00          85.00
    3    555-555    555        77.00          77.00   RWF
    3    635-640    637     80.00-87.00       82.66
    1    720-720    720        84.00          84.00

Bred Cows                  Medium and Large 1 - 2 Young
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    3    790-895    837    575.00-700.00     652.44   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
    6    955-1140  1070    685.00-800.00     760.32   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
                            Medium and Large 1 - 2 Middle Aged
    1   1080-1080  1080       575.00         575.00   Per Head  1-3 Months Bred
    2   1300-1410  1355    670.00-800.00     737.64   Per Head  1-3 Months Bred
    1    885-885    885       425.00         425.00   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
   10    910-1115  1044    475.00-775.00     596.40   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
    3   1235-1360  1282    700.00-760.00     736.96   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
    1   1330-1330  1330       785.00         785.00   Per Head  7-9 Months Bred
                            Medium and Large 1 - 2 Aged
    1    850-850    850       375.00         375.00   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred
    5    905-1170  1017    425.00-550.00     478.15   Per Head  4-6 Months Bred

Slaughter Cows                Breaker 70-80% Lean
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    6   1110-1395  1251     53.00-55.00       54.16
    6   1185-1310  1245     55.00-62.00       58.32   High Dressing
    1   1495-1495  1495        51.50          51.50
    1   1420-1420  1420        56.00          56.00   High Dressing
                               Boner 80-85% Lean
    3    750-880    827     46.00-48.00       46.95
    3    805-855    832     53.00-55.50       54.36   High Dressing
    7    700-895    826     40.00-44.50       42.34   Low Dressing
   28    900-1395  1161     46.00-52.50       49.60
   17    940-1395  1167     53.00-61.50       55.79   High Dressing
   11    920-1290  1045     40.50-45.50       43.60   Low Dressing
    1   1490-1490  1490        55.00          55.00   High Dressing

Slaughter Bulls                Yield Grade 1-2
 Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price
    2   1290-1295  1293     64.50-66.00       65.25
    1   1465-1465  1465        68.00          68.00   High Dressing
    1   1365-1365  1365        65.00          65.00   Low Dressing
    6   1500-2190  1775     63.00-68.50       65.29
    4   1520-1855  1694     67.50-70.00       68.69   High Dressing
    2   1740-1955  1848     58.00-62.50       60.38   Low Dressing

Cow Calf Pairs
 Head
    16  Young Cows 2-5 yrs 625.00-1025.00
        Middle age 6-10yrs 600.00-1025.00

Hieferettes
 Head
    10  800-1000lbs        63.00-74.00
        1000-1200lbs       58.00-68.00

No Fats offered
 
Baby Calves
 Head
    5        30.00-140.00

Slaughter Ewes 
 Head
    3        41.00-50.00

Feeder Lambs
 Head
    30     90-125lbs       1.25
           80-90 lbs       1.25
           60-80lbs      1.27-1.40
           40-60lbs      1.12-1.27
Slaughter Hogs
 Head
    1      56.00

Goats
 Head
    31     feeders       35.00-75.00
           Nannies       60.00-120.00
           Big Billies   92.00-130.00

Bon Appétit: Tuscan Summer Salad

image

Ingredients:
4 tomatoes, sliced
2 cucumbers, peeled and sliced
1/2 medium red onion, sliced into rings
1/2 medium green bell pepper, sliced
2 pepperoncini, chopped
2 tablespoons sliced olives
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 bottle low-fat or fat-free italian dressing

Alternate:
Balsamic vinegar makes a great substitute for the italian dressing called for here.

And to make this salad a meal, add some cooked, rinded and cooled pasta.

Daily G-Eye : 09.19.10

image

image
WV Trappers’ Convention
Friday, Saturday, Sunday
Gilmer County Recreation Center


Submit photos for this daily feature. You may select to have your name listed as well.
Send your photo(s) to “tellus@gilmerfreepress.net”

Stargazing - 09.19.10

image

Cassiopeia, the queen, glistens in the northeast at nightfall and wheels high across the north later on.

The queen’s five brightest stars form the shape of the letter W.

TRUTH OR TRADITION?  – #87

image

image

Steer Creek Church of Christ,  3466 Rosedale Road,  Stumptown WV 25267
Minister: Gene H Miller, 3281 Rosedale Road, Shock WV 26638-8410.
Phone:  304.462.0384     E-Mail:  “ghmiller@rtol.net”  Web Site:  steercreekchurchofchrist.org

Betty J. Allman

image

Betty J. Allman
of Jane Lew died Tuesday, September 14, 2010, at Heartland of Clarksburg Nursing Home following a long illness.

She was born on April 24, 1930, and was a life-long resident of Jane Lew.

She is survived by her husband, Archie L. Allman of Jane Lew; sons, Kenneth and wife Marsha of Buckhannon, Robert and wife Shelley of Lost Creek, John, Paul, and Larry Allman of Jane Lew. Also surviving are five grandchildren, Rashana Hebb of Buckhannon, Joseph Dean of Buckhannon, Erica Allman of West Milford, Dustin Allman of Jane Lew and Brandon Allman of Lost Creek; one great-grandchild, Shaylee Hebb of Buckhannon; two sisters, Mildred Trezise of Jane Lew and Helen Jones of Clarksburg; brother, Leyland “Pete” Freeman of Jane Lew; and several nieces and nephews.

Mrs. Allman was preceded in death by four brothers Jr. Freeman, Charles Freeman, Ralph Freeman and John Freeman, and two sisters, Hannah Chamberlain and Mary Thompson.

Betty was past owner of Jane Lew Laundromat, enjoyed cooking and spending time with her family, listening to West Virginia University football and basketball and most of all, playing bingo. She was a member of United Evangelical Mission Church of West Milford.

Friends were received Friday evening from 5-8 PM at the Morris Funeral Home, Jane Lew, where funeral services were held Saturday morning, September 18, at 11 AM at the Morris Funeral Home with Rev. Ashby Titus and Rev. William Lanham officiating. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery.

09.19.10

image

Today - 09.19.yyyy

Today is Sunday, Sept. 19, the 262nd day of 2010. There are 103 days left in the year.

Thought for Today: “He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god; he is no part of a state.“ — Aristotle, Greek philosopher (384 B.C.-322 B.C.).

Today’s Highlight in History:

image

On Sept. 19, 1960, Cuban leader Fidel Castro, in New York to visit the United Nations, angrily checked out of the Shelburne Hotel in a dispute with the management; Castro accepted an invitation to stay at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem.

On this date:

In 1777, during the Revolutionary War, American soldiers won the first Battle of Saratoga.

In 1783, Jacques Etienne Montgolfier (zhahk ayt-YEHN’ mohn-gohl-fee-AY’) launched a duck, a sheep and a rooster aboard a hot-air balloon at Versailles (vehr-SY’) in France.

In 1796, President George Washington’s farewell address was published.

In 1881, the 20th president of the United States, James A. Garfield, died 2 1/2 months after being shot by Charles Guiteau; Chester Alan Arthur became president.

In 1934, Bruno Hauptmann was arrested in New York and charged with the kidnap-murder of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr.

In 1945, Nazi radio propagandist William Joyce, known as “Lord Haw-Haw,“ was convicted of treason and sentenced to death by a British court.

In 1957, the United States conducted its first contained underground nuclear test, code-named “Rainier,“ in the Nevada desert.

In 1959, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, visiting Los Angeles, reacted angrily upon being told that, for security reasons, he wouldn’t get to visit Disneyland.

In 1970, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” debuted on CBS-TV.

In 1985, the Mexico City area was struck by a devastating earthquake that killed at least 9,500 people.

Ten years ago:
•  The Senate approved permanent normal trade status for China.
•  The Romanian women’s gymnastics team won the gold medal at the Sydney Olympics; Russia won the silver, China took the bronze, and the U.S. placed fourth. (However, in 2010, China was stripped of the bronze because a member of the team was found to have been underage; the honor went to the U.S.)

Five years ago:
•  North Korea pledged to drop its nuclear weapons development and rejoin international arms treaties, but its leaders quickly backpedaled.
•  In a statement aired on a pan-Arab TV station, Al-Qaida deputy Ayman al-Zawahri (AY’-muhn ahl-ZWAH’-ree) said his terror network had carried out the July 07 London bombings that killed 52 people.
•  Former Tyco CEO L. Dennis Kozlowski was sentenced in New York to 8 1/3 to 25 years in prison for looting the company of hundreds of millions of dollars; Tyco’s former finance chief, Mark Swartz, received the same sentence.

One year ago:
•  Russia said it would scrap a plan to deploy missiles near Poland after Washington dumped a planned missile shield in Eastern Europe. Art Ferrante, 88, half of the piano duo Ferrante and Teicher, died in Longboat Key, Fla. (Lou Teicher had died in 2008 at age 83.)

Today’s Birthdays:
Author Roger Angell is 90
TV host James Lipton (“Inside the Actors Studio”) is 84
Actress Rosemary Harris is 83
Baseball Hall of Famer Edwin “Duke” Snider is 84
Former Defense Secretary Harold Brown is 83
Actor Adam West is 80
Retired MLB All-Star Bob Turley is 80
Actor David McCallum is 77
Singer-songwriter Paul Williams is 70
Singer Bill Medley is 70
Singer Sylvia Tyson (Ian and Sylvia) is 70
Golfer Jane Blalock is 65
Singer David Bromberg is 65
Actor Randolph Mantooth is 65
Singer Freda Payne is 65
Rock singer-musician Lol Creme (10cc) is 63
Former NFL running back Larry Brown is 63
Actor Jeremy Irons is 62
Actress Twiggy Lawson is 61
TV personality Joan Lunden is 60
Singer-producer Daniel Lanois is 59
Actor Scott Colomby is 58
Musician-producer Nile Rodgers is 58
College Football Hall of Famer and former NFL player Reggie Williams is 56
Singer-actor Rex Smith is 55
Actor Kevin Hooks is 52
Actress Carolyn McCormick is 51
Country singer Jeff Bates is 47
Country singer Trisha Yearwood is 46
Actress-comedian Cheri Oteri is 45
News anchor Soledad O’Brien is 44
Rhythm-and-blues singer Espraronza Griffin is 41
Actress Sanaa Lathan (suh-NAH’ LAY’-thun) is 39
Actress Stephanie J. Block is 38
Rock singer A. Jay Popoff (Lit) is 37
Comedian and TV talk show host Jimmy Fallon is 36
TV personality Carter Oosterhouse is 34
Actress-TV host Alison Sweeney is 34
Rock musician Ryan Dusick is 33
Actor Columbus Short is 28
Rapper Eamon is 27
Christian rock musician JD Frazier is 27
Actor Kevin Zegers is 26
Actress Danielle Panabaker is 23

WV Lottery - 09.18.10

image

image

6-6-7

image

4-5-8-2

image

03-06-23-27-30     HB: 04    

image

01-18-37-39-44     PB: 13   PowerPlay: x 4  

Griffins Fall to Pioneers

image

Darold Hughes completed 16 of 25 passes for 253 yards and three touchdowns as Glenville State (2-1, 1-0) outgunned Seton Hill (1-3, 0-1) 38-28.

Jordan Griffin caught touchdown passes of 57 and 15 yards to help the Pioneers build a 35-14 halftime lead.  DeAndre Johnson rushed for 80 yards and Brian Harden added 78 as the balanced GSC attack rolled up 441 yards.  Griffin made five receptions for 118 yards, while Antwan Stewart recorded six catches for 86 yards and a score.

Seton Hill’s D.J. Lenehan hit on 23 of 38 passes for 212 yards and two touchdowns.  Daniel Butler chipped in a game-high 91 rush yards on 16 carries.  Butler tallied Griffin scores via a 37-yard rush and a 12-yard reception.  Tyree Bryant returned an interception 13 yards for another SHU touchdown.

WVU and Marshall Football - 09.18.10

image

West Virginia Defeats Maryland
Geno Smith threw for 268 yards and four touchdowns, as 21st-ranked West Virginia handled Maryland, 31-17, at Milan Puskar Stadium.

Smith completed 19-of-29 passes while Tavon Austin pulled in seven catches for 106 yards and two scores for West Virginia (3-0), which was coming off a dramatic 24-21 overtime win over instate rival Marshall last Friday. It handled Coastal Carolina, 31-0, in the season opener.

Stedman Bailey added four grabs for 60 yards and a pair of scores while Jock Sanders had six receptions for 86 yards and set up a touchdown with a 67-yard punt return. Noel Devine led the ground attack with 131 yards on 27 touches.

Jamarr Robinson completed 13-of-24 pass attempts for 227 yards and two touchdowns for Maryland (2-1), which earned a 62-3 victory over Morgan State last weekend. The Terrapins opened the season with a narrow 17-14 decision over Navy. Torrey Smith had three grabs for 149 yards and a pair of TDs.

West Virginia put up the first points on its opening drive, going 77 yards on seven plays. The Mountaineers converted a key 3rd-and-14 when Geno Smith hit Austin for a 15-yard gain before Devine galloped for 50 yards down the far sideline to the Maryland 16. Three plays later, Smith found Austin in the back corner of the end zone for the six-yard score.

Maryland was forced to punt out of the shadow of its own end zone on its first offensive try and the Mountaineers turned it into another seven points. The Terps needed only five plays to go 51 yards and a Geno Smith-to-Austin five- yard connection made it a 14-0 contest.

Geno Smith’s 26-yard hookup with Bailey in the early stages of the second quarter finished off a seven-play, 62-yard drive. The score was briefly reviewed, but upheld after it was ruled Bailey got a foot inbounds.

It remained a 21-0 game heading into the break.

However, early in the third, Sanders put WVU in outstanding position with a 67-yard punt return to the Maryland eight, and three plays later Geno Smith spotted Bailey for a five-yard TD. Again, the play was reviewed but upheld.

The Terps answered on their next possession when Robinson hit Torrey Smith for a 60-yard catch and run that got the visitors on the board, 28-7. Later in the frame, Robinson’s 80-yard strike to Torrey Smith made it a two-touchdown game with 4:07 left in the third.

Travis Baltz’s 35-yard field goal with just under 12 minutes to play drew UM within 28-17. However, West Virginia countered with a lengthy 8:46 drive that culminated in a 23-yard chip shot by Tyler Bitancurt with 3:07 remaining.

A swarming Mountaineers’ defense slammed the door on Maryland’s next series, forcing a turnover on downs, and WVU took a knee to run out the clock.


Marshall vs. Bowling Green

Quarterback Matt Schilz ran for one touchdown and threw for another as the Bowling Green Falcons defeated the Marshall Thundering Herd, 44-28, in a non-conference affair at Doyt Perry Stadium.

Schilz converted 19-of-25 passes for 181 yards and survived four sacks, while Willie Geter ran for 100 yards on 31 carries in the win for Bowling Green (1-2) while also grabbing five receptions for 86 yards. Tyrone Pronty caught three balls for 69 yards and one touchdown.

Marshall (0-3) was led by a terrific performance from running back Andre Booker, registering 121 yards and one touchdown on just seven carries (17.3 ypc). Brian Anderson converted 20-of-44 passes for 191 yards and a score, but he was also picked off four times in the disappointing outing.

The Falcons were off to a hot start, striking on the initial drive of the game as Schilz hooked up with Kamar Jorden for a five-yard touchdown toss as Bowling Green led 7-0 out of the shoot.

The only other score in the opening quarter came when Dwayne Woods picked off Anderson for a 78-yard interception return to pay dirt, pushing the Falcons to a 14-0 advantage.

BGSU continued to put the pressure on Marshall in the second quarter by taking advantage of yet another interception from the hands of Anderson, this time the throw was picked by Jovan Leacock. The Falcons only needed 16 yards to reach the end zone, and did so as Schilz capped off the drive with a one-yard touchdown dash giving Bowling Green the 21-0 advantage.

Marshall was finally able to stop the bleeding on its next drive, as Andre Booker raced 68 yards for the touchdown, making the score 21-7 in favor of the Falcons.

However, Bowling Green struck again later in the quarter on a two-yard touchdown run by Jordan Hopgood as the Falcons moved out to a 28-7 lead.

The Herd was able to bring the tally to 28-14 before halftime as Anderson was able to connect with Antavious Wilson on a six-yard touchdown strike with one second remaining in the second stanza.

Marshall took over in the third quarter, receiving two separate one-yard touchdowns runs from A.J. Graham and Martin Ward as the battle moved on to the fourth quarter tied at 28-28.

Bowling Green decided to return the favor in the final quarter, starting with a 27-yard field goal from Bryan Wright to take a 31-28 lead.

The Falcons then jumped to a 37-28 advantage after Aaron Pankratz completed a 31-yard touchdown to Tyrone Pronty. The drive was only good for six points as Wright missed on the extra point.

BGSU continued to take full control of the showdown when Jerry Gates took an interception in for a score from 29 yards out as the Falcons held off the Thundering Herd by a 16-point margin at home.

The Falcons were able to convert 50 percent (9-of-18) of their third-down plays, helping to fend off Marshall which was just 5-of-14 in similar situations.

WV DEP Secretary Working on Marcellus Shale Plan

image

State Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Randy Huffman hopes to finalize a proposed regulatory plan for the Marcellus Shale within the next few months.

Secretary Huffman says he’s been meeting with various stakeholders this year and a lot of information has been gathered including facts and opinions. He says now a smaller group will take that information and develop a plan that he can take to state lawmakers next year.

Marcellus Shale drilling is increasing in West Virginia. It’s not like the traditional drilling of shallow gas wells the state has been used to. The drilling site can be five times larger and that has put a strain on the DEP’s Oil and Gas Division.

“We just become overwhelmed when we think of spreading those guys that thin,“ Sec. Huffman told MetroNews this week.

Drilling activity continues to rise in the Marcellus Shale even though natural gas prices are not. Huffman says companies are committed to the extensive process. “It’s not as easy for the Marcellus drilling activity to ebb and flow with the prices like the conventional drilling would,“ Huffman said.

So given the anticipation the activity will continue to increase——Huffman’s plan will include new regulations and additional workers. “I’m not under any illusion that it’s going to resolve every issue,“ Huffman said. “But there are some basic fundamental things that we need to do to get us in a position to properly regulate this activity.“

Recent news items in West Virginia point toward the significance of the Marcellus Shale resources in the state and the concern some have about the increased drilling.

Gilmer County property owner Ed Broome recently said Chesapeake Energy had agreed to pay him $22 million for his property and mineral rights from the New Martinsville area back toward the Marion-Monongalia County line in Wetzel County.

In Marshall County, the board of education, State Police, DOH and Office of Emergency Services are looking at a plan to deal with increased truck traffic caused by Marcellus Shale drilling.

DEP Secretary Huffman says he’ll have his proposals before state lawmakers next January. “Nobody likes to add to government. Nobody likes to add to the regulatory oversight. But this is new, it’s not something that we have seen,“ Huffman said.

County-By-County Unemployment Rates Tell the Story – August 2010

image


West Virginia’s unemployment rate climbed three-tenths of a percentage point to 8.9% in August 2010.

Well over one-half of all counties recorded rising unemployment rates as well.

The number of counties recording an unemployment rate considered much worse than average when compared to the state rate fell to two: Mason (14.0%) and Clay (15.1%).

The number of counties recording an unemployment rate considered better than average when compared to the state rate declined slightly.

This group included Marion (7.5%), Preston (7.5%), Gilmer (7.4%), Putnam (7.4%), Pendleton (7.2%), Jefferson (6.9%), and Monroe (6.9%).

Once again, Monongalia (5.7%) was the sole county reporting an unemployment rate considered much better than average when compared to the state rate.

Labor Force Data
County Total Unemployed   Unemployment Rate
Aug-10 Jul-10 Aug-09 Aug-10 Jul-10 Aug-09
Braxton 550 500 480 9.4% 8.8% 8.1%
Calhoun 320 300 350 12.4% 11.4% 12.9%
Doddridge 220 200 230 7.8% 7.2% 8.0%
Gilmer 220 220 220 7.4% 7.2% 6.8%
Lewis 580 550 610 7.7% 7.2% 8.0%
Ritchie 390 370 410 9.3% 9.0% 9.2%
WV 69,400 67,400 66,300 8.9% 8.6% 8.3%

 

County Total Nonfarm on Payroll   Goods Producing Employees   Service Providing Employees
Aug-10 Jul-10 Aug-09 Aug-10 Jul-10 Aug-09 Aug-10 Jul-10 Aug-09
Braxton 4,440 4,390 4,450 700 690 710 3,740 3,700 3,740
Calhoun 1,440 1,450 1,480 310 310 300 1,140 1,140 1,190
Doddridge 1,250 1,260 1,320 190 190 210 1,060 1,070 1,100
Gilmer 2,350 2,360 2,420 530 540 550 1,820 1,810 1,870
Lewis 6,710 6,700 6,630 1,200 1,190 1,170 5,520 5,520 5,470
Ritchie 3,260 3,160 3,310 1,420 1,410 1,350 1,840 1,750 1,960

WV Roads: Something Has to Change

image

West Virginia University Professor Tom Witt with the Bureau of Business and Economic Research says the state cannot afford to continue to maintain its roads the way it does now.

“The dialogue we’re going to have to have is ‘What sort of highway system do we want to have in the future?  Is it going to be primarily the state’s responsibility totally or is it going to be up to localities?‘“

Earlier this week, officials with the state Division of Highways offered a number of proposals to state lawmakers for possible ways to generate more money for the state Road Fund.

One proposal would charge a tax on food purchased from drive through at restaurants.

Witt says, these days, the state Road Fund is buying two thirds of what it could have bought in 2004 and less money is coming in every year.

Most of the state’s contribution to the Road Fund comes from the taxes on gasoline, both at the wholesale and retail levels.  Those revenues have declined for a number of reasons.

“Cars are getting a lot more fuel efficient,“ Witt said.  “Cars last longer.  The population is getting older and now people are starting to shift to alternative fuel vehicles.“

On every gallon of gas you buy, you pay about 30 cents in state tax and 18 cents in federal tax.

Witt says people may need to start paying more.  “What you pay for is what you use,“ he said.

Or, he says, other options need to be considered.  Other states have started turning some paved roads into gravel roads because gravel roads require less maintenance.

If more money is not generated somehow, “You’re going to have to live with a given level of road system and we’re going to have to have a dialogue about what parts we’re going to abandon.“

West Virginia’s gas tax is the 14th highest in the United States.

G-Fin™: U.S.A.: Economy Brief - 09.17.10

image

Consumer Price Index

On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI-U increased 0.3% in August, the same increase as in July.

The index for all items less food and energy was unchanged in August after rising 0.1% in July.


Real Earnings

Real average hourly earnings for all employees was unchanged from July to August, seasonally adjusted.

This result stems from a 0.3% increase in average hourly earnings, which was offset by a 0.3% increase in the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U).

Real average weekly earnings was about unchanged over the month.


Producer Price Index

The Producer Price Index for Finished Goods increased 0.4% in August, seasonally adjusted.

This rise followed a 0.2-percent advance in July and a 0.5-percent decline in June.

The index for finished goods less foods and energy edged up 0.1%.


U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes

U.S. import prices increased 0.6% in August, after rising 0.1% the previous month.

Higher fuel and nonfuel prices contributed to the overall advance.

Export prices rose 0.8% in August after declining 0.2% in July and 0.7% in June.

Venison - An Excellent Source of Low-Fat Protein‏

image

As West Virginia hunters take to the field this fall, they will benefit from more than just an enjoyable day with friends and family. Many of these sportsmen and women will successfully harvest a deer and fill their freezer with an ample supply of venison (deer meat).

Venison provides an excellent alternative to beef for those concerned with healthier choices in their diet.

“Venison is a healthy source of protein for many West Virginia families,” said Curtis I. Taylor, chief of the Wildlife Resources Section of the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (DNR). “Venison has fewer calories and nearly five times less fat than an equivalent serving of beef.”

Immediately after the harvest, hunters can ensure their selected venison cuts retain the best quality and flavor if they take a few simple steps in caring for their game.

Meat should not be exposed to excessive heat and moisture, and it should be cooled as quickly as possible to avoid spoilage.

Hunters are not the only West Virginians that benefit from deer harvested in the state.

During the past 18 years, the DNR has sponsored the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program (HHH).

Since its inception in 1992, hunter-donated venison has provided over 975,000 meals for needy West Virginia families.

For more information about the HHH program or West Virginia’s various deer hunting seasons and regulations, consult the 2010-2011 West Virginia Hunting and Trapping Regulations Summary available at all DNR Offices and license agents.

WV GOP Files Lawsuit over Ballot Layout

image

Facing a pair of court challenges over the move, Secretary of State Natalie Tennant said Friday that past election practices support her office’s decision to print a single ballot for November 02, 2010.

The state Republican Party and an independent legislative candidate have sued separately, demanding a separate ballot for the special U.S. Senate race.

The GOP petitioned Kanawha Circuit Court on Friday.

House of Delegates candidate Janet “J.T.“ Thompson filed her challenge Thursday with the state Supreme Court.

Tennant said a single ballot will save money and avoid voter confusion.

She also called the GOP’s filing “a frivolous and wasteful lawsuit, and politically motivated,“ adding that it could prevent military and other overseas voters from getting ballots on time.

The Republicans’ filing argues that the party would suffer “irreparable harm” if voters are allowed to vote a “straight ticket” in both the general election and U.S. Senate races.

That option allows voters to select candidates from the same party by making a single mark on the ballot.

Democrats outnumber Republicans in West Virginia by nearly 2-to-1.

Tennant, a Democrat, agreed with the GOP that the U.S. Senate election is separate from the regular general election - but also said that separate elections have previously appeared on the same ballot.

She cited municipal races showing up on a ballot with other races, with the entire ballot eligible for a straight party vote.

The June death of Senator Robert C. Byrd, D-WV, prompted the special election for that seat.

Tennant said there are already two other special elections on the ballot, for unexpired terms on the Supreme Court and in the 10th state Senate District. Each was also prompted by the incumbent’s death.

As for disenfranchising military voters, Tennant noted that the GOP lawsuit seeks to block the distribution of the single ballot.

The state election calendar has a Tuesday deadline for delivering absentee ballots to county officials, who then have until October 27, 2010 to mail them to voters.

Tennant alleged that state GOP Chairman Mike Stuart had recently called it unfair to print two ballots, given the price and recession-weakened revenues. She estimated a $1 million price tag for separate printing.

Thompson is acting as her own lawyer in her petition. The Supreme Court is slated to review it September 23, 2010, and has given Tennant’s office until Wednesday to respond.

Thompson has said she has also filed a complaint with the secretary of state over the ballot issue. The office does not acknowledge any complaints, citing state law, but has said that complaints against it would go to the attorney general. Such complaints would otherwise follow the normal process, and findings would not amount to an official legal opinion.

Doddridge Invitational

image

Doddridge Invitational - 09.14.2010
Doddridge County Park

                   
                   

 
Girls 5k Run CC Varsity
=======================================================================          
    Name                    Year School                  Finals  Points          
=======================================================================          
  1 Elena Romanek             10 Wheeling Par          21:46.70    1                 
 35 Jaccie Haugh               9 Ritchie Coun          26:58.20   28                       
 40 Jessica Jones             10 Gilmer Count          27:29.34   32                       
 43 Tonya Jones                9 Ritchie Coun          27:46.34   35             
 47 Keri Kniceley             11 Doddridge Co          28:22.50                  
 48 Becca Cokeley             10 Ritchie Coun          28:27.83   37             
 51 Anna Cokeley               9 Ritchie Coun          28:53.67   39             
 54 Lindsay Gregory           10 Gilmer Count          28:59.93   41             
 57 Samantha McCune            9 Gilmer Count          29:48.55   42             
 61 Miranda Britton            9 Ritchie Coun          30:12.34   45             
 62 Ariane Stough             11 Calhoun High School   30:30.52                  
 65 Hannah Roberts             9 Gilmer Count          30:52.38   47             
 72 Katelyn Shoulders         11 Lewis County          32:26.05                  
 74 Rachel Casteel             9 Doddridge Co          32:43.35                  
 85 Sommar Swisher            12 Clay Battelle High    36:56.28                  
 86 Morgan Allen              10 Gilmer Count          37:10.25   50             
 87 Sara Coombs                9 Gilmer Count          38:08.71   51             
 88 Jahni Harkelreoad            Gilmer Count          38:40.95   52             
                                                                                 
                                   Team Scores                                   
=================================================================================
Rank Team                      Total    1    2    3    4    5   *6   *7   *8   *9
=================================================================================
   1 Wheeling Park High School    24    1    2    4    8    9   17   31          
      Total Time:  1:54:12.07                                                    
         Average:    22:50.42                                                    
   2 Parkersburg South High Sc    65    3    7   11   15   29   36   44          
      Total Time:  2:01:49.72                                                    
         Average:    24:21.95                                                    
   3 Williamstown High School     66    5   10   13   18   20   22   26          
      Total Time:  2:02:10.33                                                    
         Average:    24:26.07                                                    
   4 Grafton High School         118   12   21   23   24   38   40   43          
      Total Time:  2:11:24.17                                                    
         Average:    26:16.84                                                    
   5 Buckhannon-Upshur           121   14   16   27   30   34   49               
      Total Time:  2:10:52.64                                                    
         Average:    26:10.53                                                    
   6 Liberty High School         129    6   19   25   33   46   48               
      Total Time:  2:13:13.82                                                    
         Average:    26:38.77                                                    
   7 Ritchie County High Schoo   184   28   35   37   39   45                    
      Total Time:  2:22:18.38                                                    
         Average:    28:27.68                                                    
   8 Gilmer County High School   212   32   41   42   47   50   51   52          
      Total Time:  2:34:20.45                                                    
         Average:    30:52.09                                                    
 
 
Boys 5k Run CC Varsity
====================================================================================
               Name                    Year School                  Finals  Points          
====================================================================================
    1   108  Drew Woodford               12  Grafton High School          17:45.17       
    2   154  Johnny Hogue                 9  Ritchie County High Schoo    18:14.46       
   14   152  Clinton Hardman             11  Ritchie County High Schoo    19:30.10       
   21    62  Caleb Cade                  12  Doddridge County High Sch    19:52.17       
   26    63  Daniel Clevenger            12  Doddridge County High Sch    20:02.35       
   38    56  Zachary Hanshaw             12  Calhoun High School          20:46.95       
   39    70  Daniel Plaugher             10  Doddridge County High Sch    20:47.34       
   40    72  Matt Zorn                   10  Doddridge County High Sch    20:50.15       
   41   155  Joshua James                11  Ritchie County High Schoo    20:57.38       
   52   149  Joseph Abramovich           12  Ritchie County High Schoo    21:49.24       
   53    67  Devin Leggett               10  Doddridge County High Sch    21:49.99       
   56    66  Anthony Jones                9  Doddridge County High Sch    22:02.38       
   64    65  Nathan Godby                 9  Doddridge County High Sch    22:27.36       
   71    71  Ian Spencer                 10  Doddridge County High Sch    22:50.19       
   76    61  Keith Britton               10  Doddridge County High Sch    22:59.78       
   82   112  Sean Minney                 12  Lewis County High School     23:13.21       
   92    97  Jacob Shreves               10  Gilmer County High School    23:47.23       
   96    99  Nick Williams                9  Gilmer County High School    23:51.73       
  102   153  Danny Harris                12  Ritchie County High Schoo    24:07.17       
  105   157  Dylan Skidmore               9  Ritchie County High Schoo    24:13.43       
  106    95  Richard Dorsey              10  Gilmer County High School    24:20.64       
  119   111  Adam James                  12  Lewis County High School     25:29.43       
  120    96  Conner Ferguson             10  Gilmer County High School    25:33.05       
  121   156  Jonathan Mason              10  Ritchie County High Schoo    25:39.85       
  122    57  Jeffery Hoskins             11  Calhoun High School          25:43.97       
  138   110  Cody Henderson              10  Lewis County High School     28:59.41       
  143   109  Jeffrey Flint               10  Lewis County High School     31:48.40        
  150   269  Cory Armstrong              11  Williamstown High School     ??:??.??
                                                                                 
                                   Team Scores                                   
=================================================================================
Rank Team                      Total    1    2    3    4    5   *6   *7   *8   *9
=================================================================================
   1 St. Marys High School        65    3    4    5   17   36   41   53          
      Total Time:  1:35:29.84                                                    
         Average:    19:05.97                                                    
   2 Wheeling Park High School    93    7   18   19   23   26   28   31          
      Total Time:  1:37:48.18                                                    
         Average:    19:33.64                                                    
   3 Grafton High School         102    1    9   20   29   43   54   61          
      Total Time:  1:37:54.87                                                    
         Average:    19:34.98                                                    
   4 Bridgeport High School      119    6   11   15   42   45   56   62          
      Total Time:  1:39:51.47                                                    
         Average:    19:58.30                                                    
   5 Parkersburg South High Sc   149   13   22   24   40   50   70               
      Total Time:  1:41:56.72                                                    
         Average:    20:23.35                                                    
   6 Doddridge County High Sch   170   21   25   37   38   49   52   60          
      Total Time:  1:43:06.51                                                    
         Average:    20:37.31                                                    
   7 Ritchie County High Schoo   184    2   14   39   48   81   83   89          
      Total Time:  1:43:54.71                                                    
         Average:    20:46.95                                                    
   8 Robert C Byrd High School   201    8   12   30   65   86   91               
      Total Time:  1:46:21.57                                                    
         Average:    21:16.32                                                    
   9 Williamstown High School    210   10   27   51   55   67   80   85          
      Total Time:  1:46:12.31                                                    
         Average:    21:14.47                                                    
  10 Buckhannon-Upshur           216   16   32   44   58   66   74   79          
      Total Time:  1:46:24.20                                                    
         Average:    21:16.84                                                    
  11 Tucker County High School   260   33   35   57   63   72   75   88          
      Total Time:  1:49:03.24                                                    
         Average:    21:48.65                                                    
  12 Wirt County High School     274   34   46   59   64   71   78   90          
      Total Time:  1:50:23.39                                                    
         Average:    22:04.68                                                    
  13 Lincoln High School         371   47   69   76   87   92                    
      Total Time:  2:01:32.45                                                    
         Average:    24:18.49                                                    
  14 South Harrison              384   68   73   77   82   84                    
      Total Time:  1:58:48.88                                                    
         Average:    23:45.78                                                    
 

Bon Appétit: Mediterranean Salmon with Spinach and Beans

image

Ingredients:
3/4 cup chopped red onion (1/2- 3/4 medium) 
1 tablespoon minced garlic (2-3 large cloves) 
2 teaspoons crumbled dried sage
2 teaspoons canola oil
1 can (15 1/2 ounces) no-salt-added cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
1/2 cup fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 cups baby spinach
2 teaspoons flaxseed oil
4 skinless salmon fillets (3 ounces each) 
red-pepper flakes

Directions:
Combine the onion, garlic, 1 1/2 teaspoons sage, and oil in a deep, wide skillet.
Cover and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes or until the onion starts to soften.
Add the beans, broth, and salt.
Simmer for about 10 minutes.
Stir the spinach into the beans and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes.
Stir the flaxseed oil into the bean mixture.
Remove the pan from the heat.
Rub the salmon fillets with the remaining sage. Heat the remaining oil in a medium skillet or grill pan.
Place the salmon fillets in the pan and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
Carefully turn each fillet and cook for 1 minute longer.
Remove the fillets to 4 plates.
Spoon the beans onto each plate.
Serve with the pepper flakes.

Click Below for additional Articles...

Page 1124 of 1430 pages « First  <  1122 1123 1124 1125 1126 >  Last »



MTS






Click on the Flags to See the Number of Unique Visitors Reading The Free Press The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXV The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved