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Public Notice: Vaccination of Dogs and Cats - June 10-11, 2016

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NOTICE TO PUBLIC

VACCINATION OF DOGS & CATS

Gilmer County Assessor, Gary L. Wolfe, would like to announce that William R Moodispaw, DVM, will be at the following named places on the dates listed below, to vaccinate dogs and cats AS REQUIRED BY WV CODE §19-20A-1.

All dogs and cats, which have reached SIX MONTHS OF AGE AND HAVE NOT BEEN VACCINATED WITHIN THE PAST 24 MONTHS, are required to be vaccinated before June 01, 2016.

The fee for rabies vaccination will be $8.00 according to WV Code §19-20A-1.

Due to Dr. Moodispaw’s schedule, he will only be at the following locations on the dates and times listed below:


FRIDAY June 10th

08:30 – 09:00 am Mouth of Jesse’s Run
09:15 – 10:00 a.m. Tanner
10:20 – 11:00 a.m. Heiney’s
11:45 – 12:30 p.m. Dawson’s Farm
12:45 – 01:30 p.m. Normantown
02:00 – 03:00 p.m. Cedarville


SATURDAY June 11th

08:00 – 09:00 a.m. Court House
09:15 – 10:00 a.m. Camden Flats
10:15 – 11:15 a.m. Sand Fork
11:30 – 12:05 p.m. Mouth of Ellis
12:30 – 01:00 p.m. Somerville Store
01:30 – 02:15 p.m. Troy School

Dog Flu Outbreak Sweeps Across the Midwest

The Gilmer Free Press

MADISON, WI — A canine flu outbreak has sickened many dogs in the Midwest, and veterinarians are cautioning pet owners to keep their dogs from going nose-to-nose with other four-legged friends.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s School of Veterinary Medicine says the virus has sickened at least 1,000 dogs in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio and Indiana. Recent tests from the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory have identified the strain as H3N2. Clinical assistant professor Keith Poulsen says it’s not yet known how effective current vaccines are against this strain, which is believed to have come from Asia.

He said an older strain, H3N8, has also been detected in the region.

Both viruses can cause persistent cough, runny nose and fever in dogs. Experts say a small percentage will develop more severe symptoms. The H3N2 infection has been associated with some deaths.

Poulsen said pet owners with sick dogs should call a veterinarian to schedule a test outside the veterinary clinic and should not bring dogs into areas where they could interact with other dogs.

“It’s really no different if you’re talking about dogs or toddlers, if you think they’re sick, don’t bring them to day care,“ Poulsen said.

Veterinarians say neither canine strain is related to bird flu or is contagious to humans, but the H3N2 strain could sicken cats.

Renee Brantner Shanesy, who owns the Ruffin’ It Resort in Madison, said the kennel required immunizations against H3N8 for all dogs boarded there late last week. Shanesy said she’s now recommending, not requiring, the vaccination after veterinarians said it won’t protect against H3N2.

“The philosophy we’re taking is, just like the human flu, everyone has to take the precaution for himself,“ she said.

Shanesy said she hasn’t seen panic among dog owners, but the kennel is increasing its sanitizing practices. She said she had her two dogs vaccinated and she has cut out trips to the dog park to reduce the risk of exposure.

“Like any other pet owner right now, I’m not 100 percent comfortable,“ Shanesy said. “Anything I can do to give them a better chance of immunity, I’m in.“

Sarah Duchemin, who works at The Dog Den in Madison, said the kennel has been monitoring its dogs for symptoms, and that if a dog shows up with a runny nose or is sneezing, the animal would be isolated and sent home. She said the kennel hasn’t had a dog show any flu symptoms yet, but it cleans its floors and cages every day to prevent the spread of disease.

Luanne Moede, owner of the First Class Pet Lodge in Wausau, told the Wausau Daily Herald that clients are being asked if dogs have traveled out of state. Moede also said she’s informing pet owners about the disease.

In Illinois, vets say the cases are slowing but are still coming in. Chicago resident Jennifer Roche’s mixed-breed dog, Roxy-Rocket, is recovering after coming down with canine flu while boarded at Tucker Pup’s Dog Activity Center last week while the family was away during spring break. Roche knew she was taking a risk by boarding the family pet during the outbreak, but she feels the facility handled it well when the dog began to cough.

“They got her to the vet right away and she was on antibiotics right away,“ Roche said. “It feels a lot like when my kids get the flu. ... I’m going to be watching her very closely when the antibiotics run out.“

FOUND NEUTERED MALE CORGI MIX

The Gilmer Free Press
FOUND NEUTERED MALE CORGI MIX ON WV HIGHWAY 33
NEAR LINN, WV (Gilmer County)

2/16 Male, neutered, Corgi or Corgi mix

Recent grooming and nails are recently cut as well

Well mannered, clearly someone’s household pet

304.462.4061

Would like to get him home ASAP!

9 Science-Backed Reasons To Own A Dog

1. Dogs Make Us Laugh

People who own dogs laugh more, according to a study published in the journal “Society & Animals.“ Researchers asked people who owned dogs, cats, both, or neither to record how often they laughed over the course of a day. Those who owned just dogs and both dogs and cats recorded laughing more than the other two groups.


2. Dogs Are Loyal

The origin of today’s domesticated house-dog reaches back to between 18,800 and and 32,100 years ago, when they evolved from wolves. Wolves are known for living in packs and developing strong bonds between pack members. It’s this pack behavior that’s what makes today’s dogs so loyal.

Stephen Zawistowski, a science advisor at the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, explains that dogs see their human owners as fellow members of their pack and, therefore, form the same close bond with their owners as they would with their canine brothers and sisters.

The Gilmer Free Press


3. We’re More Social With A Dog

In the UK, a team of scientist at the University of Liverpool and the University of Bristol, found that UK residents with dogs were more likely to encounter other dogs and dog-owners than people who did not own a dog. This makes sense since dog-owners are more likely to head out of the house on walks, and are more likely to run into other dog-owners on their own strolls.

Moreover, the average American is more likely to own a dog than the other common house pet, the cat. That’s more people to converse with about annoying dog hair, funny dog farts, and comforting dog cuddles.


4. Dogs Keep Us Healthy

Dogs might even protect us from poor health. Children born into households with a dog have a lower risk of developing asthma and allergies. The reason being dust.

A study published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences” last year showed that when exposed to dust from households where dogs were permitted inside and outside, mice developed an altered community of microbes in their gut that protect against allergens. They report that these microbes could be what’s protecting young children from developing allergens in households with dogs.


5. We’re More Active With Dogs

Obesity is a major concern today, so it’s important to get regular exercise. Researchers at Michigan State University reported in 2011 that 60% of dog owners who took their pet for regular walks met federal criteria for regular moderate or vigorous exercise.

Moreover, elderly who walk their dogs actually have a more regular exercise routine and are more physically fit than elderly who walk with other people, according to a study published in the Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services in 2010.


6. Dogs Save Lives

Dogs are not a cat’s best friend, but earlier this year, one lucky cat in Florida was saved by a blood transfusion from, you guessed it, a dog. Some dogs have a universal blood donor type, just like some humans, and when no cat blood was around for “Buttercup,“ the veterinarian used what was on hand, which reportedly saved the cat’s life.

Dogs can also help humans by acting as an early-warning-system for patients who suffer from seizures. Trained dogs can sense the onset of a seizure up to 15 minutes before it occurs and will bark when this happens, which then warns the patient to sit so to prevent injury from falling down, for example. How dogs know when a seizure is coming is still unknown.


7. Dogs Give Us A Sense Of Purpose

Dogs are great companions for anyone, but especially for the elderly. In a study published in the Journal of Social Psychology, elderly who owned a dog reported feeling more satisfied with their social, physical and emotional state than those without a dog.


8. Dogs Give Us Confidence

In another study, participants obtained a dog and were assessed after 10 months with their new canine companion. In general, the participants reported a higher sense of self-esteem, improved exercise habits, and less fear of crime.


9. Dogs Make Us Genuinely Happy

Just the simple act of making eye contact with your furry friend can release the feel-good chemical called oxytocin. In a study that measured oxytocin levels from two groups of dog owners, the group that were instructed not to look directly at their dog had lower oxytocin levels than the other group that made regular eye contact.

Another study found that dog owners who relied on their dogs for social fulfillment reported that “they were less depressed, less lonely, had higher self-esteem, were happier, and tended to experience less perceived stress.“


12.13.2014
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First Dog Jog in Weston

The Wellness Committee at Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital (SJMH) coordinated a 2K Thanksgiving Dog Jog on Sunday, November 23 , 2014 at 1:00 PM along the walking path at the Hospital.

The goal was to walk the ten laps around the track to provide the 2K for the walk.

Stacy Shaffer of the ED, and Julia Spelsberg, of Marketing coordinated the event.

The goal was to provide a great walking experience for people and pets.

It also provided a wonderful opportunity to show off the walking trail at SJMH.

The Gilmer Free Press
First place winner of the costume contest was Dora, the boxer,
who wore a “Mayflower.”
She is owned by Tina Mitchell and Greg Borowske, of Weston.



The Gilmer Free Press
Second place winner was Ginger, the golden retriever,
who came to the event as a ladybug.
She is owned by Judy Wyatt, of Weston.

Some of the other costumes were dogs as Santa Claus and in holiday sweaters as well as a set of dogs dressed as cows.

Hundreds of pounds of dog and cat food were donated for the Lewis-Upshur Shelter.

Dog Jog on Sunday, November 23, 2014 at SJMH

The Gilmer Free Press

When the Lewis County Wellness Council was created several months ago, the group decided that participating and publicizing a monthly walk/run would be important for the wellness of the community.

The annual spring Weston 5K provides an opportunity for owners to bring their canine pals to participate in the run.  However, the SJMH Wellness Committee thought that dogs needed their own event.

The Wellness Committee at SJMH is coordinating a 2K Dog Jog on Sunday, November 23 at 1 PM along the walking path at the Hospital.

Ten laps around the track will provide the 2K.

Stacy Shaffer, of the Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital (SJMH) Emergency Department, is a devoted volunteer at the Lewis Upshur Animal Shelter.

This past spring she created a fundraiser at the Hospital and was able to have hundreds of pounds of dog food and other animal needs.

Stacy is asking that participants donate dog and cat supplies for entry into the event.

There will be special prizes for each entrant and a grand prize for the best costumed dog or cat.

Public Notice: Vaccination of Dogs and Cats – 09.27.2014 - This Saturday

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NOTICE TO PUBLIC

VACCINATION OF DOGS & CATS

Gilmer County Assessor, Gary L. Wolfe, would like to announce that William R Moodispaw, DVM, will be at the Gilmer County Court House parking lot on Saturday, September 27, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM to vaccinate dogs and cats AS REQUIRED BY WV CODE §19-20A-1.

All dogs and cats, which have reached SIX MONTHS OF AGE AND HAVE NOT BEEN VACCINATED WITHIN THE PAST 24 MONTHS, are required to be vaccinated before June 01, 2015.

The fee for rabies vaccination will be $8.00 according to WV Code §19-20A-1.

        The fee for 7 way- $21.08

        The fee for Lyme - $25.21

Public Notice: Vaccination of Dogs and Cats – 09.23.2014

image

NOTICE TO PUBLIC

VACCINATION OF DOGS & CATS

Gilmer County Assessor, Gary L. Wolfe, would like to announce that William R Moodispaw, DVM, will be at the Gilmer County Court House parking lot on Saturday, September 27, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM to vaccinate dogs and cats AS REQUIRED BY WV CODE §19-20A-1.

All dogs and cats, which have reached SIX MONTHS OF AGE AND HAVE NOT BEEN VACCINATED WITHIN THE PAST 24 MONTHS, are required to be vaccinated before June 01, 2015.

The fee for rabies vaccination will be $8.00 according to WV Code §19-20A-1.

        The fee for 7 way- $21.08

        The fee for Lyme - $25.21

Public Notice: Vaccination of Dogs and Cats – 09.27.2014

image

NOTICE TO PUBLIC

VACCINATION OF DOGS & CATS

Gilmer County Assessor, Gary L. Wolfe, would like to announce that William R Moodispaw, DVM, will be at the Gilmer County Court House parking lot on Saturday, September 27, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM to vaccinate dogs and cats AS REQUIRED BY WV CODE §19-20A-1.

All dogs and cats, which have reached SIX MONTHS OF AGE AND HAVE NOT BEEN VACCINATED WITHIN THE PAST 24 MONTHS, are required to be vaccinated before June 01, 2015.

The fee for rabies vaccination will be $8.00 according to WV Code §19-20A-1.

        The fee for 7 way- $21.08

        The fee for Lyme - $25.21

BBB Warning Public of Online Puppy Scam

The Gilmer Free Press

The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about an online puppy shipping scam involving AirGate Delivery.

The BBB recently received a call from a West Virginia resident claiming she had spent $900 for a Great Dane puppy that was to be shipped to her before Labor Day, but she still has no puppy.

On August 24, the local resident answered an online ad for Great Dane Puppies on Oodle Marketplace. After receiving a confirmation email from Oodle, within 10 minutes, she received an email from the alleged dog seller. The ad stated the puppy was located in Maryland; however, through the email correspondence, the buyer was now being told the puppy was located in Oklahoma, so the puppy would need to be shipped. The seller advised they would use a local shipping agency called AirGate Delivery. The cost of the puppy plus shipping was $400.

The resident was instructed to buy a “Vanilla Card,” load the money on to it, and then give the seller the account numbers from the card. Once payment was received, arrangements were then made for the puppy to be delivered on Friday, August 29th at 10:30 PM. Right before the delivery date, another email was sent from AirGate Delivery requesting an additional $300 for pet insurance before the delivery could proceed. The buyer was instructed to send the money via MoneyGram to Cameroon.

The consumer then received a third additional email from AirGate on Saturday, August 30th, stating the puppy’s vaccination was wearing off due to the climate change and that the puppy needed a new vaccine and would also require a new crate to be transported in. If another vaccine was not administered the puppy would be quarantined for 6 months. The email asked for an additional fee of $680, but when buyer received a phone call from a foreign speaking person, she was told she could pay just $200 via MoneyGram, also to Cameroon.

The resident was assured that AirGate Delivery has a 100 percent refund policy and all of her money would be given back once the puppy arrived safely at her address.

The BBB did an online search of Airgate Delivery and is unable to locate a physical location for the company and it appears the website has been suspended. ripoffreport.com also has similar complaints listed from consumers who have been scammed.

Your BBB offers the following tips for online scams:

— Never use MoneyGram, Green Dot cards or wire transfers to send money for purchases. Paying with credit cards give you coverage from the credit card company for any disputes.

— Check with the BBB before dealing with an unknown company or seller.

— If something doesn’t seem right, trust your instincts.

— When in doubt, do a quick online search. If the organization is running a scam, you may find alerts or complaints from other consumers.

— Avoid high pressure decisions. Scammers want you to react before you can think.

Start With Trust. For reliable information, lists of BBB Accredited Businesses by industry and BBB Business Reviews you can trust on local businesses, visit www.bbb.org or call 1.800.362.0494.

For more information or to schedule an interview with a BBB spokesperson, contact Kimberly Thompson at 330.454.9401.

Found Dog on Sinking Creek Road near Glenville!

The Owner of the Dog Has the Dog Now

The Gilmer Free Press
Found dog on Sinking Creek Road near Glenville!

If this dog belongs to you or you know who his owner is

please contact 304.266.9487 for more information

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