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City of Glenville Police Report

The Gilmer Free Press
City of Glenville, WV Police Report
Crime/Ordinance Violation
Officer
Disposition
Location
Speeding Gadney Warnings Issued for Speeding, Unsigned Registration, and No Proof of Insurance W. Main Street
Speeding Gadney Warning W. Main Street
No Seatbelt Gadney Cited N. Lewis Street
Cell phone while driving Huffman Cited for Cell phone while driving and Warning Issued for Unsigned Registration College Street
Speeding Gadney Warning W. Main Street
Alarm investigation Huffman All doors were secure contacted key holder Sheridan Street
Driving while Suspended Huffman Cited Walnut Street
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Foodland plaza
Welfare Check Huffman Vehicle Left the area prior to my arrival US WY 33 E
MVC Huffman Vehicle left the area prior to my arrival phone pole minimal damage contacted phone company Mineral Road
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Sycamore Road
Assist Another Agency Huffman/Garrett Assisted GCSD/WVSP with an Escaped inmate. Suspect located. FCI Gilmer
Serve Warrants Huffman Suspect arrested for WV Parole Board Center Street
Wrongful Occupation Huffman Served with Wrongful Occupation Center Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Dog Barking Complaint Huffman Owners warned about the dog barking advised if the problem continued they could be cited S. Lewis Street
Trash Complaint Huffman No One home red tagged door for trash S. Lewis Street
Non Active Domestic Huffman Referred to WVSP due to being out of City Kanawha Street
Assist Another Agency Huffman/Garrett/Gadney Assisted WVSP and GCSD serving DVPO and making an arrest Kanawha Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Cell phone While Driving Gadney Cited N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning S. Lewis Street
Cell phone while driving Huffman Cited Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Gadney Cited College Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Failure to stop for stop sign Gadney Cited for Stop Sign Violation and Expired Registration Fairground Road
Stop Sign violation Gadney Cited Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning W. Main Street
Cell phone while driving Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Stop Sign Violation Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Cell phone while driving Gadney Cited Fairground Road
Speeding Gadney Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Gadney Cited W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Gadney Cited W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warnings Issued for Defective Equipment and Unsigned Registration card River Street
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Foodland Plaza
Tree in roadway Huffman Tree fell on power lines and was blocking roadway Mon Power contacted Pine Street
Shots fired Huffman No Shots were fired sound was tree falling onto power lines Pine Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Expired MVI Gadney Cited W. Main Street
Expired MVI Gadney Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Gadney Cited W. Main Street
Active domestic Gadney All Verbal parties were separated E. Main Street
Shoplifting Huffman Cited Go Mart
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Powell Street
Battery on a School Employee Huffman Investigation Started Gilmer Co High
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and No Seatbelt, Warning Issued for Unsigned Registration W. Main Street
No Seatbelt Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning College Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Driving without headlights Garrett Warning College Street
Illegal lighting Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning College Street
Speeding Huffman Warning College Street
Reckless driver Garrett Negative Contact WV HWY 5 E
Threats Garrett Caller advised didn’t want to file charges just wanted to let someone know Howard Street
Suicide Gadney Male Subject pronounced DOS Center Street
Stop Sign Violation Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Stop Sign Violation Gadney Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Gadney Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Gadney Cited for Speeding and failure to produce operators N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning S. Lewis Street
No MVI Gadney Cited for No MVI and Warnings issued for No Proof of Registration and Defective Equipment Fairground Road
Stop Sign Violation Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Speeding Gadney Cited N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Linn Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Serve Warrants Huffman Suspect arrested and transported to CRJ Magistrate Court
Threats Huffman Suspect left the scene prior to my arrival.  No Direct Threats were made to individuals at the restaurant.  Suspect was later located and advised he was not allowed to be on the property or would be arrested for Trespassing Corner Stone
Vehicle unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Gilmer Elementary
Trash Complaint Huffman Warning Issued and was told that he had to have all the trash cleaned up or would be cited N. Lewis Street
Motor Vehicle Crash Huffman No Report Completed subjects exchanged information Foodland
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Active Domestic Huffman/Garrett All verbal, no physical contact parties were separated Walnut Street
Large Altercation Huffman Altercation with approximately 30 people involved, fight was broken up and EMS made a transport to the hospital, attempted to locate suspects Powell Street/Go Mart
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Driving without headlights Gadney Cited E. Main Street
Speeding Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Red ribbon Week Presentation Huffman Assisted with a Drug awareness presentation Gilmer Elementary
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Assist CPS Huffman Assisted CPS with a referral Glenville
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Gilmer Co High
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and No Seatbelt, warnings Issued for Unsigned registration and failure to change address W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Active Domestic Huffman All Verbal parties separated E. Main  St
Reckless Driver Garrett Negative contact with the vehicle W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
MVC Garrett Accident Report Completed High St
MVC Gadney Accident Report Completed W. Main Street
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle unlocked Conrad Motel
Speeding Gadney Warning W. Main Street
Expired MVI Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Gadney Cited Mineral Road
Improper Registration Gadney Cited for Improper Registration and No Proof of Registration Mineral Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Mineral Road
Cell phone while Driving Gadney Cited Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning S. Lewis Street
Speeding Gadney Cited Mineral Road
Assist Another Agency Gadney Assisted WVSP with active Domestic Wabash Ave
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning Fairground Road
Speeding Gadney Cited N. Lewis Street
Improper Lighting Gadney Suspect arrested for DUI W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Gadney Cited W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Gadney Warning College Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings Issued for Speeding and Unsigned Registration College Street
Active Domestic Huffman 1 male and 1 female arrested for Domestic Battery Charges Mountaineer Mart
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Conrad Motel

Lowest Support for Death Penalty in Decades

The number of Americans who favor the death penalty continues to drop, with a new Gallup poll finding the level of support is at its lowest point since 1972.

The survey, which recorded 60 percent in favor of capital punishment last year, found support had declined to 55 percent this year, with that number dropping to 39 percent among Democrats. Kristin Collins, associate director of public information at the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, said society is beginning to understand that a death sentence isn’t always the worst punishment.

“Being against the death penalty doesn’t mean you’re against punishment for people who commit murder,” Collins said. “It means that you see that there are other equally effective - maybe more effective - ways to keep our society safe and to punish the worst crimes.“

The Free Press WV
West Virginia is one of a handful of states without the death penalty.
Support for capital punishment is at its lowest point since 1972.


West Virginia does not have the death penalty, but legislation is introduced each year to change that.

Critics of capital punishment point to examples of wrongful convictions and instances of mishandling of evidence. Supporters say it’s justified for the most heinous crimes.

According to the Death Penalty Information Center, death penalty cases cost almost twice as much as those where it is not sought. Collins said people are beginning to understand the cost of the death penalty to the criminal justice system in the form of time and money.

“There really couldn’t be a more inefficient way to punish crime,” she said. “Death penalty cases go through years, sometimes decades of appeals and we need those appeals because we have to make sure we don’t execute an innocent person.“

Collins added that with life without parole, the automatic appeals process isn’t triggered by the same mandates in the system that go with a death sentence, and there are fewer attorneys involved in the process - reducing the demand on the system.

~~  Dan Heyman ~~

Glenville State College Ranked Among Best Southern Regional and Online Colleges

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has been ranked as one of the top 13 regional colleges in the South according to U.S. News and World Report Best College Rankings. GSC was among only four other West Virginia higher education institutions ranked in the southern region.

According to U.S. News and World Report, the schools listed in the Best Regional Colleges assessment focus almost entirely on the undergraduate experience and offer a broad range of programs in the liberal arts and in fields such as business, nursing, and education.

Additionally, OnlineColleges.com ranked Glenville State College as 10th in online institutions in West Virginia. The ranking focused on many factors including the availability of online programs.

“We are constantly looking for ways to improve the campus, our course offerings, and the overall way we operate here at Glenville State College. Some of these ranking are indicators of our progressing improvements and others show us that we can still do more. We acknowledge our position in these rankings and also recognize the big things that are happening at Glenville State,” said GSC President Dr. Tracy L. Pellett. “This institution is home to very talented faculty and dedicated staff and a knowledgeable student body who are pursuing and achieving their own American dream. Here at Glenville State, we aim to prepare students for their next step. Whether that next step is obtaining a graduate-level degree, entering the workforce, starting a family, or serving their country or community, we know – and our alumni know – that there is no better place to start and achieve than at GSC.”

Study Finds Too Many WV Kids Growing Up in Poverty

The Free Press WV

A high proportion of West Virginia children are living in stubbornly persistent poverty, according to a major new study.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s “Race for Results” report looked at a variety of health, education, family stability and income data by state. In West Virginia, it said, a quarter of the state’s children were living in poverty in 2015 - the same percentage as in 2010.

Sam Hickman, executive director of the National Association of Social Workers, said research is finding that adverse childhood experiences - more common in poor homes - can limit a child for life. He said experts now can even predict some results of a hard childhood.

“Whether or not you will be divorced, whether or not you’ll be able to hold a job or become incarcerated,“ he said, “even to the point of how many medications you might be taking in your elder years.“

Hickman noted that West Virginia does a good job of providing health coverage to children; 97 percent now can access medical care when they need it. However, that progress is threatened by Congress’ failure to continue funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

According to the Race for Results report, nearly 70 percent of West Virginia’s Hispanic children and more than 70 percent of its African-American children live in households that struggle financially. Laura Speer, associate director for policy reform and advocacy at the Casey Foundation, said it would make sense to invest more in helping their families succeed.

“As they get older, these kids are going to drive local and state economies,“ she said. “They’re going to contribute to their communities, and they’re really going to be the driving force in ensuring that we’re all better off in the long run.“

Hickman said a state Earned Income Tax Credit would be an effective way West Virginia could help these families gain more financial stability. Too often, he said, poor families are blamed for being poor, when the real issue is a lack of resources.

“If we have the supports - the working environment, in terms of living wages and benefits - these are structural things that society can influence,“ he said. “It’s not personal failing across the board.“

The report is online at aecf.org/raceforresults.

Study: Climate Change Damaging Region’s Infrastructure

A new study from the Midwest Economic Policy Institute warns that climate change impacts could wreak havoc on transportation and infrastructure systems across the region.

Study author Mary Craighead said policymakers need to understand the potential costs and consequences of climate change, and added they need to be proactive to protect communities and the economy. According to the report, the average air temperature has increased by more than 4 degrees since the 1980s, and there’s been a 27 percent increase in the number of days of very heavy rain since the ‘50s.

“The higher temperatures and the stronger storms can reduce the lifespan of roads, bridges,” Craighead said. “They can cause railways to buckle. Flooding, obviously, is a huge issue that can impact the flow of traffic, the flow of freight, which can impact our economy.“

The Free Press WV
Flooding such last year’s in West Virginia probably will increase because of climate change and will cause more damage to infrastructure in the region, according to a new report.


Craighead said flooding will be a key issue.

She pointed out there has been an increase in power outages, adding that the Midwest is a net distributor of electricity to other regions. Floods, high winds, ice, snow and storms can damage facilities and above-ground transmission lines.

The study said national infrastructure needs are expected to top $2 trillion by 2025. It noted the state departments of transportation in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Minnesota have all pursued asset management programs to address climate change and assess vulnerabilities.

The report recommended limiting development in low-lying areas that already have experienced storm related damage, and updating heat and rainfall standards used in the project design process.

“It’s just going to keep getting worse,” Craighead said. “So it’s time we really need to stop debating it and start actually taking action and planning for it in the future so we don’t have to deal with the ramifications after the fact, we can actually plan for it ahead of time.“

Climate change deniers say such concerns are misplaced or exaggerated, but the consensus among scientists is that climate change is real and will have significant impacts.

~~  Dan Heyman ~~

GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES

The Free Press WV
GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES
September 04, 2017
7:00 PM

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Mayor Dennis Fitzpatrick with Council members Wiant, Huffman, and Fisher present. Councilmembers Taylor and Dean were absent.

Pledge of Allegiance

The Pledge of Allegiance was led by Kaydee and Lacie Martin.


I. Call to Order


II. Public

Certificates of Appreciation (Kaydee and Lacie Martin) - Kaydee and Lacie Martin were awarded a certificate of appreciation for recognition of 70 hours of volunteer service to the City of Glenville for planting and watering the flowers downtown.


A. Approval of Minutes – August 07, 2017

Minutes for the August 07, 2017, meeting were reviewed and placed on file for audit.


III. Reports

B. Financial

The book keeper was absent. Mayor Fitzpatrick provided the financial summary to council. He noted that the book keeper had initially paid the street paving costs from the proposal, however, the final cost for paving was approximately $38000, less than the amount reported at the August meeting, and has been paid. The budget is currently at 18.08% of fiscal year with revenue at 14.49% and expenditures at 16.42%. Councilwoman Huffman made a motion to approve the financial summary as presented. Councilman Fisher seconded the motion. Motion passed.

C. Street report

The street report was provided to council for review. Mayor Fitzpatrick noted that there was a large tree in an alleyway in Camden Flats. Cooks Tree Service has provided an estimate of $1100 for complete tree removal. Councilman Wiant made a motion to approve this tree removal at a total cost of $1100. Councilman Fisher seconded the motion. Motion passed.

D. Police

Chief Huffman provided the police report to council. He stated the new officer had 24 days remaining in the academy and is doing very well. He will be placed with a current officer for one week when he returns to duty and will then be released to work his shift. Chief requested council consider paying the $100 membership fee for the Chief of Police fees which provides discounts for training and the annual conference. Mayor Fitzpatrick agreed to pay this membership for Chief Huffman.

E. Glenville Utility

Mayor Fitzpatrick attended the August 23 meeting of the Utility Board. There were minor water leaks with a few minor sewer problems. He noted the annual audit began last week and will continue this week for both the Utility Board and City.

F. Recorder

Nothing to report.

G. Mayors Comments

- Recommendations to Library Board Daniel Smith and June Nonnenberg

Request to appoint Daniel Smith to the Library Board and reappoint June Nonnenberg for another term. Councilwoman Huffman made a motion to approve the appointment of Daniel Smith and reappointment of June Nonnenberg to the Library Board. Councilman Fisher seconded the motion. Motion passed.

- Update August Meetings (Mayor)

Attended the Board of Directors meeting for the WV Municipal League in August.

- City Cruiser

Applied for a grant for a new cruiser. Current cruiser has high mileage. The grant application was submitted last week.

- 2017 Municipal Fees have been invoiced

Municipal fees have been invoiced and have received several to date.

- $1100.00 to cut tree on Camden Flats (alley)

Covered under Financial Report

- Recap Congressman McKinley’s visit

Congressman McKinley recently visited Glenville. He worked with Mayor Fitzpatrick providing assistance with grant application for a new police cruiser by writing a letter of recommendation which was included in grant packet. They also talked about dredging of the river. Congressman McKinley noted the Army Corp of Engineers plan to dredge around the state this year.

- Explanation on paving amount

Covered under Financial Report

- 5K Glow Stick Run 22nd of September

A request for approval to hold a 5K Glow Stick Run on Friday, September 22 with the route beginning at the City Park, up Sycamore to Recreation Center, and return. The Fire Depart will provide assistance. The Glenville Pony League is also requesting to hold a 5K Run/Walk on November 4 with the same route. Councilman Fisher made a motion to approve both 5K runs. Councilman Wiant seconded the motion. Motion passed.

- GCHS Homecoming Parade October 6th (5:00 p.m.)

- GSC Homecoming Parade October 21st (10:00 a.m.)

Request received to have Homecoming Parade for Gilmer County High School on October 06 with the street blocked at 4:00 p.m. and Glenville State College on October 21 with the street blocked at 8:00 a.m. Councilwoman Huffman made a motion to approve the GCHS and GSC Homecoming parades. Councilman Fisher seconded the motion. Motion passed.


IV. Unfinished Business

None


V. New Business

None


VI. Other Business to come before Council

Councilwoman Huffman noted a culvert on Norris Road with trees coming into the road. Mayor Fitzpatrick will check and trim back the trees if possible.


VII. Next council meeting – October 02, 2017 at 7:00 p.m.


VIII. Adjourn

Meeting adjourned at 7:15 PM

New 4-H Office in Glenville

The Free Press WV

The Gilmer County Parks and Recreation are busy with upgrades and improvements to our facilities ever growing further use for our customers.

This will be the new home of the WVU 4-H office .

We were able to purchase one of the double wide from Gilmer County Board of Education this past September.

Thank you Gilmer County Board of Education for the purchase .

Help to make this project possible are the fine young men and women from Gilmer County’s High School Ag-Mechanics class under the direction of Mr. Nick Cox.

They started digging the footers last week and we hope to pour concrete on Tuesday .

Again thank you to both entity’s for your support for our community recreation center for without groups as yours we would have to dig a little harder to make this happen in the time frame given.

Thank you
Darrel Ramsey/Director

The Free Press WV

GCEDA Broadband Public Meeting Notice

The Free Press WV

As the lead economic development arm of the the Gilmer County Commission the GCEDA’s President Jeff Campbell provided the following information at last weeks County Commission meeting:

The Gilmer County Economic Development Association will be making an application, on behalf of the County, for a West Virginia Development Office Community Development Block Grant for Broadband Planning.

The WVDO has set aside $700,000 of funds for this year with grants due by October 31, 2017. 

A broadband planning grant for a county may be between the amounts of $50,000 to $75,000. 

The GCEDA has budgeted for the 2017 Fiscal Year - $10,000 to pursue a broadband grant/project a portion of which will be used for a consultant to handle the grant application and the remainder as a match on the grant to ensure we receive one. 

The majority of the county has negligible broadband, with the exception of those areas around the College or where Shentel has service. 

The planning grant would be used to create a engineering design for a wireless broadband project for Gilmer County, like Upshur/Randolphf/Barbour consortium.

The Upshur/Randolph/Barbour consortium was awarded a grant from the USDA for $3.0M for a fixed wireless solution which will serve 9,000 residents and businesses with between 10 and 100 megabyte downstream service from tower based wireless internet.

The application is currently underway with an initial public meeting on Wednesday, October 11th at 6:00 pm at the Glenville Inn. 

This is one of two mandatory meetings required by the CDBG process and will inform the public of the grant opportunity and take public comments. 

We would request all the Commissioners make the meeting if possible, but at least one attend. 

A second mandatory public meeting will be held on Wednesday, October 25th at 6:00 pm at the Glenville Inn where the application will be presented and further comments taken. 

Additionally the County Commission will need to adopt a Resolution at its second October meeting on October 20th in support of the grant application.


Respectfully,
Jeff Campbell
President GCEDA

City of Glenville Police Report

The Gilmer Free Press
City of Glenville, WV Police Report
Crime/Ordinance Violation
Officer
Disposition
Location
Speeding Garrett Cited N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Driving without headlights Garrett Warning S. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Assist another Agency Huffman Attempted to locate a stolen vehicle negative contact Glenville
Assist another Agency Huffman Subject disrupting other shoppers he was taken into custody at Probation officers request and drug tested Dollar General
Serve Warrants Huffman Subject Arrested and Transported to CRJ Magistrate Court
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Trespassing Huffman Subject arrested for Trespassing asked to leave Walnut Street
Vehicle unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Go Mart
Loose Dog Huffman Unable to locate River Street
Escort Huffman Escorted a Band into to town at Mayors Request Glenville
Suspicious Person Garrett Subject had left the area Howard Street
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning College Street
Speeding Huffman Cited College Street
Suicidal Tendencies Huffman Suspect refused medical treatment E. Main Street
Possible hostage situation Huffman Unable to locate the vehicle and was advised by Calhoun Control that wasn’t sure if the vehicle even came towards Gilmer County WV HWY 5 W
Failure to signal Huffman Warning Pine Street
Stop sign Violation Huffman Warning Pine Street
Suspicious Person Huffman Subject left the area prior to my arrival Calhoun Banks
Suspicious Person Huffman Spoke to subject and advised him he was making people very nervous and the that I had been advised they wanted him to leave Subject left the store Rite-Aid
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Stop Sign Violation Huffman Warning Walnut Street
Suspicious vehicle Huffman Driver was asleep, I spoke to the driver and she left the area Stadium Drive
Assist another agency Huffman Assisted with a Breaking and Entering WV HWY 5 W
Suspicious person Huffman Subject left the area upon my arrival Cornerstone
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning Mineral Road
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning Mineral Road
Shoplifting Huffman Cited for 1st offense shoplifting Go Mart
Speeding Garrett Cited for Driving suspended 1st offense S. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Cited for Speeding and Driving Suspended 1st offense College Street
Alarm Investigation Huffman Employee set off the alarm everything ok Library
Alarm Investigation Huffman All doors were secure United Bank
Assist another agency Huffman Assisted DNR, WVSP, GCSD with Active Domestic Right Ellis Rd
Stop Sign Violation Huffman Warnings for Stop Sign Violation and Unsigned Registration College Street
Trash Complaint Huffman Cited for Mandatory Trash Disposal Howard Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and No Proof of Insurance W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning College Street
No Seatbelt Huffman Cited College Street
Expired MVI Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for speeding and warning for No Proof of Registration W. Main Street
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked US WY 33W
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings Issued for Speeding, No Proof of Insurance, and Unsigned Registration W. Main Street
No Seatbelt Huffman Cited for no Seatbelt and Warnings Issued for Defective equipment, Failure to Signal, and Unsigned Registration E. Main Street
Cardiac Arrest Huffman Assisted EMS with a Cardiac Arrest Complex
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Motor Vehicle Crash Huffman Crash Report Completed 1 subject DOS and one subject transported to Stonewall Jackson Hospital WV HWY 5 E
Assist Another Agency Huffman Assisted WVSP with a suicide US HWY 33 E
Alarm Investigation Huffman Sherriff cleared the call prior to my arrival Calhoun Banks
Speeding Garrett Cited College Street
One Way Street Violation Huffman Cited Pine Street
One way Street Violation Huffman Cited for One Way Street Violation and No Proof of Insurance Pine Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and Warning Issued for Left of Center College Street
Altercation Garrett Neither party wished to file charges Beverly Drive
Assault Garrett CI Started Goodwin Hall
Child Neglect Huffman Suspect arrested on 2 counts of child Neglect Sheridan Street

West Virginia’s Fiscal Condition Ranks 42nd in Nation

The Free Press WV

The Mercatus Center at George Mason University recently released the findings from its 2017 state fiscal rankings study, ranking West Virginia 42nd in the nation for financial health based on five separate categories.

Eileen Norcross, author of the 2017 study and director for the state and local policy project at Mercatus Center at George Mason University, said she examined each state’s audited financial reports by looking at cash solvency, the ability to cover short-term bills; budget solvency, the ability to cover fiscal year spending with current revenues; long-run solvency, the ability to meet long term commitments and the ability to absorb a potential recession; service level solvency, the amount of “fiscal slack” available for additional citizen services; and trust fund solvency, the amount of unfunded pension and healthcare liabilities.

Norcross ranked West Virginia 28th in the nation strongest in terms of budget solvency, or the ability to cover current fiscal year spending with current revenues. This is the state’s biggest financial strength, according to the study.

“Revenues exceed expenses by 3 percent, and net position improved by $221 per capita in FY 2015,” the study said.

However, West Virginia ranks 46th in service-level solvency because state spending and revenues are relatively high compared with the percent of relative income of state residents, according to Norcross.

“Total primary government debt is $2.08 billion, or 3.1 percent of state personal income,” said Norcross in the study. “West Virginia has a relatively high level of revenues and expenses as a percent of state personal income.”

Norcross said the study could be helpful for state policy makers, and it could be a helpful tool while crafting future budgets.

Analyzing the numbers, Norcross said West Virginia needs to build up its rainy day fund.

“Although there was a healthy level in the past, there doesn’t appear to be a lot there currently,” Norcross said. “(Rainy day funds) should only drop down when there is a true emergency. States should make sure they have the discipline to put aside rainy day funds and only use it when needed.”

However, Norcross said West Virginia is relatively well off in the short term with a supportable level of current spending. She said the state performs better than average in terms of unfunded healthcare pensions and liabilities as well.

“The lessons from this year’s study demonstrate that policy makers should take stock of both their short- and long term fiscal health before making public policy decisions. The quality of financial reporting also plays a large role in what is known about the states’ fiscal health,” Norcross said. “These metrics, when used alongside other information, are intended to help policy makers identify trends in state finances and respond with policies to ensure short-run solvency and long-run fiscal stability.”

In its fourth year, the study composed by Norcross and Olivia Gonzalez, research associate of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, examines each state’s comprehensive annual financial report. Florida is currently ranked number one for national financial health, and New Jersey is ranked lowest.

“The authors’ goal is to shed light on a topic that matters to all of us, but which we are all too often in the dark on. This project is unique among them–an impartial, fully academic comparison of the financial numbers every state must report each year. Those numbers are typically useless to non-budget experts without being put in the right context. For example, with this report, West Virginia’s lower rank can give us policy direction for improving the fiscal condition of the state,” said Abbey Lovett, media relations associate at Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

West Virginia Ranks as Worst State for Business by CNBC

Business news channel CNBC released its ratings of the “top states for business” for this year, placing West Virginia at the bottom of the list.

The Mountain State ranked 50th for the first time in CNBC’s 11-year ranking system. Across 10 different categories, West Virginia ranked worse than 40th in six groups. This includes economy, where it placed last.

“The state is 1 of only 7 whose economies shrank in 2016,” journalist Scott Cohn said. “The decline in state GDP of 0.9 percent for the year was not the biggest in the nation, but West Virginia did not have much to lose.”

The rankings were determined by factors including economic output, infrastructure, economic growth, livability and educational opportunity and success. West Virginia scored 942 out of a possible 2,500 points.

The Free Press WV

Cohn said poor forecasts of coal mining hurt West Virginia’s ranking, adding the state is not ready to adapt to a dwindling coal production. He also noted how the Mountain State has the highest overdose death rate and the least-educated workforce in the United States

One report Cohn mentioned is from the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the West Virginia University College of Business and Economics. The analysis, “Coal Production in West Virginia: 2017-2040,” said coal production would increase over the next three years before declining to 80 million tons by 2030.

“The state is 1 of only 4 that lost jobs last year, down by nearly 1 percent,” Cohn said. “Once again, the clear culprit is coal. Mining employment is down 40 percent in just the past five years, with some parts of the state losing as many as 70 percent of their coal mining jobs.”

He also noted how the West Virginia Legislature passed a budget with higher education cuts, including 8 percent ($3.9 million) at Marshall University and more than 6 percent ($7.4 percent) at West Virginia University.

“Whether it provides a path for West Virginia out of the depths of our rankings remains to be seen,” Cohn wrote.

The legislative budget went into effect July 1 without the signature of Gov. Jim Justice.

“The West Virginia Legislature keeps twiddling their thumbs while our state continues to stay locked in an ‘economic death spiral,‘” Justice said in a statement.

“I had a real plan, a drug epidemic solution, and a pathway to hope and prosperity. Our Legislature did nothing except pass terrible pain and despair on to the backs of the poor, the disabled, and our middle class. The entire world gets it. WHY DON’T THEY?” (emphasis not added)

The top-five ranked states are Washington, Georgia, Minnesota, Texas and North Carolina. Washington had 1621 points, around 72 percent higher than West Virginia’s score.

~~  Alex Thomas ~~

WV Ranks 43rd Nationally in Kids’ Well-Being

The Free Press WV

West Virginia ranks 43rd in the country in terms of children’s well-being, according to the latest Kids Count report.

Last year, West Virginia ranked 39th. The year before that, the state ranked 43rd. And in 2014, West Virginia ranked 37th.

The data to judge children’s well-being is gathered annually by KidsCount, which is produced by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

West Virginia’s economic well-being rank is 42nd nationally, and its health rank is 36th. A rank indicating the state’s strength of family and community is 33rd.

Although the latest report was released in June, the data actually reflects what was happening through 2015, the most recent full year of statistics available.

West Virginia was worse than the national average in several indicators of child well-being.

Twenty-five percent of children in West Virginia live in poverty, compared to the 21 percent national average. West Virginia had the same percentage last year and has been around that same ratio several years in a row.

The raw number of West Virginia considered to be living in poverty is 94,000.

The percentage of children whose parents lack secure employment was 37 percent in West Virginia, compared to the national average of 29 percent.

West Virginia has a slightly higher than average percentage of children living in single-parent families. West Virginia’s rate is 38 percent. That’s compared to the national average of 35 percent.

West Virginia’s percentage of low-birthweight babies is 9.6 percent. The national average is 8.1 percent.

“Babies born with a low birthweight have a high probability of experiencing developmental problems and short- and long-term disabilities and are at greater risk of dying within the first year of life,” according to Kids Count.

“Smoking, poor nutrition, poverty, stress, infections and violence can increase the risk of a baby being born with a low birthweight.”

West Virginia’s child and teen death rate is 29 per 100,000. That’s a bit lower than other years of the recent past. The national average is 25 out of 100,000. Kids Count notes that accidents, particularly vehicle accidents, are the leading cause of death for youth.

In some areas, West Virginia did better than the national average.

The children living in households with a high housing cost burden was 22 percent in West Virginia, compared to 33 percent for the nation.

Compared to the national average, West Virgnia’s poverty is spread out. Kids Count says 9 percent of West Virginia children live in communities of concentrated poverty. The national average is 14 percent.

“Concentrated poverty puts whole neighborhoods, and the people living in them, at risk. High-poverty neighborhoods are much more likely than others to have high rates of crime and violence, physical and mental health issues, unemployment and other problems,” according to Kids Count.

~~  Brad McElhinny ~~

2018 State Historic Preservation Annual Work Program

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Division of Culture and History announces the proposed Annual Work Program for the 2017-2018 Historic Preservation Program is now available for review and comment.

The work program describes the activities and programs the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) will undertake as part of its continuing efforts to assist communities and residents of the state in preserving the physical evidence of our history.

A copy of the proposed work program may be requested by contacting Pamela Brooks, SHPO grants coordinator, The Culture Center, 1900 Kanawha Blvd, E., Charleston, WV 25305-0300.

The plan also can be reviewed and accessed on the division’s web page HERE .

Persons reviewing the program document may submit comments by completing a Work Program comment form, and mailing it to the address above or emailing . The deadline for public comment is August 31, 2017.

For more information, contact Brooks at 304.558.0240.

ICYMI™: Gilmer County’s 2016 Drinking Water Quality Report

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

What is the quality of your drinking water?

What are new developments and initiatives conducted by the Gilmer County Public Service District?

Where does your water come from?

How is it treated?

The answers to these questions and more are included in the 2016 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, the latest report issued by GCPSD.

Click HERE to review and print the report.

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