GilmerFreePress.net

Garden

Garden

Ceremony Held to Break Ground on Greenhouse at GSC

 

On Friday, November 04, 2016 Glenville State College broke ground on the newest addition to its campus facilities, a greenhouse. The new space will be located in the open area behind college housing and adjacent to the Waco Center on the College’s Mineral Road Campus.

When it is completed, the greenhouse will serve many functions for the college and community including a research site for Science and Mathematics and Land Resources Department faculty and students, a location for activities sponsored by GSC’s Environmental Club, a site for students to experience the operation of a greenhouse/high tunnel, and a place for community engagement by Land Resources and Biology faculty members.

The Free Press WV
Tom Snyder (GSC Land Resources Department Instructional Assistant),
Walt Helmick (WV Agriculture Commissioner),
Dr. Milan Vavrek (GSC Vice President for Academic Affairs),
Tom Ratliff (GSC Physical Plant Director,
Dr. Rico Gazal (GSC Land Resources Department Chair), and
Dr. Gary Morris (GSC Science and Mathematics Department Chair)
turn soil at the groundbreaking ceremony


The West Virginia Department of Agriculture provided $6,300 in funding to Glenville State College to complete the project and Agriculture Commissioner Walt Helmick was on hand at the ceremony.

“Providing opportunities like this helps engage people in the agriculture industry. This project will give a great opportunity for Glenville and the students at Glenville State College and we’re happy to be an integral part of it,” said Helmick. “Glenville joins a large number of state schools from primary level upward that we have helped with high tunnels, which we see as a critical technology for moving West Virginia agriculture into the future,” he added.

The Free Press WV
Walt Helmick, WV Department of Agriculture Commissioner,
speaks at the groundbreaking ceremony


“We are appreciative of the support that the Commissioner is providing to this project at Glenville State College. Many of our students, faculty, and staff on campus look forward to being able to make full use of this greenhouse when it is completed,” said GSC President Dr. Peter Barr.

A timeline for construction of the greenhouse has not yet been specified.

High Tunnel to Be Constructed at the New Gilmer Elementary Grade School Becomes a Reality

The beginning of this year, Mr. Louis Aspey, State Conservationist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) notified the 14 Conservation Districts in WV that each district would be receiving $5,000 to develop School Community Gardens in their counties.  Schools had to submit a proposal for the grant and each district would select a school to receive the grant.

Gilmer County Elementary principal, Toni Bishop, submitted a proposal to the West Fork Conservation District for a High Tunnel and was awarded the $5,000 grant. The High Tunnel will provide an educational opportunity for students on agricultural production, food nutrition, and conservation education and other topics.

The Free Press WV
(L-R) Phil Osborne, Conservation Supervisor for Harrison County, Bill Coffindaffer, Chairman of West Fork Conservation District, Tom Radcliff, Gilmer County Board of Education, Jane Collins, Conservation Supervisor for Gilmer County, Carl Amour, Gilmer County Board of Education, Walt Helmick, WV Commissioner of Agriculture, Mr. Devono, Superintendent of Gilmer County Schools, Toni Bishop, Principal, Larry Sponaugle, Conservation Supervisor for Gilmer County, Louis Aspey, State Conservationist with USDA, Brian Farkas, State Conservation Agency Executive Director.


The goal for the project was finding an innovative way to bring conservation education to the classroom through a fun hands-on-activity that also could provide fresh produce to local schools. The total cost of the project was $9,000.

The grant was a start but it would not cover all the expense involved in constructing a high tunnel.  A partner needed to be secured in order to get this project completed.

Conservation Supervisors for Gilmer County, Larry Sponaugle and Jane Collins contacted The Department of Agriculture office in hopes of securing more funding to get the project completed.

The proposal for a high tunnel was explained to Ag. Commissioner Walt Helmick, who was excited to become a partner in the financing of this project and on June 06, 2016, Mr. Helmick traveled to Gilmer County and presented an additional $4,000 for the completion of the High Tunnel.

With the additional funding on this project from Mr. Helmick it has made the completion of this high tunnel a reality.  Many thanks to AG Commissioner Walt Helmick for helping compete this project for Gilmer County.

 

Glenville: Gilmer County Farmers’ Market - Today

The Free Press WV

The Gilmer County Farmers Market is open every Saturday from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM at the Gilmer County Senior Citizens pavilion in Glenville, WV.

Lots of vendors are set up with plants and some vegetables are now available,  baked goods, honey, jelly and jams, fresh farm eggs, and much more.

Come out and see what our Farmers Market has to offer.

Kids’ Day at Gilmer county Farmers’ Market - Today

The Free Press WV

High Tunnel Educational Dinner

The Free Press WV

The Gilmer County Farm Bureau and the Wes-Mon-Ty Soil Conservation District sponsored an educational dinner meeting on Thursday, December 03, 2015 at the Gilmer County Recreation Center beginning at 6:00 p.m.
The topic presented was High Tunnels and was conducted by Joseph Hatton from USDA/NRCS office in Morgantown.
Does fresh vegetables ever come to mind when thinking about winter? No? High tunnels make winter gardens not only possible, but remarkably uncomplicated to manage.

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV


Hatton, also an owner of a sustainable farm, helped interested Gilmer County residents understand what all is involved in high tunnel gardening.
“So the plants go in high tunnels, and I have one high tunnel,” Hatton said.
The high tunnel, at his farm consists of a frame and plastic covering. The covering keeps cold winds out, while letting the sun come in and nourish the many different crops.
“I grow some winter vegetables,” Hatton said. “Basically, you start them in September or a couple weeks before, and then if they are in a high tunnel structure … that’s enough protection that they do not freeze or really go through a cold spell.”

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV


Some crops are less delicate.
“Broccoli and cabbage will go through a couple frosts, and they are fine, but they can’t freeze. They do need some kind of protection over them,” he said.
Hatton said greens are a big part of the winter crops.
PVC pipes, clamps and plastic covers are all that is needed to make a low tunnel hoop house.
Hatton said West Virginia’s sun is strong, some winter days the plastic may need to be removed so the plants do not get too hot.

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV


“You’re going to need a little bit of something else at night time,” he said. “The plastic is good to keep it warm when the sun is out, but it has no insulating properties when the sun goes down.”
If the garden is small enough, Hatton said a sheet can be thrown over the top to keep the plants warm at night.
“There’s a difference between cold-season crops and warm-season crops,” he said.

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV


Warm-season crops are vegetables like eggplants and peppers, which originated south of the equator. Cold-season crops are mostly greens, originating north of the equator.
Hatton pointed out a lot of advantages about growing during the winter.
“West Virginia is just at the perfect climate for a high tunnel because we have sunny days that aren’t very cold,” he said.
Hatton added that he prefers winter farming because there is no excessive heat and very few fungal and insect problems.

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

Variety of Oaks Available from West Virginia State Tree Nursery

Few trees are as versatile and resilient as the mighty oak. Oaks come in a variety of species and sizes from the massive white oak with its majestic crown and high-quality lumber to the relatively small-growing English oak, a prolific acorn producer.

Clements State Tree Nursery, West Virginia’s only forest tree nursery, has six species of oak available this year for planting in spring of 2015. All trees are bare-root seedlings and are 1-2 years old. Seedlings are sold in bundles of 25. Prices depend on the number of seedlings ordered, and there is a 30% discount offered on orders of 5,000 or more. The nursery will accept orders through April 30, 2015.

Please note, because all oak species listed below grow to a mature height taller than 25-30 feet, they should never be planted under or near utility lines.

The Gilmer Free Press


White oak reaches a height of 100 feet or more. The white oak’s leaves turn red or brown in autumn and often stay attached to the tree in winter. It is a slow-growing tree and one of the most valuable timber trees in the state. White oak acorns are excellent mast for livestock and wildlife.

The red oak has a rounded crown that turns an eye-catching shade of red in the fall. Great as a shade or ornamental tree, red oak also is of commercial value and its wood is used in furniture, flooring, crossties and fence posts. Red oaks grow 75-100 feet tall.

Chestnut, Chinkapin and sawtooth oaks are medium-sized trees. Chestnut oaks grow 60 to 90 feet tall and are great for planting on rocky ridges. Chestnut oak lumber is used to make crossties and fence posts. Chinkapin oaks grow to a height of 70 to 80 feet and are highly valued for their excellent acorn production. Sawtooth oaks grow to heights of 40 to 60 feet and have a pyramidal shape.

English oak is a relatively small oak, usually growing 30-40 feet in height and width. It is an excellent acorn producer and likes well-drained soil and full sun.

Order online at www.wvcommerce.org/ClementsNursery or call 304.675.1820.

STRAWBERRY GROWERS NEEDED FOR FESTIVAL MARKET 2015

The Gilmer Free Press


Fresh, local strawberries are needed for this year’s West Virginia Strawberry Festival to stock a “Strawberry Market” planned for the May 09-17, 2015, event.

The Strawberry Festival board, the City of Buckhannon and the West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) are working cooperatively with private farmers to have local berries for sale at locations throughout West Virginia’s “strawberry city.”

“This great festival is an excellent opportunity for local farmers to benefit from the visitors that pour into Upshur County each May,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Walt Helmick. “But like the other tremendous food-related opportunities in our state, we need more growers to become involved.”

While local growers have continued to produce small amounts of berries for the traditional strawberry auction and other festival events, retail sales of West Virginia berries has been nearly non-existent for decades. At one time, the area grew a surplus of strawberries that were shipped out of state following the festival. One undated historical report in the archives of the Upshur County Historical Society notes that more than 1,500 gallons of berries were shipped to Pittsburgh. It also said that farmers would be supplying cherries, raspberries and currants “later in the season.” But over the years, that supply was replaced by berries from large-scale, out-of-state producers.

However, local berries made a reappearance in 2014. WVDA project coordinator Buddy Davidson said that the few berries provided by state growers sold well last year.

“We sold 200 pints of berries at quite a premium over farmers’ market prices, and that was only at one location and only over two days,” Davidson said. “I think we can duplicate that number at three or four other locations in Buckhannon.”

He noted that the timing of the festival has been problematic for growers, who have had a difficult time having berries ripe in mid-May. The increasing prevalence of high tunnels – low-cost, unheated greenhouse-type structures – makes fresh berries in mid-May a more practical proposition than in past years. In fact, many farmers report using the tunnels to grow some types of produce year-round.

He noted that the WVDA will be able to purchase berries up-front as a way of simplifying the financial aspects of the project. Berries will be then be priced to recoup the price paid to growers, with a little bit left over to donate to the Upshur County FFA club for helping with the sale.

“We serve two goals with this project,” said Davidson. “One is to help farmers take direct advantage of the pricing opportunity they have with a large, popular namesake festival. The other is to educate high school students about agriculture and business, and steer some of them to become food producers in the future.

The age of the average farmer in West Virginia and the U.S. continues to climb and few young people see farming as a viable career option, but it is, he noted.

“People will always need to eat and more and more, they prefer to eat food produced close to where they live,” Davidson said.

For more information, contact WVDA Communications Officer Buddy Davidson at 304.558.3708, 304.541.5932 (cell), or .

Annual Berry Plant Sale Deadline Line Extended Until This Friday, February 27, 2015

The Gilmer Free Press

Gilmer County Farm Bureau and WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County will once again be placing a bulk order for berry plants.

The berry plants that are available this year will be strawberries, blackberries, raspberries (both red and black), and blueberries.

We will also be offering asparagus roots.

If you would like to improve your garden by adding one or more of these berry plants contact the WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County at 304.462.7061, of the Calhoun Office at 304.354.6332, and we will mail you an order form.

Orders and payment is due by February 27, 2015, at the close of business, 4:00 PM. 

Once plants arrive all participants will be called and plants will need to be picked up within 5 days.

Do not miss out on this opportunity to add some fresh berries to your future family meals.

Annual Berry Plant Sale Deadline Line Extended until Friday, February 27, 2015

The Gilmer Free Press

Gilmer County Farm Bureau and WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County will once again be placing a bulk order for berry plants.

The berry plants that are available this year will be strawberries, blackberries, raspberries (both red and black), and blueberries.

We will also be offering asparagus roots.

If you would like to improve your garden by adding one or more of these berry plants contact the WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County at 304.462.7061, of the Calhoun Office at 304.354.6332, and we will mail you an order form.

Orders and payment is due by February 27, 2015, at the close of business, 4:00 PM. 

Once plants arrive all participants will be called and plants will need to be picked up within 5 days.

Do not miss out on this opportunity to add some fresh berries to your future family meals.

Taking Orders Now for Annual Berry Plant Sale - Order by 02.22.15

The Gilmer Free Press

Gilmer County Farm Bureau and WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County will once again be placing a bulk order for berry plants.

The berry plants that are available this year will be strawberries, blackberries, raspberries (both red and black), and blueberries.

We will also be offering asparagus roots.

If you would like to improve your garden by adding one or more of these berry plants contact the WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County at 304.462.7061, and we will mail you an order form.

Orders and payment is due by February 22, 2015, at the close of business, 4:00 PM. 

Once plants arrive all participants will be called and plants will need to be picked up within 5 days.

Do not miss out on this opportunity to add some fresh berries to your future family meals.

STRAWBERRY GROWERS NEEDED FOR FESTIVAL MARKET 2015

The Gilmer Free Press


Fresh, local strawberries are needed for this year’s West Virginia Strawberry Festival to stock a “Strawberry Market” planned for the May 09-17, 2015, event.

The Strawberry Festival board, the City of Buckhannon and the West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) are working cooperatively with private farmers to have local berries for sale at locations throughout West Virginia’s “strawberry city.”

“This great festival is an excellent opportunity for local farmers to benefit from the visitors that pour into Upshur County each May,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Walt Helmick. “But like the other tremendous food-related opportunities in our state, we need more growers to become involved.”

While local growers have continued to produce small amounts of berries for the traditional strawberry auction and other festival events, retail sales of West Virginia berries has been nearly non-existent for decades. At one time, the area grew a surplus of strawberries that were shipped out of state following the festival. One undated historical report in the archives of the Upshur County Historical Society notes that more than 1,500 gallons of berries were shipped to Pittsburgh. It also said that farmers would be supplying cherries, raspberries and currants “later in the season.” But over the years, that supply was replaced by berries from large-scale, out-of-state producers.

However, local berries made a reappearance in 2014. WVDA project coordinator Buddy Davidson said that the few berries provided by state growers sold well last year.

“We sold 200 pints of berries at quite a premium over farmers’ market prices, and that was only at one location and only over two days,” Davidson said. “I think we can duplicate that number at three or four other locations in Buckhannon.”

He noted that the timing of the festival has been problematic for growers, who have had a difficult time having berries ripe in mid-May. The increasing prevalence of high tunnels – low-cost, unheated greenhouse-type structures – makes fresh berries in mid-May a more practical proposition than in past years. In fact, many farmers report using the tunnels to grow some types of produce year-round.

He noted that the WVDA will be able to purchase berries up-front as a way of simplifying the financial aspects of the project. Berries will be then be priced to recoup the price paid to growers, with a little bit left over to donate to the Upshur County FFA club for helping with the sale.

“We serve two goals with this project,” said Davidson. “One is to help farmers take direct advantage of the pricing opportunity they have with a large, popular namesake festival. The other is to educate high school students about agriculture and business, and steer some of them to become food producers in the future.

The age of the average farmer in West Virginia and the U.S. continues to climb and few young people see farming as a viable career option, but it is, he noted.

“People will always need to eat and more and more, they prefer to eat food produced close to where they live,” Davidson said.

For more information, contact WVDA Communications Officer Buddy Davidson at 304.558.3708, 304.541.5932 (cell), or .

Plan for Abundance with the WVU Extension Service 2015 Garden Calendar

Plan your garden from the ground up with the 2015 Garden Calendar from the West Virginia University Extension Service, available now at the Gilmer County Office!

The new calendar’s theme is Planning for Abundance, with a focus on helping you get the most from your garden.

Articles by WVU Extension experts range from deciding what to grow and how large a garden to plant, to garden location and soil preparation.

The Gilmer Free Press


Learn to effectively tend your garden, harvest when crops are at their tastiest and preserve your harvest so you and your family can enjoy the flavors – and health benefits – of your garden all year-round.

“The garden calendar is one of the most popular pieces we produce each year,” said Steve Bonanno, WVU Extension Service interim director.

“Whether it’s your first time planting or you’re a perennial gardener, our faculty agents and specialists provide tips and techniques to help ensure your garden is a success.”

As always, there is “by the date” garden information to remind you when certain gardening chores should be done.

There’s also a bonus article introducing two uncommon vegetables you can try this gardening season and the latest planning zone map.

The free 2015 WVU Extension Service Garden Calendar is available at the WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County Office and at local businesses around town while supplies last.

You can also download the calendar information and other gardening resources online at www.anr.ext.wvu.edu/garden_calendar.

Plan for Abundance with the WVU Extension Service 2015 Garden Calendar

Plan your garden from the ground up with the 2015 Garden Calendar from the West Virginia University Extension Service, available now at the Gilmer County Office!

The new calendar’s theme is Planning for Abundance, with a focus on helping you get the most from your garden.

Articles by WVU Extension experts range from deciding what to grow and how large a garden to plant, to garden location and soil preparation.

The Gilmer Free Press


Learn to effectively tend your garden, harvest when crops are at their tastiest and preserve your harvest so you and your family can enjoy the flavors – and health benefits – of your garden all year-round.

“The garden calendar is one of the most popular pieces we produce each year,” said Steve Bonanno, WVU Extension Service interim director.

“Whether it’s your first time planting or you’re a perennial gardener, our faculty agents and specialists provide tips and techniques to help ensure your garden is a success.”

As always, there is “by the date” garden information to remind you when certain gardening chores should be done.

There’s also a bonus article introducing two uncommon vegetables you can try this gardening season and the latest planning zone map.

The free 2015 WVU Extension Service Garden Calendar is available at the WVU Extension Service- Gilmer County Office and at local businesses around town while supplies last.

You can also download the calendar information and other gardening resources online at www.anr.ext.wvu.edu/garden_calendar.

Glenville: Gilmer County Farmers’ Market - Saturday, July 12, 2014 - Today

image

The Gilmer County Farmers Market is open every Saturday from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM at the Gilmer County Senior Citizens pavilion in Glenville, WV.

Lots of vendors are set up with vegetable and flower plants and some vegetables are now available, fresh lamb meat,  baked goods, honey, jelly and jams, fresh farm eggs, lunch is available, and much more.

Come out and see what our Farmers Market has to offer.

Gilmer County Farmers’ Market - Saturday, 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM - 06.07.14

The Gilmer Free Press

The Farmers’ Market is open this Saturday from 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM.

Vendors are scheduled to sell hot food each weekend.

Gil’s Pit Beef is a family owned business that plans to open in Glenville.

They will be preparing fresh pit beef sandwiches so come on out, taste something new and take home some local grown produce or handmade crafts!

Click Below for additional Articles...

Page 1 of 18 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »





The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVII The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved