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History | WayBackWhen™

History, WayBackWhen™

Flashback: What Happened on June 26, ....

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•  1868 The governor approved an act authorizing Elliot Deem to construct a wharf on the south side of the Little Kanawha River opposite Parkersburg.

•  1942 Governor Mathew Neely, State Superintendent of Black Schools D. T. Murray, and West Virginia State College President John Warren Davis dedicated Camp Washington-Carver in Fayette County as the State Black 4-H Camp.

•  1973 WNST - AM radio went on the air, the first radio station in Milton, Cabell County.

•  1974 Twenty-seven Kanawha County ministers announced their opposition to the supplemental textbooks involved in controversy. That same day, the West Virginia Human Rights Commission endorsed the books.

•  1989 Following a request from the National Labor Relations Board, Judge Dennis Knapp of the Southern West Virginia Federal Court issued a restraining order, requiring all striking UMW miners back to work.

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™: June 26

Today is Thursday, June 26, the 177th day of 2014. There are 188 days left in the year.


Thought for Today: “Nothing is improbable until it moves into the past tense.“ — George Ade, American writer (1866-1944).


Today’s Highlight in History:

The Gilmer Free Press

On June 26, 1974, the supermarket price scanner made its debut in Troy, Ohio, as a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum costing 67 cents and bearing a Uniform Product Code (UPC) was scanned by Marsh Supermarket cashier Sharon Buchanan for customer Clyde Dawson. (The barcoded package of never-chewed gum is on display at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.)


On this date:

In 1483, Richard III began his reign as King of England (he was crowned the following month at Westminster Abbey).

In 1870, the first section of Atlantic City, New Jersey’s Boardwalk was opened to the public.

In 1915, following a whirlwind courtship, poet T.S. Eliot married Vivienne Haigh-Wood in London. (The marriage proved disastrous, but the couple never divorced.)

In 1925, Charlie Chaplin’s classic comedy “The Gold Rush” premiered at Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood.

In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was nominated for a second term of office by delegates to the Democratic national convention in Philadelphia.

In 1944, the Republican national convention opened in Chicago with a keynote speech by California Governor Earl Warren. In an unusual Major League Baseball experiment, the New York Giants, Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees played a three-way (or “tri-cornered”) exhibition game at the Polo Grounds to benefit war bonds. (Final score: Dodgers 5, Yankees 1, Giants 0.)

In 1945, the charter of the United Nations was signed by 50 countries in San Francisco.

In 1950, President Harry S. Truman authorized the Air Force and Navy to enter the Korean War.

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy visited West Berlin, where he delivered his famous speech expressing solidarity with the city’s residents, declaring: “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner).

In 1973, former White House counsel John W. Dean told the Senate Watergate Committee about an “enemies list” kept by the Nixon White House.

In 1988, three people were killed when a new Airbus A320 jetliner carrying more than 130 people crashed into a forest during a demonstration at an air show in Mulhouse (muh-LOOZ’), France.

In 1989, the Supreme Court ruled the death penalty may be imposed for murderers who committed their crimes as young as age 16, and for mentally retarded killers as well.


Ten years ago:

President George W. Bush won support from the 25-nation European Union for an initial agreement to help train Iraq’s armed forces.

A memorial service was held in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, for Paul M. Johnson Jr., an engineer slain by kidnappers in Saudi Arabia.


Five years ago:

Los Angeles County medical examiners performed an autopsy on the remains of pop star Michael Jackson a day following his death at age 50.

The Democratic-controlled House passed a global warming measure 219-212 following intense lobbying by President Barack Obama.

A federal judge in New York ordered disgraced financier Bernard Madoff stripped of all his possessions under a $171 billion forfeiture order.


One year ago:

In deciding its first cases on the issue, the U.S. Supreme Court gave the nation’s legally married gay couples equal federal footing with all other married Americans and also cleared the way for same-sex marriages to resume in California.

New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez was arrested and charged with murder in the shooting death of Odin Lloyd; less than two hours after the arrest, the Patriots announced they had cut Hernandez.

Seven-time champion Roger Federer was stunned by 116th-ranked Sergiy Stakhovsky in the second round of Wimbledon, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (5), 7-5, 7-6 (5); third-seeded Maria Sharapova was knocked out by the 131st-ranked qualifier, losing 6-3, 6-4 to Michelle Larcher de Brito of Portugal.

The state of Texas executed Kimberly McCarthy, 52, for the 1997 robbery, beating and fatal stabbing of her neighbor, Dorothy Booth, a 71-year-old retired college psychology professor.

Belgian-born financier Marc Rich, 78, pardoned by President Bill Clinton after being indicted for fraud, racketeering and tax evasion, died in Lucerne, Switzerland.


Today’s Birthdays:

Jazz musician-film composer Dave Grusin is 80

Actor Josef Sommer is 80

Singer Billy Davis Jr. is 74

Rock singer Georgie Fame is 71

Actor Clive Francis is 68

Rhythm-and-blues singer Brenda Holloway is 68

Actor Michael Paul Chan is 64

Actor Robert Davi is 63

Singer-musician Mick Jones is 59

Actor Gedde Watanabe is 59

Rock singer Chris Isaak is 58

Rock singer Patty Smyth is 57

Singer Terri Nunn (Berlin) is 53

U.S. Bicycling Hall of Famer Greg LeMond is 53

Rock singer Harriet Wheeler (The Sundays) is 51

Country musician Eddie Perez (The Mavericks) is 46

Rock musician Colin Greenwood (Radiohead) is 45

Writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson is 44

Actor Sean Hayes is 44

Actor Matt Letscher is 44

Actor Chris O’Donnell is 44

Actor Nick Offerman is 44

Actress Rebecca Budig is 41

MLB All-Star Derek Jeter is 40

Contemporary Christian musician Jeff Frankenstein (Newsboys) is 40

Country singer Gretchen Wilson is 40

Rock musician Nathan Followill (Kings of Leon) is 35

Pop-rock singer-musician Ryan Tedder (OneRepublic) is 35

Actor-musician Jason Schwartzman is 34

Actress Aubrey Plaza is 30

Actress-singer Jennette McCurdy is 22

Actress-singer Ariana Grande (TV: “Victorious”) is 21

Flashback: What Happened on June 25, ....

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•  1868 The governor approved an act authorizing the West Virginia Agricultural College, which later became West Virginia University, to sell the Monongalia Academy in Morgantown.

•  1950 The United States committed troops to the civil war which had broken out between North and South Korea.

•  1980 The bodies of 19 year old Nancy Santomero of Huntington, NY and 26 year old Vicki Durian of Wellman, IO, were found near the Droop Mountain Battlefield in Pocahontas County. They were murdered while attending a gathering of the Rainbow Family in the county. No charges were officially filed until 1992.

•  1981 Two Charleston police were killed in the line of duty. Antoine Hickman was later convicted of the murders.

•  1981 Postal workers went on strike in Parkersburg (Wood County).

•  1992 Bill Tattersall, assistant secretary of labor for the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration, issued 25 closure orders for 19 mines in West Virginia, due to dangerous conditions.

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™: June 25

Today is Wednesday, June 25, the 176th day of 2014. There are 189 days left in the year.


Thought for Today:

“Make your ego porous. Will is of little importance, complaining is nothing, fame is nothing. Openness, patience, receptivity, solitude is everything.“ — Rainer Maria Rilke, Austrian poet-author (1875-1926).


Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 25, 2009, death claimed Michael Jackson, the “King of Pop,“ in Los Angeles at age 50 and actress Farrah Fawcett in Santa Monica, Calif., at age 62.


On this date:

In 1788, Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution.

In 1876, Lt. Col. Colonel George A. Custer and his 7th Cavalry were wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana.

In 1888, the Republican National Convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Benjamin Harrison for the presidency. (Harrison went on to win the election, defeating President Grover Cleveland.)

In 1910, President William Howard Taft signed the White-Slave Traffic Act, more popularly known as the Mann Act, which made it illegal to transport women across state lines for “immoral” purposes.

The Gilmer Free Press


In 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 was enacted.

In 1943, Congress passed, over President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s veto, the Smith-Connally Anti-Strike Act, which allowed the federal government to seize and operate privately owned war plants facing labor strikes.

In 1950, war broke out in Korea as forces from the communist North invaded the South.

In 1962, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Engel v. Vitale, ruled 6-1 that recitation of a state-sponsored prayer in New York State public schools was unconstitutional.

In 1973, former White House Counsel John W. Dean began testifying before the Senate Watergate Committee, implicating top administration officials, including President Richard Nixon as well as himself, in the Watergate scandal and cover-up.

In 1984, the Prince and the Revolution soundtrack album “Purple Rain” was released by Warner Bros. Records.

In 1993, Kim Campbell was sworn in as Canada’s 19th prime minister, the first woman to hold the post.

In 1998, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a line-item veto law as unconstitutional, and ruled that HIV-infected people are protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act.


Ten years ago:

Republican Jack Ryan withdrew from the U.S. Senate race in Illinois after revelations of sex-club visits with his then-wife, actress Jeri Ryan.

President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, opened a European trip as they arrived in Ireland.

Taliban fighters killed up to 17 people after learning they had registered for Afghanistan’s U.S.-backed national elections.


Five years ago:

North Korea vowed to enlarge its atomic arsenal and warned of a “fire shower of nuclear retaliation” in the event of a U.S. attack, as the regime marked the 1950 outbreak of the Korean War.


One year ago:

President Barack Obama declared the debate over climate change and its causes obsolete as he announced at Georgetown University a wide-ranging plan to tackle pollution and prepare communities for global warming.

Russian President Vladimir Putin confirmed the whereabouts of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden at a Moscow airport, but promptly rejected a U.S. plea to turn him over.

Democratic Texas State Senator Wendy Davis began a one-woman filibuster to block a GOP-led effort to impose stringent new abortion restrictions across the nation’s second-most populous state. (Republicans voted to end the filibuster minutes before midnight, sparking a chaotic scene with demonstrators who succeeded in forcing lawmakers to miss the deadline for passing the bill.)


Today’s Birthdays:

Actress June Lockhart is 89

Civil rights activist James Meredith is 81

R&B’s Eddie Floyd is 77

Actress Barbara Montgomery is 75

Actress Mary Beth Peil is 74

Singer Carly Simon is 69

Rocker Ian McDonald is 68

Actor Jimmie Walker is 67

Actor-director Michael Lembeck is 66

TV’s Phyllis George is 65

Rocker Tim Finn is 62

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is 60

Rocker David Paich is 60

Actor Michael Sabatino is 59

Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain is 58

Actor-writer-director Ricky Gervais is 53

Actor John Benjamin Hickey is 51

Rocker George Michael is 51

Actress Erica Gimpel is 50

Rapper-producer Richie Rich is 47

Rapper Candyman is 46

Actress Angela Kinsey is 43

Rocker Mike Kroeger is 42

Rocker Mario Calire is 40

Actress Linda Cardellini is 39

Actress Busy Philipps is 35

Flashback: What Happened on June 24, ....

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•  1863 State Senate President John Phelps appointed the senate’s first committee on education.

•  1974 Ten Kanawha County ministers gave their support to the supplemental textbooks involved in controversy.

•  1992 Construction workers filed suit against Union Carbide in South Charleston, Kanawha County, for hiring non-union laborers of Brown and Root construction firm of Texas to replace them.

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™: June 24

Today is Tuesday, June 24, the 175th day of 2014. There are 190 days left in the year.


Thought for Today:

“Move, and the way will open.“ - Zen saying.


Today’s Highlight in History:

The Gilmer Free Press

On June 24, 1964, AT&T inaugurated commercial “Picturephone” service between New York, Chicago and Washington, D.C., as Lady Bird Johnson, wife of the president, called Dr. Elizabeth A. Wood of Bell Laboratories in New York. (Requiring the use of video booths, with a 3-minute call from Washington to New York costing $16, and a $27 charge for a 3-minute call between New York and Chicago, Picturephone never caught on.)


On this date:

In 1314, the forces of Scotland’s Robert the Bruce defeated the English in the Battle of Bannockburn.

In 1509, Henry VIII was crowned king of England; his wife, Catherine of Aragon, was crowned queen consort.

In 1793, the first republican constitution in France was adopted.

In 1880, “O Canada,“ the future Canadian national anthem, was first performed in Quebec City.

In 1908, the 22nd and 24th presidents of the United States, Grover Cleveland, died in Princeton, New Jersey, at age 71.

In 1939, the Southeast Asian country Siam changed its name to Thailand. (It went back to being Siam in 1945, then became Thailand once again in 1949.)

In 1940, France signed an armistice with Italy during World War II.

In 1948, Communist forces cut off all land and water routes between West Germany and West Berlin, prompting the western allies to organize the Berlin Airlift.

In 1968, “Resurrection City,“ a shantytown constructed as part of the Poor People’s March on Washington D.C., was closed down by authorities.

In 1975, 113 people were killed when an Eastern Airlines Boeing 727 crashed while attempting to land during a thunderstorm at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

In 1983, the space shuttle Challenger - carrying America’s first woman in space, Sally K. Ride - coasted to a safe landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

In 1993, David Gelernter, a Yale University computer scientist, was seriously injured by a mail bomb sent from the Unabomber, Theodore Kaczynski.


Ten years ago:

Federal investigators questioned President George W. Bush for more than an hour in connection with the news leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame’s identity.

In a bizarre conclusion to a huge upset, the chair umpire called the wrong score in the second tiebreaker, and Venus Williams fell 7-6 (5), 7-6 (6) to Karolina Sprem in the second round at Wimbledon.


Five years ago:

South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford admitted he had secretly flown to Argentina to visit a woman with whom he was having an affair, and said he would resign as head of the Republican Governors Association.

Ed Thomas, the football coach of Aplington-Parkersburg High School in Iowa for 34 years, was gunned down by former player Mark Becker. (Becker was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.)

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced plans to double the number of best picture nominees to 10 for the 2010 Oscar ceremony. (The winner under this revised system was “The Hurt Locker.“)


One year ago:

Opening statements took place in the Sanford, Florida, trial of George Zimmerman, accused of murdering 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. (Zimmerman was acquitted.)

Silvio Berlusconi, Italy’s flamboyant former premier, was sentenced to seven years in prison and banned from politics for life for paying an underaged prostitute for sex during parties and forcing public officials to cover it up (Berlusconi is appealing his conviction).

The Chicago Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup with a stunning 3-2 comeback victory in Game 6 over the Boston Bruins.

In one of Wimbledon’s greatest upsets, an ailing Rafael Nadal was knocked out in straight sets by 135th-ranked Steve Darcis of Belgium, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (8), 6-4.


Today’s Birthdays:

Actor Al Molinaro is 95

Comedian Jack Carter is 92

Rock singer Arthur Brown is 72

Actress Michele Lee is 72

Actor-director Georg Stanford Brown is 71

Rock musician Jeff Beck is 70

Rock singer Colin Blunstone (The Zombies) is 69

Musician Mick Fleetwood is 67

Actor Peter Weller is 67

Rock musician John Illsley (Dire Straits) is 65

Actress Nancy Allen is 64

Reggae singer Derrick Simpson (Black Uhuru) is 64

Actor Joe Penny is 58

Reggae singer Astro (UB40) is 57

Singer-musician Andy McCluskey (Orchestral Manoevres in the Dark) is 55

Actor Iain Glen (TV: “Game of Thrones”; “Downton Abbey”) is 53

Rock singer Curt Smith is 53

Actress Danielle Spencer is 49

Actress Sherry Stringfield is 47

Singer Glenn Medeiros is 44

Actress-producer Mindy Kaling is 35

Actress Minka Kelly is 34

Actress Kaitlin Cullum is 28

Singer Solange Knowles is 28

Flashback: What Happened on June 23, ....

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•  1849 Johnson Camden of Sutton, Braxton County, resigned from West Point after accumulating 145 demerits.

•  1861 General George B. McClellan stationed 20,000 Union troops in Grafton, Taylor County.

•  1865 The Lowther’s Run Petroleum and Mining Company of Pennsylvania and West Virginia was incorporated in West Virginia by the following: Robert C. Davis, John Barry, John Stilz, Isaac Rheinstrom, and William F. Brady, all of Philadelphia. The company’s purpose was to mine oil, gas, and extractive minerals on its property in Ritchie County, WV and Fulton County, PA, with its main office in Philadelphia.

•  1944 A tornado killed 103 people in and around Shinnston, Harrison County.

•  1947 Congress passed the Taft-Hartley Act over President Truman’s veto. In protest, UMW coal miners went on strike and John L. Lewis shut down the mines.

•  1959 Governor Cecil Underwood flew to the Soviet Union.

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™:  June 23

Today is Monday, June 23, the 174th day of 2014. There are 191 days left in the year.


Thought for Today:

“To have felt too much is to end in feeling nothing.“ - Dorothy Thompson, American journalist (1894-1961).


Today’s Highlight in History:

The Gilmer Free Press

On June 23, 1314, during the First War of Scottish Independence, the two-day Battle of Bannockburn, resulting in victory for the forces of Robert the Bruce over the army of King Edward II, began near Stirling.


On this date:

In 1757, forces of the East India Company led by Robert Clive won the Battle of Plassey, which effectively marked the beginning of British colonial rule in India.

In 1812, Britain, unaware that America had declared war against it five days earlier, rescinded its policy on neutral shipping, a major issue of contention between the two countries.

In 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt was nominated for a second term of office at the Republican national convention in Chicago.

In 1931, aviators Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from New York on a round-the-world flight that lasted eight days and 15 hours.

In 1938, the Civil Aeronautics Authority was established.

In 1947, the Senate joined the House in overriding President Harry S. Truman’s veto of the Taft-Hartley Act, designed to limit the power of organized labor.

In 1956, Gamal Abdel Nasser was elected president of Egypt.

In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin held the first of two meetings at Glassboro State College in New Jersey.

In 1969, Warren E. Burger was sworn in as chief justice of the United States by the man he was succeeding, Earl Warren.

In 1972, President Richard Nixon and White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman discussed a plan to use the CIA to obstruct the FBI’s Watergate investigation. (Revelation of the tape recording of this conversation sparked Nixon’s resignation.) President Nixon signed Title IX, which barred discrimination on the basis of sex for “any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.“

In 1989, the Supreme Court refused to shut down the “dial-a-porn” industry, ruling Congress had gone too far in passing a law banning all sexually-oriented phone message services.

In 1994, the movie “Forrest Gump,“ starring Tom Hanks as a simple yet kindhearted soul and his serendipitous brushes with greatness, was released by Paramount Pictures.


Ten years ago:

In a major retreat, the United States abandoned an attempt to win a new exemption for American troops from international prosecution for war crimes - an effort that had faced strong opposition because of the Iraqi prisoner abuse scandal.


Five years ago:

Hardening the U.S. reaction to Iran’s disputed elections and bloody aftermath, President Barack Obama condemned the violence against protesters and lent his strongest support yet to their accusations the hardline victory was a fraud.

“Tonight Show” sidekick Ed McMahon died in Los Angeles at 86.

Dr. Jerri Nielsen FitzGerald, who’d diagnosed and treated her own breast cancer before a dramatic rescue from a South Pole station, died in Southwick, Massachusetts, at 57.

Steve Yzerman, Brett Hull, Luc Robitaille and Brian Leetch were elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame.


One year ago:

Edward Snowden, the National Security Agency contractor behind the disclosures of the U.S. government’s sweeping surveillance programs, left Hong Kong for Moscow with the stated intention of seeking asylum in Ecuador; however, Snowden ended up remaining in Moscow.

Aerialist Nik Wallenda completed a tightrope walk that took him a quarter mile over the Little Colorado River Gorge in northeastern Arizona.

Sci-fi and fantasy writer Richard Matheson, 87, died in Los Angeles.


Today’s Birthdays:

Singer Diana Trask is 74

Musical conductor James Levine is 71

Rhythm-and-blues singer Rosetta Hightower (The Orlons) is 70

Actor Ted Shackelford is 68

Actor Bryan Brown is 67

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is 66

Actor Jim Metzler is 63

“American Idol” ex-judge Randy Jackson is 58

Actress Frances McDormand is 57

Rock musician Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth) is 52

Actor Paul La Greca is 52

Writer-director Joss Whedon is 50

Rhythm-and-blues singer Chico DeBarge is 44

Actress Selma Blair is 42

Rock singer KT Tunstall is 39

Rhythm-and-blues singer Virgo Williams (Ghostowns DJs) is 39

Singer-songwriter Jason Mraz is 37

Actress Melissa Rauch is 34

Rock singer Duffy is 30

Country singer Katie Armiger is 23

Flashback: What Happened on June 22, ....

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•  1940 The first residents moved into the Littlepage Terrace housing project units in Charleston. The Littlepage Terrace units and those at Washington Manor, also in Charleston, were the first federally funded housing projects in the United States.

•  1960 WJPB - TV went on the air, the first television station in Bridgeport, Harrison County. It was owned by J. Patrick Beacom, Thomas P. Johnson, and George W. Eby. It later changed its call letters to WDTV - TV.

•  1970 Ten thousand UMW coal miners in West Virginia and Pennsylvania went on strike, lasting 4 days. This strike was led by Disabled Miners and Widows demanding pensions and hospital cards.

•  1971 Governor Moore announced that unemployment in West Virginia had reached its lowest point in 20 years.

•  1984 The sixth annual women’s coal miners convention was held in Charleston.

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™: June 24

Today is Sunday, June 22, the 173rd day of 2014. There are 192 days left in the year.


Thought for Today:

“Study men, not historians.“ — President Harry S. Truman (1884-1972).


Today’s Highlight in History:

The Gilmer Free Press

On June 22, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the “GI Bill of Rights.“


On this date:

In 1611, English explorer Henry Hudson, his son and several other people were set adrift in present-day Hudson Bay by mutineers aboard the Discovery; their fate remains unknown.

In 1870, the United States Department of Justice was created.

In 1911, Britain’s King George V was crowned at Westminster Abbey.

In 1937, Joe Louis began his reign as world heavyweight boxing champion by knocking out Jim Braddock in the eighth round of their fight in Chicago.

In 1938, Joe Louis knocked out Max Schmeling in the first round of their rematch at Yankee Stadium.

In 1940, during World War II, Adolf Hitler gained a stunning victory as France was forced to sign an armistice eight days after German forces overran Paris.

In 1959, the Swedish film “Wild Strawberries,“ written and directed by Ingmar Bergman, opened in New York.

In 1964, in a pair of rulings, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that the Henry Miller novel “Tropic of Cancer” and the French film “The Lovers” were not obscene.

In 1974, French composer Darius Milhaud, 81, died in Geneva.

In 1977, John N. Mitchell became the first former U.S. Attorney General to go to prison as he began serving a sentence for his role in the Watergate cover-up. (He was released 19 months later.)

In 1984, the British airline Virgin Atlantic began operations.

In 1992, the U.S. Supreme Court, in R.A.V. v. City of St. Paul, unanimously ruled that “hate crime” laws that banned cross burning and similar expressions of racial bias violated free-speech rights.


Ten years ago:

Islamic militants beheaded Kim Sun-il, a South Korean hostage who’d pleaded for his life in a heart-wrenching videotape; he was the third foreign hostage decapitated in the Middle East in little over a month.

Mexican newspaper editor Francisco Ortiz Franco was shot to death by masked gunmen in Tijuana.

Former President Bill Clinton’s memoir, “My Life,“ was officially released.

Child poet Mattie Stepanek, a prominent voice for muscular dystrophy sufferers, died in Washington, D.C., at age 13.


Five years ago:

Nine people were killed when a Washington, D.C., commuter train crashed into the rear of another during afternoon rush hour.

President Barack Obama signed the nation’s toughest anti-smoking law, aiming to keep thousands of teens from getting hooked.

Chris Brown pleaded guilty to felony assault of ex-girlfriend Rihanna (he was later sentenced to probation and community labor).

Lucas Glover won the U.S. Open at Bethpage Black with a 3-over 73 for a two-shot victory.


One year ago:

Islamic militants disguised as policemen killed 10 foreign climbers and a Pakistani guide in a brazen overnight raid at the base camp of Nanga Parbat, saying it was to avenge the death of their deputy leader in a U.S. drone strike.

A plane carrying a wing walker crashed at an air show near Dayton, Ohio, killing both the pilot, Charlie Schwenker, and the stunt performer, Jane Wicker.


Today’s Birthdays:

Actress Prunella Scales is 82

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is 81

Singer-actor Kris Kristofferson is 78

Movie director John Korty is 78

Actor Michael Lerner is 73

Actor Klaus Maria Brandauer is 71

Fox News analyst Brit Hume is 71

Singer Peter Asher (Peter and Gordon) is 70

Actor Andrew Rubin is 68

Actor David L. Lander is 67

Singer Howard “Eddie” Kaylan is 67

Singer-musician Todd Rundgren is 66

Actress Meryl Streep is 65

Actress Lindsay Wagner is 65

Singer Alan Osmond is 65

Actor Murphy Cross is 64

Actor Graham Greene is 62

Pop singer Cyndi Lauper is 61

Actor Chris Lemmon is 60

Rock musician Derek Forbes is 58

Actor Tim Russ is 58

Rock musician Garry Beers (INXS) is 57

Actor-producer-writer Bruce Campbell is 56

Rock musician Alan Anton (Cowboy Junkies) is 55

Actress Tracy Pollan is 54

Environmental activist Erin Brockovich is 54

Rock singer-musician Jimmy Somerville is 53

Basketball Hall of Famer Clyde Drexler is 52

Author Dan Brown is 50

Rock singer-musician Mike Edwards (Jesus Jones) is 50

Rock singer Steven Page is 44

Actor Michael Trucco is 44

Actress Mary Lynn Rajskub (RYS’-kub) is 43

TV personality Carson Daly is 41

Rock musician Chris Traynor is 41

Country musician Jimmy Wallace is 41

Actor Donald Faison (FAY’-zahn) is 40

Actress Alicia Goranson is 40

Actor-comedian Mike O’Brien (TV: “Saturday Night Live”) is 38

TV personality/actor Jai Rodriguez is 35

Actress Lindsay Ridgeway is 29

Flashback: What Happened on June 21, ....

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•  1861 Reorganized Government of Virginia Governor Pierpont requested President Lincoln to send troops to protect western Virginia.

•  1866 The Little Kanawha and Burning Spring Petroleum Company was incorporated in West Virginia by the following: Rev. Daniel H. A. McLean of Beaver, PA; Rev. James Prestley, Rev. Robert Gracey, Isaac Jones, William Floyd, James McCandless, Samuel Richardson, George Woods, William Frew, and Robert Robb, all of Pittsburgh, PA. The company’s purpose was to mine oil in Wirt County and Calhoun County with its main offices in Pittsburgh, PA.

•  1866 The Standing Stone and West Fork Petroleum Company was incorporated in West Virginia by the following: Rev. Daniel H. A. McLean, Joseph C. Wilson of Beaver, PA; John Brown, Jr., of Allegheny County, PA; William Floyd, James S. Negley, William Frew, Theodore E. Tack, Rev. James Prestley of Pittsburgh, PA; Robert A. Patterson of Mercer, PA; and Wilson King of Erie County, PA. The company’s purpose was to mine oil and cut lumber in Wirt County and Calhoun County.

•  1925 The Parchment Valley Farm Women’s Club was organized in Jackson County. It later became the Parchment Valley Extension Homemakers Club.

•  1938 A monument to city founder General Alfred Beckley was dedicated on the courthouse lawn in Beckley (Raleigh County).

Congratulation to Area’s History Whizzes on WV’s Birthday

West Virginia History Whiz Kids Become Knights of the Golden Horseshoe - 2013

 

The Gilmer Free Press


Nearly 230 eighth grade students from across West Virginia on Thursday received the prestigious Golden Horseshoe award for outstanding knowledge of West Virginia history and culture.

State Superintendent Jim Phares inducted the students from all 55 counties as Knights of the Golden Horseshoe Society during a pinning ceremony at the Cultural Center. The award is considered one of the greatest honors bestowed upon students in West Virginia.

“As a former history teacher it was a great honor to have a role in this ceremony,“ Phares said. “The Golden Horseshoe is coveted by many in the state, but received by very few. It is an honor that these students can be proud of for years to come.“


The Golden Horseshoe test has been administered in West Virginia each year since 1931 and is the longest running program of its kind in the United States. The top-scoring students in each county receive the prestigious award. Each county has at least two winners. The exam tests student knowledge on West Virginia citizenship, civics and government, economics, geography, history and current events.

The Golden Horseshoe originated in the early 1700s in Virginia when then-Governor Alexander Spotswood saw the need for exploration of the land west of the Allegheny Mountains, most of which is now West Virginia. Spotswood organized a party of about 50 men to explore the frontier. At the end of the exploration, he presented each member of the party with a golden horseshoe. Translated from Latin, the inscription on each horseshoe read, “Thus it was decided to cross the mountains.“ On the other side was written, “Order of the Golden Horseshoe.“ Because of this, the recipients became known as ‘The Knights of the Golden Horseshoe.‘“

Golden Horseshoe Winners for Area Counties
County First Name Last Name
Barbour Maddi Carpenter
Barbour Brandon Messenger
Barbour Johnny Williams
Braxton Heath Cottrill
Braxton Timothy Harman
Braxton Logan Rose
Calhoun Caroline Mccumbers
Calhoun Robert Twist IV
Clay Joseph Dawson
Clay Laura Hundley
Clay David Tanner II
Doddridge Logan Gogan
Doddridge Joseph Heckert
Gilmer Ruthann Cain
Gilmer Sada Wright
Harrison Norman Junkins III
Harrison Joplin Kehrer
Harrison Dylan McCullough
Harrison Kendall Robey
Harrison Chase Sfameni
Harrison Matthew Strange
Harrison Leon Wilson
Lewis Benjamin Harman
Lewis Skylar Metz
Lewis Robert Mitchell
Nicholas Andrew Cook
Nicholas Eamonn Payton
Nicholas Joseph Perry
Nicholas Savannah Tinnel
Pleasants Corbin Bussey
Pleasants Lindsay George
Pleasants Ryan McFarland
Pleasants Andrea Watson
Pleasants Spencer Wren
Ritchie Ivy Scoville
Ritchie William Siers
Ritchie Jonathan Wilson
Roane Paige Davenport
Roane Christophe Deel
Roane Keira Shaffer
Tyler Colby Buchanan
Tyler Rosana Smith
Tyler Theodore Stackpole
Upshur Benjamin Bohman
Upshur Shelby Daugherty
Upshur Gabrielle Epp
Webster Ian Chapman
Webster Avery Clutter
Webster Waymon McCourt
Wirt Addie Bailey
Wirt Kyle Bentz
Wood Anna Fatta
Wood Andrew Gnegy
Wood Jordan Mader
Wood Ian McKnight
Wood Wade Powers
Wood Akshay Sambandham
Wood Kaylyn Smith



West Virginia History Whiz Kids Become Knights of the Golden Horseshoe - 2013

More than 200 eighth grade students from across West Virginia on Friday received the prestigious Golden Horseshoe award for outstanding knowledge of West Virginia history and culture.

State Superintendent Jim Phares inducted the students from all 55 counties as Knights of the Golden Horseshoe Society during a pinning ceremony at the Cultural Center. The award is considered one of the greatest honors bestowed upon students in West Virginia.

“As a former history teacher it was a great honor to have a role in this ceremony,“ Phares said. “The Golden Horseshoe is coveted by many in the state, but received by very few. It is an honor that these students can be proud of for years to come.“

The Gilmer Free Press


The Golden Horseshoe test has been administered in West Virginia each year since 1931 and is the longest running program of its kind in the United States. The top-scoring students in each county receive the prestigious award. Each county has at least two winners. The exam tests student knowledge on West Virginia citizenship, civics and government, economics, geography, history and current events.

The Golden Horseshoe originated in the early 1700s in Virginia when then-Gov. Alexander Spotswood saw the need for exploration of the land west of the Allegheny Mountains, most of which is now West Virginia. Spotswood organized a party of about 50 men to explore the frontier. At the end of the exploration, he presented each member of the party with a golden horseshoe. Translated from Latin, the inscription on each horseshoe read, “Thus it was decided to cross the mountains.“ On the other side was written, “Order of the Golden Horseshoe.“ Because of this, the recipients became known as ‘The Knights of the Golden Horseshoe.‘“


Area winner for 2013 Are:

Braxton

•  Emmanuel Backus

•  Forrest Taylor

•  Justin Vankirk


Calhoun

•  Karlie Johnson

•  Adrianne Shimer


Clay

•  Zachary Myers

•  Brennan Rhodes

•  Ian Smith


Doddridge

•  Nicholas Morgan

•  Colten Oliver


Gilmer

•  William Greene

•  Dalton Law


Lewis

•  Allaina Hope

•  Jaret Mullooly

•  Alexander Scott


Ritchie

•  Sydney Campbell

•  Sarah Cokeley

•  Davi Stanley


Roane

•  Faith Bender

•  Joseph Burch

•  Thomas Wright


Webster

•  Trace Durham

•  Gavin Surbaugh


Wirt

•  Allan Phillips

•  Joseph Powell


Eighth Grade Students Receive the Golden Horseshoe Award 2012

More than 200 eighth grade students from across West Virginia on Thursday received the prestigious Golden Horseshoe award for outstanding knowledge of West Virginia history and culture.

State Superintendent Jorea Marple inducted the students from all 55 counties as Knights of the Golden Horseshoe Society during a pinning ceremony at the Cultural Center.

The award is considered one of the greatest honors bestowed upon students in West Virginia.

The Golden Horseshoe honors and rewards students for their appreciation and understanding of West Virginia and her people,” Marple said. “The Golden Horseshoe is coveted by many in the state, but received by very few. Those who receive it are among a select group,” Marple said. “It is an honor that these students can be proud of for years to come.”

image


The Golden Horseshoe test has been administered in West Virginia each year since 1931 and is the longest running program of its kind in the United States.

The top-scoring students in each county receive the prestigious award.

Each county has at least two winners.

The exam tests student knowledge on West Virginia citizenship, civics and government, economics, geography, history and current events.

Past recipients have included authors and state Supreme Court justices, a state attorney general and a state Board of Education president.

The Golden Horseshoe originated in the early 1700s in Virginia when then-Governor Alexander Spotswood saw the need for exploration of the land west of the Allegheny Mountains, most of which is now West Virginia.

Spotswood organized a party of about 50 men to explore the frontier.

At the end of the exploration, he presented each member of the party with a golden horseshoe.

Translated from Latin, the inscription on each horseshoe read, “Thus it was decided to cross the mountains.”  On the other side was written, “Order of the Golden Horseshoe.” Because of this, the recipients became known as ‘The Knights of the Golden Horseshoe.’”


Area 2012 Knights of the Golden Horseshoe Society:


Braxton

•  Caroline Nicholas

•  Sarah Skidmore

•  Emma Steorts


Calhoun

•  Taylor Garrett

•  Melinda McCumbers


Clay

•  Johnna Casey

•  Isabelle Haverty

•  George Wilkinson

•  Kali Muhly-Alexander

•  Shawna Webb


Gilmer

•  Hannah Moore

•  Cheruto Shiow


Lewis

•  Kurtis Gunter

•  Hannah Hall

•  Lindsey Lough


Ritchie

•  Ryan Alexander

•  Justin Curfman

•  Elizabeth Little


Roane

•  Johnathan Harris

•  Nicholas Keaton

•  Camden Moore


Webster

•  Bethany Anderson

•  Sydney Mollohan

•  Jakob Payne


Wirt

•  Cammi Ferguson

•  Brady Ohrn



Area 8th-Graders among More than 200 in WV to Earn Golden Horseshoe 2011

The Golden Horseshoe test, which has been given each year since 1931, measures knowledge of West Virginia history and culture.

The top-scoring students from each county are bestowed with the award.


Braxton County:

•  Zachary Chapman, Braxton County Middle

•  Christian Facemire, Braxton County Middle

•  Grace Skidmore, Braxton County Middle.


Calhoun County:

•  Nathaniel Hipp, Calhoun Middle/High

•  Kenneth Wolf, Calhoun Middle/High.


Clay County:

•  Mckinzee R. Barker, Clay County Middle School

•  Stephen R. Cole, Clay County Middle School

•  Chase A. Massey, Clay County Middle School


Doddridge County:

•  Katherine Bonnell, Doddridge County Middle

•  Alexandria Carder, Doddridge County Middle


Gilmer County:

•  Chemutai Shiow, Gilmer County High

•  Trevor Wright, Gilmer County High.


Lewis County:

•  Benjamin Holden, Robert L. Bland Middle

•  Quinten Squires, Robert L. Bland Middle

•  Ashley Vandall, Robert L. Bland Middle.


Ritchie County:

•  Victoria Ayers, Ritchie County Middle

•  Matthew Byrd, Ritchie County Middle

•  Michael Channell, Ritchie County Middle.


Roane County:

•  Steven McGinnis, Geary Elementary/Middle

•  Robert Pavalok, Walton Elementary Middle

•  James Williams, Spencer Middle.

The Gilmer Free Press

Flashback: What Happened on June 20, ....

image

•  1868 The Traverse Oil Company was incorporated in West Virginia by the following: Samuel S. Knowles, David Alban, T. C. H. Smith, George M. Woodbridge of Marietta, OH; and J. W. Willis of Lick Fork, Ritchie County. The company’s main office was at Lick Fork on the Laurel Fork and Sand Hill Railroad, Ritchie County.

•  1932 Governor William G. Conley dedicated the state capitol building in Charleston, designed by Cass Gilbert and costing nearly $10,000,000.

•  1947 Howard M. Gore, seventeenth West Virginia governor, died in Clarksburg.

•  1962 Former President Harry Truman spoke on the steps of the capitol in Charleston.

•  1963 President Kennedy spoke at the capitol in Charleston on the 100th anniversary of West Virginia statehood.

•  1972 The Charleston Gazette reported that former Governor Barron had worked illegally in support of the election of Governor Moore in 1968, including an alleged bribe supposedly refused by Republican candidate former Governor Underwood.

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™: June 20

Today is Friday, June 20, the 171st day of 2014. There are 194 days left in the year.


Thought for Today:

“A man’s errors are his portals of discovery.“ — James Joyce, Irish poet (1882-1941).


Today’s Highlight in History:

The Gilmer Free Press

On June 20, 1944, during World War II, Japanese naval forces retreated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea after suffering heavy losses to the victorious American fleet.


On this date:

In 1782, Congress approved the Great Seal of the United States, featuring the emblem of the bald eagle.

In 1837, Queen Victoria acceded to the British throne following the death of her uncle, King William IV.

In 1863, West Virginia became the 35th state.

In 1893, a jury in New Bedford, Massachusetts, found Lizzie Borden not guilty of the ax murders of her father and stepmother.

In 1921, U.S. Rep. Alice Mary Robertson, R-Okla., became the first woman to preside over a session of the House of Representatives.

In 1943, race-related rioting erupted in Detroit; federal troops were sent in two days later to quell the violence that resulted in more than 30 deaths.

In 1947, Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel was shot dead at the Beverly Hills, California, mansion of his girlfriend, Virginia Hill, apparently at the order of mob associates.

In 1967, boxer Muhammad Ali was convicted in Houston of violating Selective Service laws by refusing to be drafted. (Ali’s conviction was ultimately overturned by the Supreme Court.)

In 1974, the film noir “Chinatown,“ starring Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway, was released by Paramount Pictures.

In 1979, ABC News correspondent Bill Stewart was shot to death in Managua, Nicaragua, by a member of President Anastasio Somoza’s national guard.

In 1982, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed National Bald Eagle Day.

In 1994, O.J. Simpson pleaded not guilty in Los Angeles to the killings of his ex-wife, Nicole, and her friend, Ronald Goldman. Former airman Dean Allen Mellberg went on a shooting rampage at Fairchild Air Force Base near Spokane, Washington, killing four people and wounding 22 others before being killed by a military police sharpshooter.


Ten years ago:

The Arab satellite TV network Al-Jazeera aired a videotape from al-Qaida-linked militants showing a South Korean hostage begging for his life and pleading with his government to withdraw troops from Iraq. (The hostage, Kim Sun-il, was beheaded two days later.)

Retief Goosen (reh-TEEF’ GOO’-sin) captured his second U.S. Open in four years at Shinnecock Hills.


Five years ago:

Iranian music student Neda Agha Soltan, 27, was gunned down during election protests in Tehran; her dying moments were caught on video and circulated widely on the Internet, making her name a rallying cry for the opposition and sparking international outrage.


One year ago:

In a telephone interview with The Associated Press, the Taliban proposed a deal in which they would free U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, held since 2009, in exchange for five of their most senior operatives at Guantanamo Bay. (Bergdahl was handed over on May 31, 2014.)

The Food and Drug Administration approved unrestricted sales of the morning-after pill, lifting all age limits on the emergency contraceptive.

The Miami Heat repeated as champions with a 95-88 victory over the San Antonio Spurs in Game 7 of the NBA Finals.


Today’s Birthdays:

Actor Martin Landau is 86

Actress Bonnie Bartlett is 85

Actress Olympia Dukakis is 83

Actor James Tolkan is 83

Actor Danny Aiello is 81

Blues musician Lazy Lester is 81

Actor John Mahoney is 74

Movie director Stephen Frears is 73

Singer-songwriter Brian Wilson is 72

Actor John McCook is 70

Singer Anne Murray is 69

TV personality Bob Vila is 68

Musician Andre Watts is 68

Actress Candy Clark is 67

Producer Tina Sinatra is 66

Rhythm-and-blues singer Lionel Richie is 65

Actor John Goodman is 62

Rock musician Michael Anthony is 60

Pop musician John Taylor is 54

Rock musician Mark degli Antoni is 52

Rock musician Murphy Karges (Sugar Ray) is 47

Actress Nicole Kidman is 47

Country/bluegrass singer-musician Dan Tyminski is 47

Movie director Robert Rodriguez is 46

Actor Peter Paige is 45

Actor Josh Lucas is 43

Rock musician Jeordie White (AKA Twiggy Ramirez) is 43

Rock singer Chino Moreno (Deftones) is 41

Country-folk singer-songwriter Amos Lee is 37

Country singer Chuck Wicks is 35

Country musician Chris Thompson (The Eli Young Band) is 34

Christian rock musician Chris Dudley (Underoath) is 31

Rock singer Grace Potter (Grace Potter & the Nocturnals) is 31

Actor Mark Saul is 29

Actress Dreama Walker is 28

Actor Chris Mintz-Plasse (plahs) is 25

Actress Maria Lark is 17

Flashback: What Happened on June 19, ....

image

•  1944 The Board of Governors, with the support of Governor Neely, voted to oust Charles Lawall as West Virginia University president. The Kanawha County Circuit Court blocked the dismissal. Lawall resigned based on his own decision in August 1945.

•  1960 Earl Mathews of Marmet, Kanawha County, stole $370,000 from the West Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles vault. Mathews confessed on July 09.

•  1974 The Kanawha County Council of Parents and Teachers denounced some of the supplemental books approved by the Kanawha County Board of Education.

•  1984 Governor Rockefeller broke ground for the Blennerhassett Mansion Reconstruction Project at Parkersburg (Wood County).

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™: June 19

Today is Thursday, June 19, the 170th day of 2014. There are 195 days left in the year.


Thought for Today:

“To seek fulfillment is to invite frustration.“ — Jiddu Krishnamurti, Indian author and philosopher (1895-1986).


Today’s Highlight in History:

The Gilmer Free Press

On June 19, 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was approved by the U.S. Senate, 73-27, after surviving a lengthy filibuster. Hours later, a twin-engine plane carrying Sens. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., and Birch Bayh, D-Ind., crashed near Springfield, Massachusetts. Kennedy was seriously injured, Bayh and his wife, Marvella, less so, but two people, including the pilot, were killed.


On this date:

In 1764, Jose Gervasio Artigas, considered the father of Uruguayan independence, was born in Montevideo.

In 1864, during the Civil War, the Confederate sloop-of-war CSS Alabama was sunk by the USS Kearsarge (also a sloop-of-war) off Cherbourg, France.

In 1865, Union troops commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War was over, and that all remaining slaves in Texas were free, an event celebrated to this day as “Juneteenth.“

In 1910, the first-ever Father’s Day was celebrated in Spokane, Wash. (The idea for the observance is credited to Sonora Louise Smart Dodd.)

In 1934, the Federal Communications Commission was created; it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

In 1938, four dozen people were killed when a railroad bridge in Montana collapsed, sending a train known as the Olympian hurtling into Custer Creek.

In 1944, during World War II, the two-day Battle of the Philippine Sea began, resulting in a decisive victory for the Americans over the Japanese.

In 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York.

In 1964, a groundbreaking ceremony took place in Concord, California, for the Bay Area Rapid Transit system, with President Lyndon B. Johnson presiding.

In 1972, Hurricane Agnes, blamed for at least 122 deaths, made landfall over the Florida Panhandle.

In 1986, University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias, the first draft pick of the Boston Celtics, suffered a fatal cocaine-induced seizure. Artificial heart recipient Murray P. Haydon died in Louisville, Kentucky, after 16 months on the manmade pump.

In 1999, author Stephen King was seriously injured when he was struck by a van driven by Bryan Smith in North Lovell, Maine. Britain’s Prince Edward married commoner Sophie Rhys-Jones (rees johnz) in Windsor, England.


Ten years ago:

The U.S. military stepped up its campaign against militant leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi (AH’-boo MOO’-sahb ahl-zahr-KOW’-ee), launching an airstrike that pulverized a suspected hideout in Fallujah.

President George W. Bush told Americans in his weekly radio address that the economy was growing stronger and more jobs were being created despite Democrats’ claim he’d presided over a downturn for the country.


Five years ago:

New York Times reporter David S. Rohde (rohd) and Afghan reporter Tahir Ludin escaped from militant captors after more than seven months in captivity in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Texas billionaire R. Allen Stanford was indicted and jailed on charges his international banking empire was really just a Ponzi scheme built on lies, bluster and bribery. (Stanford was sentenced to 110 years in prison after being convicted of bilking investors in a $7.2 billion scheme that involved the sale of fraudulent certificates of deposits.)


One year ago:

Afghan President Hamid Karzai suspended talks with the United States on a new security deal to protest the way his government was left out of initial peace negotiations with the Taliban.

President Barack Obama, speaking in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate, pledged to cut deployed U.S. nuclear weapons by one-third if Cold War foe Russia did the same.

Actor James Gandolfini, 51, died while vacationing in Rome.

Country singer Slim Whitman, 90, died in Orange Park, Florida.


Today’s Birthdays:

Pop singer Tommy DeVito (The Four Seasons) is 86

Actress Gena (JEH’-nuh) Rowlands is 84

Hall of Fame race car driver Shirley Muldowney is 74

Singer Spanky McFarlane (Spanky and Our Gang) is 72

Nobel peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi (soo chee) is 69

Author Salman Rushdie is 67

Actress Phylicia Rashad is 66

Rock singer Ann Wilson (Heart) is 64

Musician Larry Dunn is 61

Actress Kathleen Turner is 60

Country singer Doug Stone is 58

Singer Mark DeBarge is 55

Singer-dancer Paula Abdul is 52

Actor Andy Lauer is 51

Rock singer-musician Brian Vander Ark (Verve Pipe) is 50

Actress Mia Sara is 47

Rock musician Brian “Head” Welch is 44

Actor Jean Dujardin is 42

Actress Robin Tunney is 42

Actor Bumper Robinson is 40

Actress Poppy Montgomery is 39

Alt-country singer-musician Scott Avett (AY’-veht) (The Avett Brothers) is 38

Actor Ryan Hurst is 38

Actress Zoe Saldana is 36

Actress Lauren Lee Smith is 34

Rapper Macklemore (Macklemore and Ryan Lewis) is 31

Actor Paul Dano is 30

Actor Atticus Shaffer is 16

June 19, 2014 at Lewis County Senior Center is Date for West Virginia History Challenge Will Be Held

During the 2013 Amazing Week activities, it was decided to have a history challenge in conjunction with West Virginia’s 150th Birthday.

The contest was so successful, that Amazing Week organizers will again have a contest on Thursday, June 19, 2014 at the Lewis County Senior Center on West Second Street.

The event was cross-generational in that there were children participating as well as a gentleman in his 90s.

The Gilmer Free Press


Joey Pickens, a teacher at LCHS was the moderator for the contest.

For the History Contest, two retired West Virginia History teachers – Karen Pickens and Judy McWhorter, are creating the contest questions.

The event will be open to everyone throughout the region.

The prizes will be $150 for first place and $100 for second.

Most importantly, will be the winner’s claim to knowing the most of anyone about West Virginia history.

This event is part of the annual Weston’s Amazing Week. (The event is a weeklong promotion including a Street Fair, Pet Show, WV Birthday Cake Challenge, Cornhole Tourney, Garden Tour, and Evening at the Movies.) Interested entrants should call Spelsberg at 304.269.3683 in the evening to register.

Flashback: What Happened on June 18, ....

image

•  1917 South Charleston was chartered as a city.

•  1923 The trial of Bill Blizzard as an accessory in the killing of George Munsy began in Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, after being relocated from Charles Town, Jefferson County. The trial ended in a hung jury.

•  1949 West Virginia adopted the sugar maple as the state tree and the cardinal as the state bird.

•  1992 Andrew “Hun” Pastoria of Morgantown, Monongalia County, was charged with allegedly attempting to extort money from a coal operator in order to influence a case before the State Supreme Court.

2014 >>  WayBackWhen™: June 18

Today is Wednesday, June 18, the 169th day of 2014. There are 196 days left in the year.


Thought for Today:

“The way of a superior man is three-fold; virtuous, he is free from anxieties; wise, he is free from perplexities; bold, he is free from fear.“ — Confucius, Chinese philosopher (551-479 B.C.).


Today’s Highlight in History:

The Gilmer Free Press

On June 18, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Japanese Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda spoke to each other by telephone as they inaugurated the first trans-Pacific cable completed by AT&T between Japan and Hawaii, and linked to existing cables between Hawaii and California. (Due to the time difference, it was already June 19 in Tokyo.)


On this date:

In 1778, American forces entered Philadelphia as the British withdrew during the Revolutionary War.

In 1812, the War of 1812 began as the United States Congress approved, and President James Madison signed, a declaration of war against Britain.

In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte met his Waterloo as British and Prussian troops defeated the French in Belgium.

In 1873, suffragist Susan B. Anthony was found guilty by a judge in Canandaigua, New York, of breaking the law by casting a vote in the 1872 presidential election. (The judge fined Anthony $100, but she never paid the penalty.)

In 1908, William Howard Taft was nominated for president by the Republican National Convention in Chicago.

In 1912, the Republican National Convention, which would nominate President William Howard Taft for another term of office, opened in Chicago.

In 1940, during World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill urged his countrymen to conduct themselves in a manner that would prompt future generations to say, “This was their finest hour.“

In 1953, a U.S. Air Force Douglas C-124 Globemaster II crashed near Tokyo, killing all 129 people on board. Egypt’s 148-year-old Muhammad Ali Dynasty came to an end with the overthrow of the monarchy and the proclamation of a republic.

In 1972, 118 people were killed in the crash of a Brussels-bound British European Airways Hawker Siddeley Trident 1C shortly after takeoff from London Heathrow Airport.

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter and Soviet President Leonid I. Brezhnev signed the SALT II strategic arms limitation treaty in Vienna.

In 1983, astronaut Sally K. Ride, 32, became America’s first woman in space as she and four colleagues blasted off aboard the space shuttle Challenger on a six-day mission.

In 1984, Alan Berg, a Denver radio talk show host, was shot to death outside his home. (Two white supremacists were later convicted of civil rights violations in the slaying.)


Ten years ago:

An al-Qaida cell in Saudi Arabia beheaded American engineer Paul M. Johnson Jr., 49, posting grisly photographs of his severed head; hours later, Saudi security forces tracked down and killed the alleged mastermind of the kidnapping and murder.

European Union leaders agreed on the first constitution for the bloc’s 25 members.


Five years ago:

Tens of thousands of protesters filled the streets of Tehran again, joining opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi to mourn demonstrators killed in clashes over Iran’s disputed presidential election.

Hortensia Bussi, the widow of Chilean President Salvador Allende who helped lead opposition to the military dictatorship that ousted her husband, died at 94.

Washington Capitals forward Alex Ovechkin was named the NHL’s most valuable player for the second straight year after leading the league with 56 goals.


One year ago:

The Taliban and the U.S. said they would hold talks on finding a political solution to ending nearly 12 years of war in Afghanistan, as the international coalition formally handed over control of the country’s security to the Afghan army and police.

Declaring “the days of Rambo are over,“ Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that cultural, social and behavioral concerns might be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military’s special operations units.


Today’s Birthdays:

Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-WV, is 77

Baseball Hall of Famer Lou Brock is 75

Rock singer-composer-musician Sir Paul McCartney is 72

Actress Constance McCashin is 67

Actress Linda Thorson is 67

Rock musician John Evans (The Box Tops) is 66

Sen. Mike Johanns, R-Neb., is 64

Actress Isabella Rossellini is 62

Actress Carol Kane is 62

Actor Brian Benben is 58

Actress Andrea Evans is 57

Rock singer Alison Moyet is 53

Rock musician Dizzy Reed (Guns N’ Roses) is 51

Figure skater Kurt Browning is 48

Country singer-musician Tim Hunt is 47

Rock singer-musician Sice (The Boo Radleys) is 45

Rhythm-and-blues singer Nathan Morris (Boyz II Men) is 43

Actress Mara Hobel is 43

Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne is 41

Rapper Silkk the Shocker is 39

Actress Alana de la Garza is 38

Country singer Blake Shelton is 38

Rock musician Steven Chen (Airborne Toxic Event) is 36

Actor David Giuntoli is 34

Actress Renee Olstead is 25

Actress Willa Holland is 23

June 19, 2014 at Lewis County Senior Center is Date for West Virginia History Challenge Will Be Held

During the 2013 Amazing Week activities, it was decided to have a history challenge in conjunction with West Virginia’s 150th Birthday.

The contest was so successful, that Amazing Week organizers will again have a contest on Thursday, June 19, 2014 at the Lewis County Senior Center on West Second Street.

The event was cross-generational in that there were children participating as well as a gentleman in his 90s.

The Gilmer Free Press


Joey Pickens, a teacher at LCHS was the moderator for the contest.

For the History Contest, two retired West Virginia History teachers – Karen Pickens and Judy McWhorter, are creating the contest questions.

The event will be open to everyone throughout the region.

The prizes will be $150 for first place and $100 for second.

Most importantly, will be the winner’s claim to knowing the most of anyone about West Virginia history.

This event is part of the annual Weston’s Amazing Week. (The event is a weeklong promotion including a Street Fair, Pet Show, WV Birthday Cake Challenge, Cornhole Tourney, Garden Tour, and Evening at the Movies.) Interested entrants should call Spelsberg at 304.269.3683 in the evening to register.

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