GilmerFreePress.net

Holidays | Occasions

Holidays | Occasions

Happy New Year 2017

The Free Press WV

Every New Year brings us not only opportunities but challenges as well.

As we enter 2017, the challenges we face at The Free Press loom large.

The threats to our community freedom and the right to speak about your concerns are greatly increasing.

But as the Apostle Paul tells us, the key to winning any struggle is running the race to the end.

That is why we are so thankful to our readers and supporters who are committed to staying in the battle for the long run.

We have faith that not only what we are doing is right, but that in the end we will prevail.

Thank you and God bless you, for running the race with us.

Your faithful prayers and support make it possible for us to finish the race and protect the cherished God-given freedoms we all rely on.


Faithfully yours,

The Free Press WV

“Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation;
old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new.”
— 2 Corinthians 5:17

Governor and First Lady Tomblin to Kick Off Holiday Season with Annual Joyful Night Celebration

Joyful Night celebration to be held Tuesday, December 06 at State Capitol Complex
The Free Press WV

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and First Lady Joanne Jaeger Tomblin will welcome West Virginians to the annual Joyful Night celebration Tuesday, December 06 at the State Capitol Complex in Charleston.

As part of the evening’s festivities, the First Family encourages attendees to bring a new unwrapped toy for the U.S. Marines’ Toys for Tots campaign. There also will be a special tribute to West Virginia’s military men and women, veterans, Gold Star Families and first responders.

“Joanne and I are excited to welcome West Virginians from across the state to join us as we kick off the holiday season with this year’s Joyful Night celebration for the last time as your Governor and First Lady,” Gov. Tomblin said. “This celebration is a special time for us as we reflect on the cherished memories we have made over the past six years. We will be celebrating friendship, family and camaraderie—values we as West Virginians hold dear—and honoring our state’s brave service men and women, their families and our first responders. We look forward to seeing you and sharing in the holiday celebrations.”

The Joyful Night program will begin at 5:30 p.m. at the South Plaza of the Capitol with performances from West Virginia school bands and at 6:00 p.m. Governor and First Lady Tomblin will light the state Christmas tree, donated by Brenda and David Hanson of Winfield.

This year, Toyota is the first corporate sponsor for West Virginia’s Joyful Night Celebration.

For more information about the Joyful Night activities, contact Caryn Gresham, deputy commissioner of the West Virginia Division of Culture and History at 304.558.0220.

How Big of A Turkey Should I Buy? And Other Thanksgiving FAQs

Thanksgiving is all about tradition, so it’s only natural that we field a lot of the same questions each year about the same things.

But it’s okay. These things come up again and again for a reason! We’ve gathered some of the most common questions here for your easy perusal.


How big of a turkey should I buy?

The Agriculture Department suggests one pound of turkey per person. We’ve previously suggested about 1½ pounds for each diner to allow for leftovers.

• When to buy and how to store your turkey. When you buy the bird depends on whether you’re going with fresh or frozen. A raw, fresh turkey should be stored for no longer than two days in the refrigerator. In theory, a frozen turkey can last indefinitely. But for the best quality, use it within a year. Of course, if you have yet to buy one for this year, you have nothing to worry about in terms of storage time.

The Free Press WV


Should I brine the turkey?

Brining helps poultry stay moist and tasty. (Kosher or self-basting birds should not be brined.) Some people choose to dry brine their turkey – rub it with salt, basically. In that situation, salt draws the meat’s juices to the surface of the bird. The juices then mix with the salt, forming a brine that is then reabsorbed by the meat. A few years ago, deputy Post Food editor Bonnie S. Benwick tried both methods and decided she preferred a wet brine, which required less effort and resulted in more uniformly moist and seasoned meat. When you remove the turkey from the brine, make sure you pat it thoroughly dry to get crisp skin. But consider this: You can also achieve a moist, flavorful turkey without brining at all.


Why a turkey breast?

Even dark-meat fans can appreciate the moist, tender yield of a bone-in turkey breast. The key is in choosing a cooking method that will do it justice. A turkey breast can be just the ticket for a small group, as well as an alternative to roasting a second bird when you’re planning to feed a crowd. A real selling point: It can be done in advance.


Should I roast a turkey breast for two people?

Size-wise, a turkey breast is definitely a good fit for a small crowd, though for a pair, you’ll probably want to aim for something close to six pounds. Even then, you’ll have some extra for subsequent meals. To satisfy those who go for dark meat, consider getting a small whole turkey. You might have especially good luck with a local farmer. If the ideas of a white-meat-only breast or too-big whole turkey don’t appeal to you, there are other options. You might consider a duck, which is smaller, with rich, gamy flavor. Or go the ultimate route for single- or small-serving poultry and cook Cornish hens.


How can I make gravy in advance?

Roast extra turkey wings until deeply browned and crisped. Toss them into a pot of at least four cups of broth with your favorite aromatics: celery, onion, fresh herbs, a bay leaf, whole black peppercorns. For interest, add ½ cup of dry red wine or Madeira or unsweetened apple cider. Cook, strain, and discard the solids. Then you can melt eight tablespoons of unsalted butter in a separate saucepan and whisk in ½ cup of low-protein flour, like Wondra or pastry flour, to form a smooth roux; it needs to be cooked over medium heat for a few minutes to lose its floury taste. Whisk in your enriched stock and cook until thickened, which should take more than 20 minutes. Season, cool, refrigerate or freeze. Once the bird comes out of the oven, you might want to whisk strained pan drippings into the reheated gravy, then season with salt and pepper.


How do I make a perfect pie crust?

A few pointers: Keep things cool. Rotate the crust 90 degrees periodically as you’re rolling it. Make your crusts in advance. And if something does go wrong, roll with it. Do your best, and call it a day. Smile, because, hey, you’re going to be eating pie!


What can I make ahead?

Cranberry sauce. Most cranberry relishes can be refrigerated for up to a week.

Gravy. You can make your gravy (or most of it, minus the drippings) a few days early.

Bread. Bake your bread or rolls a day or two in advance.

Pies. Most pies can be made two or more days in advance.

Turkey. Start brining the day before.

Stuffing. Advance work depends on the recipe. Some stuffings can be made wholly in advance; others should be made up to the point of adding the liquid. Reheat or finish baking on Thursday.


What can I do with leftovers?

• Send home extras with your friends and family.

• Make a Thanksgiving hash.

• Blend vegetables into purée for soup.

• Layer other dishes into a type of terrine.

• Turn bread into croutons or bread crumbs.

• Mash pies into ramekins for a kind of custard.

Happy Labor Day 2016

The Gilmer Free Press

Gilmer County Schools 2016-17 School Year Important Date

The Free Press WV

Happy 4th of July 2016

The Free Press WV

“This independence day brings forth a new hope to make our tomorrows most beautiful and cherished. Wishing everyone a very happy 4th of July.”

“Independence is one of the valuable gifts that one can enjoy. Hope that God’s blessings are always with us so that the coming generations can also enjoy the fruits of independence. Enjoy and have a great day.”
“Take time on this special day to understand what independence means to you. Happy July 4th!”

“We are very lucky to be born in America which is famous for its rich culture and traditions. While celebrating the Independence Day we promise to preserve the reputation so that the freedom fighters can feel proud of us.”

“May our country always flourishes and celebrates many more years of independence. Wishing you all a very happy and blessed independence day.”

“Happy 4th of July! I feel so proud to be a part of the most wonderful country in the world.”

“Let each one of us make a promise, that as long as we live, we will be good citizens of our country in the best of our capabilities and we will help America grow into a better nation with each passing day.”

“Freedom is a gift, given to us by our freedom fighters. They had to struggle to win Independence and sacrificed their whole lives so that we could live in a free country. Let their sacrifice not go in vain. Let us promise to work hard towards making America a better nation each day free from corruption and violence. Happy Independence day to all my brothers and sisters.”

Think About it. Have We Lost The Real Meaning of Fourth of July?

The Free Press WV

Fireworks and firecrackers into the night. Picnics in the park. Hamburgers and all the fixings. Family get-togethers and a day to be with family and friends. Special sales. Maybe a patriotic parade with flags flying to honor our service people.

All feel-good events. All good. But soon forgotten until the next holiday. A holiday for children and everybody else. That’s what the Fourth of July has become. A day of fun.

What should we be celebrating? Our independence. The freedom to live our lives in freedom and pursue our dreams.

On the Fourth of July in 1776, 56 men pledged their lives, fortunes and sacred honor for us. After much work and deliberation they all signed the Declaration of Independence. That nature’s God had created all men as equal with a natural right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Many of the 56 men lost their lives and fortunes to win America’s freedom. None gave up their sacred honor.

Are we honoring their courage and sacrifices? No. As a people we are honoring hamburgers and potato salad and a day off.

Our indifference is costing us our independence and, for many, the opportunity to succeed – the chance to create a better life for ourselves and our families. We no longer value the idea that it is good for all citizens to have our people create wealth through individual achievement. Creation of wealth by some through achievement has become the resource for creating indolence and redistributing wealth. Government at all levels governs without the consent of the people as our Founding Fathers directed.

In a very real sense, Americans are in much the same position as were the colonists at the start of the American Revolution.

We have a leader who ignores law and governs without legal authority, legislators who no longer represent the people. “Looking the other way” has become the practice of many citizens. Or an unsaid attitude of “What’s in in for me?” Or, “There’s nothing I can do about it. I’ll just live on what I have earned and live my life.”

If we have a tyrannical, “lawless,” despotic government, we have no one to blame but ourselves. Many don’t care. Others are enjoying dependency and some have given up trying to restore our historical American values.

What should we or can we do? The first thing is for each one of us to decide whether we want our children and grandchildren to live in an America where they have a God-given right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The freedom to succeed and keep the rewards of achievement. The freedom to worship as we please or not at all. All of the God-given freedoms envisioned by our Founding Fathers in the document signed with the pledge of their lives, fortunes and sacred honor on the Fourth of July in 1776.

It is really up to you, me and every American. America’s Founding Fathers said, when a government becomes despotic, it is their (the people’s) right, their duty to throw off such government. To provide new guards for their future security. It is election time. It is time for us to do our duty. It is time to throw off a government that has become tyrannical, lawless and despotic – at every level.

I have no recommendations to give you, except to encourage you to decide which candidates will be most likely to preserve and protect our republic. Or choose candidates who will continue to be governed by partisanship and their own selfish desires.

The fate of our nation is in our hands, yours and mine.

Do we have the courage to do our duty as did the 56 Founding Fathers?

You decide.

It is more than important.

It is matter of survival.

Father’s Day 2016

image

We may not shower him with praise

Nor mention his name in song,

And sometimes it seems that we forget

The joy he spreads as he goes along,

But it doesn’t mean that we don’t know

The wonderful role that he has had.

And away down deep in every heart

There’s a place that is just for Dad…..

Happy Fathers’ Day to All Dads

Origins of Father’s Day Rooted in Church Service

The Free Press WV

Every third Sunday of June, Americans celebrate Father’s Day.

The origin of Father’s Day began in 1908 at a church service in West Virginia. Grace Golden Clayton, a member of the Williams Memorial Methodist Church, had recently lost her father in a mining accident.

Her father was one of 362 men, 250 who were fathers, who lost their lives at the Fairmont Coal Company in Monongah, West Virginia, when a series of explosions occurred.

About 1,000 children were left fatherless.

Clayton suggested holding a service in remembrance of those fathers.

From this beginning, Father’s Day slowly gained popularity and spread.

In 1911, President Woodrow Wilson attempted to make Father’s Day a national holiday but faced opposition in Congress due to its perceived commercial nature.

President Calvin Coolidge likewise made an attempt but failed.

President Lyndon Johnson issued a proclamation to honor fathers in 1966, and President Richard Nixon finally made the holiday official in 1972.

Father’s Day is an excellent opportunity to honor our father for his influence and direction in our life.

In Exodus 20, the nation of Israel was given the Ten Commandments.

The fifth commandment in verse 12 states, “Honor thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.”

Practicing this commandment is reasonable for all people in every generation.

Perhaps your father did not live up to your expectations. Maybe he neglected you, abandoned or abused you.

Consider then your heavenly father who promises, “I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee,” it says in Hebrews 13:5.

This heavenly father loves us. I John 3:1 declares, “Behold what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God.”

God the father promises to be with us in times of trouble and trial, even through death.

This is why David could write in Psalms 23:4, “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me: thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.”

Our heavenly father is always there and loves you greatly.

May you have a happy Father’s Day.

Here is some practical advice, from” The Fatherhood Project: 10 Facts About Father Engagement.“

  • Children benefit directly from a dad’s parenting.
  • Spending time together means greater academic success.
  • Lending emotional support means more positive social behavior.
  • Giving everyday assistance results in fewer conduct problems.
  • Monitoring children’s behavior makes for greater self-esteem.
  • Providing clear boundaries equates with reduced contact with the juvenile justice system.

Memorial Day 2016

The Gilmer Free Press
“They hover as a cloud of witnesses above this Nation.“
Henry Ward Beecher


“These martyrs of patriotism gave their lives for an idea.“
Schuyler Colfax


“Each man is a hero and an oracle to somebody.“
Ralph Waldo Emerson


“In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.“
Franklin D. Roosevelt


“Courage is contagious. When a brave man takes a stand, the spines of others are often stiffened.“
Billy Graham


“Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship,
support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.“
John F. Kennedy


“Memorial Day (Decoration Day) is the most beautiful of our national holidays.
The grim cannon have turned into palm branches, and the shell and shrapnel into peach blossoms.“
Thomas Bailey Aldrich


“All we have of freedom, all we use or know - This our fathers bought for us long and long ago.“
Rudyard Kipling, The Old Issue, 1899

 

The Gilmer Free Press

Memorial Day is a day to remember those men and women who have died serving their country. While many people visit cemeteries and memorials in their memory, others celebrate the service of all U.S. veterans—including those who live on and who continue to bear the burden of their sacrifice every day.

As a tribute to fellow Americans killed in war, Memorial Day is also an opportunity for future generations to pay tribute to veterans who made it home by helping them face the challenges they found both on and off the battlefield. Flags display patriotism and support on this holiday, and yet Americans can help veterans in other ways, as well.

The Military Order of the Purple Heart Service Foundation provides emotional, physical, educational and financial support for wounded and disabled veterans, to help improve their lives. Programs include suicide prevention, support for veterans with brain injuries, counseling for Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS) and assistance for women’s health issues—all common challenges for veterans. The Purple Heart Service Foundation provides scholarships, family assistance, claims assistance and employment training. Family members also get support, learning how to help disabled veterans to cope with their physical, emotional and behavioral challenges.

In addition to displaying their flags on Memorial Day and remembering those who have died in service, Americans can support all our veterans by volunteering or making a donation to a worthy veterans service organization. As we continue to identify new areas of concern for veterans and their families, we know that solutions are in reach if we can help them gain access to programs, services and support.

Visit www.PurpleHeartFoundation.org to learn more about how you can impact the lives of veterans by while honoring their sacrifice with your service.

The Gilmer Free Press

Senator Leonhardt to Honor Robert D. Taylor of Troy, WV with Bridge

Senator Kent Leonhardt and the Gilmer County High School Class of 1981 invite the pubic to attend a bridge dedication in memory of U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer Robert D. Taylor, “Taylor” in Troy, WV on Friday, June 17 at 15:00 hours or 3:00 PM.  Taylor grew up in Troy, WV and was a 1981 graduate of Gilmer County High School and went on to serve in the U.S. Army.

U.S. Army BG General Charles Veit will be on hand with the Class of 1981 and Senator Leonhardt for the dedication to honor Taylor for his 8 years of service in the U.S. Army.  Officer Taylor was aboard an AH-1 Cobra Helicopter assigned to the 5th Bn, 501st Aviation Regiment U.S. Army patrolling the Korean demilitarized zone between South and North Korea and was killed on November 13, 1991 in a helicopter accident.

The Free Press WV


The bridge being dedicated to his memory crosses Leading Creek served as the state road access to the community where the Taylor family lived. The bridge to be dedicated is just east of the community of Troy on US 47 on the road formerly known as Spruce Run Road now named as Hemlock Run Road. When Taylor lived on “Spruce Run” the West Virginia Department of Highways bridge was a steel truss bridge. The bridge was replaced in 2010 with a new concrete span that meets today engineering and safety standards and was designed by Tim Hermansdorfer and constructed by Kenton Meadows Construction from Gassaway, WV.

Senator Leonhardt said “I am honored for the opportunity to recognize Robert Taylor’s service to our country.  We must remember those who sacrificed and died in our nation’s service, so we can enjoy our freedom.  We must not take our freedom for granted”.  Taylor is remembered by his classmates and friends as someone who loved his community and country with big dreams of flying.

The bridge dedication ceremony will be held on the bridge on Friday, June 17, 2016 at 3:00 PM.  Everyone is invited to attend, the fellowship with family and friends and honor Robert D. Taylor for his ultimate sacrifice.  For more information, call 304.482.6135


Directions:

Take US119/US33 West for 17 miles. (From Weston)
Turn Right onto WV-47 at Linn
Travel 2 miles towards Troy.
Turn left onto Hemlock “Spruce” Run Road
Parking in field next to bridge.


Take US119/US33 East for 10 miles. (From Glenville)
Turn Left onto WV-47 at Linn
Travel 2 miles towards Troy.
Turn left onto Hemlock “Spruce” Run Road
Parking in field next to bridge.

Mother’s Day 2016

The Gilmer Free Press
Happy Mother’s Day to my dear Mom,

Author of my personality:

Pleased, I hope, with what you read in me;

Pleased, I hope, with episodes to come.

Yet now I, too, would get some pleasure from

Making you the book in which I see,

Of all the players in my family,

The central character, whom I would plumb.

How beautiful to move in that direction!

Each to each a separate source of pleasure,

Reading in the others happiness,

‘Mid much description, underlying love.

So would we deepen the connection,

Discovering new passages to treasure

As we follow time towards tenderness,

Yearning for what years unread will prove.

Mother’s Day around the World

The Gilmer Free Press

The United States commercial market for Mother’s Day has skyrocketed in recent years.

According to the Society of American Florists, 25% of all purchases of fresh flowers and plants are for Mother’s Day; and Hallmark says Mother’s Day is the third largest card selling holiday and second most popular gift-giving holiday after Christmas. 

So it may surprise you to find that the first efforts to establish Mother’s Day in the U.S. weren’t exactly successful.

After the Civil War and during the start of the Franco-Prussian War, social activist Julia Ward Howe wrote a Mother’s Day Proclamation calling for peace.  She was inspired by a woman named Ann Jarvis who attempted to unite women and improve sanitation conditions through the Mothers’ Work Days.  Howe’s Mother’s Day for Peace did not gain much of a following and her proposal to convert the July 4th festivities into a celebration of peace and mothers fell flat. 

In 1908, after Jarvis’ death, her daughter Anna M. Jarvis campaigned for a Mother’s Day holiday.  Her Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia held the first official Mother’s Day celebration and in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson eventually declared the second Sunday of May the official national date for the holiday.

By the end of Anna Jarvis’ life, Mother’s Day was celebrated in more than 40 countries.  The carnation was Ann Jarvis’ favorite flower and was present at her funeral.  The tradition has arisen of wearing a carnation, colored if the mother is living, and white if not, to honor one’s mother on the holiday.  It is also common to honor Grandmothers, wives, and other important mother figures in your life. 


Here’s a look at Mother’s Day traditions around the world:


In Mexico, Mother’s Day has been celebrated on May 10 since the early 1900s.  It is one of the biggest gift-giving holidays in Latin American countries.  The celebration is also tied to the Virgin of Guadalupe who is considered a symbol of motherhood.  There is a special mass for Dia de las Madres along with traditional breakfast or brunch for mothers and some sort of serenade in the morning as well in Mexico.


El Salvador and Guatemala also observe Mother’s Day on May 10. 


In the United Kingdom Mother’s Day is celebrated on the fourth Sunday of Lent.  In the 1600s, children that were working away from home as servants visited their Mother Church on Mothering Day.  They also saw their families and their mothers during this time.  Eventually the holiday began to take on a secular celebration as well.  A tradition of giving your mother a glazed cake was started.  The cake comes from a folk tale about a married couple named Simon and Nell.  When they couldn’t decide whether to boil or bake a cake, they did both and invented the Simnel cake. 


In Spain and Portugal, where the holiday is more religious, people respect and remember the Virgin Mary on December 08. Children also honor their own mothers on this day.


In the former Republic of Yugoslavia, Mother’s Day was tied to a three day series of holidays.  The Mother’s Day cycle in Yugoslavia began with Children’s Day or “Dechiyi Dan” three days before Christmas. The following Sunday was Mother’s Day or “Materitse”, and the Sunday after that was Father’s Day or “Ochichi.“  It was a three day event where in the parents and the children alternated in tying each other up.  The children had to promise to be good in order to be released and the mother offered the children treats so that she could be freed. 


Many countries celebrate Mother’s Day on March 08:

Afghanistan, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Armenia, to name just a few.  However, that date has other importance as well.  International Women’s Day, celebrated on March 8, recognizes the economic, political, and social achievements of women.


The Socialist Party of American began celebrating a National Women’s Day in 1909.  The following year the Socialist International met in Copenhagen and established a Women’s Day of an international nature in order to support the women’s rights movement.  Albania, Belarus, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and Russia are just a few of the countries that celebrate International Women’s Day rather than Mother’s Day. 


France celebrates Mother’s Day the last Sunday in May. After WWI the holiday took shape around the desire to repopulate the country.  Medals were awarded depending on the number of children a woman had.  This springtime Sunday is referred to as La Fete des Meres, and it provides children and adults throughout France with the opportunity to make their mother the center of attention, and give her gifts and treats. Today a common gift is a cake shaped to resemble a bouquet of flowers, along with candies, flowers, cards and perfumes.  In Sweden, the Swedish Red Cross sells little plastic flowers before Mother’s Day. They then use the money that they make from these flowers to help needy children and their mothers. 


In Finland Mother’s Day is called aidipayiva.  The family picks flower and presents a bouquet to the mother.  A small white pungent flower called the valkovuokko is usually preferred. 


Some Asian countries, such as Singapore and China, follow suit with the American Mother’s day tradition.  In China most names begin with a character signifying mother which honors the maternal heritage.  Other Asian countries have their own unique traditions.  In Thailand, the celebration of the beloved queen Sirikit Kitayakara’s birthday on August 12 has become a Mother’s Day celebration.


Hong Kong’s holiday, called mu quin jie, usually honors the parents of the mother if she is deceased.


In Japan, the name for Mother’s Day is haha no hi. In the early 1900s the Japanese celebrated Mother’s day according to Western custom, but this was banned during World War II. After the war, the tradition became widespread again and there were drawing contests offered for children to illustrate their mothers.  The exhibits celebrating mothers and peace toured throughout the country. 


In Iran and Bahrain, Ruz-e Madar or Mothers’ day is observed on the first Day of Spring, March 21.  This also happens in Lebanon and United Arab Emirates


In Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, Yaum ul-umm, is modeled after Western Mothers’ Day and is marked by celebrations and feasts. 


In Ethiopia, Mother’s Day occurs in mid-fall when the rainy season ends.  There is a three day feast called “Antrosht,“ which is part of the celebration.


South Africa celebrates Mother’s Day on the first Sunday in May.


The Egyptian goddess Isis was considered the mother of the gods.  She was revered as a loving wife and mother and symbol of fertility and magic.  She was revered and a cult even formed to worship her.


In ancient Greece, Rhea, “mother of the gods,“ was honored in the spring with honey-cakes, fine drinks, and flowers at dawn.  Her Roman counterpart, Cybele, was celebrated with games and a procession through the streets. 


The Celtic goddess Brigid, was celebrated during spring in connection to the first milk of the ewes and calves that flowed, symbolizing purity and nourishment. 


For thousands of years, In India, the Hindu people celebrate for nine days in October during a festival called Durga Puja.  This puja (or worship) celebrates Hindu goddess Durga, a warrior-like protector and mother.  It is currently the largest Hindu festival in Bengal.

Kid President Celebrated Mother’s Day

Happy Easter 2016

The Gilmer Free Press

Easter is the central religious feast in the Christian religion.

Jesus was raised from the dead on the third day after his crucifixion.

People all over the world celebrate this resurrection on Easter Day or Easter Sunday, two days after Good Friday and three days after Maundy Thursday.

Now officially Easter lasts for the fifty days until Pentecost. Easter also marks the end of Lent, a season of fasting, prayer, and penance.

The exact origins of this religious feast day’s name are unknown. Some sources claim the word Easter is derived from Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility.

Other accounts trace Easter to the Latin term hebdomada alba, or white week, an ancient reference to Easter week and the white clothing donned by people who were baptized during that time.

Through a translation error, the term later appeared as esostarum in Old High German, which eventually became Easter in English.

In Spanish, Easter is known as Pascua; in French, Paques.

These words are derived from the Greek and Latin Pascha or Pasch, for Passover.

Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection occurred after he went to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover (or Pesach in Hebrew), the Jewish festival commemorating the ancient Israelites’ exodus from slavery in Egypt.

Pascha eventually came to mean Easter.

Easter is really an entire season of the Christian church year, as opposed to a single-day observance.

Lent, the 40-day period leading up to Easter Sunday, is a time of reflection and penance and represents the 40 days that Jesus spent alone in the wilderness before starting his ministry, a time in which Christians believe he survived various temptations by the devil.

The day before Lent, known as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday, is a last hurrah of food and fun before the fasting begins.

The week preceding Easter is called Holy Week and includes Maundy Thursday, which commemorates Jesus’ last supper with his disciples; Good Friday, which honors the day of his crucifixion; and Holy Saturday, which focuses on the transition between the crucifixion and resurrection.

The 50-day period following Easter Sunday is called Eastertide and includes a celebration of Jesus’ ascension into heaven.

In addition to Easter’s religious significance, it also has a commercial side, as evidenced by the mounds of jelly beans and marshmallow chicks that appear in stores each spring.

As with Christmas, over the centuries various folk customs and pagan traditions, including Easter eggs, bunnies, baskets and candy, have become a standard part of this holy holiday.

The Gilmer Free Press

Click Below for additional Articles...

Page 1 of 43 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »





The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVII The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved