GilmerFreePress.net

Ritchie County

Ritchie County

Sunday Storms Could Cause Flash Flooding

The Free Press WV

More than two dozen counties in West Virginia are under a Flash Flood Watch through Sunday evening, the National Weather Service said.

Additional rounds of thunderstorms containing very heavy rain could cause flooding along small streams and poor drainage areas, meteorologists said.

The counties under the watch include: Mason, Jackson, Wood, Pleasants, Tyler, Putnam, Kanawha, Roane, Wirt, Calhoun, Ritchie, Doddridge, Clay, Braxton, Gilmer, Lewis, Harrison, Taylor, Upshur Barbour, Fayette, Nicholas, Webster, Pocahontas, and Randolph.

Controlled Deer Hunt Applications Available for Four West Virginia State Parks

Applications for controlled deer hunts in 2017 are being accepted at four West Virginia State Parks.

Those parks are Blennerhassett Island Historical State Park in Wood County, Pipestem Resort State Park in Summers County, Cacapon Resort State Park in Morgan County and North Bend State Park in Ritchie County.

For the first time, multiple-day hunts are scheduled at Cacapon and North Bend State Parks.

The deadline to apply is August 13, 2017. All West Virginia hunting regulations will apply.

Applications must be submitted at www.wvhunt.com.

Applicants with a DNR ID number must log in using their existing account.

The Free Press WV


New customers need to create an account on the Electronic Licensing and Game Checking System.

“Controlled hunts have been successful in deer management in previous years,” said Sam Cowell, hunt coordinator for the West Virginia State Parks system.

“It is an effective and efficient means of maintaining a biologically and socially balanced deer herd at our parks experiencing overpopulation.”

Dates for the 2017 controlled hunts at state parks are as follows:

Park

Hunting Date

Blennerhassett Island Historical State Park

September 25 and October 23

Pipestem Resort State Park

October 09-10

Cacapon Resort State Park

November 03-04

North Bend State Park

November 06-08 and November 13-15


Controlled Hunt Application Process

Applications must be submitted at www.wvhunt.com.

Once logged in, applicants must select “Enter Lottery” and then choose only one of the hunting options listed for the park where the applicant is applying to hunt.

Multiple entries for the same park hunt may disqualify you.

Applications must be completed by midnight Sunday, August 13, 2017.

Hunters will be selected at random. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of August.


Controlled Hunts Benefits

Controlled hunts help manage deer populations. Over-browsing by deer leads to loss of native vegetation, prevents forest regeneration and alters habitats for all wildlife species living in the park.

The primary goal of controlled hunts is to reduce deer numbers to levels that prevent habitat loss, property damage, vehicle collisions and potential human injuries.

Hunting contributes to wildlife conservation while maintaining a healthy deer herd population.

State park contacts are: Nathan Hanshaw, Pipestem Resort State Park 304.466.1800); Miles Evenson, Blennerhassett Island State Park (304.420.4800); Scott Fortney, Cacapon Resort State Park (304.258.1022); and Steve Jones, North Bend State Park (304.643.2931).

West Virginia Division of Natural Resources hunting regulations will apply to all managed hunts.

To learn more, visit www.wvhunt.com.

Scholarships Available Through Women’s Opportunity Fund

The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation is accepting scholarship applications for the Women’s Opportunity Fund – Linda H. Culp Memorial Scholarship.  The Women’s Opportunity Fund provides educational resources to non-traditional female students who are working to complete their education or to pursue additional schooling toward higher level career goals, professional certification, or other degrees.  As a memorial to Linda H. Culp, this fund honors a pioneering and hardworking local leader who mentored and supported other women in accomplishing their hopes and dreams.

To be eligible for financial assistance, an applicant must meet all the following requirements:

·      Applicant must be a female, adult learner who is not a recent high school graduate.

·      Applicant must reside in one of the following counties:  Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Jackson, Mason, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Tyler, Wirt, or Wood counties in West Virginia and Athens, Meigs, or Washington counties in Ohio.

·      Applicant must be pursuing a form of post-secondary education, including bachelor’s degrees, advanced degrees, certificate programs, or vocational/technical studies in any chosen field.

Recipients are selected by an independent scholarship advisory committee.  The scholarship can be applied toward tuition, books or other education related costs.  To apply, visit the Foundation’s website, www.pacfwv.com/Scholarships/Apply.  The application deadline is July 26th.  For additional information, please contact the PACF’s Regional Scholarships Officer, Rachel Brezler, at 304.428.4438.

The Free Press WV

About Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates:

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates (PACF) works with individuals, families, businesses, and civic or nonprofit organizations to make a positive and permanent commitment for the future of our community.  PACF is a single 501(c)(3) public charity that manages more than 350 charitable funds with nearly $40 million in assets.  PACF works in partnership with its local affiliates to provide leadership and develop philanthropic resources to meet the needs of an 11-county service area.  Since 1963, PACF has helped local citizens support charitable needs and touch every aspect of life in the community in a variety of lasting ways.  For more information about PACF, visit www.pacfwv.com or call 304.428.4438.

Central WV Community Action, Inc. Works to Get People Back On Their Feet

The Free Press WV

Central West Virginia Community Action, Inc. has just under 100 staff members with 8 locations serving Lewis, Harrison, Gilmer and Ritchie Counties.

Shannon Cunningham-Snead, the executive director, said the agency plays a critical role in the community through its anti-poverty mission.

“The agency is specifically charged to work in collaboration with existing efforts of government services and other non-profits and to avoid the duplication of services,” she said. “The agency conducts a community needs assessment every three years and uses that information to design or re-design its work, especially to fill the gaps where needs are not currently being met.”

The agency’s largest program is Head Start which helps more than 360 low-income families and other at-risk 3 to 5-year-olds in the four country region, Cunningham-Snead said.

“Children participate in pre-school and follow a curriculum designed to prepare them for a successful transition to kindergarten,” she said. “They receive free transportation, meals and other support services, and all children receive medical and dental exams.”

Children with special needs are also provided access to addition services, Cunningham-Snead said. The program is operated in strong partnership with each county’s Board of Education.

“Head Start is unique in that it focuses on the well-being of the child’s whole family, and family coordinators work with the parents and caregivers to ensure that they have access to adequate housing, food, employment opportunities and more,” she said.

Many know the agency for the Family Services program it offers in Lewis County, Cunningham-Snead said. Services are designed to meet unique needs of families in effort to obtain financial self-sufficiency.

“Case managers work with low-income customers on creating a household budget, accessing available resources such as SNAP benefits, housing vouchers, job training opportunities and providing direct assistance to support individuals obtain or maintain employment,” she said.

The agency can also provide job-specific clothing, testing fees, license renewals and more in order for individuals to be successful with employment, Cunningham-Snead said. Through an AmeriCorps program, they also offer free tax preparation services for low-income individuals.

“The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program is specifically geared to ensure that qualifying individuals receive the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Care Tax Credit,” she said. “Additionally, opportunities to create a household budget and open a savings account are provided as well.”

Central WV Community Action, Inc. recently received a grant for the No Heat Emergency Program. The initiative provides free repair or replacement of heating systems for qualifying households, Cunningham-Snead said.

“To qualify, individuals should own their own home, and their heat source must not be in working condition or not considered a safe method of heating the home,” she said. “The agency provides assistance, as it is available, for those struggling to keep up with utility bills.”

Vonda Berry, the program director, said the Family Services offered are vital for the communities in Lewis County. They are able to assist those who are employable.

“If for some reason someone has lost their job or have been on a leave, they can see a Family Services specialist,” she said. “They will assist in setting goals, create a budget together and appoint them to other available resources if they need it.”

Berry said they like to call what they do a “hand up” instead of a hand-out because they are teaching people how to become self-sufficient and independent.

“It can be hard for those who don’t have a support system and encouragement to get the help they need,” she said. “When someone’s living paycheck to paycheck, it only takes one crisis to set them back.”

The agency works closely with the Department of Health and Human Resources as well as the Family Resource Network, Berry said. They are stronger by pulling everyone together because not one agency can do it all and have all the answers.

“It’s good to have a place to go where someone knows what’s available in the community and can help you set goals, short and long-term,” she said. “I think that’s what hurts people, they get so overwhelmed by a crisis they can’t see what’s next.”

The agency works with the individual to see a vision and then help them get there step-by-step, Berry said.

Individuals seeking assistance can contact the agency’s main number at 304.622.8495 to find the service location nearest to their community. The agency’s Family Services programs are operated at 468 Main Avenue in Weston, and 108 South 3rd Street in Clarksburg.

~~  Victoria L. Cann ~~

DIY Network Show ‘Barnwood Builders’ Visits Ritchie County

On last Sunday’s episode of “Barnwood Builders,” Mark Bowe and his team of old-school craftsmen saved a 150-year-old log cabin on top of a mountain in Ritchie County.

While they were in town, they visited Berdine’s, America’s oldest five and dime store. They also learned to make marbles by hand with Ellenboro glass artist Sam Hogue.

In nearby Cairo, Ritchie County, the Barnwood Builders met Martha and Dick Hartley, a local couple who built a log house homestead by hand.

The episode aired Sunday night on the DIY Network.

For those who missed the Harrisville episode it will air again this Sunday, July 16 at 10 p.m, on DIY.

And it will air again on Tuesday, July 18 at 5 p.m. and Sunday, July 23 at 11 p.m.

Filming for the episode in Ritchie County took place in January.

The Free Press WV


Now in its fifth season, “Barnwood Builders” is one of the most successful shows on the DIY Network, said Sean McCourt, executive producer. Silent Crow Arts, based in New York City, is the production company.

McCourt describes the one-hour show as: “Six good natured West Virginians travel the heartland saving pioneer log cabins and building gorgeous modern homes with reclaimed lumber. The show’s star, Mark Bowe, lives by the motto, ‘work hard, be kind, take pride.’”

Bowe lives in Lewisburg. Bowe wanted the show to present a positive message about West Virginia, McCourt said.

McCourt said he has found that West Virginians take great pride in the homespun series that celebrates old fashioned values and West Virginia pride.

There is a new episode of “Barnwood Builders” every Sunday at 9 p.m. on DIY. Episodes then re-air several times, McCourt said.

McCourt said the Barnwood Builders do great work, transforming old barns and cabins into nice homes.

There are 13 “Barnwood Builders” shows each season, with seven taking place in West Virginia, McCourt said.

Seasons six and seven of the show have been scheduled, McCourt said.

Grants Available From Community Foundation

The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates (PACF) is currently accepting grant applications for the fall cycle of its Community Action Grants Program. 

The Foundation’s application process is online and the deadline to submit is midnight on September 15. 

To access the online application, visit the Foundation’s website:  www.pacfwv.com/Grants/Apply.

To be considered for a Community Action Grant, an applicant must be a private, nonprofit organization, tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or a public institution. 

Either the applicant or program to be funded must be located in the Foundation’s eleven-county geographic service area (Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Jackson, Mason, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Wirt, and Wood counties in West Virginia, and Washington County, Ohio).

Priority counties for Foundation grant support are:

  • Calhoun
  • Doddridge
  • Gilmer
  • Ritchie
  • Roane
  • Wirt
  • Wood

The Foundation provides support for capital and equipment projects, program development, technical assistance, training, capacity building, and, under special circumstances, operating support. 

Submitted applications are considered for support from charitable funds managed by the PACF that are designed to support a wide variety of projects and causes throughout the region. 

Applications from Calhoun, Gilmer and Wirt counties are also reviewed by the Foundation’s Little Kanawha Area Community Foundation regional affiliate advisory board.

“In an effort to make a larger and more immediate impact on regional needs, the Foundation has made important changes to its Community Action Grants Program,” said Marian Clowes, PACF’s Senior Program Officer.  “As a result, the maximum grant request size has been increased to $15,000.  Additionally, the proposed projects must be completed within a 12-month timeframe.”

To learn more about the Foundation’s Community Action Grants Program, visit www.pacfwv.com/Grants or contact Marian Clowes at 304.428.4438 or .

 

About the Parkersburg Area Community Foundation

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates (PACF) works with individuals, families, businesses, and civic or non-profit organizations to make a positive and permanent commitment for the future of our community.  PACF is a single 501(c)(3) public charity that manages more than 340 charitable funds with nearly $34 million in assets.  PACF works in partnership with its local affiliates to provide leadership and develop philanthropic resources to meet the needs of an 11-county service area.  Since 1963, PACF has helped local citizens support charitable needs and touch every aspect of life in the community in a variety of lasting ways.  For more information about PACF, visit www.pacfwv.com or call 304.428.4438.

Flash Flood Watch in Effect For Several WV Counties

The Free Press WV

The National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Watch for nearly two dozen West Virginia counties through Friday evening.

According to NWS meteorologists, “A frontal system is expected to pass through the region Thursday afternoon and Friday. Storms associated with it could produce excessive rainfall. This rain coupled with the wet soils across the area could produce flash flooding, especially along small streams, creeks, low spots and poor drainage areas.”

Counties named in the watch include:

  • Barbour
  • Braxton
  • Calhoun
  • Doddridge
  • Gilmer
  • Harrison
  • Jackson
  • Lewis
  • Mason
  • Pleasants
  • Pocahontas
  • Randolph
  • Ritchie
  • Roane
  • Taylor
  • Tyler
  • Upshur
  • Webster
  • Wirt
  • Wood

WVDEP’s REAP Collecting Tires Six Counties In July

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s (WVDEP) Rehabilitation Environmental Action Plan (REAP) is holding six tire collections across the state in July.

The events are:

o   Wood County: Saturday, July 08, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Erickson All Sports Center on Erickson Drive in Parkersburg;

o   Pleasants County: Saturday, July 08, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Marys Marina, St. Marys;

o   Boone County: Saturday, July 15, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.at the Boone County Courthouse;

o   Ritchie County: Saturday, July 15, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the DOH Garage in Ellenboro;

o   Pendleton County: Saturday, July 22, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Franklin Oil on Rt. 220 in Franklin;

o   Monongalia County: Saturday, July 29, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wal-Mart off I-68 Exit 1.

Residents may dispose of up to 10 tires per person with a valid West Virginia ID for the county in which the tire collection event is being held.

The tires must be off the rims. Only car and light truck tires, 16-inches or less, will be accepted.

Haulers and businesses are not allowed to participate.

This tire collection is made possible, in part, through REAP, which brings together all of the state’s cleanup programs to maximize West Virginia’s cleanup efforts.

Students Named to Spring 2017 Honor Lists at GSC

The Free Press WV

The names of students who attained the Glenville State College President’s and Vice President’s Honor Lists for the Spring 2017 semester have been announced.

To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison

Boone County: Tiffany D. Muller

Braxton County: Coleden R. Belknap, Bridget D. Carr, Amber N. Hyre

Calhoun County: Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont

Clay County:  Dalton M. Holcomb

Doddridge County:  Dennis M. Bowling, Jr., Joshua M. Pitcock

Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth

Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Jonathan E. Clark, Michaela L. Gumm, Christina L. Jenkins, Amanda R. Lamb, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Halee N. Wildman

Grant County: Larissa A. Henry

Jackson County: Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical, Clayton Swisher

Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Jasmine N. Tarman

Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Rebecca E. Wiseman

Lewis County: Jennifer M. Eiler, Justin P. Raines, Kelly L. Weaver

Logan County: Matthew A. Zachary

Marshall County: Logen M. LeMasters

Mason County: Anthony ‘AJ’ Howard

Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton

Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg, Michael I. Pracht

Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Mark H. Sanson

Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto

Preston County: Madison H. Null, Josiah D. Nuse

Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne

Randolph County: Chad E. Cook, Daniel T. Crawford, Christopher D. Varner

Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff

Roane County: Georgia B. Bing

Tucker County: Wiley T. Raines

Upshur County: Skylar A. Fulton, Belinda L. Lewis

Wayne County: James M. Egnor

Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule

Wirt County: Mary M. Strong

Wood County:  Taylor A. Broadwater

Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Raven P. Fatool, Raven C. Greer, Jake Hensell, Momi P. Lievan, Allison A. Parski, Victoria L. Peterson, Brian S. Williams

***

To be named to the GSC Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Logan M. Renner

Boone County: Andrew K. Boktor, Gregory I. Lail, Mackenzie R. Smith

Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Tyler K. Cunningham, Larissa E. DeLuca, Garrett E. Hacker, Sean R. Hawkins, Jacob D. Haymond, Tonya L. Lyons, Christian M. Pritt, Joshua L. Rexroad, Teddy J. Richardson, Randy A. Stiers, Andrew R. Tefft, Erica N. Toler, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Andrea B. Vidal, Elania N. White, Shanna S. Wine

Calhoun County: Moriah J. Creelfox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Amber N. Frymier, Chelsea R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Devon T. Toppings

Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Carrie G. Huffman, Caitlyn M. Rogers, Kristie D. Taylor

Doddridge County: Ryan M. Mizia, Megan J. Sheets, Lindsey G. Travis

Fayette County: Breanna N. Bennett, Anthony J. Murdock, II, Travis C. Myers, Trevor D. Wood

Gilmer County: Katelyn S. Benson, Madison L. Campbell, Janessia S. Cool, Teayria G. Cool, Sara B. Coombs, Tara S. Evans, Conner T. Ferguson, Samantha L. McCune, Matthew M. Montgomery, Cody M. Moore, Dawn R. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Hunter Moore, Zaon A. Starseed, Lexsey A. Wagner, Timothy G. Wine, Carrissa M. Wood, Trevor D. Wright

Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty

Hardy County: Faith V. Smith

Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Abby S. McCarty, Hannah M. Mick, Lia Runyan, Megan E. Ruppert, Amy A. Weiss, Bettie M. Wilfong

Kanawha County:  McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Jacob T. Lutsy, Jeri D. Potter, Bethany N. Spelock

Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, James Z. Browning, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Daniel M. Pascasio, Mitchell D. Queen, Torie A. Riffle

Logan County: Kristin A. DesRocher

Marion County:  Emily A. Stoller

Mason County:  Kaylee M. Howard

Monongalia County: Hunter A. Given

Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Brady A. Tritapoe

Nicholas County: Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Kimmy K. Little, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Eric W. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Joshua ‘Cameron’ Woods

Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Brittany L. Huffman, Chase M. Simmons, Raven D. Turner

Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote

Pocahontas County: Lucas W. Fuller, Isaac C. Hise, Brooke A. Riffe

Putnam County: Tori L. Ward

Raleigh County: Jordan B. Coalson, Jacob Coots, Michael A. Layne, Matthew Welch

Randolph County: Jerome W. Smith

Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Olivia D. Goff, Valerie E. Ogle

Roane County: Bonita J. Schreckengost, Cassidy M. Taylor, James D. Williams

Tucker County: Catherine Chambers

Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber

Upshur County: Heather A. Gregory

Webster County: Richard M. Burns, Tonya N. Sahl, Danielle Williams

Wetzel County: Colton L. Ring, Brandon M. Smith

Wood County: Brooke N. Radabaugh

Wyoming County: Kaci M. Mullins

Out of State: Ali P. Capobianco, Jr, Brianna T. D’Angelo, Jessica D. Digennaro, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Alex E. Gilmore, Tanner B. Helms, Cedric J. Johnson, Justin S. Koogler, Julia E. Lindberg, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Asiya B. Smith, Tayana L. Stewart, Johnni M. Tillman

North Bend State Park Introduces Outdoor Adventure, Saturday, June 10, 2017

Encouraging people to try a new outdoor activity or to summon the courage to try again is the goal of North Bend State Park’s Introduction to Adventure event this Saturday, June 10. As part of the park’s “Quest” program, three instructional classes on kayaking, mountain biking and rappelling are planned.

Park rangers and activity guides will provide instruction in an affordable group format. Along with skill development, instructors will be sharing information about equipment and how to get started. Sessions are fee-based and registration is at the North Bend Lodge front desk in person or by calling 304.643.2931. Registration is open until June 09, or if space is still available, June 10. More information about this weekend event and the Quest program is available at www.northbendsp.com.

The Free Press WV


Course descriptions:

MOUNTAIN BIKING – 9 a.m., Base Camp
Mountain Biking basics and skills is a four-hour session that includes instruction on maintenance, adjusting your bike’s fit, peddling cadence, how to get the most out of your gears, controlling your speed, balance, the ready position and simple obstacles. Students will ride on the park’s trails to work on braking techniques, cornering, handling terrain, picking lines and putting it all together and making it flow like surfing through the woods. The class fee is $35 per person and includes equipment. Lunch is not included.

RAPPELLING – 10 a.m., Lodge
Introduction to belaying and rappelling is a 2.5-hour session designed to introduce you to the sport of rappelling safely. With a six-to-one guest/guide ratio, the course will include introduction, all equipment, safety instruction, and belaying and rappelling techniques. The class is $65 per person and includes necessary equipment. Lunch is not provided.

KAYAKING – 6 p.m., Cokeley Boathouse
Kayak Basics is a two-hour excursion designed to introduce and improve basic flat water skills while enjoying the natural environment of North Bend State Park from a different perspective. This course includes safety information, balance, basic paddle strokes and all the required equipment. The class is $35 per person.


North Bend State Park is located near Cairo and Harrisville in Ritchie County. Open year-round, the park is popular for its outdoor pursuits, hiking and bird watching. North Bend Lake is 305 acres and open to the public for licensed fishing. The lake is home to a large population of red-headed woodpeckers and other watchable wildlife via kayak. To learn more about North Bend State Park, park activities, events and accommodations, visit www.northbendsp.com or call 304.643.2931.

Over $326,000 Raised for Local Nonprofits Through Give Local MOV!

The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation & Regional Affiliates (PACF) announced that $326,185 was raised through Give Local MOV, the May 2rd fundraising event hosted by the PACF.

Nonprofit partners in Give Local MOV 2017 included 43 groups with missions supporting animals; arts and culture; community improvement; education; environment; health; human services; and youth development.  Organizations invited to participate were those with a charitable fund associated with PACF’s family of funds.

Nonprofits raising the most funds included:  Parkersburg Area Coalition for the Homeless, FaithLink, Parkersburg Art Center, Parkersburg High School Foundation, and the YMCA of Parkersburg.  .

A key benefit of giving to the participating nonprofits on May 2nd was the availability of matching funds.  PACF raised nearly $180,000 which was made available and awarded through matching fund challenges and incentive prizes over the giving period.  Several regional sponsors, led by Superior Toyota, supplied matching funds that made the day even more exciting.  This year, because of Superior’s generosity, a local philanthropist, Mary M. Welch, matched their donation to help the Foundation to offer the Give Local MOV campaign.  In addition, several individuals/businesses offered private challenges to specific organizations and $7,000 in hourly prize incentives encouraged giving. 

The PACF takes no fee to organize and host the Give Local MOV campaign.  The PACF supplies the secure online giving platform and also covers credit card processing fees, allowing 100% of each donor’s gift to go to its intended agency.  This year, some donors that gave on May 2nd opted to help cover the credit card processing and transaction fees with their donation and the Foundation is very grateful for their support. 

“Our event sponsors and the local donors who contribute are the critical factors in the success of Give Local MOV,” said Boyce said.  “Our local businesses truly stepped up this year and enabled us to make an incredible impact region-wide. And, local businesses are only able to support positive initiatives, such as Give Local MOV, if they themselves have support from local residents.  By supporting local businesses and shopping local, you can help provide for the greater good of our community. We urge everyone to give local and to shop local!”

The Foundation plans to host Give Local MOV again on May 01, 2018.  Businesses, nonprofits or individuals interested in having a significant impact for their investment and want to get involved in Give Local MOV 2018 should contact Boyce at 304.428.4438 to learn more.


About Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates:

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates (PACF) works with individuals, families, businesses, and civic or non-profit organizations to make a positive and permanent commitment for the future of our community.  PACF is a single 501(c)(3) public charity that manages more than 350 charitable funds with nearly $34 million in assets.  PACF works in partnership with its local affiliates to provide leadership and develop philanthropic resources to meet the needs of an 11-county service area.  Since 1963, PACF has helped local citizens support charitable needs and touch every aspect of life in the community in a variety of lasting ways.  For more information about PACF, visit www.pacfwv.com or call 304.428.4438.

Local Community Foundation Receives National Accreditation

The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation & Regional Affiliates (PACF) has once again been re-accredited under the National Standards for Community Foundations.  As affiliate organizations of the PACF, the Doddridge County Community Foundation (DCCF), Little Kanawha Area Community Foundation (LKACF) and the Ritchie County Community Foundation (RCCF) are included within PACF’s re-accreditation. Attainment of National Standards is a significant achievement that recognizes the commitment to accountability, transparency and excellence of the accredited foundation.

The National Standards are a self-regulation program for community foundations that involves a lengthy and rigorous process of submitting one’s policies, procedures and practices for review by peers, professional reviewers and attorneys to ensure that they meet the current legal requirements and most effective practices and policies of community foundations. The National Standards are known to Congress, state legislators and other regulators as the only accreditation program currently existing for foundations.

The National Standards for Community Foundations Accreditation program is directed by the Community Foundation National Standards Board (CFNSB) with the support of the Council on Foundations. The Accreditation Seal is only achieved by those community foundations that demonstrate compliance with the twenty-six distinct standards of excellence. The re-accreditation process is annual and the Accreditation Seal is awarded only to those community foundations that continue to meet the comprehensive standards.

According to the CFNSB, “The Accreditation Seal signals to donors and to their professional advisors that a community foundation is a sound place to give and to make a difference.”

By undertaking the National Accreditation process, the PACF demonstrates its commitment to accountability and excellence to its donors, its community, policymakers and the general public.  The PACF provides permanent fund management and grantmaking services to an eleven-county area (Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Jackson, Mason, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Wirt and Wood counties in West Virginia and Washington County, Ohio).

PACF Board Chairman, Greg Herrick said, “The Foundation and its Regional Affiliates are delighted to share the news of our organization’s re-accreditation under the National Standards. We are very grateful to our donors and we continuously strive to ensure that we operate in a manner reflecting the most effective and efficient of practices. Receiving re-accreditation is something in which our whole community of supporters may take pride.” 


About Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates:

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates (PACF) works with individuals, families, businesses, and civic or non-profit organizations to make a positive and permanent commitment for the future of our community.  PACF is a single 501(c)(3) public charity that manages more than 350 charitable funds with nearly $40 million in assets.  PACF works in partnership with its local affiliates to provide leadership and develop philanthropic resources to meet the needs of an 11-county service area.  Since 1963, PACF has helped local citizens support charitable needs and touch every aspect of life in the community in a variety of lasting ways.  For more information about PACF, visit www.pacfwv.com or call 304.428.4438.

Spring Interns Complete Student Teaching for GSC

The Free Press WV

Ten students have completed their student teaching internships for Glenville State College and participated in GSC’s 143rd Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, May 06, 2017.


The Free Press WV
Kaitlyn Bircheat of Chapmanville, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Buckhannon-Upshur High School, Robert L. Bland Middle School, and Jane Lew Elementary School with Jeremiah Smallridge and Tracy Alfred.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. John Taylor were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Steve and Dewana Bircheat of Chapmanville, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Brittany Burdette of Ripley, WV completed her student teaching in English Education (5-adult) at Robert L. Bland Middle School and Lewis County High School with Lesley White and Grace Harris.

Dr. John Taylor and Dr. Melody Wise were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter Julie Burdette and Alex Buchanan of Evans, West Virginia.

She is engaged to be married to Spencer Steele, who is a recent GSC graduate.


The Free Press WV
Meghan Harubin of Normantown, WV completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Davis Elementary School with Melissa Duckworth and Paula Frame.

Dr. Shelly Ratliff was her GSC Supervisor.

She is the daughter of Chuck and Kathy Harubin of Normantown, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Jerrica Hilbert of Saint Albans, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Williamstown High School with Chris Hodges and at Mineral Wells Elementary with Beth Buskirk.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. Shara Curry were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Jerry and Sherry Hilbert of Saint Albans, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Charles ‘Chuck’ Lynch of Sissonville, WV completed his student teaching in Biological Science (9-adult) and General Science (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School with Travis Fisher and Monica Haley.

Dr. Shara Curry and Dr. Jeff Hunter were his GSC supervisors.

He is the son of Dana and Tami Lynch of Sissonville, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Jonathan Reid of Clear Creek, WV completed his student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Gilmer County Elementary School and Doddridge County High School with Judy Leggett and Shaylyn Dabbs.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. Shelly Ratliff were his GSC supervisors.

He is the son of Randall and Kathy Reid of Clear Creek, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Sara Rollins of Macfarlan, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Williamstown High School, Pleasant Hill Elementary School, and Arnoldsburg Elementary School with Chris Hodges and John Bugby.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. Shara Curry were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Terry and Vicki Rollins of Macfarlan, West Virginia.

Rollins was also named Outstanding Student Teacher of the spring semester by the education honor society Kappa Delta Pi.


The Free Press WV
J’Aime Shearer of Weston, WV completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Gilmer County Elementary School with Amber Frashure and Lora Stump.

Dr. Shara Curry and Connie Stout-O’Dell were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Jim and Beth Barnes of Horner, West Virginia.

She currently resides in Weston with her husband William and daughter Madison.


The Free Press WV
Kimberly Smith of Harrisville, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Lewis County High School, Leading Creek Elementary School, and Roanoke Elementary School with Whitney Ballard and Allen Heath.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. John Taylor were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Amy Floyd of Coxs Mills, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Tiffany (Young) Somerville of Linn, WV completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Leading Creek Elementary School with Debbie Adams and Debbie Moss.

Dr. Shelly Ratliff was her GSC Supervisor.

She is the daughter of Larry and Robin Young of Sand Fork, West Virginia.

She currently resides in Linn with her husband Taylor.


Senior teacher education students take part in an internship during their final semester at GSC. At the conclusion of their internship students must complete a presentation illustrating their mastery of the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards as well as the standards of their particular area of study.

For more information about the Teacher Education Program at Glenville State College, contact 304.462.4119.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 11,539 Spring Turkeys In 2017

The Free Press WV

Spring turkey hunters harvested 11,539 gobblers this year, an increase of more than 11 percent from 2016, according to preliminary numbers provided by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The harvest is the largest since 2006 when 11,735 birds were harvested, and is more than 18 percent above the 10-year average.

“Weather conditions were variable across the state during this year’s spring gobbler season, so it’s nice to see hunters were able to get out and enjoy some successful hunting, which is reflected in the harvest numbers,” said Mike Peters, DNR game bird biologist.

Five of the six DNR districts reported increased harvests over last year.

District 4 was the only district in which fewer birds were harvested than in 2016.

District 1 again recorded the most birds harvested this year (2,578), followed by District 6 (2,250), District 5 (2,090), District 4 (1,858), District 3 (1,733) and District 2 (1,030).

The top five counties with the largest harvests were Preston (475), which was up more than 100 birds from last year, Mason (448), Jackson (408), Wood (380), and Harrison (327).

Youth hunters harvested 458 turkeys during the one-day youth season on April 15.

Those numbers are included on the accompanying table.

West Virginia Spring Gobbler Season Results

County

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Barbour

162

178

127

165

204

Brooke

104

84

67

78

100

Hancock

110

110

89

98

106

Harrison

355

264

247

286

327

Marion

218

149

170

192

256

Marshall

300

220

174

207

255

Monongalia

262

174

199

197

266

Ohio

131

91

109

111

113

Preston

403

344

333

371

475

Taylor

103

87

72

101

135

Tucker

57

88

82

90

97

Wetzel

256

203

168

196

244

District 1 Subtotal

2,461

1,992

1,837

2,092

2,578

Berkeley

98

112

124

115

147

Grant

129

129

131

161

145

Hampshire

124

138

156

170

184

Hardy

129

135

116

132

132

Jefferson

60

57

82

79

114

Mineral

87

96

118

134

132

Morgan

54

62

64

54

64

Pendleton

117

95

94

88

112

District 2 Subtotal

798

824

885

933

1,030

Braxton

238

175

194

197

209

Clay

147

68

83

101

120

Lewis

221

180

194

211

249

Nicholas

221

164

213

330

311

Pocahontas

160

130

145

144

143

Randolph

217

186

225

250

248

Upshur

262

229

231

228

303

Webster

118

113

114

156

150

District 3 Subtotal

1,584

1,245

1,399

1,617

1,733

Fayette

287

244

239

292

278

Greenbrier

299

245

242

308

269

McDowell

308

215

218

200

177

Mercer

177

170

161

176

192

Monroe

206

212

181

184

192

Raleigh

277

214

231

283

279

Summers

258

209

199

219

209

Wyoming

291

255

257

320

262

District 4 Subtotal

2,103

1,764

1,728

1,982

1,858

Boone

230

159

138

157

157

Cabell

138

80

110

114

176

Kanawha

332

231

227

285

319

Lincoln

213

178

169

215

228

Logan

246

181

172

181

165

Mason

370

293

314

378

448

Mingo

141

93

91

131

143

Putnam

225

150

181

210

268

Wayne

144

103

108

139

186

District 5 Subtotal

2,039

1,468

1,510

1,810

2,090

Calhoun

179

135

128

145

164

Doddridge

138

126

118

137

160

Gilmer

191

147

124

132

143

Jackson

326

293

264

302

408

Pleasants

83

73

71

80

89

Ritchie

326

245

218

216

263

Roane

236

232

210

231

256

Tyler

211

136

144

182

181

Wirt

193

177

153

174

206

Wood

294

271

248

328

380

District 6 Subtotal

2,177

1,835

1,678

1,927

2,250

State Total

11,162

9,128

9,037

10,361

11,539

Click Below for additional Articles...

Page 1 of 169 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »








The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVI The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved