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SAFE AT HOME WEST VIRGINIA

The Free Press WV
SAFE AT HOME WEST VIRGINIA IS CREATING A
BRIGHTER FUTURE FOR WEST VIRGINIA YOUTH

A column by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin

As Governor, our children’s well-being is one of my top priorities, and I am particularly proud of the progress we have made through the Safe at Home West Virginia program. The federally supported program’s innovative approach provides community and behavioral health services to children between 12 and 17 to keep them at home, close to their families. This model also reduces use of out-of-state facilities by keeping these youth in their communities.
Safe at Home West Virginia’s “wraparound” model allows the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources more flexibility in delivering services to youth, family members, caregivers and foster parents. Wraparound recognizes the far-reaching impact of trauma through all aspects of the youth’s community and involves the family in plans to address these complex needs. With the youth at the center of these efforts, many West Virginians are able to remain or return home safely.
We are excited to share and celebrate the stories of the lives our program already has touched. One young man had been away from his family for two years in a facility for treatment of behavioral problems caused by traumatic experiences. Through Safe at Home West Virginia, his family was reunited and provided the support and guidance they needed for development of a stable, loving home.
In the first phase of Safe at Home West Virginia, nearly 150 cases from 11 counties have been referred for wraparound services. Of those, 17 youth have returned to West Virginia; 23 have moved back to their home communities from in-state residential placements; and 43 have been prevented from entering residential placement.
Safe at Home West Virginia is equipping our families with the tools and resources to create environments where children can lead safe, healthy and successful lives at home in the Mountain State.
Given the positive results of the program’s first phase in Berkeley, Boone, Cabell, Jefferson, Kanawha, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, Morgan, Putnam and Wayne counties, Safe at Home will begin to expand in the summer of 2016. The next phase will include Barbour, Brooke, Grant, Greenbrier, Hampshire, Hancock, Hardy, Harrison, Lewis, Marion, Mercer, Mineral, Monongalia, Monroe, Nicholas, Ohio, Pendleton, Pocahontas, Preston, Randolph, Summers, Taylor, Tucker and Upshur counties.
To learn more about this project, please visit safe.wvdhhr.org.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 10,369 Spring Turkeys In 2016

The Free Press WV

ELKINS, WV – Spring turkey hunters harvested 10,369 gobblers this year, up 14 percent from 2015, according to Keith Krantz, wild turkey and upland game biologist for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (DNR). The 2016 season, April 18 through May 14, started on the third Monday in April for the first time in recent history, a week earlier than usual.

Youth hunters checked in 380 gobblers during the one-day youth season held April 16. Preston County had the highest reported harvest of 16, followed by Raleigh and Upshur counties with 15 apiece, Wyoming County with 14 and Nicholas and Greenbrier counties with 13 each.

All six DNR districts showed an increase in overall harvest compared to 2015. District 1 in the northern part of the state recorded the most birds checked with 2,093, followed by District 4 (1,979), District 6 (1,926), District 5 (1,811), District 3 (1,622) and District 2 (938).

Mason County in District 5 led the state with 379 gobblers checked. Preston County (372), Nicholas (330), Wood (326) and Wyoming (320) counties rounded out the top five.
“The harvest stayed high throughout the entire four-week season,“ Krantz said. “Good weather during much of the season, coupled with an earlier starting date, likely affected the harvest in 2016. Now we’re hoping we will have the proper brood-rearing conditions for high poult survival this year.“ Krantz said.

West   Virginia Spring Turkey Harvest, 2012–2016

County

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Barbour

182

162

178

127

167

Brooke

74

104

84

67

77

Hancock

92

110

110

89

99

Harrison

282

355

264

247

286

Marion

163

218

149

170

192

Marshall

224

300

220

174

206

Monongalia

221

262

174

199

198

Ohio

87

131

91

109

108

Preston

330

403

344

333

372

Taylor

93

103

87

72

101

Tucker

62

57

88

82

90

Wetzel

210

256

203

168

197

District 1   Subtotal

2,020

2,461

1,992

1,837

2,093

Berkeley

88

98

112

124

115

Grant

114

129

129

131

164

Hampshire

120

124

138

156

170

Hardy

101

129

135

116

132

Jefferson

43

60

57

82

80

Mineral

86

87

96

118

135

Morgan

56

54

62

64

54

Pendleton

95

117

95

94

88

District 2   Subtotal

703

798

824

885

938

Braxton

119

238

175

194

199

Clay

77

147

68

83

101

Lewis

181

221

180

194

213

Nicholas

161

221

164

213

330

Pocahontas

124

160

130

145

145

Randolph

94

217

186

225

249

Upshur

199

262

229

231

229

Webster

94

118

113

114

156

District 3   Subtotal

1,049

1,584

1,245

1,399

1,622

Fayette

176

287

244

239

293

Greenbrier

235

299

245

242

309

McDowell

154

308

215

218

199

Mercer

146

177

170

161

175

Monroe

162

206

212

181

184

Raleigh

185

277

214

231

281

Summers

176

258

209

199

218

Wyoming

132

291

255

257

320

District 4 Subtotal

1,366

2,103

1,764

1,728

1,979

Boone

144

230

159

138

157

Cabell

129

138

80

110

114

Kanawha

214

332

231

227

284

Lincoln

157

213

178

169

216

Logan

133

246

181

172

181

Mason

343

370

293

314

379

Mingo

92

141

93

91

131

Putnam

196

225

150

181

210

Wayne

92

144

103

108

139

District 5   Subtotal

1,500

2,039

1,468

1,510

1,811

Calhoun

138

179

135

128

143

Doddridge

111

138

126

118

137

Gilmer

132

191

147

124

133

Jackson

244

326

293

264

305

Pleasants

81

83

73

71

81

Ritchie

233

326

245

218

218

Roane

193

236

232

210

230

Tyler

133

211

136

144

182

Wirt

164

193

177

153

171

Wood

236

294

271

248

326

District 6   Subtotal

1,665

2,177

1,835

1,678

1,926

State   Total

8,303

11,162

9,128

9,037

10,369

College Students Come Together To Promote Student Leadership On Campus

The Free Press WV

WESTON, WV – College students from across West Virginia are meeting at Jackson’s Mill this week to learn new ways to strengthen their campus communities. More than 75 student representatives from West Virginia’s public two-year and four-year colleges and universities are participating in the annual West Virginia Student Leadership Conference, which kicks off today and continues through Wednesday. The conference is sponsored by the West Virginia Community and Technical College System (WVCTCS), the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (Commission) and Shepherd University. 

During the conference, students will attend breakout sessions focused on helping them inspire and engage their classmates and mobilize groups in support of community goals. Students also will work together to identify the unique needs facing their campuses and share ideas for addressing these issues.

“Higher education is not a product that our faculty and administrators hand down to students,” Dr. Paul Hill, chancellor of the Commission, said. “It’s about creating a learning environment where students are collaborators in the experience. I commend the students who are participating in this year’s Leadership Conference for their commitment to that ideal.” 

“Leadership, problem-solving, and social networking skills are essential for succeeding in today’s workforce,” Dr. Sarah Tucker, WVCTCS chancellor said. “These students are working hard to develop their qualifications for future employment, and to put those lessons to use for the benefit of our campus communities.”

G-LtE™: Mountain Valley Pipeline

The Free Press WV

With twelve (12) Counties in West Virginia affected by the Mountain Valley Pipeline route, there is still time for citizens concerned about potential impa cts to their water supplies (aquifers), streams, wetlands and rivers to write The WVDEP to request public hearings in their respective counties.

So far public comments are working! And we need more folks along the MVP Route to respond now. DEP says they will likely prioritize holding public hearings from where they’ve received the most comments which is right now Greenbrier, Monroe and Summers. We need to help get the word out to folks further up along the proposed route (Wetzel, Doddridge, Harrison, Lewis, Upshur, Braxton, Webster, Nicholas, Fayette) about weighing in now to request public hearings so they’re not left out.

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) Division of Water and Waste Management (DWWM) will be extending the public comment period on the State 401 Water Quality Certification for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline project until further notice. But it only takes a few minutes to send them a letter requesting a Public Hearing in your county so you can learn and get answers to your concerns.

Originally, the public comment period, which is required under state regulation 47CSR5A, would have ended next week on 5/17, but because of widespread public interest in the proposed project, DWWM will be scheduling public hearings to discuss certification of the proposed project. Information about the dates and locations of those hearings will be made public as soon as plans are finalized.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline is a $3.5 billion project, developed by EQT Corp., and it involves a 42-inch-diameter pipeline that would run 301 miles south from the Equitrans L.P. transmission system near the MarkWest Energy Mobley Complex in Wetzel County to a Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Co. compressor station in Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

This project is one of multiple pipeline projects currently under review by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission one of the other projects is the Atlantic Coast Pipeline that will run somewhat parallel and north of the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

When issuing certification, DWWM’s 401 Certification Program may consider the proposed activity’s impact on water resources, fish and wildlife, recreation, critical habitats, wetlands and other natural resources. In its 401 certification application, EQT anticipates that the Mountain Valley Pipeline project will have temporary impacts to approximately 49,892 linear feet of streams and 18.9 acres of wetlands and permanent impacts to approximately 3,125 linear feet of streams and 10 acres of wetlands within the Mountain State.

 

Comments and information relating to the certification should be emailed to , with “MVP 401 Certification” in the subject line or mailed to:

West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water and Waste Management

401 Certification Program

601 57th Street SE

Charleston, WV 25304


Responding now with a request for a public hearing in your county will give you and your neighbors a chance to express your concerns to the West Virginia’s Department of Environmental Protection.

 

John W. Cobb, Jr.

Ireland, West Virginia 26376

05.16.2016
CommunityBraxton CountyDoddridge CountyHarrison CountyLewis CountyNicholas CountyUpshur CountyWetzel CountyNewsRegionWest VirginiaOpinions | Commentary | G-LtE™ | G-Comm™ | G-OpEd™OutdoorsNature | EnvironmentPolitics | Government | ElectionState-WV(1) Comments

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~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

My personal opinion is if it doesn’t affect you directly…like coming through your property, then you have no standing in this and you need to sit down and shut up.

With or with out public hearings, the MVP will be built. The government will see to that. It will benefit way more people than the greenies and farmers that are complaining.

People on the other end are welcoming the natural gas it will bring.

By Pipeliner - Doddridge County  on  05.17.2016

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FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES SPRING 2016 FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon, West Virginia
The Free Press WV

Buckhannon, WV— The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon, West Virginia, is pleased to announce the dates for its initial grant cycle for 2016. This new foundation, formed in 2015, will serve healthcare related needs of the community in Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur, and Webster counties through its annual grant award process.

“The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon seeks partnerships with non-profit organizations with the potential to inspire healthier choices for the communities of Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur, and Webster counties,” stated Executive Director, Janell E. Ray. “On May 01, 2016, we open our inaugural grant cycle and are excited to be able to offer funding support to local organizations that share our mission and vision for the community. We will be accepting applications through August 15, 2016 for grant awards in late September or early October.”


Grant cycle deadlines for this inaugural grant-making session are:

    •  Submission of Letters of Inquiry – May 31, 2016

    •  Approval of Letters of Inquiry and Invitation for Full Application Issued – June 30, 2016

    •  Submission of Completed Applications – August 15, 2016


The PFB will focus its funding awards in four broad healthcare related areas:

    •  Health and Wellness – Examples include diabetes prevention, oral hygiene, prenatal care.

    •  Leadership Development – Examples include staff and management training, marketing and fundraising training.

    •  Lifestyle Education – Examples include substance and domestic violence programs, homeless assistance, mental health care.

    •  Spiritual and Pastoral Care – Examples include hospice care, senior services, Alzheimer and dementia care, bereavement counseling.


The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon provides grant funding for qualified 501(c)(3) organizations in Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur and Webster counties in West Virginia that serve healthcare and healthcare related needs of the community. Learn more about the Foundation. pallottinebuckhannon.org

Honors Doled Out by WVWC During Academic and Leadership Banquet

The Free Press WV

Honors Doled Out at Annual Academic and Leadership Awards Banquet

Students, faculty, and staff members were honored on Saturday, April 23 during West Virginia Wesleyan College’s Academic and Leadership Awards Banquet, held in the French A. See Dining Center on the Buckhannon campus.

Listed below are the awards and their recipients.

 

Student Senate Award – Faculty: Jeanne Sullivan, associate professor of biology

Student Senate Award – Staff: Jessica Vincent, leadership & service program assistant

Greek Woman of the Year – Keana Bertocci (Alpha Xi Delta; Perryopolis, PA)

Greek Man of the Year – Joshua Loptiz (Theta Xi; Leonardtown, MD)

International Student Ambassador  Julia Uchoa (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award – Erin Hudnall (Ansted, WV)

The Mary Mildred Sullivan Award – Shawna L. Clayton (Clarksburg, WV)

2015 Newman Civic Fellows Award – Mark Leadingham III (Sharpsburg, MD)

John Wesley Do All the Good You Can Award – Amadu Bah (Laurel, MD) and Ashley Cooper (Rupert, WV)

Wesleyan Values Award – Elaine Ashman (Newton, WV) and Keana Bertocci (Perryopolis, PA)

Outstanding Peer Leader Award – Kayla Hinkley (Hurricane, WV)

Outstanding Community Outreach Awards – Angelica Harvey (Buckhannon, WV)

 

ART

Outstanding Senior Award – Haley Chambers (Jumping Branch, WV)

Outstanding Junior Award – Reno Swiger (Shinnston, WV)

Outstanding Sophomore Award – Kelsey Acree (Mt. Nebo, WV)

Outstanding Freshman Award – De’andre Brown (Baltimore, MD)

 

BIOLOGY

Outstanding Senior – Rebecca Davis (Mechanicsburg, PA), Rebekah Honce (Bridgeport, WV), and Langely Salyers (Moorefield, WV)

Outstanding Research Student – Rebekah Honce (Bridgeport, WV)

Outstanding Junior – Evan McLanahan (Red House, WV)

Outstanding Sophomore – Kelsey Acree (Mt. Nebo, WV)

Outstanding Freshmen – Mary Catherine Bandak (Charleston, WV), Mason Lee (Wheeling, WV), and Erick Trent (Point Pleasant, WV)

Outstanding Student Assistant – Dillon Wagman (Mahopac, NY)

 

DANCE/THEATRE

Outstanding Senior in Dance Lydia Krimmel (Mineral Wells, WV)

Outstanding Theatre Arts Students – Elizabeth Clever (Inwood, WV) and Emily Jenkins (Albright, WV)

 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Outstanding Senior – Jeremy R. Davidson (Buckhannon, WV)

Outstanding Junior – Thomas Anderson (Rock Cave, WV)

Outstanding Sophomore – James DeMarco (Vanderbilt, PA)

Outstanding Freshman –   Viola Donegia (Belington, WV)

Outstanding Research – Emma Malcomb (Buckhannon, WV) 

 

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

Outstanding Accounting Student – Jessica Hardman (Buckhannon, WV) and Alex Pugh (Buckhannon, WV)

Outstanding Business Administration Student – Tyler Gray (Buckhannon, WV)

Outstanding Economics Student – Hannah Gurtis (Morgantown, WV)

Outstanding International Business Student – Abigail Hensley (Huntington, WV)

Outstanding Management Student –Soeren Doessing (Denmark) and Sydney Pettit (Sand Fork, WV)

Outstanding Marketing Student – Keenan Moreta (Bayfield, CO)

Outstanding Sport Marketing Student – Nicole Friedemann (Canby, OR)

Outstanding 5-Year MBA Student – Kayla Hinkley (Hurricane, WV)

 

CHAPEL

Sheridan Watson Bell Award – Jeremy Lambson (Buckhannon, WV)

 

CHEMISTRY

Outstanding Senior – Asa Nichols (Saint Marys, WV)

Outstanding Junior – Aaron Kessler (Cowen, WV)

Outstanding Laboratory Assistant – Kelsey Krantz (Elkins, WV)

Outstanding Chemical Hygiene Officer Assistant – Angelica Harvey (Buckhannon, WV))

 

COMMUNICATION

Overall Most Outstanding Senior – James Young (Hurricane, WV)

Excellence in Applied Learning – Kelsie Andrews (North East, MD)

Excellence in Writing – Timothy Nelson (Charleston, WV) and Mattison Swartz (Lewisburg, WV)

Excellence in Speaking – Joshua Lopitz (Leonardtown, MD)

 

CRIMINIAL JUSTICE

Criminal Justice Award – Ryan Rado (St. Augustine, FL)

 

EDUCATION

Academic Achievement Freshman Award – Mary Ambuul (Martinsburg, WV)

Academic Achievement Sophomore Award – Leah Casarano (Aurthurdale, WV) and Andrew Kinkead (Stuarts Draft, VA)

Academic Achievement Junior Award – Kathalyn Maxson (Ravenswood, WV) and Logan Tucker (Ravenswood, WV)

Academic Achievement Senior Award – Holden Akers-Toler (Beckley, WV) and Emily Jenkins (Albright, WV)  

Dr. Ruth Mansberger Shearer Education Award – Samantha Swann (Owings, MD)

The Dorie McHugh O’Brien ’64 Education Award Chad Gradisek (Mount Pleasant, PA)

 

ENGLISH

Outstanding Senior English Major – Joseph Keener (Buckhannon, WV)

Outstanding English as a Second Language Student – Shin Fujikawa (Japan) and Kohtaroh Kusunoki (Japan)

 

EXERCISE SCIENCE

Outstanding Senior in Athletic Training – Devon Brosh (Petersburg, WV)

Freshman with Highest GPA for Athletic Training – Hannah Pulley (Lusby, MD)

Delta Psi Kappa/David E. Reemsnyder Award – Lauren Graham (Bessemer City, NC)

Sam Ross Athletic Scholars – Tanner McGrew (Buckhannon, WV) and Rebekah Honce (Bridgeport, WV)

 

HISTORY

Outstanding Senior History Majors – Sarah Campbell (Saint Marys, WV) and Stephanie Frazer (Alum Creek, WV)

Outstanding Junior History Majors – Tori Badaway (Canada) and Richard Baisden (Clarksburg, MD)

Outstanding Senior International Studies Major – Rebecca Davis (Mechanicsburg, PA)

 

HUMANITIES

Pamela Thorn Humanities Award – Morgan Carter (Fredericksburg, VA)

 

MATHEMATICS

Hallam Awards – Zachary C. Abbot (Carmel, IN), Stacie M. Baumann (Gahanna, OH) Jacob W. Coleman (Belington, WV), Andrew R. Kinkead (Stuarts Draft, VA), Mark P. Leadingham (Sharpsburg, MD), Jericho A. Norris (Vienna, WV), Daniel R. Plaugher (Salem, WV), and Trevor T. Williams (Buckhannon, WV)

 

MUSIC

Outstanding Senior Music Awards – Holden Akers-Toler (Beckley, WV) and Julia Uchoa (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

 

NURSING

Outstanding Senior Nursing Awards – Chelsea Bennett (Jane Lew, WV), Jessica Frolo (Belle Vernon, PA), and Tracey Gregory (Craigsville, WV)

 

PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING

Outstanding Seniors – Lauren Cronise (Hagerstown, MD), Cody O’Meara (Charles Town, WV), and Corey Rhodes (Seneca Rocks, WV)

Outstanding Freshmen – Kaylee Burdette (Cross Lanes, WV), Rebecca Davis (Blakeslee, PA), Allison Haertter (Reading, PA), Emily Kearney (Ranson, WV), Bobbi Mitchell (Scott Depot, WV), Mackenzie Robatin (Uniontown, PA), Olivia Rycroft (Elkins, WV), and Zachary Whiting (Ashland, WI)

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Outstanding Senior – Robert Brosh (Charles Town, WV)

 

PSYCHOLOGY

The Kelly Lynn Martin Memorial Psychology Award – Erin Hudnall (Ansted, WV)

 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Outstanding Senior in Religious Studies Jeremy Lambson (Buckhannon, WV)

 

SOCIOLOGY

The John Warner Memorial Sociology Award – Jordon Barr (Buckhannon, WV)

The Vijaya Rao Global Awareness Award – Erin Hudnall (Ansted, WV)

Outstanding Senior in Sociology – Erin Hudnall (Ansted, WV)

Wesleyan Spirit Awards

Freshmen – Maya Eberhart (Brooklyn, NY) and Jacob Sullivan (White Sulphur Springs, WV)

Sophomores – Tobi Carter (Baltimore, MD) and Lucas Trovato (Mogantown, WV)

Juniors – Reno Swiger (Shinnston, WV) and Peyton Teets (Elkins, WV)

Seniors – Allie Browne (Charleston, WV) and Soeren Doessing (Denmark)

 

Outstanding Seniors – Keana Bertocci (Perryopolis, PA), Kayla Hinkley (Hurricane, WV), Erin Hudnall (Anstead, WV), Cody O’Meara (Charles Town, WV), and Sydney Pettit (Sand Fork, WV)

 

Academic and Leadership Awards – Leah Bailey (Baden, PA), Chloe Bland (Dunmore, WV), Megann Boone (Frametown, WV), Devon Brosh (Petersburg, WV), Robert Brosh (Charles Town, WV), Morgan Carter (Fredericksburg, VA), Shawna Clayton (Clarksburg, WV), Alberta Crawford (Wellsburg, WV), Lauren Cronise (Hagerstown, MD), Rebecca Davis (Mechanicsburg, PA), Nicole Friedemann (Canby, OR), Tracey Gregory (Craigsville, WV), Rebekah Honce (Bridgeport, WV), Mikaela Hutchinson (Charleston, WV), Emily Jenkins (Albright, WV), Jeremy Lambson (Buckhannon, WV), Tanner McGrew (Buckhannon, WV), Gregory Strader (Moon Township, PA), Samantha Sunshine (Blacksburg, VA).

 

Senior Who’s Who Among Students in America – Elaine Ashman (Newton, WV), Victoria Crise (Natrona Heights, PA), Carson Cunningham (Buckhannon, WV), Paula Gyamfi (Beltsville, MD), Bethany Jordan (Scott Depot, WV), Danielle Lancaster (Millstone, WV), Danielle Nehilla (South Park, PA), John Prentice (Elkins, WV), Kirsten Reneau (Grafton, WV), Corey Rhodes (Seneca Rocks, WV), Catherine Riggleman (Beverly, WV), Nathan Ropelewski (Richmond, VA), Telena Sanson (Summersville, WV), Scott Stoeckle (Buckhannon, WV), Philip Summers (Charleston, WV), and Jordan Tate (Charleston, WV)

 

Junior Who’s Who Among Students in America – Jackson Carey (Follansbee, WV), Katherine Casey (Canton, OH), Audrey Chefan-Kemseu (France), Kimberly Culver (Culpeper, VA), Jordan Danko (Ravenswood, WV), Jessica Engels (Kingwood, WV), Kortney Frame (Troy, WV), Taylor Germain (Oakland, MD), Thomas Haines (Green Spring, WV), Wilson Harvey (Weston, WV), Madison Ovies (Franklin, TN), Sarah Petitto (West Milford, WV), Kaitlyn Romain (Bridgeport, WV), Aurora Snyder (Royersford, PA), Destinee Tunstall (Indian Head, MD), and Mason Winkie (Bridgeport, WV)

The Free Press WV

Voting Begins Today for May primary

The Free Press WV

Voters will start going to the polls for the May primary election as soon as Wednesday in West Virginia when the early voting period begins in the Mountain State ahead of the May 10 primary election.

“If you’re ready to go, go vote then in West Virginia’s election,” said Secretary of State Natalie Tennant who is a fan of the early voting option.

“It allows a voter to determine themselves when Election Day is and fit it into their schedule.”

Early voting first launched in West Virginia during the 2002 primary election. That year, 14,000 people cast ballots ahead of Election Day.

By the 2014 midterm primary, early voting was up above 44,000, according to information from the Secretary of State’s Office.

During an appearance on Tuesday’s MetroNews “Talkline,” Tennant did not make any predictions about how early voting would go ahead of the 2016 primary.

This year, West Virginians are nominating candidates for president, U.S. House of Representatives, governor, secretary of state, auditor, treasurer, agriculture commissioner, attorney general, state Senate, state House of Delegates

For the first time, judges are being elected on nonpartisan ballots.

Races for Supreme Court, circuit court, family court and magistrates will be at the end of the May ballots. The judicial races are split up by divisions and there is no nominating process. The judicial candidates elected will take their seats on January 01, 2017.

On Republican ballots, delegates to the Republican National Convention are also being selected. The judicial races come after the more than 200 possible GOP Presidential delegates.

At the local levels, there are also board of education races, which are nonpartisan, along with mayoral, city council and county levy elections in parts of West Virginia.

“Remember, this is a longer ballot. All of our offices are on the ballot except for U.S. Senate, so you really need to be doing some research right now,” Tennant advised.

As for unaffiliated or independent voters who are not registered with any particular political party, “When you go into the polling place, you have to ask for a ballot. You have to ask for Democrat, Republican or Mountain Party,” Tennant explained.

The poll workers cannot offer you a party ballot, she said. “You have to ask for a ballot otherwise you only receive (the ballot for) the nonpartisan election.”

The ten-day early voting period continues through May 07.

In addition to regular weekday hours, early voting is an option on two Saturdays, April 30 and May 07, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Early voting locations vary by county and are either at county courthouses, courthouse annexes or at other community voting locations.

On Tuesday, May 10, polls will be open from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Throughout the election season, violations of election law can be reported to the Secretary of State’s Office at 304.558.6000.

Tennant, who was first elected in 2008, is again seeking renomination during the primary election. She is facing a primary challenge from Delegate Patsy Trecost (D-Harrison, 48), a former member of Clarksburg’s City Council.

The Republicans seeking the Secretary of State nomination are Mac Warner, a U.S. Army veteran, military officer and lawyer, and Barry Holstein, a Kanawha County native, U.S. Army veteran and operations management worker.

Gilmer County Clerk: Notice to Creditors and Beneficiaries

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CLERK OF THE COUNTY COMMISSION OF GILMER COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND BENEFICIARIES

The administration of the estates(s) of the following deceased is pending before the Clerk of the County Commission of Gilmer County, 10 Howard Street, Glenville WV 26351.

The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below.

Notice is hereby given that the estate(s) of the following has been opened for probate.  Any interested person objecting to the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative or the venue or jurisdiction of the court, shall file notice of an objection with the County Commission within ninety days after the date of the first publication or within 30 days of service of notice, whichever is later.  If an objection is not timely filed, the objection is forever barred.

All persons having claims against the estate(s) of the said following deceased, whether due or not, are notified to exhibit their claims, with the voucher thereof, legally verified, to the undersigned, at the County Clerk’s Office on or before June 20, 2016  otherwise they may by law be excluded from all benefit of said estate(s).  All beneficiaries of said estate(s) may appear on or before said day to examine said claims and otherwise protect their interests.

Claims against the estate must be filed in accordance with West Virginia Code 44-1-14a.

 

DECENDENT NAME PER.REP/NAME REPER.REP/ADDRESS
Millie S. Beall Hunter L Beall
Amy M. Self
2906 Sassafras Run Road, Weston, WV 26452
28 VanHorn Drive, Glenville, WV 26351
Lloyd Glenn “Buck” Stephens Sally Keefer 4433 Bradley Road
Huntington, WV 25704
Dianna Smith James Wright 91 Main Street
W. Alexander, PA 15376


Clerk of Gilmer County Commission
Jean Butcher
10 Howard Street
Glenville, WV 26351

The date of the first publication of this Notice is : April 21, 2016

DHHR’s ‘Safe At Home’ Program To Expand Out To More WV Counties

The Free Press WV

The first phase of the state Department of Health and Human Resources’ “Safe at Home” program has seen positive results so far, according to Nancy Exline, commissioner for the state DHHR’s Bureau for Children and Families.

The program was implemented last year in Berkeley, Boone, Cabell, Jefferson, Kanawha, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, Morgan, Putnam and Wayne counties. The program serves 12-17 year olds and their families, caregivers and foster parents by providing them with wraparound services in order to develop and maintain a stable and loving environment.

Exline said, so far, 122 children have been referred for wraparound services and 16 of them have returned to West Virginia. She also said 22 have moved back to their communities from in-state residential placements and 37 have been prevented from entering residential placements.

“We are still working with them. We’re trying to build capacity for maybe a foster home for those children that meets their needs to bring them back to their communities,” Exline said.

Plans to expand the program out to several other West Virginia counties will happen this July or August, she said.

Phase two will include Barbour, Brooke, Grant, Greenbrier, Hampshire, Hancock, Hardy, Harrison, Lewis, Marion, Mercer, Mineral, Monongalia, Monroe, Nicholas, Ohio, Pendleton, Pocahontas, Preston, Randolph, Summers, Taylor, Tucker and Upshur counties.

They eventually want to implement the program in all 55 counties, but Exline said it takes time.

“It’s always a good idea to start slow and build as you build capacity for community-based services,” she said. “We’re moving across the state.”

The goal is to have the program in place for all of West Virginia by next year.

The long-term plan, she said, is focused on four main goals: to keep children safe, to keep them healthy, to make sure they are supported in their communities and that they grow up to be successful adults.

“It is important that we build the base here in West Virginia that children are able to stay with their families,” Exline said.

The department’s Bureau for Children and Families is always looking for families interested in becoming foster parents, Exline said. For more information, visit the DHHR’s website.

Batman Visits Leading Creek Elementary School

Batman went to Leading Creek Elementary on March 30, 2016 for an inspirational talk for the students.
He addressed bullying, and how to make positive life choices.

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV

Governor Tomblin Announces Records Management, Survey and Planning Grants

More than 50 communities receive $464,177 in grant funding to preserve local archives
The Free Press WV

CHARLESTON, WV –  Governor Earl Ray Tomblin today awarded more than $464,000 in grant funding to more than 50 communities across the state to preserve West Virginia history through the survey and planning and records management and preservation grant programs.

“Whether written stories about our past or historic land documents, West Virginia is full of records, archives and landmark structures that play an important role in defining our state’s history,” Governor Tomblin said. “This grant funding will help enhance access to public records and maintain historic infrastructure around the state to ensure our state’s past is preserved and passed down for generations.”


The Records Management and Preservation Grant Program is administered through the Records Management and Preservation Board (RMPB) and includes projects to improve management, storage conditions, access, and preservation of public records held in county offices.  Funding for the grants program comes from filing fees collected by county clerks and deposited in the special Public Records and Preservation Account. Recipients of Records Management and Preservation Grants include:


Barbour County Commission
$6,218

To scan and index criminal case files in the prosecuting attorney’s office.


Berkeley County Council
$10,000

To index digital images of case files in the circuit clerk’s office. 


Boone County Commission
$10,000

To scan and index civil and criminal case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Braxton County Commission
$13,182

To purchase open steel shelving and archival cubic foot records storage boxes for the prosecuting attorney’s, sheriff’s and circuit clerk’s offices; and to digitize chancery case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Brooke County Commission
$4,215

To rebind and encapsulate deed books in the county clerk’s office.


Calhoun County Commission
$10,000

To index deed books digitized by the RMPB Statewide Preservation Project in the county clerk’s office.


Doddridge County Commission
$8,650

To purchase a map cabinet and Mylar sleeves to encapsulate maps, and to rebind and encapsulate will and land books in the county clerk’s office.


Fayette County Commission
$10,305

To digitize birth, death, and marriage books in the county clerk’s office, and for the county commission to purchase an oversize scanner to digitize maps, blueprints, and other records that will be used by all county offices. 


Gilmer County Commission
$12,347

To purchase roller shelving for improved storage of deed books in the county clerk’s office.


Grant County Commission
$9,245

To digitize deed books and deeds of trust books in the county clerk’s office.


Greenbrier County Commission
$12,500

To scan and index map cards in the assessor’s office, and to scan and index civil and criminal case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Hampshire County Commission
$6,954

To restore and digitize wills and will books, and to purchase roller shelving in the county clerk’s office.


Hardy County Commission
$9,455

To digitize land books in the assessor’s office.


Harrison County Commission
$10,000

To digitize the assessor’s copies of land books in the county clerk’s office.


Jackson County Commission
$14,859

To purchase map cabinets and Mylar sleeves to encapsulate maps in the county clerk’s office.


Kanawha County Commission
$19,091

To purchase roller shelving for oversize deed and land books in the county clerk’s office; and to scan and index civil case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Lewis County Commission
$15,000

To index digitized deed books in the county clerk’s office, and to scan and index criminal case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Lincoln County Commission
$11,650

To index deed books digitized by the RMPB Statewide Preservation Project, to purchase public access computers for the records room, and to restore and encapsulate land books in the county clerk’s office.


Marshall County Commission
$2,727

To review records and implement the retention schedule, and to scan and index case files in the prosecuting attorney’s office.


Mason County Commission
$12,500

To digitize the assessor’s copies of land books, and to scan and index estate files in the county clerk’s office.


McDowell County Commission
$3,000

To digitize maps in the county clerk’s office.


Mercer County Commission
$11,703

To purchase moveable track shelving for long-term inactive case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Mingo County Commission
$7,500

To scan and index order books in the circuit clerk’s office.


Monroe County Commission
$7,847

To scan and index map cards in the assessor’s office, and to purchase shelving for inactive case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Morgan County Commission
$6,355

To scan and index tax records, and to purchase two color scanners and open steel shelving for the sheriff’s office.


Nicholas County Commission
$4,818

To restore and encapsulate the assessor’s copies of land books in the county clerk’s office.


Ohio County Commission
$10,000

To digitize microfilm of case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Pendleton County Commission
$4,636

To digitize deed, release, and deeds of trust books, and to restore, rebind, and encapsulate deed books in the county clerk’s office.


Pocahontas County Commission
$7,500

To review and implement the records retention schedule and scan and index deed books in the county clerk’s office.


Preston County Commission
$7,500

To scan and index deed books in the county clerk’s office.


Putnam County Commission
$9,500

To digitize oil and gas lease books in the county clerk’s office, and to purchase open steel shelving for homestead and property records in the assessor’s office.


Raleigh County Commission
$4,963

To review and implement the records retention schedule, and to purchase a high-volume, cross-cut shredder to dispose of records that have exceeded the retention requirement in the assessor’s office.


Ritchie County Commission
$13,991

To purchase moveable track shelving for improved case file management in the prosecuting attorney’s office.

Roane County Commission
$4,523

To encapsulate and rebind the earliest chancery order books in the circuit clerk’s office. 


Summers County Commission
$5,146

To digitize military discharge books, and to restore, rebind, and encapsulate will and deed books in the county clerk’s office.


Taylor County Commission
$7,993

To scan and index map cards, and to purchase color scanners and public access computers for the assessor’s office.


Tucker County Commission
$11,136

To scan and index birth books, to purchase public access computers, and to restore, rebind, and encapsulate the assessor’s copies of land books in the county clerk’s office.


Upshur County Commission
$10,000

To digitize chancery and law case files in the circuit clerk’s office.


Wayne County Commission
$17,109

To index deed books digitized by the RMPB Statewide Preservation Project, to encapsulate the assessor’s copies of land books, and to purchase a map cabinet in the county clerk’s office.


Webster County Commission
$7,500

To scan and index deeds of trust books in the county clerk’s office.


Wood County Commission
$7,500

To index deed books digitized by the RMPB Statewide Preservation Project in the county clerk’s office.


Wyoming County Commission
$4,909

To restore, rebind, and encapsulate will and birth books in the county clerk’s office.


The Survey and Planning Grant Program is administered with funds from the Historic Preservation Fund, National Park Service.  The grants may be used for activities including conducting architectural/archaeological surveys, National Register nominations, predevelopment plans and heritage education projects. Recipients of Survey and Planning Grants include:


Beverly Historic Landmark Commission
$6,300

To assist with the 2016 Statewide Preservation Conference to be held in Beverly/Elkins, Randolph County.


City of Lewisburg/Lewisburg Historic Landmark Commission
$16,800

To assist with the Barracks Plans and Specs in Lewisburg, Greenbrier County.


City of Morgantown/Morgantown Historic Landmark Commission
$11,000

To assist with the architectural survey of the Suncrest neighborhood in Morgantown, Monongalia County.


Hampshire County Historic Landmark Commission
$3,500

To assist with the Phase II of a cemetery survey of Hampshire County.


City of Wheeling/Wheeling Historic Landmark Commission
$14,490

To assist with predevelopment documents for the Towngate Theatre and Stifel Arts Center projects in Wheeling, Ohio County.


Moorefield Historic Landmark Commission
$12,000

To assist with the architectural resurvey of the Moorefield Historic District in Moorefield, Hardy County.


Greenbrier County Historic Landmark Commission
$5,000

To assist with the preparation of a National Register Nomination on the Senator Robert Boone Property in Ronceverte, Greenbrier County.


Corporation of Shepherdstown
$5,460

To assist with the historic structures report on the Mecklenburg Tobacco Warehouse in Shepherdstown, Jefferson County.


Beckley Historic Landmark Commission
$5,600

To assist with the Neville and Main Street Building Assessments in Beckley, Raleigh County.

Governor Tomblin Presents 13 Communities with Small Cities Block Grants

Funding supports more than $12 million in local projects
The Free Press WV

CHARLESTON, WV – Governor Earl Ray Tomblin presented more than $12 million in Small Cities Block Grant funds for 13 critical infrastructure projects to support communities across West Virginia. In total, more than $44 million in other federal, state and local funding will support these projects for more than 17,000 West Virginia households, improving infrastructure reliability statewide.

“Today’s grant funding kicks off a number of anticipated improvement projects in cities and communities across West Virginia,” Governor Tomblin said. “Economic development projects and infrastructure improvements, like those supported by the Small Cities Block Grant program, are investments that not only open the door to new business prospects, but also improve the quality of life for West Virginians now and for years to come.”

Small Cities Block Grant funding is provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Community Development Division of the West Virginia Development Office manages the administration of these funds.


GREENBRIER COUNTY COMMISSION  
$200,000

This $10 million project will enable the Greenbrier Public Service District to extend water service in and around several Greenbrier County communities along I-64 / US Rt. 60 including, but not limited to, Crawley, Shawver’s Crossing, Sam Black Church, Clintonville, Alta, Williamsburg and Trout to more than 400 new households. The project will provide water service to customers who currently rely on wells and cisterns. The project will also provide an interconnection to the Town of Rupert, which will enable the town’s aging plant to be placed on standby status.


JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION                                                    
$704,000

This $1.28 million project will enable the Northern Jackson Public Service District to extend water service to 54 new household customers along Trace Fork Road.  The project will provide reliable water service to area residents who currently rely on private wells and other water collection methods.


LEWIS COUNTY COMMISSION        
$1,250,000

This $3.6 million project will enable the Lewis County Commission to extend water service to 96 households in the Churchville and Sugar Camp area, including Laurel Run, Mare Run, Limestone Run and Murphy Creek areas in the Northwest Lewis Water Extension. This area is currently served by individual wells, many of which have low quantity and quality.


LINCOLN COUNTY COMMISSION
$1,500,000

This $4.57 million project will enable the Lincoln County Public Service District to extend safe drinking water to 147 new household customers in the areas of Lower Mud River, Laurel Creek, Straight Fork, Buffalo Creek, Little Buffalo Creek, and surrounding areas.  The project includes a 100,000 gallon storage tank; one pressure reducing station; and 51 fire hydrants, valves, and individual customer services.


LOGAN COUNTY COMMISSION
$1,300,000

This $4.95 million project will enable the Logan County Public Service District to extend water service to approximately 195 residential households in the communities of Big Harts Creek, Smokehouse Road, White Oak Branch, and surrounding areas of Logan County. The project will provide a reliable source of water in the project area which is currently served by private wells.


MARION COUNTY COMMISSION                                                    
$238,694

This $2.1 million project will allow the Colfax Public Service District to decommission its waste water treatment plant; and extend the Colfax sewage system to the Kingmill Valley Public Service District, benefitting a total of 230 households. This project promotes a regional approach to the provision of critical public services and eliminates duplication of treatment facilities. The project will protect public water sources by halting overflow into the Tygart Valley River, which is upstream from the Town of Monongah and the City of Fairmont’s public water intakes.


TOWN OF MARLINTON (Pocahontas County)        
$1,000,000

This $4.35 million project will enable the Town of Marlinton to upgrade its existing water treatment plant and water storage system to 721 households.  The project will also enable the town to replace three water storage tanks; update booster stations, install telemetry to the plant, tanks and boosters; and complete related upgrades throughout the system to ensure its long-term viability. 


MERCER COUNTY COMMISSION              
$1,209,503

This $5.1 million project will enable the Oakvale Road Public Service District to extend water service to approximately 150 new households in the Elgood area, including the communities of Elgood, Twin Oaks and Christians Ridge in Eastern Mercer County. The project will include the installation of new water lines, booster stations, water storage tank and related improvements needed to provide safe drinking water to area residents.


TOWN OF NORTHFORK (McDowell County)                                     
$200,000

This $6.35 million project will allow the Town of Northfork to replace the existing water system which serves the Upland, Powhatan, Kyle, Northfork and Keystone communities and provide a second water source for the Maybeury Water Treatment Plant, serving a total of more than 400 households. This project replaces a water distribution system that has exceeded its useful life and is plagued by frequent line breaks and water loss.


TOWN OF PAW PAW (Morgan County)                                       
$1,500,000

This $1.5 million project will enable the Town of Paw Paw to replace old water lines throughout the project area to serve more than 240 households. This project will establish a more reliable and efficient water system for the Paw Paw residents as its current water distribution system is outdated, inefficient and often unsafe. 


TOWN OF PENNSBORO (Ritchie County)                                       
$1,500,000

This $5.1 million project will enable the City of Pennsboro to complete the third and final phase of necessary upgrades to its aging and antiquated wastewater treatment plant that services approximately 590 households. This project allows the Town of Pennsboro to comply with a consent order to correct deficiencies at the wastewater treatment plant.


CITY OF RICHWOOD (Nicholas County)                                           
$200,000

This $6.4 million project will allow the Town of Richwood to improve its municipal water system and extend water service to approximately 115 new households of the Hinkle Mountain and Little Laurel Creek areas. This project will provide these residents with a reliable source of water, some of whom are forced to treat the water in their homes or transport it from other sources.


TUCKER COUNTY COMMISSION                  
$1,250,000

This $6.25 million project will upgrade the existing Hamrick Public Service District water treatment plant, improve the existing distribution system and provide water service along Location Road to more than 700 households. The project will also include the installation of new water lines, booster stations, and tanks to serve residents who currently rely on private wells, many of which have low quality and quantity.

Lewis County Grand Jury Report

The Free Press WV

WESTON, WV — The March 2016 term of the Lewis County Grand Jury convened Monday in Weston and indicted 18 individuals, according to the prosecuting attorney’s office.


    •  Anthony Eugene Horner, 27, of Walkersville, who is charged with two felony counts of Domestic Assault, two misdemeanor counts of Assault, one count misdemeanor of Destruction of Property, two misdemeanor counts of Reckless Driving, one misdemeanor count of Leaving the Scene and two misdemeanor counts of Stalking.


    •  Jonathan Leroy Taylor, 30, of Jane Lew, who now faces one felony count of Burglary and one felony count of Grand Larceny.


    •  Tommie Larry Rinehart, Jr., 42, of Jane Lew, who is accused of one felony count of Attempted Robbery, one misdemeanor count of Assault and one misdemeanor count of Obstructing an Officer.


    •  Matthew Lee Jones, 22, of Jane Lew, who is charged with one felony count of Grand Larceny.


    •  Gloria Ann Yeager, 36, of Weston, who faces two felony counts of Forgery and two felony counts of Uttering.


    •  Everett J. Wine, 57, of Weston, who is accused of one felony count of Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent to Deliver, Methamphetamine and one misdemeanor count of Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol.


    •  Diana Lynn Summers, 50, of Florida, who is charged with one felony count of Abuse or Neglect of Incapacitated Adult by a Caregiver.


    •  Guy Summers, of Florida, who is also charged with one felony count of Abuse or Neglect of Incapacitated Adult by a Caregiver.


    •  Thomas William Bonnell, Jr., 41, of Weston, who faces one felony count of Driving While License Revoked for DUI, Third Offense.


    •  David Oren Webb, Sr., 44, of Buckhannon, who is accused of five felony counts of Wanton Endangerment, one misdemeanor count of Domestic Battery and one misdemeanor count of Obstructing.


    •  Michael Wesley Marion, 25, Weston, who is charged with one felony count of Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent to Deliver, Marijuana, one felony county of Manufacture of a Controlled Substance, Marijuana, and one misdemeanor count of Possession of a Controlled Substance, Psilocybin.


    •  Michael Lawrence Louk, 45, of Weston, who faces two felony counts of Driving While License Revoked for DUI, Third Offense, one misdemeanor count of Duty Upon Striking Fixtures and three total misdemeanor counts of Possession of a Controlled Substance for Heroin, Methamphetamine and Marijuana.


    •  David Mark Ratliff, 46, of Burnsville, who is accused of two felony counts of Delivery of a Controlled Substance, Methamphetamine.


    •  James Brian Stout, 40, of Jane Lew, who is charged with two felony counts of Delivery of a Controlled Substance, Hydrocodone.


    •  Elizabeht Michal Carpenter, 26, of Weston, who faces three felony counts of Delivery of a Controlled Substance, Buprenophine, within 1,000 feet of a school, one felony count of Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent to Deliver, Buprenophine and one felony count of Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent to Deliver, Alprazolam.


    •  Steven Michael Sears, 38, of Weston, who is accused of five felony counts of Delivery of a Controlled Substance, Methamphetamine and one misdemeanor count of Prohibited Person in Possession of a Firearm.


    •  Justin Allen Lyons, 24, of Spencer, who is charged with two felony counts of Forgery of Public Record, two misdemeanor counts of Driving While License Suspended and two misdemeanor counts of Speeding.


    •  John William Cole, 36, of Camden, who faces one felony count of Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol, Third Offense, one felony count of Driving While License Revoked for DUI, Third Offense, one misdemeanor count of Improper Registration and one misdemeanor count of No Insurance.


Judge Jacob Reger presided while Prosecuting Attorney Christina Flanigan and Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Kurt Hall presented the cases.

Those indicted are ordered to report to the Lewis County Judicial Annex Circuit Courtroom, 117 Court Avenue, Weston, at 9 a.m. on March 11 for arraignment.

Gilmer County Schools February 2016 Newsletter

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G-LtE™: Wake Up West Virginia

The Free Press WV

There are several currently proposed WV Senate Bills in the WV Legislature now that could seriously hurt our rights as property owners:

  • SB 508 Destroys a more than 200 year old law that allows citizens the right to file “Nuisance Suits” against neighbors or companies who harm their property values or their right to the pursuit of happiness on their property.

  • SB 565 Would allow drillers to build well pads and access roads on a surface owner’s property without having a permit to drill a well. This is actually Forced Trespassing.

  • SB596 Would Allow gas and pipeline companies to come onto private property to survey your land for pipelines which may not even be in the public interest. This is actually- Legalizing Trespassing. 

  • SB 601 Forces West Virginia Landfill authorities to take drill cuttings from Marcellus Wells which may include contaminated waste and radioactive materials that could pose risks to our aquifers and water supplies. Good water is a West Virginian’s God Given Right.

None of these bills should be amended!  They are wrong in any possible form.

None of these Senate Bills should come to the full Legislative floor for a vote.

All these Bills should be killed/stopped – NOW!

These Senate Bills seem to be totally for the benefit of the Marcellus Drilling and Pipeline companies and are putting our property rights, values, lives and peace of mind at risk.  The out-of-state companies will be gone in ten years, but many of our property rights could be gone forever.  It’s time to Act to get involved!

Crossover Tuesday on March 2 is when these Senate Bills will move to the House of Delegates for review.  So, they should be killed in the House in the next two weeks in the event they make it out of the Senate.

Our Senators will not be representing “the majority” of their constituents if they sponsor or support or vote for these Senate Bills!

Please watch closely how your elected representatives vote in this session of the Legislature. It is important that they vote for our Property Rights.

It just does not seem to stop.  Governor, Tomblin asked the WV Senate to Pass Bill SB 419.  This bill will eliminate some of revenue derived from the State Severance Tax on oil and gas extraction   by 4.7 cents per thousand cubic feet of natural gas (along with a fee on coal extraction). 

Call me thunderstruck, but this tax revenue cut comes at a time when our state has a shortfall of over $350 million in the WV budget.

Yes, the fee was originally to be used to pay down the state’s old workers’ compensation debts and Tomblin had promised that once the debt was paid, the fee would be lifted.

Guess what.  Our WV Senators have unanimously passed Senate Bill (SB) 419 and it is now awaiting the Governor’s signature. If signed, we will lose this potential tax revenue source that could help us fix our state’s budget.  So I ask you, “Who is working to fix our budget”? 

Finally, we need to kill any Bill that supports forced pooling.

Two such bill are SB646 and HB 4639 which support forced pooling. These bills will allow drilling under a surface owners property without their consent and without benefit to the surface owner. These are the worst forced pooling bills ever. Last year the legislature tried to pass a forced pooling bill and it failed because it is an unfair concept and an unfair law.

I thought this was the year that our infrastructure was to have been top priority.  What Happened?

Our roads and bridges need repair and improvement. We need new roads. We still need to get good water to the thousands of folks who are on spring or well water. Yes, many families are still in need of reliable city water. So many people today in our state are still living as third world citizens.

So ask your representative why they are working so hard on taking away more of our rights?

There has never been a more important time to watch what is going on in Charleston!

There is still time to contact your elected officials. So take action now to protect your property rights.

These bills are taking away people’s rights and it is unfair to take away the legal system from ordinary citizens.

You can check a bill’s status at:  www.legis.state.wv.us  and you can also find your legislator by clicking on Senate or Delegate and then Member to get the phone number or email address to contact your representative.

You can make a positive impact. Take the time to protect your property rights now.

John W. Cobb, Jr.
Ireland, West Virginia

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