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Lewis County

Lewis County

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations Coming to Stonewall Resort in April

The Free Press WV

Stonewall Resort in Lewis County soon will accommodate the growing number of guests who drive electric vehicles (EV). Three EV charging stations will be installed at the property in April, resort officials have announced. Stonewall joins Blackwater Falls, Pipestem Resort, Twin Falls, Cacapon Resort, Tygart Lake and Hawks Nest lodges in incorporating EV charging stations as a complimentary guest service.

“The popularity and versatility of electric vehicles continue to grow and we’re pleased to offer this service to our guests,” said Mike Hager, general manager at Stonewall Resort. “Our location near Interstate 79 provides a perfect location for guests to stop and refuel, while also taking time to enjoy our natural lakeside setting and amenities.”

Hager said the electric vehicle charging stations will be installed in parking spaces in the resort’s circle drive. Two of the parking spaces will be dedicated Tesla-brand vehicle charging stations and the third spot will be equipped with a charging station that can handle a broad range of electric vehicles. Electric Vehicle owners should check their EV station location apps to learn when the Stonewall Resort charging docks become active.

For additional information and reservations, contact the resort at 888-278-8150 or visit www.StonewallResort.com.

Gilmer County Family Court Report

The Free Press WV

On Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Family Court Judge Steven Jones presided over Family Court in Gilmer County.


•  One divorce was granted wherein Kellee Elliott (21) of Weston, WV divorced Steven Allen Elliott (25) of Rock Cave, WV.


•  Two divorces were continued.


•  One hearing had a status conference held.


•  One modification was heard.

Open Letter to Governor Jim Justice and DEP Secretary Austin Caperton

The Free Press WV

How is the air down there in Charleston?  Still clean?  Do you plan to move out into the country near some of the new Marcellus drilling industry?  Maybe near a compressor station with eleven of those big engines, roaring and belching 24 hours a day?

Or perhaps near a well pad where there is 24 hour light and noise and chemicals and diesel smoke with lots of PM2.5 coming out the exhaust.  Particulate matter 2.5 microns or less is now know that is the cause of Alzheimer’s-like effects you know.  Going to bring along your grandchildren and your Mom along?  Families like that live out here, and the young and the old are particularly susceptible to toxics.

May be you are like the famous story about Rex Tillerson, who has inflicted that kind of misery on many thousands of people.  Then he complained when a water tower to enable fracking was erected in sight of his own piece of earth.

Do you think those who drink water without the taste of chlorine shouldn’t complain when their well is poisoned with a complex mixture of water slickers, detergents, and anti-oxidants, antibacterial compounds, and God-only-knows what else?  Maybe they deserve car-busting roads and interminable delays when they use public roads too?

I can see you demurring all the way from here.  You are like Rex Tillerson, the ultimate not-in-my-back-yard guy.

So you are going to govern the state for all the people.  For all the people of West Virginia – like John J. Cornwell was governing West Virginia for all the people, including the miners, at the time of the battle of Matewan? Oh yes!  Those corporations had good living officers and investors, but not miners.  It’s been like that since the beginning of the state.  Wealth carried off, mostly north and east, but occasionally to build a motel in Florida.

So I’m being a little hard on you. You are just doing it to bring jobs, jobs, jobs, you say?  You do realize gas and oil extraction are capital intensive and labor weak, don’t you?  That once the drilling is done by those fellows brought in from elsewhere, they will go away and leave few permanent jobs?  The reason they have to move so much is that when a well is drilled they have to move on?  You certainly know several companies are developing automated drilling, so drilling labor will go the way of coal labor, don’t you?

Oh yes!  Obama killed coal the fable says.  You really know better than that, don’t you?  Coal companies going to more mechanization, especially long wall and surface mining that can use huge equipment, killed coal jobs.  That fable was a tool using prejudice and diversion of the truth to affect voters slow to catch on.

What moral code do you have that allows collateral damage to rural residents in peacetime for a for profit industry?  Forget for the moment all the externalized costs, the true cost of the extraction, the damage to other industries, global warming, destruction of surface value for farming and timber, recreation and hunting.  What justifies forest destruction, land disturbances, public annoyances, and public health for fossil fuel extraction? Especially when last year 39% of new electrical capacity was solar and 29% was wind power.  (Coal has had virtually no capacity built for the last two years.)  No CO2 from the renewable resources, either.

What ethical system does this come out of?  It doesn’t seem to come out of any of the world’s Great Religions.  Perhaps a cult?  Demon worship?

How do you decide these people are unworthy of protection?  Simply because of rural residence?  Those who can’t afford to move elsewhere, or too attached to the family plot?

On the other hand, what gives the right to protection?  Urban residence, well off enough to move?

Hey guys, people out here are probably more astute than you think.  Some don’t think very far ahead, and few are articulate, but, given time, it will all become too clear.

West Virginia has the highest rate of exiting population in the nation.  It has the lowest ratio of employment to employable people in he nation.  College kids head for the door, and so do a lot of high school grads.

Is higher taxes, corrupting the environment, destroying the people, allowing the wealth to be carted off by favored industries – to be the past, present (and future?) of Almost Heaven?

S. Thomas Bond
Jane Lew. WV

West Fork Conservation District Spring Agricultural Enhancement Program Funding

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has approved the following cooperators for financial assistance through the Spring FY17 Agricultural Enhancement Program:

  • Bee, Ann (Gilmer): Lime - $923.79

  • Blake, Nelson (Harrison): Lime - $1,931.00

  • Grogg, Billie (Gilmer): Lime - $2,382.00

  • Huff, Denzil (Gilmer): Nutrient Management - $420.00

  • Kefauver, Ronald (Harrison): Lime - $200.00

  • Lang, David (Harrison): Lime - $523.80

  • Lowther, Bill (Lewis): Lime - $1,829.50, Nutrient Management - $424.40

  • Marshall, Greg (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $276.90

  • Maxwell, Robert (Doddridge): Lime - $1,136.00

  • Nutter, Lisa (Harrison): Lime - $2,209.30

  • Oldaker, John (Lewis): Lime - $ 2,160.00

  • Pennington, Bernard (Doddridge): Nutrient Management: - $246.00

  • Potesta, A. Robert (Harrison): Lime - $498.00

  • Robinson, Anne (Doddridge): Lime - $1,380.00

  • Rockwell, Virginia (Harrison): Lime - $2,958.00

  • Shiflet, Michael (Gilmer): Lime - $3,000.00

  • Short, Eldon (Lewis): Lime - $1,333.50

  • Stout II, Lowell (Harrison): Lime - $364.80

  • Stutler, Kermit (Harrison): Nutrient Management: - $356.40

  • Suan, Bill (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Suan, Robert (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $90.00

  • Sypolt, Charles (Gilmer): Lime - $506.00

  • Tomes, Edward (Harrison): Lime - $3,000.00

  • White, L. Frank (Lewis): Lime - $420.00

  • White, William (Harrison): Lime - $2,200.00

  • Wolfe, Lynwood (Lewis): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Workman, Joseph (Harrison): Lime - $2,650.00

WEST FORK CONSERVATION DISTRICT Education Programs and Scholarship Opportunities

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has a busy schedule already planned for educational events to take place in 2017.

Eligible students from grades K-12 are encouraged to look at some of these programs, and see if they may be of interest to them. Information about these programs will be going out to Principals, Guidance Counselors, and select science teachers in schools located in Lewis, Doddridge, Gilmer and Harrison Counties.

Included in this news release is a list of the various programs to take part in, and a brief description of each along with their deadlines and dates to remember!

Please call the WFCD office at 304.627.2160 x 4, for additional information on our programs.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity for Seniors:  The West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts awards nine $500 college scholarships to graduating high school seniors who plan on majoring in an agriculture related field. Students must submit applications to their Conservation District Office by March 6th, 2017. The recipients will be notified in May. Applications are available at your Guidance Counselor’s office or the WFCD office.

  2. Grassland Evaluation Contest: All high school 4-H and FFA students may compete at the Grassland Contest. It is held in conjunction with the Beef Expo on April 7th, 2017 at Jackson’s Mills. The contest covers the topics of grassland condition, soil interpretation, wildlife habitation and plant identification. Scholarships are awarded to top winners. The registration form can be found at wvca.us/education/grassland_contest.cfm.

  3. Sixth Grade Conservation Field Day: Gilmer County holds a special field day for all sixth grade students. It is scheduled for April 25th, 2017 at Cedar Creek State Park. Stations are set up covering soils, forests, wildlife, oil and gas environmental concerns, beekeeping, streams, etc. It is a full day of learning for students. If your school is interested in having a conservation field day, contact the WFCD for more information.

  4. Samara Exam: The Samara Exam is a test that measures the knowledge students have attained about the environment up through the 6th grade. The test is administered in March or April at the teacher’s convenience. Teachers, if you are interested in conducting this fun activity, you can use the links found on our website at wvca.us, under the education programs tab, or contact the WFCD for more information. It’s fun, educational and free!

  5. Envirothon Training Day:  This workshop is for teams of 9th-12th grade students to explore current environmental and earth sciences within the framework of five disciplines: aquatics, forestry, soils, wildlife and a current environmental topic. The contest will be held at the Doddridge County Park and will help teams prepare for the field competition to be held on April 20th & 21st, 2017 at Camp Caesar at Cowen, WV. The team with the highest score from the field competition will become the state champion and will represent West Virginia in the NCF Envirothon. You will find all needed information and can register your team at wvca.us under the education tab or contact the WFCD office.

  6. Forestry Contest: The Upper Ohio, Little Kanawha and West Fork Conservation Districts in conjunction with the West Virginia Division of Forestry will again be holding their annual Forestry Contest. This year it will be held in the Upper Ohio Conservation District area. It will be based on WV career development events for forestry. FFA teachers will receive announcements in the near future detailing the contest.

  7. Tri District Land Judging: Land judging is a program to help students learn about the different types of soils and their characteristics and how to judge depth, erosion, slope and permeability. They learn how to use these factors to classify land and learn some of the conservation practices needed to maintain or improve lands. The winning regional Vo-Ag teams will advance to the State Vo-Ag contest. The winning local 4-H groups attend the State 4-H contest. The winning teams from the State Vo-Ag and State 4-H contests are eligible to participate in the National Land Judging Contest in Oklahoma the following Spring. The District Contest is scheduled for May 11th, 2017. Information will be forthcoming to Tri-District Extension Agents, FFA Instructors and Conservation Districts regarding the dates, locations and times.

Gilmer County Family Court Report

The Free Press WV

On Wednesday, February 08, 2017 Family Court Judge Steve Jones held Family Court in the Court House Annex.


•  One domestic violence petition was denied.


Two divorces were granted wherein:

•  Debra Doolittle (50) of Weston, WV divorced Orville Jack Doolittle (58) of Mt. Olive, WV.


•  Matthew D. Fisher (25) of Cedarville, WV divorced Tracey Fisher (24) of Paden City, WV.


•  One divorce was continued.


•  A guardian ad litem was appointed in a modification case and it was continued.


•  Another modification had no order entered in it yet due to attorneys being involved and they will prepare the order and submit it for signature to the FCJ.

Wesleyan to Hold 2nd Annual North-Central West Virginia Honor Band

The Free Press WV

On February 03, students from area county music programs will gather on the campus of West Virginia Wesleyan College for the second annual North-Central West Virginia Honor Band.  The two-day honor band, which stemmed from the idea of giving every middle and high school student in West Virginia a high-level musical experience opportunity, is facilitated by Logan Lindsey, director of bands at Wesleyan.

Students from Barbour, Upshur, Randolph, Gilmer, Lewis, and Taylor will arrive on campus on Friday to prepare for a Saturday, February 04 concert to be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Culpepper Auditorium of the Virginia Thomas Law Center for the Performing Arts.  The middle school band, comprised of 64 students, will be under the direction of Charles Doherty, director of instrumental music at Damascus High School in Damascus, MD.  The 63-piece high school band will be under the direction of Lindsey.

“The North-Central West Virginia Honor Band has taken a huge step in growth this year, adding three counties to its participating schools and looking for more in the future,” stated Lindsey.  “This is a vital part of musical development for young students as none of the participating counties offer an All-County Honor Band.  As I am sure this event will continue to grow and adapt, the most important part is that is continues to cater to the musical needs of the local students and their directors.”

Doherty directs two bands, a jazz band, and a string orchestra at Damascus High School.  He earned a bachelor of science degree in music education and a master of music in trombone performance from Duquesne University. He played principal trombone in the Symphony Band, lead trombone in the Jazz Ensemble, and principal bass trombone in the Wind Symphony, as well as conducted the Symphony Band in performance.  As a performer, Doherty has played with numerous groups in the D.C. area, including Mike Kamuf Little Big Band, Martinsburg Jazz Orchestra, The Yesterday Swing Orchestra, the Montgomery Philharmonic, and the Trinity Chamber Orchestra.

Lindsey is currently in his fourth year as Director of Bands at West Virginia Wesleyan College.  He is sought out regionally and nationally both as a soloist and conductor.  Growing up near New Orleans immersed in multiple music worlds has really shaped his performances and teaching to be very unique and always educational.  Lindsey has performed with the Modern Jazz Tuba Project, one of the premier jazz tuba/euphonium groups in the world.  He attributes his success to his teachers, mentors, and the blessings of his experiences.  Of these, his biggest influences came from Dr. Richard Perry, jazz and orchestral tubist and professor at the University of Southern Mississippi; Dr. Steven Sudduth, former low brass conductor at the University of South Dakota; and Chester Schmitz, retired Boston Pops Orchestra tubist.

The event is free and open to the public.

Glenville State College President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison, Lawrence C. Wolf


Braxton County: Bridget D. Carr, Dakota S. Johnson, Stacy N. Loyd, Brittany V. White


Calhoun County: Devon T. Toppings


Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Dalton M. Holcomb, Carrie G. Huffman, Andrea P. Litton, Kaitlyn J. Samples


Doddridge County: Joshua L. Smith


Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth


Gilmer County: Jonathan E. Clark, Landon P. Gumm, Michaela L. Gumm, Sean M. Lang, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Trevor D. Wright


Grant County: Larissa A. Henry


Greenbrier County: Myka K. Perry


Hardy County: Faith V. Smith


Harrison County: Joseph M. Bush, Cecilia A. Matheney, Megan E. Ruppert


Jackson County: Brittaney M. Burdette, Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical


Jefferson County: Jasmine Z. Tarman


Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Jerrica D. Hilbert


Lewis County: James Z. Browning, Daniel C. Conrad, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Torie A. Riffle


Logan County: Hannah P. Runyon, Matthew A. Zachary


Marion County: Phillip J. Poling


Mason County: Kaylee M. Howard


Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg


Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Joshua D. Huffman, Eric W. Peyatt, Kathryn G. Waddell


Preston County: Madison H. Null


Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne


Randolph County: Diana R. Miller, Melissa D. Nicholson


Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff, Kimberly A. Smith


Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber


Upshur County: Brandy L. Bachman, Skylar A. Fulton


Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Hunter A. Given, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule


Wood County: Michael L. Briggs


Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Raven P. Fatool, Cedric J. Johnson, Kellie N. Kinsinger, Allison A. Parski, John S. Peloro, Victoria L. Peterson, Emily A. Walker, Brian S. Williams

Glenville State College Vice President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the Vice President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Brianna A. Shivers


Boone County: Ally K. Brown, Michele L. Epling, Crystal M. Jarrell, Gregory I. Lail


Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Coleden R. Belknap, Tyler K. Cunningham, Kathryn L. Dean, Larissa E. DeLuca, Jacob D. Haymond, Samantha N. Mazzella, Teddy J. Richardson, Cami D. Roberts, Alexis S. Spell, Heather N. Thayer, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Maranda J. Vaughan, Andrea B. Vidal, Brandon M. White, Shanna S. Wine


Calhoun County: Tiffany A. Brannon, Moriah J. CreelFox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Taylor S. Garrett, Chelsea  R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont, Johnathan X. Taylor


Clay County: Casey E. Brown, Opalene D. Huffman, William C. Robertson, Sydnee M. Vance


Doddridge County: Joshua M. Pitcock, Lindsey G. Travis


Fayette County: Vladimir V. Iotov, Kelsey L. Norris, Trevor D. Wood


Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Katelyn S. Benson, Julie A. Bishop, Monica D.  Bush, Madison L. Campbell, Sara B. Coombs, Colby G. Cunningham, Lucas D. DeMarino, Meghan Harubin, Christina L. Jenkins, Jaylin K. Johnson, Amanda R. Lamb, Tonya L. Lyons, Matthew M. Montgomery, Adam H. Moore, Cody M. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Zandel M. Sponaugle, Alexus C. Sprouse, Zaon A. Starseed, Elania N. White, Carrissa M. Wood


Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty, Tina M. Jerman


Hampshire County: Dylan G. Kesner


Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Lia Runyan


Jackson County: Ryan A. Gregory, Kirsten M. Marks, Joel E. McDonald, Sapphire N. Parsons, Clayton Swisher, Bradley J. Titus, Kelly J. Trippett


Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Mary E. Lewis, Anthony R. Vazquez


Kanawha County: Faith Donze, McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Rema K. Jordan, Zachary Lively, Jonathan L. Mullins, Jeri D. Potter, Rebecca E. Wiseman


Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, Jennifer M. Eiler, Destiny L. Grimes, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Justin P. Raines, J’Aime L. Shearer, Kelly L. Weaver


Logan County: Kaitlyn A. Bircheat, Alec G. Maynard


Marion County: Morgan P. Hardesty


Marshall County: Logen M. Lemasters


Mason County: Charles B. Walton


Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton


Monongalia County: Alyssa B. Boback


Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Michael I. Pracht, Brady A. Tritapoe


Nicholas County: Autumn G. Barnett, Jessica R. Bird, Marlyn S. Donelson, Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Morgan Francis, Taylor Keenan, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Nathan S. Spencer, Mason A. Thomas, Samuel P. Whitlock


Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Raven D. Turner


Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote


Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto, Isaac C. Hise


Preston County: Kathleen L. Faber


Putnam County: Jacob M. Stover


Raleigh County: Luke D. Carpenter, Kaylee S. Dickenson, Michael A. Layne


Randolph County: Christopher A. Cozad, Angela R. McWilliams, Kathlyne L. Simmons, Christopher D. Varner


Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Carleena P. Elliott, Olivia D. Goff, Trinity R. Muschweck


Roane County: Georgia B. Bing, Joshua C. Runyon, Bonita J. Schreckengost, James D. Williams


Taylor County: Eva S. Guthrie


Tucker County: John Chambers, Wiley T. Raines, Stephanie R. Williams


Tyler County: Devon J. Harris


Upshur County: Autumn Knight, Belinda L. Lewis


Wayne County: Taylor N. Brumfield


Webster County: Valerie L. Rule, Danielle Williams


Wetzel County: Daniel M. Jackson, Colton L. Ring, Andrew R. Tefft


Wirt County: Micheal L. Morgan, Mary M. Strong


Wood County: Taylor A. Broadwater


Wyoming County: Travis D. Gibson, Kaci M. Mullins


Out of State: Karla Y. Barr, Chandler R. Carrera, Ibrahim O. Ghanem, Dwyron K. Gillard, II, Taylor A. Gilliland, Noah R. Green, Jake Hensell, Justin S. Koogler, Momi P. Lievan, Paris M. McLeod, Anthony W. McPoyle, Emily M. Meyers, Stephen G. Mickle, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Casey R. Sheaffer, Wesley D. Stauffer, Johnni M. Tillman, Ernesto Torres, Paranda S. Uber, Jack H. Varndell, Timothy G. Wine, Hannah N. Wright

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 112,384 Deer In 2016

The Free Press WV

Preliminary counts indicate West Virginia hunters harvested 112,384 white-tailed deer during the recently completed bucks firearms, antlerless, muzzleloader, archery, crossbow, and youth/Class Q/Class XS deer seasons, according to Paul Johansen, chief of the Division of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife Resources Section. This year’s total harvest was 19 percent below the 2015 deer harvest of 138,493 and 15 percent below the five-year average of 132,466.

A breakdown of the combined 2016 deer seasons reveals 46,071 bucks harvested during the traditional buck firearm season, 32,508 antlerless deer taken during all antlerless firearm hunting opportunities, 28,808 deer harvested by bows and crossbows, and 4,997 deer taken by muzzleloader hunters.


Antlerless Deer Season

The 2016 antlerless deer season harvest, which includes the youth/Class Q/Class XS deer season, was 18 percent less than in 2015 and 26.5 percent below the five-year average of 44,239.  “It is important to note that the antlerless harvest is the key component to any deer management strategy, as it controls the future deer population,” said Johansen.  Hunters are reminded that on March 13 and 14, 2017, the DNR will hold 12 public meetings across the state to gather comments on proposed fall 2017 antlerless deer hunting seasons in each of the 51 counties where firearms deer hunting is permitted.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,535), Upshur (1,485), Lewis (1,292), Mason (1,269), Jackson (1,224), Ritchie (1,215), Wood (1,126), Roane (1,034), Harrison (972), and Braxton (854).


Muzzleloader Deer Season

The 2016 muzzleloader harvest of 4,997 was 3 percent below the 2015 harvest of 5,178, and 21 percent below the five-year average of 6,344. The top 10 counties are Randolph (243), Nicholas (232), Preston (217), Upshur (185), Lewis (168), Jackson (158), Braxton (157), Mason (153), Wood (141), and Webster (139).


Archery and Crossbow Deer Season

The bow and crossbow hunter’s take of 28,808 deer was 11 percent less than the 2015 archery season harvest of 32,540, and four percent above the five-year average archery season harvest of 27,596.  Archery harvests are inversely correlated to hard mast crops. The below-average acorn crop in 2015, followed by a better acorn crop in 2016, likely contributed to the lower 2016 harvest; however, the proportion of the harvest taken using a crossbow increased in 2016 over that recorded in 2015.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,365), Randolph (975), Wood (945), Kanawha (921), Upshur (867), Wyoming (867), Mason (791), Jackson (785), Nicholas (765), and Raleigh (738).


WESTVIRGINIA DEER HARVEST, 2016

County

BuckFirearms

Antlerless

Muzzleloader

Archery/Crossbow

Total

Barbour

1,098

773

133

568

2,572

Brooke

268

367

38

287

960

Hancock

209

164

34

357

764

Harrison

1,138

972

113

632

2,855

Marion

765

787

113

521

2,186

Marshall

727

493

73

357

1,650

Monongalia

827

644

91

707

2,269

Ohio

270

222

46

294

832

Preston

1,774

1,535

217

1,365

4,891

Taylor

581

490

70

303

1,444

Tucker

730

191

73

409

1,403

Wetzel

899

819

90

335

2,143

District 1Subtotal

9,286

7,457

1,091

6,135

23,969

Berkeley

737

627

67

582

2,013

Grant

954

439

81

351

1,825

Hampshire

1,197

836

88

421

2,542

Hardy

1,076

610

63

317

2,066

Jefferson

422

413

54

417

1,306

Mineral

922

684

80

404

2,090

Morgan

437

406

44

241

1,128

Pendleton

1,088

448

70

345

1,951

District 2 Subtotal

6,833

4,463

547

3,078

14,921

Braxton

1,102

854

157

571

2,684

Clay

390

164

43

241

838

Lewis

1,246

1,292

168

629

3,335

Nicholas

1,044

470

232

765

2,511

Pocahontas

921

202

56

278

1,457

Randolph

1,617

803

243

975

3,638

Upshur

1,399

1,485

185

867

3,936

Webster

941

303

139

548

1,931

District 3 Subtotal

8,660

5,573

1,223

4,874

20,330

Fayette

889

266

124

718

1,997

Greenbrier

1,447

699

135

565

2,846

McDowell

456

456

Mercer

636

383

86

684

1,789

Monroe

1,099

752

70

550

2,471

Raleigh

648

206

70

738

1,662

Summers

657

562

62

403

1,684

Wyoming

 

 

 

867

867

District 4 Subtotal

5,376

2,868

547

4,981

13,772

Boone

573

147

72

364

1,156

Cabell

677

404

60

434

1,575

Kanawha

1,058

385

78

921

2,442

Lincoln

846

522

106

466

1,940

Logan

574

574

Mason

1,267

1,269

153

791

3,480

Mingo

386

386

Putnam

992

803

119

661

2,575

Wayne

815

252

62

419

1,548

District 5 Subtotal

6,228

3,782

650

5,016

15,676

Calhoun

705

599

69

326

1,699

Doddridge

946

706

70

308

2,030

Gilmer

791

634

93

311

1,829

Jackson

1,487

1,224

158

785

3,654

Pleasants

334

251

27

154

766

Ritchie

1,422

1,215

102

630

3,369

Roane

1,178

1,034

105

544

2,861

Tyler

855

766

82

330

2,033

Wirt

777

810

92

391

2,070

Wood

1,193

1,126

141

945

3,405

District 6 Subtotal

9,688

8,365

939

4,724

23,716

StateTotal

46,071

32,508

4,997

28,808

112,384

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 3,012 Black Bears In 2016

The Free Press WV

West Virginia hunters harvested 3,012 black bears during the combined 2016 archery, crossbow and firearms seasons, according to Colin Carpenter, Black Bear Project leader for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The preliminary black bear harvest data for the combined 2016 seasons were 6 percent lower than the record set in 2015. The harvest is the second highest bear kill recorded and is the second time the harvest has topped 3,000.

“The mast index for all oak species in 2016 increased significantly over 2015 and was above the long-term average,” said Carpenter. “Historically, an abundance of oak mast makes bears harder to target for archery hunters. Conversely, increased oak mast typically means a higher December firearms harvest because many bears delay entering their dens due to the abundance of food.”

Carpenter added, “In the 2016 Mast Survey and Hunting Outlook, we predicted a decreased archery harvest and a similar-to-slightly greater December firearms harvest over the levels observed in 2015. Our prediction held true for the archery season, but did not hold up in the December season.”

“Overall, the 2016 harvest declined during the archery, buck-gun and December seasons over the levels recorded in 2015. However, those decreases were partially offset by very successful early gun seasons in September and October.

Hunters killed 1,012 bears during the first segment of the 2016 archery season (Sept. 24 – Nov. 19).  They took 584 bears with vertical bows and 428 with crossbows. The top five counties were Randolph (82), Fayette (74), Nicholas (60), Greenbrier (55) and Preston (52).

Firearms hunters harvested 2,000 bears during 2016. Hunters took 883 bears in September and October, 349 during the concurrent buck-gun bear season, and 768 during the traditional December season. The top five counties were Pendleton (177), Randolph (167), Pocahontas (161), Nicholas (153) and Hardy (133).

2016 WEST VIRGINIA BLACK BEAR HARVEST

County

Bow/Crossbow

Sept/Oct Gun

Buck Gun

December

Total

Barbour

45

20

1

0

66

Brooke

0

0

0

0

0

Hancock

0

0

0

0

0

Harrison

16

0

2

0

18

Marion

3

0

0

0

3

Marshall

2

0

0

0

2

Monongalia

7

0

2

0

9

Ohio

0

0

0

0

0

Preston

52

41

22

22

137

Taylor

17

0

1

0

18

Tucker

35

37

6

50

128

Wetzel

1

0

0

1

2

District 1 Subtotal

178

98

34

73

383

Berkeley

3

0

3

0

6

Grant

25

31

6

39

101

Hampshire

17

0

29

4

50

Hardy

26

61

14

58

159

Jefferson

3

0

2

0

5

Mineral

11

0

0

9

20

Morgan

8

0

11

0

19

Pendleton

37

100

10

67

214

District 2 Subtotal

130

192

75

177

574

Braxton

36

11

4

11

62

Clay

9

13

7

16

45

Lewis

13

0

5

0

18

Nicholas

60

56

31

66

213

Pocahontas

23

62

11

88

184

Randolph

82

99

4

64

249

Upshur

14

10

2

6

32

Webster

38

50

9

52

149

District 3 Subtotal

275

301

73

303

952

Fayette

74

21

39

13

147

Greenbrier

55

45

12

73

185

McDowell

49

38

5

16

108

Mercer

33

0

4

2

39

Monroe

24

27

17

29

97

Raleigh

36

25

9

7

77

Summers

26

0

8

0

34

Wyoming

24

30

1

2

57

District 4 Subtotal

321

186

95

142

744

Boone

23

28

30

32

113

Cabell

0

0

0

0

0

Kanawha

26

38

33

28

125

Lincoln

1

0

0

0

1

Logan

22

26

1

2

51

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

Mingo

13

14

0

7

34

Putnam

0

0

0

0

0

Wayne

1

0

0

0

1

District 5 Subtotal

86

106

64

69

325

Calhoun

1

0

3

0

4

Doddridge

3

0

0

0

3

Gilmer

7

0

4

3

14

Jackson

0

0

0

0

0

Pleasants

0

0

0

0

0

Ritchie

4

0

0

0

4

Roane

1

0

0

0

1

Tyler

2

0

0

0

2

Wirt

4

0

1

1

6

Wood

0

0

0

0

0

District 6 Subtotal

22

0

8

4

34

State Total

1012

883

349

768

3012

Bears listed for Logan, McDowell and Wyoming counties as"Buck Gun” are bow or crossbow kills from 11.21.16 -12.031

November 19, 2016. All other bow and crossbow kills have been separated based on the seasonsin which they were killed

Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 05, 2017

The Free Press WV
Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 05, 2017
 
Closings and Delays
Early Dismissal
Glenville State College  
Gilmer County Board of Education  
Gilmer County Courthouse  
Gilmer County Health Department  
Gilmer County Senior Center  
Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic 
Gilmer County Schools   Closing at 12:30 PM
Braxton County Schools   Closing 1 Hour Early
Calhoun County Schools   Closing at 12:00 PM
Doddridge County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Lewis County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Ritchie County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Barbour County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Clay County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Harrison County Schools  
Nicholas County Schools  
Pleasants County Schools   Closing at 1:00 PM
Roane County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Tyler County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Upshur County Schools   Closing at 1:00 PM
Webster County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wetzel County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wirt County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wood County Schools  
Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700


The Free Press WV

Merry Christmas 2016

image

Fall Interns Complete Student Teaching for GSC

Sixteen students have completed their student teaching internships for Glenville State College and participated in GSC’s December Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, December 10.

The Free Press WV
(L-R) Sarah Gillespie, Katie Stover, Kennedy Cochran, Justin Oney, Justin Lewis,
Nathan Kincaid, Larisa Gray, Krystal Jones, Elizabeth Shuman, Jacob Yocum,
Athena Morris, Seth Elmore, Amanda Hanks, Anissa Cox, Kayla Rose, and Paige Tuttle

  • Kennedy Cochran completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Multi- Categorical Special Education (K-6) at Leading Creek Elementary School with Brianna Short and Melissa Wood. Dr. Shelly Ratliff and Dr. Tara Cosco were her GSC supervisors. She is the daughter of Clinton and Lisa Cochran of Clifftop, West Virginia. Cochran was also named Outstanding Student Teacher of the fall semester by the education honor society Kappa Delta Pi.


  • Anissa Cox completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and English Education (5-9) at Jane Lew Elementary School and Robert L. Bland Middle School with Carmen Shafer and Traci McCarty. Dr. Shara Curry and Dr. Melody Wise were her GSC supervisors. She is the daughter of Charles Holcomb of Paden City, West Virginia and Yvonne and Brian Tannous of Weston, West Virginia. She currently resides in Jane Lew, West Virginia with her husband Brent and son Elliot.


  • Seth Elmore completed his student teaching in Music Education (5-adult) at Gilmer County Elementary School and Lewis County High School with Judy Leggett, Allen Heath, and Tina Norman. Dr. David Lewis, Dr. Shara Curry, and Donald Sheets were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Joseph Wayne and Kandi Jo Elmore of Greenville, West Virginia. He currently resides in Dixie, West Virginia with his wife Courtney.


  • Sarah Gillespie completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6), and General Math-Algebra I (5-9) at Tennerton Elementary School and Buckhannon-Upshur Middle School with Rachel Stump and Carol Shenuski. Dr. John Taylor and Joseph Wood were her GSC Supervisors. She is the daughter of Matthew and Rena Gillespie of Buckhannon, West Virginia. She currently resides with her Fiancé Daniel Nolte in Buckhannon, West Virginia.


  • Larisa Gray completed her student teaching in Math Education (5-adult) at Robert L. Bland Middle School and Lewis County High School with Tammie Lattea and Theresa Johnston. Dr. John Taylor and Joseph Wood were her GSC supervisors. She is the daughter of Daniel and Victoria Gordon of Cox’s Mills, West Virginia. She currently resides with her husband, Breken, in Westminster, Maryland.


  • Amanda Hanks completed her student teaching in Early Education (PreK-K) and Elementary Education (K-6) at Glade Creek Elementary School with Lori Symes and Briana Waters. Frances Fry was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Mike and Kim Hanks of Summersville, West Virginia.


  • Krystal Jones completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Multi-Categorical Special Education (K-6) at Summersville Elementary School with Aime Thomas and Betsy Strickland. Dr. John Taylor was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Myrtle Jones and Donald Barnes of Milford, Virginia.


  • Nathan Kincaid completed his student teaching in Business and Marketing Education (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School with Lora Chapman. Dr. Kevin Cain and Dr. John Taylor were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Michael and Sandra Kincaid of Summersville, West Virginia.


  • Justin Lewis completed his student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School and Calhoun County Middle/High School with Karen McClain and Brandi Richards. Dr. Shara Curry was his GSC supervisor. He is the son of Danny and MaLesa Lewis of Boonsboro, Maryland.


  • Athena Morris completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Multi-Categorical Special Education (K-6) at Arnoldsburg Elementary School with Tammey Webb and Maria Arnold. Dr. Tara Cosco was her GSC supervisor. She currently resides in Glenville, West Virginia with her husband Gary and children Kevin, Sebastian, and Isabel.


  • Justin Oney completed his student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School and Calhoun County Middle/High School with Lindsey Bush and Dan Cosgrove. Dr. Shara Curry and Don Sheets were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Eric and Kristi Oney of Logan, West Virginia.


  • Kayla Rose completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Burnsville Elementary School with Sherri Stalnaker and Melinda Wilson. Frances Fry was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Jessica Rose of Weston, West Virginia. She currently resides with her husband JR in Clarksburg, West Virginia.


  • Elizabeth Shuman completed her student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) and Elementary Education (K-6) at Lewis County High School and Jane Lew Elementary School with Ben Whetsell and Lisa Vaillancourt. Dr. Shara Curry was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Kelly Shuman of Jane Lew, West Virginia and Nelson Shuman of Fairview, West Virginia and is the mother of Karus Musselman.


  • Katie Stover completed her student teaching in English Education (5-adult) at Braxton County High School and Geary Elementary School with Janis Collins and Staci Moore. Her GSC supervisors were Dr. Shara Curry, Dr. Melody Wise, and Frances Fry. She is the daughter of Brett and Kara Stover of Wallback, West Virginia.


  • Paige Tuttle completed her student teaching in Early Education (PreK-K) and Elementary Education (K-6) at Gilmer County Elementary School with Ronni Facemire and Tanya Stewart. Dr. Shelly Ratliff was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of David and Heather Tuttle of Fairview, West Virginia.


  • Jacob Yocum completed his student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School and Braxton County Middle School with McKinley Buckley and Lori Dittman. Frances Fry and Don Sheets were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Jennifer and Rodney Thompson of Elkins, West Virginia.


  • Senior teacher education students take part in an internship during their final semester at GSC. At the conclusion of their internship students must complete a presentation illustrating their mastery of the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards as well as the standards of their particular area of study.


For more information about the Teacher Education Program at Glenville State College, contact 304.462.4119.

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