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Lewis County

Lewis County

Welcome Back to School and College - Students, Teacher, and Staff - 2017-2018

The Gilmer Free Press
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The Gilmer Free Press



The Gilmer Free Press
The Gilmer Free Press
The Gilmer Free Press

Public School Start/End Dates for 2017-18 Across the Area

The Free Press WV

Barbour County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 23


Braxton County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 10

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 16


Calhoun County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Clay County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 30


Doddridge County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Gilmer County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Harrison County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 24


Lewis County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Nicholas County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Pleasants County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Ritchie County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Roane County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Tyler County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Webster County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Wetzel County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, June 07


Wirt County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Wood County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01

Stonewall Bass

The Free Press WV

Four years ago when the West Virginia Natural Resources Commission agreed to a recommendation to change the long held catch and release restriction on black bass at Stonewall Jackson Lake there was widespread concern.  Many bass anglers feared they would see heavy stringers of fat bass carried through the lake’s parking lots. There was a concern the state’s crown jewel for bass would become just another run of the mill fishing lake.  But it turns out none that has happened.

“When people catch and want to bring fish home, they’re thinking pan fish or walleye,” said Division of Natural Resources District Fisheries Biologist Jim Walker. “They don’t usually think, ‘I want a mess for dinner, I’m going to take some five pound bass.‘”

Still, the agency was cautious about allowing harvest of the hefty largemouth bass for which the lake is known.  The current restriction allows anglers to keep five bass, but only one can be over 18 inches.  It was a compromise at the time to address some of the concerns raised by fishermen.

“We put that there because we really weren’t sure how people were going to react,” said Walker. “We didn’t want to create some big boom where people are going there and harvesting big loads of big bass.  We erred to the side caution because once you make a decision it sticks.”

Since the regulation was put into place, it has allowed for bass tournaments to flourish on the lake.  But tournament fishermen werent’ the primary concern.  Those fish, per tournament rules, go into a live well and are released back into the water after the weigh-in. But careful monitoring has shown very few of the non-tournament anglers are keeping the bass either.

“We tagged close to 300 bass two years in a row,” said Walker. “The aim was for anglers to see that tag, give us a call and let us know what they did with the bass.  Out of that study, only one angler reported harvesting the bass.”

It was a small study, but it was backed up by fish surveys at the ramp.  A creel clerk working for the agency spent two summers interviewing anglers as they came off the water.  The clerk logged more than 400 interviews with fishermen as they pulled their boats out of the lake, they recorded only two bass harvested after those interviews.

“From that little bit of research, we’ve determined it’s still functioning as a catch and release impountment,” Walker surmised.

The current regulation created an interesting dynamic for tournament anglers who naturally try to catch the biggest creel possible.  Under the current restrictions however, only one of their day’s fish can be over 18 inches. Many bass fishermen often have to change tactics in hopes of catching smaller bass to fill out their limit.  Some would like to see the regulations loosened to change the dynamic.  It could happen before long according to Walker.

“It’s possible. It’s something we’re going to be looking at over the next year or so,” said Walker. “We wanted to give it five years and then we may revisit it.  We realize the regs are fairly complicated, but there’s a reason for every regulation we’ve got.”

~~  Chris Lawrence ~~

Annual Stonewall Triathlon and Cardboard Boat Race

The Free Press WV

The 10th annual Atlantic Coast Pipeline Stonewall Jackson Triathlon winners will be eligible for national competition after the August 17 race.

Participants will go for a 1,000-meter swim in Stonewall Jackson Lake, a 26-mile bike ride along local country roads and finish with a four mile run through Stonewall Resort State Park and the Arnold Palmer golf course.

“This year, racers will be back on the original bike course. Last year it was rerouted because a bridge was out, but it’s back again this year,” said Benji Jones, owner of Jones Racing Co.

The duathlon option is also available again this year, he said. For those who don’t want to or can’t swim, it’s set up as a run-bike-run option. They do a one mile run, the 26 mile bike ride, and then a four-mile run to finish.

While average age of race participants is 39, Sherry Rogers, executive director of the Lewis County Chamber of Commerce, said people from teenagers to those in their late 70s take part, too.

“Since the race’s inception, athletes have traveled from 10 states and all around West Virginia to compete,” she said. “When you register, you can look at the participant list to see where other people are from, their gender and age. It’s really interesting to look at.”

The money that isn’t used for operational costs of the race goes to operating the chamber, Rogers said.

“The Chamber of Commerce runs on memberships, donations and fundraisers. This helps to fund the chamber in day-to-day operations,” she said.

Rogers said the triathlon is a big deal not only because it’s a sanctioned race and named “Best of the Best” by USA Triathlon, but it showcases Lewis County.

“This showcases our area and the beauty of West Virginia. Participants and their families oftentimes have return visits to Lewis County and the resort at different times throughout the year,” she said.

Registration is available online at www.jonesracingcompany.com until 8 a.m. on August 16. Registration and packet pickup will also be available from 4-8 p.m. at The Lodge at Stonewall Resort and 6-7 a.m. at the picnic pavilion near the resort’s Roanoke building.

The annual cardboard boat race will immediately follow the swim portion of the triathlon, said Samantha Norris, community outreach director for the resort. The race is hosted by the Stonewall State Park Foundation and sponsored by Appalachian Stream Restoration.

“First of all it’s a great opportunity to engage our community and guests on the water,” she said. “It’s a fabulous time of recreation for the entire family on the lake. Second, we conduct it with the triathlon because it offers spectators some entertainment during the bike portion.”

Norris mentioned that once the athletes are finished swimming and have moved to the bicycling portion of the race, the cardboard boat race begins.

“We ask everyone to meet at the marina parking lot to make sure we all launch together for the safety of the athletes,” she said. “It’s also a really awesome team building event from Boy Scouts to church youth groups and different companies.”

It’s an event for all ages to watch and participate, Norris said. There are awards for first, second and third place for best time, but also for best design and most spectacular sinking.

“Essentially the only products that can be used to build the boat are cardboard, duct tape and paint or whatever they want to use to decorate,” she said. “The cost is only $10 a team; it helps us cover the cost of the event and it’s very affordable.”

More information about the cardboard boat race rules and regulations and to sign up can be found by visiting the Stonewall State Park Foundation Facebook page or contact Norris at 304.269.8820.

NWS Puts Most of State Under Flash Flood Watch Through Friday Evening

The Free Press WV

The National Weather Service in Charleston has issued a Flash Flood Watch for its entire coverage area in West Virginia through Friday at 8 p.m.

“Rounds of showers and thunderstorms with very heavy rain are expected through Friday,” the NWS message said. “This rainfall, coupled with rain that has already fallen, could produce flash flooding, especially along small streams, creeks, low spots and poor drainage areas.”

Counties under the watch include: Barbour, Boone, Braxton, Cabell, Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge, Gilmer, Harrison, Jackson WV, Kanawha, Lewis, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, McDowell, Mingo, Fayette, Nicholas, Pocahontas, Raleigh, Randolph, Webster, Pleasants, Putnam, Ritchie, Roane,Taylor, Tyler, Upshur, Wayne, Wirt, Wood and Wyoming.

The National Weather Service Office in Pittsburgh issued a similar Flash Flood Watch for the Northern Panhandle, Eastern Panhandle and north central counties from 6 a.m. Friday through 1 a.m. Saturday.

Sunday Storms Could Cause Flash Flooding

The Free Press WV

More than two dozen counties in West Virginia are under a Flash Flood Watch through Sunday evening, the National Weather Service said.

Additional rounds of thunderstorms containing very heavy rain could cause flooding along small streams and poor drainage areas, meteorologists said.

The counties under the watch include: Mason, Jackson, Wood, Pleasants, Tyler, Putnam, Kanawha, Roane, Wirt, Calhoun, Ritchie, Doddridge, Clay, Braxton, Gilmer, Lewis, Harrison, Taylor, Upshur Barbour, Fayette, Nicholas, Webster, Pocahontas, and Randolph.

Central WV Community Action, Inc. Works to Get People Back On Their Feet

The Free Press WV

Central West Virginia Community Action, Inc. has just under 100 staff members with 8 locations serving Lewis, Harrison, Gilmer and Ritchie Counties.

Shannon Cunningham-Snead, the executive director, said the agency plays a critical role in the community through its anti-poverty mission.

“The agency is specifically charged to work in collaboration with existing efforts of government services and other non-profits and to avoid the duplication of services,” she said. “The agency conducts a community needs assessment every three years and uses that information to design or re-design its work, especially to fill the gaps where needs are not currently being met.”

The agency’s largest program is Head Start which helps more than 360 low-income families and other at-risk 3 to 5-year-olds in the four country region, Cunningham-Snead said.

“Children participate in pre-school and follow a curriculum designed to prepare them for a successful transition to kindergarten,” she said. “They receive free transportation, meals and other support services, and all children receive medical and dental exams.”

Children with special needs are also provided access to addition services, Cunningham-Snead said. The program is operated in strong partnership with each county’s Board of Education.

“Head Start is unique in that it focuses on the well-being of the child’s whole family, and family coordinators work with the parents and caregivers to ensure that they have access to adequate housing, food, employment opportunities and more,” she said.

Many know the agency for the Family Services program it offers in Lewis County, Cunningham-Snead said. Services are designed to meet unique needs of families in effort to obtain financial self-sufficiency.

“Case managers work with low-income customers on creating a household budget, accessing available resources such as SNAP benefits, housing vouchers, job training opportunities and providing direct assistance to support individuals obtain or maintain employment,” she said.

The agency can also provide job-specific clothing, testing fees, license renewals and more in order for individuals to be successful with employment, Cunningham-Snead said. Through an AmeriCorps program, they also offer free tax preparation services for low-income individuals.

“The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program is specifically geared to ensure that qualifying individuals receive the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Care Tax Credit,” she said. “Additionally, opportunities to create a household budget and open a savings account are provided as well.”

Central WV Community Action, Inc. recently received a grant for the No Heat Emergency Program. The initiative provides free repair or replacement of heating systems for qualifying households, Cunningham-Snead said.

“To qualify, individuals should own their own home, and their heat source must not be in working condition or not considered a safe method of heating the home,” she said. “The agency provides assistance, as it is available, for those struggling to keep up with utility bills.”

Vonda Berry, the program director, said the Family Services offered are vital for the communities in Lewis County. They are able to assist those who are employable.

“If for some reason someone has lost their job or have been on a leave, they can see a Family Services specialist,” she said. “They will assist in setting goals, create a budget together and appoint them to other available resources if they need it.”

Berry said they like to call what they do a “hand up” instead of a hand-out because they are teaching people how to become self-sufficient and independent.

“It can be hard for those who don’t have a support system and encouragement to get the help they need,” she said. “When someone’s living paycheck to paycheck, it only takes one crisis to set them back.”

The agency works closely with the Department of Health and Human Resources as well as the Family Resource Network, Berry said. They are stronger by pulling everyone together because not one agency can do it all and have all the answers.

“It’s good to have a place to go where someone knows what’s available in the community and can help you set goals, short and long-term,” she said. “I think that’s what hurts people, they get so overwhelmed by a crisis they can’t see what’s next.”

The agency works with the individual to see a vision and then help them get there step-by-step, Berry said.

Individuals seeking assistance can contact the agency’s main number at 304.622.8495 to find the service location nearest to their community. The agency’s Family Services programs are operated at 468 Main Avenue in Weston, and 108 South 3rd Street in Clarksburg.

~~  Victoria L. Cann ~~

Flash Flood Watch in Effect For Several WV Counties

The Free Press WV

The National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Watch for nearly two dozen West Virginia counties through Friday evening.

According to NWS meteorologists, “A frontal system is expected to pass through the region Thursday afternoon and Friday. Storms associated with it could produce excessive rainfall. This rain coupled with the wet soils across the area could produce flash flooding, especially along small streams, creeks, low spots and poor drainage areas.”

Counties named in the watch include:

  • Barbour
  • Braxton
  • Calhoun
  • Doddridge
  • Gilmer
  • Harrison
  • Jackson
  • Lewis
  • Mason
  • Pleasants
  • Pocahontas
  • Randolph
  • Ritchie
  • Roane
  • Taylor
  • Tyler
  • Upshur
  • Webster
  • Wirt
  • Wood

Lewis/Upshur/Gilmer FSA County Committee Nomination Period Now Open

The Free Press WV

The nomination period for the Lewis/Upshur/Gilmer County FSA County Committee opened on June 15, 2017. Nomination forms must be postmarked or received in the Lewis/Upshur/Gilmer County FSA Office by close of business on August 01, 2017.

County Committees are unique to FSA and allow producers to have a voice on federal farm program implementation at the local level.

To be eligible to serve on the FSA county committee, a person must participate or cooperate in an agency administered program, be eligible to vote in a county committee election and reside in the Local Administrative Area (LAA) where they are nominated. All producers, including women, minority and beginning farmers and ranchers are encouraged to participate in the nomination and election process.

This year, nominations and elections will be held in LAA 3, which includes the western portion of Lewis County (including the communities of Alum Bridge, Camden, Churchville, Copley, and Freemansburg.

Producers may nominate themselves or others as candidates. Organizations representing minority and women farmers and ranchers may also nominate candidates. To become a nominee, eligible individuals must sign form FSA-669A. The form and more information about county committee elections is available online at:  www.fsa.usda.gov/elections.

Elected county committee members serve a three-year term and are responsible for making decisions on FSA disaster, conservation, commodity and price support programs, as well as other important federal farm program issues. County committees consist of three to 11 members.

FSA will mail election ballots to eligible voters beginning November 06. Ballots are due back in the Lewis/Upshur/Gilmer County Office by mail or in person no later than December 04. All newly elected county committee members and alternates will take office January 01, 2018.

For more information about county committees, please contact the Lewis/Upshur/Gilmer County FSA office at 304.269.8431 or visit www.fsa.usda.gov/elections.

Stonewall Jackson WMA Shooting Range Closed Two Weeks Beginning July 17, 2017

The Free Press WV

The Stonewall Jackson Wildlife Management Area shooting range will be closed for about two weeks for repair and improvements beginning July 17.

“We’ll be installing new barrier posts and signs and will make improvements to backstops,” said Keith Krantz of the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Section. “We’ll also add stone to the parking lot and the perimeter of the shooting pavilion.”

For additional information, please contact the DNR French Creek office at 304.924.6211 or the Stonewall Jackson WMA office at 304.452.9957.

West Virginia Department of Education to Host Public Stakeholder Meetings on ESSA Plan

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) announced a series of regional stakeholder meetings to discuss the state’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan. The meetings will include a brief informational session and an open question and answer session. All stakeholder meetings are open to the public. Events will take place at the following dates and times:

June 19, 5:30 p.m.
Lewis County High School
205 Minuteman Drive
Weston, WV 26452
June 28, 5:30 p.m.
Riverside High School
1 Warrior Way
Belle, WV 25015
July 10, 5:30 p.m.
Spring Mills High School
499 Campus Drive
Martinsburg, WV 25404

ESSA was signed into law in December 2015, replacing the No Child Left Behind Act. The federal legislation represents a shift from broad federal oversight to greater flexibility of primary and secondary education at the state and local levels. ESSA requires all states to develop plans that address standards, assessments, accountability and support for struggling schools. West Virginia will submit its final plan in September 2017.

“It is imperative that our ESSA state plan is reflective of input from all stakeholder groups,” said West Virginia Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Steven Paine. “We value feedback from community members and encourage those with questions or input to attend.”

In addition to attending the stakeholder meetings, citizens can visit the Department’s ESSA website to participate in a survey and sign up to stay informed on the development of the plan: wvde.state.wv.us/essa/.

Students Named to Spring 2017 Honor Lists at GSC

The Free Press WV

The names of students who attained the Glenville State College President’s and Vice President’s Honor Lists for the Spring 2017 semester have been announced.

To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison

Boone County: Tiffany D. Muller

Braxton County: Coleden R. Belknap, Bridget D. Carr, Amber N. Hyre

Calhoun County: Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont

Clay County:  Dalton M. Holcomb

Doddridge County:  Dennis M. Bowling, Jr., Joshua M. Pitcock

Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth

Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Jonathan E. Clark, Michaela L. Gumm, Christina L. Jenkins, Amanda R. Lamb, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Halee N. Wildman

Grant County: Larissa A. Henry

Jackson County: Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical, Clayton Swisher

Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Jasmine N. Tarman

Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Rebecca E. Wiseman

Lewis County: Jennifer M. Eiler, Justin P. Raines, Kelly L. Weaver

Logan County: Matthew A. Zachary

Marshall County: Logen M. LeMasters

Mason County: Anthony ‘AJ’ Howard

Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton

Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg, Michael I. Pracht

Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Mark H. Sanson

Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto

Preston County: Madison H. Null, Josiah D. Nuse

Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne

Randolph County: Chad E. Cook, Daniel T. Crawford, Christopher D. Varner

Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff

Roane County: Georgia B. Bing

Tucker County: Wiley T. Raines

Upshur County: Skylar A. Fulton, Belinda L. Lewis

Wayne County: James M. Egnor

Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule

Wirt County: Mary M. Strong

Wood County:  Taylor A. Broadwater

Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Raven P. Fatool, Raven C. Greer, Jake Hensell, Momi P. Lievan, Allison A. Parski, Victoria L. Peterson, Brian S. Williams

***

To be named to the GSC Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Logan M. Renner

Boone County: Andrew K. Boktor, Gregory I. Lail, Mackenzie R. Smith

Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Tyler K. Cunningham, Larissa E. DeLuca, Garrett E. Hacker, Sean R. Hawkins, Jacob D. Haymond, Tonya L. Lyons, Christian M. Pritt, Joshua L. Rexroad, Teddy J. Richardson, Randy A. Stiers, Andrew R. Tefft, Erica N. Toler, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Andrea B. Vidal, Elania N. White, Shanna S. Wine

Calhoun County: Moriah J. Creelfox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Amber N. Frymier, Chelsea R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Devon T. Toppings

Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Carrie G. Huffman, Caitlyn M. Rogers, Kristie D. Taylor

Doddridge County: Ryan M. Mizia, Megan J. Sheets, Lindsey G. Travis

Fayette County: Breanna N. Bennett, Anthony J. Murdock, II, Travis C. Myers, Trevor D. Wood

Gilmer County: Katelyn S. Benson, Madison L. Campbell, Janessia S. Cool, Teayria G. Cool, Sara B. Coombs, Tara S. Evans, Conner T. Ferguson, Samantha L. McCune, Matthew M. Montgomery, Cody M. Moore, Dawn R. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Hunter Moore, Zaon A. Starseed, Lexsey A. Wagner, Timothy G. Wine, Carrissa M. Wood, Trevor D. Wright

Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty

Hardy County: Faith V. Smith

Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Abby S. McCarty, Hannah M. Mick, Lia Runyan, Megan E. Ruppert, Amy A. Weiss, Bettie M. Wilfong

Kanawha County:  McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Jacob T. Lutsy, Jeri D. Potter, Bethany N. Spelock

Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, James Z. Browning, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Daniel M. Pascasio, Mitchell D. Queen, Torie A. Riffle

Logan County: Kristin A. DesRocher

Marion County:  Emily A. Stoller

Mason County:  Kaylee M. Howard

Monongalia County: Hunter A. Given

Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Brady A. Tritapoe

Nicholas County: Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Kimmy K. Little, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Eric W. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Joshua ‘Cameron’ Woods

Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Brittany L. Huffman, Chase M. Simmons, Raven D. Turner

Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote

Pocahontas County: Lucas W. Fuller, Isaac C. Hise, Brooke A. Riffe

Putnam County: Tori L. Ward

Raleigh County: Jordan B. Coalson, Jacob Coots, Michael A. Layne, Matthew Welch

Randolph County: Jerome W. Smith

Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Olivia D. Goff, Valerie E. Ogle

Roane County: Bonita J. Schreckengost, Cassidy M. Taylor, James D. Williams

Tucker County: Catherine Chambers

Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber

Upshur County: Heather A. Gregory

Webster County: Richard M. Burns, Tonya N. Sahl, Danielle Williams

Wetzel County: Colton L. Ring, Brandon M. Smith

Wood County: Brooke N. Radabaugh

Wyoming County: Kaci M. Mullins

Out of State: Ali P. Capobianco, Jr, Brianna T. D’Angelo, Jessica D. Digennaro, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Alex E. Gilmore, Tanner B. Helms, Cedric J. Johnson, Justin S. Koogler, Julia E. Lindberg, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Asiya B. Smith, Tayana L. Stewart, Johnni M. Tillman

Grants Available from Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon

The Free Press WV

The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon opened its 2017-2018 grant cycle on May 01.

The foundation, formed in 2015, serves communities’ health care-related needs in Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur and Webster counties through its annual grant award process.

Letters of inquiry are due June 15. By June 30, the organization will approve the letters and invite submitters to send a full application. Complete applications are due August 15. Grants will be awarded in late September or early October.

“The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon seeks partnerships with nonprofit organizations with the potential to inspire healthier choices for the communities of Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur, and Webster counties,” Executive Director Janell E. Ray said.

The PFB focuses its funding awards in four broad health care-related areas:

• Health and Wellness – Examples include diabetes prevention, oral hygiene, prenatal care.

• Leadership Development – Examples include staff and management training, marketing and fundraising training.

• Lifestyle Education – Examples include substance and domestic violence programs, homeless assistance, mental health care.

• Spiritual and Pastoral Care – Examples include hospice care, senior services, Alzheimer and dementia care, bereavement counseling.

The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon provides grant funding for qualified 501(c)(3) organizations in Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur, and Webster counties in West Virginia that serve healthcare and healthcare-related needs of the community. Exclusion areas are capital projects, scholarships, endowments, and individuals. Learn more about the Foundation. pallottinebuckhannon.org/

Spring Interns Complete Student Teaching for GSC

The Free Press WV

Ten students have completed their student teaching internships for Glenville State College and participated in GSC’s 143rd Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, May 06, 2017.


The Free Press WV
Kaitlyn Bircheat of Chapmanville, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Buckhannon-Upshur High School, Robert L. Bland Middle School, and Jane Lew Elementary School with Jeremiah Smallridge and Tracy Alfred.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. John Taylor were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Steve and Dewana Bircheat of Chapmanville, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Brittany Burdette of Ripley, WV completed her student teaching in English Education (5-adult) at Robert L. Bland Middle School and Lewis County High School with Lesley White and Grace Harris.

Dr. John Taylor and Dr. Melody Wise were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter Julie Burdette and Alex Buchanan of Evans, West Virginia.

She is engaged to be married to Spencer Steele, who is a recent GSC graduate.


The Free Press WV
Meghan Harubin of Normantown, WV completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Davis Elementary School with Melissa Duckworth and Paula Frame.

Dr. Shelly Ratliff was her GSC Supervisor.

She is the daughter of Chuck and Kathy Harubin of Normantown, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Jerrica Hilbert of Saint Albans, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Williamstown High School with Chris Hodges and at Mineral Wells Elementary with Beth Buskirk.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. Shara Curry were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Jerry and Sherry Hilbert of Saint Albans, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Charles ‘Chuck’ Lynch of Sissonville, WV completed his student teaching in Biological Science (9-adult) and General Science (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School with Travis Fisher and Monica Haley.

Dr. Shara Curry and Dr. Jeff Hunter were his GSC supervisors.

He is the son of Dana and Tami Lynch of Sissonville, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Jonathan Reid of Clear Creek, WV completed his student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Gilmer County Elementary School and Doddridge County High School with Judy Leggett and Shaylyn Dabbs.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. Shelly Ratliff were his GSC supervisors.

He is the son of Randall and Kathy Reid of Clear Creek, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Sara Rollins of Macfarlan, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Williamstown High School, Pleasant Hill Elementary School, and Arnoldsburg Elementary School with Chris Hodges and John Bugby.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. Shara Curry were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Terry and Vicki Rollins of Macfarlan, West Virginia.

Rollins was also named Outstanding Student Teacher of the spring semester by the education honor society Kappa Delta Pi.


The Free Press WV
J’Aime Shearer of Weston, WV completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Gilmer County Elementary School with Amber Frashure and Lora Stump.

Dr. Shara Curry and Connie Stout-O’Dell were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Jim and Beth Barnes of Horner, West Virginia.

She currently resides in Weston with her husband William and daughter Madison.


The Free Press WV
Kimberly Smith of Harrisville, WV completed her student teaching in Music Education (PreK-adult) at Lewis County High School, Leading Creek Elementary School, and Roanoke Elementary School with Whitney Ballard and Allen Heath.

Dr. David Lewis and Dr. John Taylor were her GSC supervisors.

She is the daughter of Amy Floyd of Coxs Mills, West Virginia.


The Free Press WV
Tiffany (Young) Somerville of Linn, WV completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Leading Creek Elementary School with Debbie Adams and Debbie Moss.

Dr. Shelly Ratliff was her GSC Supervisor.

She is the daughter of Larry and Robin Young of Sand Fork, West Virginia.

She currently resides in Linn with her husband Taylor.


Senior teacher education students take part in an internship during their final semester at GSC. At the conclusion of their internship students must complete a presentation illustrating their mastery of the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards as well as the standards of their particular area of study.

For more information about the Teacher Education Program at Glenville State College, contact 304.462.4119.

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