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Doddridge County

Doddridge County

Wellspring Family Services Appoints New Leader in New Martinsville and Harrisville

Wellspring Family Services, the community-based counseling division of Crittenton Services, Inc., is proud to announce a new site director at its Wetzel County and Ritchie County locations.

Lya Burgess, a native of Doddridge County, is the site director for both the New Martinsville and Harrisville offices. Burgess brings 22 years of therapy practice to the position. Prior to joining Crittenton, she conducted a private practice in New Martinsville. She said, “I’m excited to take on a new challenge. At Wellspring, I have the opportunity to bring behavioral health services to more West Virginia families.”

The Free Press WV


Burgess earned a Regents BA from West Virginia State University, with an emphasis in Human Services. She went on to earn her MSW from West Virginia University in 1995. Burgess has been a Licensed Independent Social Worker (LICSW) in West Virginia since 2001. In her free time, Lya enjoys participating in horse shows with her quarter horse, Reggie, and spending time with her two dogs.

Wellspring Family Services offers outpatient and in-home counseling services to children, families and adults for more than 30 years. Wellspring therapists assist individuals and families struggling with behavioral health issues like depression, behavioral problems, addiction, divorce, parenting concerns, problems at school, family relationships and emotional issues. Most insurance plans are accepted, including all WV Medicaid managed care providers. Last year, more than 1700 clients chose Wellspring Family Services as a mental health provider. Wellspring currently has 7 offices serving 21 counties in West Virginia.

The New Martinsville office is located at 761 Third Street and serves clients in Wetzel and Tyler Counties. The Harrisville Wellspring office is located at 2479 Ellenboro Road and serves clients in Ritchie, Doddridge and Gilmer Counties.

For more information, call 1.800.280.2229 or visit www.wellspringwv.com.

Scholarships Available through Women’s Opportunity Fund

The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation is accepting scholarship applications for the Women’s Opportunity Fund – Linda H. Culp Memorial Scholarship. 

The Women’s Opportunity Fund provides educational resources to non-traditional female students who are working to complete their education or to pursue additional schooling toward higher level career goals, professional certification, or other degrees. 

As a memorial to Linda H. Culp, this fund honors a pioneering and hardworking local leader who mentored and supported other women in accomplishing their hopes and dreams.

To be eligible for financial assistance, an applicant must meet all the following requirements:

  • Applicant must be a female, adult learner who is not a recent high school graduate.
  • Applicant must reside in one of the following counties:  Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Jackson, Mason, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Tyler, Wirt, or Wood counties in West Virginia and Athens, Meigs, or Washington counties in Ohio.
  • Applicant must be pursuing a form of post-secondary education, including bachelor’s degrees, advanced degrees, certificate programs, or vocational/technical studies in any chosen field.

Recipients are selected by an independent scholarship advisory committee. 

The scholarship can be applied toward tuition, books or other education related costs.

To apply, visit the Foundation’s website, www.pacfwv.com/Scholarships/Apply

The application deadline is June 01, 2017. 

For additional information, please contact the PACF’s Regional Scholarship Coordinator, Rachel Brezler, at 304.428.4438. 

G-LtE™ More Jobs Lost To Robots, Than To Illegal Immigrants

The Free Press WV

From “2001: A Space Odyssey” to “The Terminator” to “The Matrix,” movies have often portrayed a dystopian future where technology has become our masters and threatens our way of life. If you look around you’ll see that the future is now but instead of robots taking our lives, they’re taking our livelihoods.

In his address to Congress, President Donald Trump talked about bad trade deals and policies that shipped manufacturing jobs to other countries. Trump loves to blame Mexico and China for our economic woes (even though he himself manufactures his goods in other countries and has been caught multiple times hiring undocumented immigrants.) But a Ball State University study attributes only 13 percent of manufacturing job losses to trade while the bulk of the rest is due to automation.

It’s true if you’re a farm-worker, restaurant worker, work landscaping, as a maid or in light construction you’ll face more competition from undocumented immigrants. The consistent low-skilled labor pool helps stagnate wages.

But it’s the rise of the machines that has left most American workers scrambling. And the evidence of the great shift toward automation is all around us every day, great and small. Amazon uses more than 30,000 Kiva robots in its warehouses, and they’re not the only ones. The auto industry, steel industry, tech industry, agriculture and medical field are rolling out the robots.

Five hundred McDonald’s restaurants have self-order kiosks and the plan is to roll them out to all stores. Wendy’s is expanding kiosks to 1,000 stores by the end of the year. Other restaurants are putting tablets at their tables where customers can order and pay.

Years ago I regularly used a small travel agency for all of my travel needs. Now, who doesn’t book their own travel?

When I go to the movies, I always purchase tickets online ahead of time. Right now there’s an employee that hands me my ticket when he scans the QR code on my phone. But how long until I do it all myself?

Half the time I go grocery shopping these days I check myself out at the self-check and bag my groceries (with bags I provide).

When we call companies, we often talk to machines more than people.

Shopping cart pushers allow one supermarket employee the ability to move up to 50 shopping carts by themselves.

Taxi companies may be angry at Uber and Lyft, but all of them are just dining on the last crumbs of cab service before driverless cars and buses put them all out of work.

America has lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since 2000 but productivity is up. Profits are up. That’s due to automation. We’re producing far more goods with fewer people. Most steel jobs were lost to automation rather than overseas production. And American car manufacturers have far fewer employees than they had in the 1970s yet they’re producing more cars than ever.

Politicians can blame the North American Free Trade Agreement or any other trade deal they want but the jobs that have been lost to globalization would’ve been lost to technology eventually. Even the mammoth Chinese company Foxconn that manufactures iPhones, iPads, Kindles and Xbox Ones, among other products, announced last year that they’ve cut 60,000 jobs and replaced them with robotics.

One Oxford study claims that up to a third of all jobs could be automated within the next two decades.

Robots are faster than you, more efficient than you and ultimately cheaper than you. Robots don’t get sick, don’t show up late, don’t steal, don’t fail drug tests, don’t take vacations and they have a consistent work rate. And no politician of any stripe has come up with a plan as to how we’re going to deal with this problem.

Our problem isn’t Juan coming over the border or Chang working in a Beijing factory, it’s HAL 9000. Peace.

~~  Kelvin Wade ~~

West Fork Conservation District Spring Agricultural Enhancement Program Funding

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has approved the following cooperators for financial assistance through the Spring FY17 Agricultural Enhancement Program:

  • Bee, Ann (Gilmer): Lime - $923.79

  • Blake, Nelson (Harrison): Lime - $1,931.00

  • Grogg, Billie (Gilmer): Lime - $2,382.00

  • Huff, Denzil (Gilmer): Nutrient Management - $420.00

  • Kefauver, Ronald (Harrison): Lime - $200.00

  • Lang, David (Harrison): Lime - $523.80

  • Lowther, Bill (Lewis): Lime - $1,829.50, Nutrient Management - $424.40

  • Marshall, Greg (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $276.90

  • Maxwell, Robert (Doddridge): Lime - $1,136.00

  • Nutter, Lisa (Harrison): Lime - $2,209.30

  • Oldaker, John (Lewis): Lime - $ 2,160.00

  • Pennington, Bernard (Doddridge): Nutrient Management: - $246.00

  • Potesta, A. Robert (Harrison): Lime - $498.00

  • Robinson, Anne (Doddridge): Lime - $1,380.00

  • Rockwell, Virginia (Harrison): Lime - $2,958.00

  • Shiflet, Michael (Gilmer): Lime - $3,000.00

  • Short, Eldon (Lewis): Lime - $1,333.50

  • Stout II, Lowell (Harrison): Lime - $364.80

  • Stutler, Kermit (Harrison): Nutrient Management: - $356.40

  • Suan, Bill (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Suan, Robert (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $90.00

  • Sypolt, Charles (Gilmer): Lime - $506.00

  • Tomes, Edward (Harrison): Lime - $3,000.00

  • White, L. Frank (Lewis): Lime - $420.00

  • White, William (Harrison): Lime - $2,200.00

  • Wolfe, Lynwood (Lewis): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Workman, Joseph (Harrison): Lime - $2,650.00

WEST FORK CONSERVATION DISTRICT Education Programs and Scholarship Opportunities

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has a busy schedule already planned for educational events to take place in 2017.

Eligible students from grades K-12 are encouraged to look at some of these programs, and see if they may be of interest to them. Information about these programs will be going out to Principals, Guidance Counselors, and select science teachers in schools located in Lewis, Doddridge, Gilmer and Harrison Counties.

Included in this news release is a list of the various programs to take part in, and a brief description of each along with their deadlines and dates to remember!

Please call the WFCD office at 304.627.2160 x 4, for additional information on our programs.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity for Seniors:  The West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts awards nine $500 college scholarships to graduating high school seniors who plan on majoring in an agriculture related field. Students must submit applications to their Conservation District Office by March 6th, 2017. The recipients will be notified in May. Applications are available at your Guidance Counselor’s office or the WFCD office.

  2. Grassland Evaluation Contest: All high school 4-H and FFA students may compete at the Grassland Contest. It is held in conjunction with the Beef Expo on April 7th, 2017 at Jackson’s Mills. The contest covers the topics of grassland condition, soil interpretation, wildlife habitation and plant identification. Scholarships are awarded to top winners. The registration form can be found at wvca.us/education/grassland_contest.cfm.

  3. Sixth Grade Conservation Field Day: Gilmer County holds a special field day for all sixth grade students. It is scheduled for April 25th, 2017 at Cedar Creek State Park. Stations are set up covering soils, forests, wildlife, oil and gas environmental concerns, beekeeping, streams, etc. It is a full day of learning for students. If your school is interested in having a conservation field day, contact the WFCD for more information.

  4. Samara Exam: The Samara Exam is a test that measures the knowledge students have attained about the environment up through the 6th grade. The test is administered in March or April at the teacher’s convenience. Teachers, if you are interested in conducting this fun activity, you can use the links found on our website at wvca.us, under the education programs tab, or contact the WFCD for more information. It’s fun, educational and free!

  5. Envirothon Training Day:  This workshop is for teams of 9th-12th grade students to explore current environmental and earth sciences within the framework of five disciplines: aquatics, forestry, soils, wildlife and a current environmental topic. The contest will be held at the Doddridge County Park and will help teams prepare for the field competition to be held on April 20th & 21st, 2017 at Camp Caesar at Cowen, WV. The team with the highest score from the field competition will become the state champion and will represent West Virginia in the NCF Envirothon. You will find all needed information and can register your team at wvca.us under the education tab or contact the WFCD office.

  6. Forestry Contest: The Upper Ohio, Little Kanawha and West Fork Conservation Districts in conjunction with the West Virginia Division of Forestry will again be holding their annual Forestry Contest. This year it will be held in the Upper Ohio Conservation District area. It will be based on WV career development events for forestry. FFA teachers will receive announcements in the near future detailing the contest.

  7. Tri District Land Judging: Land judging is a program to help students learn about the different types of soils and their characteristics and how to judge depth, erosion, slope and permeability. They learn how to use these factors to classify land and learn some of the conservation practices needed to maintain or improve lands. The winning regional Vo-Ag teams will advance to the State Vo-Ag contest. The winning local 4-H groups attend the State 4-H contest. The winning teams from the State Vo-Ag and State 4-H contests are eligible to participate in the National Land Judging Contest in Oklahoma the following Spring. The District Contest is scheduled for May 11th, 2017. Information will be forthcoming to Tri-District Extension Agents, FFA Instructors and Conservation Districts regarding the dates, locations and times.

Secretary of State’s Office Announces Field Representative for Mid-Ohio Valley

The Free Press WV

West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner is pleased to announce that Dot Underwood has joined his staff as Field Service Representative for Tyler, Pleasants, Doddridge, Harrison, Ritchie, Gilmer, Braxton, Wood and Wirt counties.

“Dot Underwood is one of a group of dedicated individuals who are helping us launch our new Field Service Representative initiative,’ Warner said. “Our Field Service Representatives will assist new businesses with registration and licensing, work side-by-side with county clerks to improve our office’s assistance, reach out to voters and candidates, assisting with registration, election questions, and associated issues.”

Dot Underwood is no stranger to the region she is serving. She was a Regional Representative for former Governors Joe Manchin and Earl Ray Tomblin, serving many of the same counties. As a Regional Representative, Underwood represented the Governor’s Office for official functions, as well as helping constituents with questions and issues.

“Our field representatives will serve as mobile Secretary of State offices, providing instant communication between citizens, businesses, and our office as needed,” Warner said. “I can think of no one better than Dot Underwood to represent this office in the Mid-Ohio Valley area.”

Mountain Valley Pipeline Public Hearing Notice

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection – Division of Water and Waste Management will hold public hearings regarding the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline project for State 401 Water Quality Certification, Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and for Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit. Oral and written comments will be accepted at each hearing. The hearings will start at 6:00PM at the following locations:

For Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, State 401 Water Quality Certification, and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Summers County at Summers Memorial Building (451 1st Ave in Hinton) on Tuesday March 07, 2017. 

For State 401 Water Quality Certification and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Webster County at Webster County High School auditorium on Monday March 6, 2017.

• Harrison County at Robert C. Byrd High School Large Group Instruction Room on Thursday March 09, 2017.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project is comprised of approximately 195 miles of natural gas pipeline along with compressor stations, meter stations, access roads, and interconnects through: Wetzel, Harrison, Doddridge, Lewis, Braxton, Webster, Nicholas, Greenbrier, Fayette, Summers, and Monroe Counties in West Virginia. The associated Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667) would be for the discharge of stormwater associated with the disturbance of 4,214 acres of land for the of construction of this project. The Natural Streams Preservation Act permit (NSP-17-0001) being sought is for a proposed crossing of Greenbrier River in Summers County near Pence Springs. The State 401 Water Quality Certification (WQC-16-0005) would be for activities that will or may discharge fill into waters of the State. Mountain Valley Pipeline project is proposing to mitigate for the streams and wetlands permanently impacted by this project.

Any interested person may submit written comments on the Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit, the Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and/or the State 401 Water Quality Certification by addressing such to the Director of the Division of Water and Waste Management during the comment period, which begins with this notice and ends on March 19, 2017 at 8PM. Comments or requests should be emailed to or by mail addressed to:

Director, Division of Water and Management, DEP

ATTN: Sharon Mullins, Permitting Section

601 57th Street SE

Charleston, WV 25304-2345

Applicant Type Permit ID

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit WVR310667

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. State 401 Water Quality Certification WQC-16-0005

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit NSP-17-0001

Additional Information

State 401 Water Quality Certification application (WQC-16-0005) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Natural Streams Preservation Act permit application (NSP-17-0001) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667)

Instructions for navigating the Oil and Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit webpages

Mountain Valley Pipeline Information Page

Glenville State College President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison, Lawrence C. Wolf


Braxton County: Bridget D. Carr, Dakota S. Johnson, Stacy N. Loyd, Brittany V. White


Calhoun County: Devon T. Toppings


Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Dalton M. Holcomb, Carrie G. Huffman, Andrea P. Litton, Kaitlyn J. Samples


Doddridge County: Joshua L. Smith


Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth


Gilmer County: Jonathan E. Clark, Landon P. Gumm, Michaela L. Gumm, Sean M. Lang, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Trevor D. Wright


Grant County: Larissa A. Henry


Greenbrier County: Myka K. Perry


Hardy County: Faith V. Smith


Harrison County: Joseph M. Bush, Cecilia A. Matheney, Megan E. Ruppert


Jackson County: Brittaney M. Burdette, Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical


Jefferson County: Jasmine Z. Tarman


Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Jerrica D. Hilbert


Lewis County: James Z. Browning, Daniel C. Conrad, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Torie A. Riffle


Logan County: Hannah P. Runyon, Matthew A. Zachary


Marion County: Phillip J. Poling


Mason County: Kaylee M. Howard


Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg


Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Joshua D. Huffman, Eric W. Peyatt, Kathryn G. Waddell


Preston County: Madison H. Null


Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne


Randolph County: Diana R. Miller, Melissa D. Nicholson


Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff, Kimberly A. Smith


Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber


Upshur County: Brandy L. Bachman, Skylar A. Fulton


Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Hunter A. Given, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule


Wood County: Michael L. Briggs


Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Raven P. Fatool, Cedric J. Johnson, Kellie N. Kinsinger, Allison A. Parski, John S. Peloro, Victoria L. Peterson, Emily A. Walker, Brian S. Williams

Glenville State College Vice President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the Vice President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Brianna A. Shivers


Boone County: Ally K. Brown, Michele L. Epling, Crystal M. Jarrell, Gregory I. Lail


Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Coleden R. Belknap, Tyler K. Cunningham, Kathryn L. Dean, Larissa E. DeLuca, Jacob D. Haymond, Samantha N. Mazzella, Teddy J. Richardson, Cami D. Roberts, Alexis S. Spell, Heather N. Thayer, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Maranda J. Vaughan, Andrea B. Vidal, Brandon M. White, Shanna S. Wine


Calhoun County: Tiffany A. Brannon, Moriah J. CreelFox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Taylor S. Garrett, Chelsea  R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont, Johnathan X. Taylor


Clay County: Casey E. Brown, Opalene D. Huffman, William C. Robertson, Sydnee M. Vance


Doddridge County: Joshua M. Pitcock, Lindsey G. Travis


Fayette County: Vladimir V. Iotov, Kelsey L. Norris, Trevor D. Wood


Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Katelyn S. Benson, Julie A. Bishop, Monica D.  Bush, Madison L. Campbell, Sara B. Coombs, Colby G. Cunningham, Lucas D. DeMarino, Meghan Harubin, Christina L. Jenkins, Jaylin K. Johnson, Amanda R. Lamb, Tonya L. Lyons, Matthew M. Montgomery, Adam H. Moore, Cody M. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Zandel M. Sponaugle, Alexus C. Sprouse, Zaon A. Starseed, Elania N. White, Carrissa M. Wood


Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty, Tina M. Jerman


Hampshire County: Dylan G. Kesner


Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Lia Runyan


Jackson County: Ryan A. Gregory, Kirsten M. Marks, Joel E. McDonald, Sapphire N. Parsons, Clayton Swisher, Bradley J. Titus, Kelly J. Trippett


Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Mary E. Lewis, Anthony R. Vazquez


Kanawha County: Faith Donze, McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Rema K. Jordan, Zachary Lively, Jonathan L. Mullins, Jeri D. Potter, Rebecca E. Wiseman


Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, Jennifer M. Eiler, Destiny L. Grimes, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Justin P. Raines, J’Aime L. Shearer, Kelly L. Weaver


Logan County: Kaitlyn A. Bircheat, Alec G. Maynard


Marion County: Morgan P. Hardesty


Marshall County: Logen M. Lemasters


Mason County: Charles B. Walton


Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton


Monongalia County: Alyssa B. Boback


Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Michael I. Pracht, Brady A. Tritapoe


Nicholas County: Autumn G. Barnett, Jessica R. Bird, Marlyn S. Donelson, Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Morgan Francis, Taylor Keenan, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Nathan S. Spencer, Mason A. Thomas, Samuel P. Whitlock


Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Raven D. Turner


Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote


Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto, Isaac C. Hise


Preston County: Kathleen L. Faber


Putnam County: Jacob M. Stover


Raleigh County: Luke D. Carpenter, Kaylee S. Dickenson, Michael A. Layne


Randolph County: Christopher A. Cozad, Angela R. McWilliams, Kathlyne L. Simmons, Christopher D. Varner


Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Carleena P. Elliott, Olivia D. Goff, Trinity R. Muschweck


Roane County: Georgia B. Bing, Joshua C. Runyon, Bonita J. Schreckengost, James D. Williams


Taylor County: Eva S. Guthrie


Tucker County: John Chambers, Wiley T. Raines, Stephanie R. Williams


Tyler County: Devon J. Harris


Upshur County: Autumn Knight, Belinda L. Lewis


Wayne County: Taylor N. Brumfield


Webster County: Valerie L. Rule, Danielle Williams


Wetzel County: Daniel M. Jackson, Colton L. Ring, Andrew R. Tefft


Wirt County: Micheal L. Morgan, Mary M. Strong


Wood County: Taylor A. Broadwater


Wyoming County: Travis D. Gibson, Kaci M. Mullins


Out of State: Karla Y. Barr, Chandler R. Carrera, Ibrahim O. Ghanem, Dwyron K. Gillard, II, Taylor A. Gilliland, Noah R. Green, Jake Hensell, Justin S. Koogler, Momi P. Lievan, Paris M. McLeod, Anthony W. McPoyle, Emily M. Meyers, Stephen G. Mickle, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Casey R. Sheaffer, Wesley D. Stauffer, Johnni M. Tillman, Ernesto Torres, Paranda S. Uber, Jack H. Varndell, Timothy G. Wine, Hannah N. Wright

Grants Available For Christian Youth

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates announces the availability of grants from the Proclaimers Gospel Quartet Fund for Christian Youth.

This fund provides support for Christian youth and Christian youth groups in need of financial assistance in order to attend or participate in Christian service-related events. 

Grants may be made, for example, for attendance at Christian camps or for participation in educational events or church or community service activities.

Applicants should note that persons or groups assisted through this fund generally shall only be eligible every fifth year following receipt of support.

The application period is open from February 01, 2017 through June 01, 2017.

Applications must be submitted through a church or a sponsoring non-profit organization.

Applications are available on the Foundation’s web site, www.pacfwv.com/Grants/Apply, or by contacting the Foundation by calling 304-428-4438 or emailing .

Scholarships Available for Vocational & Technical Students

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates (PACF) announces the availability of vocational/technical scholarships for students from throughout the Foundation’s service area of Wood, Calhoun, Gilmer, Doddridge, Roane, Wirt, Ritchie, Jackson, Mason, and Pleasants counties in West Virginia and Washington County, Ohio.  The Foundation uses one consolidated online application that allows students to apply for multiple scholarships with one application.  To access the application and apply, visit www.pacfwv.com/Scholarships/Apply and select the PACF Consolidated Scholarship Application.  The application deadline is March 01, 2017.

 

The Foundation administers more than 140 scholarship funds, some of which include vocational/technical scholarships.  The following scholarships are offered to include students seeking a vocational or technical degree:


•     Dave Couch Memorial Scholarship


•     Hino Motors Scholarship


•     Parkersburg-Marietta Contractors Association Scholarship


•     Dr. David Monroe Ritchie Scholarship


•     West Virginia Nurses Association District #3 Scholarship


•     Mary K. Smith Rector Scholarship


•     Harrisville Lions Club Scholarship


•     William Reaser Scholarship


•     Chester H. Bruce Scholarship


•     Robert Storck Scholarship


•     “Sig” and Kate Barker Memorial Scholarship


•     Dave Elmo Memorial Scholarship


•     Little Kanawha Area Community Foundation Scholarship


•     Marcus McPhail Memorial Scholarship


•     Marbie McCartney Smith Memorial Scholarship


•     Nancy C. Barton Scholarship


•     Doddridge County Vocation Scholarship


•     Andrea Bailes Honary Scholarship

 

For additional information, please contact PACF’s Regional Scholarship Officer, Rachel Brezler, at 304.428.4438. 

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 112,384 Deer In 2016

The Free Press WV

Preliminary counts indicate West Virginia hunters harvested 112,384 white-tailed deer during the recently completed bucks firearms, antlerless, muzzleloader, archery, crossbow, and youth/Class Q/Class XS deer seasons, according to Paul Johansen, chief of the Division of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife Resources Section. This year’s total harvest was 19 percent below the 2015 deer harvest of 138,493 and 15 percent below the five-year average of 132,466.

A breakdown of the combined 2016 deer seasons reveals 46,071 bucks harvested during the traditional buck firearm season, 32,508 antlerless deer taken during all antlerless firearm hunting opportunities, 28,808 deer harvested by bows and crossbows, and 4,997 deer taken by muzzleloader hunters.


Antlerless Deer Season

The 2016 antlerless deer season harvest, which includes the youth/Class Q/Class XS deer season, was 18 percent less than in 2015 and 26.5 percent below the five-year average of 44,239.  “It is important to note that the antlerless harvest is the key component to any deer management strategy, as it controls the future deer population,” said Johansen.  Hunters are reminded that on March 13 and 14, 2017, the DNR will hold 12 public meetings across the state to gather comments on proposed fall 2017 antlerless deer hunting seasons in each of the 51 counties where firearms deer hunting is permitted.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,535), Upshur (1,485), Lewis (1,292), Mason (1,269), Jackson (1,224), Ritchie (1,215), Wood (1,126), Roane (1,034), Harrison (972), and Braxton (854).


Muzzleloader Deer Season

The 2016 muzzleloader harvest of 4,997 was 3 percent below the 2015 harvest of 5,178, and 21 percent below the five-year average of 6,344. The top 10 counties are Randolph (243), Nicholas (232), Preston (217), Upshur (185), Lewis (168), Jackson (158), Braxton (157), Mason (153), Wood (141), and Webster (139).


Archery and Crossbow Deer Season

The bow and crossbow hunter’s take of 28,808 deer was 11 percent less than the 2015 archery season harvest of 32,540, and four percent above the five-year average archery season harvest of 27,596.  Archery harvests are inversely correlated to hard mast crops. The below-average acorn crop in 2015, followed by a better acorn crop in 2016, likely contributed to the lower 2016 harvest; however, the proportion of the harvest taken using a crossbow increased in 2016 over that recorded in 2015.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,365), Randolph (975), Wood (945), Kanawha (921), Upshur (867), Wyoming (867), Mason (791), Jackson (785), Nicholas (765), and Raleigh (738).


WESTVIRGINIA DEER HARVEST, 2016

County

BuckFirearms

Antlerless

Muzzleloader

Archery/Crossbow

Total

Barbour

1,098

773

133

568

2,572

Brooke

268

367

38

287

960

Hancock

209

164

34

357

764

Harrison

1,138

972

113

632

2,855

Marion

765

787

113

521

2,186

Marshall

727

493

73

357

1,650

Monongalia

827

644

91

707

2,269

Ohio

270

222

46

294

832

Preston

1,774

1,535

217

1,365

4,891

Taylor

581

490

70

303

1,444

Tucker

730

191

73

409

1,403

Wetzel

899

819

90

335

2,143

District 1Subtotal

9,286

7,457

1,091

6,135

23,969

Berkeley

737

627

67

582

2,013

Grant

954

439

81

351

1,825

Hampshire

1,197

836

88

421

2,542

Hardy

1,076

610

63

317

2,066

Jefferson

422

413

54

417

1,306

Mineral

922

684

80

404

2,090

Morgan

437

406

44

241

1,128

Pendleton

1,088

448

70

345

1,951

District 2 Subtotal

6,833

4,463

547

3,078

14,921

Braxton

1,102

854

157

571

2,684

Clay

390

164

43

241

838

Lewis

1,246

1,292

168

629

3,335

Nicholas

1,044

470

232

765

2,511

Pocahontas

921

202

56

278

1,457

Randolph

1,617

803

243

975

3,638

Upshur

1,399

1,485

185

867

3,936

Webster

941

303

139

548

1,931

District 3 Subtotal

8,660

5,573

1,223

4,874

20,330

Fayette

889

266

124

718

1,997

Greenbrier

1,447

699

135

565

2,846

McDowell

456

456

Mercer

636

383

86

684

1,789

Monroe

1,099

752

70

550

2,471

Raleigh

648

206

70

738

1,662

Summers

657

562

62

403

1,684

Wyoming

 

 

 

867

867

District 4 Subtotal

5,376

2,868

547

4,981

13,772

Boone

573

147

72

364

1,156

Cabell

677

404

60

434

1,575

Kanawha

1,058

385

78

921

2,442

Lincoln

846

522

106

466

1,940

Logan

574

574

Mason

1,267

1,269

153

791

3,480

Mingo

386

386

Putnam

992

803

119

661

2,575

Wayne

815

252

62

419

1,548

District 5 Subtotal

6,228

3,782

650

5,016

15,676

Calhoun

705

599

69

326

1,699

Doddridge

946

706

70

308

2,030

Gilmer

791

634

93

311

1,829

Jackson

1,487

1,224

158

785

3,654

Pleasants

334

251

27

154

766

Ritchie

1,422

1,215

102

630

3,369

Roane

1,178

1,034

105

544

2,861

Tyler

855

766

82

330

2,033

Wirt

777

810

92

391

2,070

Wood

1,193

1,126

141

945

3,405

District 6 Subtotal

9,688

8,365

939

4,724

23,716

StateTotal

46,071

32,508

4,997

28,808

112,384

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 3,012 Black Bears In 2016

The Free Press WV

West Virginia hunters harvested 3,012 black bears during the combined 2016 archery, crossbow and firearms seasons, according to Colin Carpenter, Black Bear Project leader for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The preliminary black bear harvest data for the combined 2016 seasons were 6 percent lower than the record set in 2015. The harvest is the second highest bear kill recorded and is the second time the harvest has topped 3,000.

“The mast index for all oak species in 2016 increased significantly over 2015 and was above the long-term average,” said Carpenter. “Historically, an abundance of oak mast makes bears harder to target for archery hunters. Conversely, increased oak mast typically means a higher December firearms harvest because many bears delay entering their dens due to the abundance of food.”

Carpenter added, “In the 2016 Mast Survey and Hunting Outlook, we predicted a decreased archery harvest and a similar-to-slightly greater December firearms harvest over the levels observed in 2015. Our prediction held true for the archery season, but did not hold up in the December season.”

“Overall, the 2016 harvest declined during the archery, buck-gun and December seasons over the levels recorded in 2015. However, those decreases were partially offset by very successful early gun seasons in September and October.

Hunters killed 1,012 bears during the first segment of the 2016 archery season (Sept. 24 – Nov. 19).  They took 584 bears with vertical bows and 428 with crossbows. The top five counties were Randolph (82), Fayette (74), Nicholas (60), Greenbrier (55) and Preston (52).

Firearms hunters harvested 2,000 bears during 2016. Hunters took 883 bears in September and October, 349 during the concurrent buck-gun bear season, and 768 during the traditional December season. The top five counties were Pendleton (177), Randolph (167), Pocahontas (161), Nicholas (153) and Hardy (133).

2016 WEST VIRGINIA BLACK BEAR HARVEST

County

Bow/Crossbow

Sept/Oct Gun

Buck Gun

December

Total

Barbour

45

20

1

0

66

Brooke

0

0

0

0

0

Hancock

0

0

0

0

0

Harrison

16

0

2

0

18

Marion

3

0

0

0

3

Marshall

2

0

0

0

2

Monongalia

7

0

2

0

9

Ohio

0

0

0

0

0

Preston

52

41

22

22

137

Taylor

17

0

1

0

18

Tucker

35

37

6

50

128

Wetzel

1

0

0

1

2

District 1 Subtotal

178

98

34

73

383

Berkeley

3

0

3

0

6

Grant

25

31

6

39

101

Hampshire

17

0

29

4

50

Hardy

26

61

14

58

159

Jefferson

3

0

2

0

5

Mineral

11

0

0

9

20

Morgan

8

0

11

0

19

Pendleton

37

100

10

67

214

District 2 Subtotal

130

192

75

177

574

Braxton

36

11

4

11

62

Clay

9

13

7

16

45

Lewis

13

0

5

0

18

Nicholas

60

56

31

66

213

Pocahontas

23

62

11

88

184

Randolph

82

99

4

64

249

Upshur

14

10

2

6

32

Webster

38

50

9

52

149

District 3 Subtotal

275

301

73

303

952

Fayette

74

21

39

13

147

Greenbrier

55

45

12

73

185

McDowell

49

38

5

16

108

Mercer

33

0

4

2

39

Monroe

24

27

17

29

97

Raleigh

36

25

9

7

77

Summers

26

0

8

0

34

Wyoming

24

30

1

2

57

District 4 Subtotal

321

186

95

142

744

Boone

23

28

30

32

113

Cabell

0

0

0

0

0

Kanawha

26

38

33

28

125

Lincoln

1

0

0

0

1

Logan

22

26

1

2

51

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

Mingo

13

14

0

7

34

Putnam

0

0

0

0

0

Wayne

1

0

0

0

1

District 5 Subtotal

86

106

64

69

325

Calhoun

1

0

3

0

4

Doddridge

3

0

0

0

3

Gilmer

7

0

4

3

14

Jackson

0

0

0

0

0

Pleasants

0

0

0

0

0

Ritchie

4

0

0

0

4

Roane

1

0

0

0

1

Tyler

2

0

0

0

2

Wirt

4

0

1

1

6

Wood

0

0

0

0

0

District 6 Subtotal

22

0

8

4

34

State Total

1012

883

349

768

3012

Bears listed for Logan, McDowell and Wyoming counties as"Buck Gun” are bow or crossbow kills from 11.21.16 -12.031

November 19, 2016. All other bow and crossbow kills have been separated based on the seasonsin which they were killed

Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 05, 2017

The Free Press WV
Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 05, 2017
 
Closings and Delays
Early Dismissal
Glenville State College  
Gilmer County Board of Education  
Gilmer County Courthouse  
Gilmer County Health Department  
Gilmer County Senior Center  
Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic 
Gilmer County Schools   Closing at 12:30 PM
Braxton County Schools   Closing 1 Hour Early
Calhoun County Schools   Closing at 12:00 PM
Doddridge County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Lewis County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Ritchie County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Barbour County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Clay County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Harrison County Schools  
Nicholas County Schools  
Pleasants County Schools   Closing at 1:00 PM
Roane County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Tyler County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Upshur County Schools   Closing at 1:00 PM
Webster County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wetzel County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wirt County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wood County Schools  
Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700


The Free Press WV

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