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WV Legislative Update: Delegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman

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As the special election to authorize sale of road bonds is only a couple weeks away, I’m beginning to have inquiries in person and by phone as to what it’s all about and why it must go before the voters prior to moving forward.  To provide information to those that may have missed it a few weeks ago in my weekly update, I’m going to reprint an information piece that our House Minority staff compiled.


Special Election for Amendment No. 1 - Roads to Prosperity Amendment of 2017


What:  Senate Joint Resolution 6 was passed by the Legislature at the request of Governor Jim Justice.  This resolution provides for a special election for the Roads to Prosperity Amendment of 2017.  If voters pass the proposal, the State of West Virginia will be authorized to issue and sell up to $1.6 billion in state bonds for road construction and improvements.  The state bonds are to be issued and sold over a four-year period based on the following schedule: FY2018- up to $800 million; FY2019- up to $400 million; FY2020- up to $200 million; FY2021- up to $200 million.

If the bond amendment is passed, the proceeds of the bonds will be used for highway construction and improvement. The funding may be used to match available federal funds for highway and bridge construction and for general highway and secondary road and bridge construction or improvements in all fifty-five counties. The bond money will not be used for projects on the West Virginia Turnpike.

The bonds will be paid off through funding from legislation that has already passed the Legislature. During the 2017 First Extraordinary Session, the Legislature passed Senate Bill 1006. This bill updated DMV fees, increased the wholesale gas tax, increased the sales tax on motor vehicles; and created new registration fees for alternative fuel vehicles.  These changes are expected to net approximately $126.5 million annually to dedicate to road bond payments. If the bond amendment fails, these increases will still be in effect. That funding will still be dedicated to road construction and improvement. However, the initial impact will be less significant.  An $11.7 million transfer from the General Revenue Fund to the State Road Fund will also be dedicated toward bond payment.


Why:    The bond would indebt the State of West Virginia because the debt would be financed over a multi-year period.  Because the Constitution of the State of West Virginia prohibits state debt, a constitutional amendment must be passed to allow the state to incur this debt.


When: Election Day: Saturday, October 07 - Polls open 6:30 am through 7:30 pm.


Voter Registration Deadline: Monday, September 18


Absentee Voting: Saturday, July 15 through Monday, October 02


Early Voting: Friday, September 22 through Wednesday, October 04


The cost of this election is estimated to be approximately $6 million.

I hope the above information is helpful in making a decision on whether or not to support the upcoming constitutional amendment.  It’s not a democrat or republican legislative proposal.  This was proposed by Governor Justice and must be put before the voters to make the call, as required by the WV Constitution.  It is very similar to the recommendation of the Blue Ribbon Commission set up by former Governor Tomblin to address our highway needs.

How did our roads get in such bad shape?  The cost of asphalt and other road building materials have skyrocketed over the past couple decades.  What it cost to pave four miles of road twenty years ago, now only covers one mile…unless you spread it so thin it’s a waste of money.  Also, newer model vehicles get much improved fuel mileage, which negatively affects the amount of road fund revenue available for roads, bridges and routine maintenance.  Plus, we have no county roads in West Virginia.  The county road system was dissolved decades ago to ensure some level of continuity across the state in terms of road priorities, maintenance and repair.  Additionally, there is no supplement to road funding from counties or local entities, unlike surrounding states.  Finally, it just costs more to build and maintain a road in the mountains of West Virginia as compared to relatively flat land in many states across America.

Based on the above factors, the available road funding for construction and maintenance has not kept pace with needs.  For instance, normal resurfacing schedules of 12 to 15 years have been extended in some instances to over thirty years – well beyond the expected lifespan of road surfaces. Ditches need pulled, culvert replaced, brush cut, slips and slides are in desperate need of attention.

All the funding set aside by the legislature will be used on roads, bridges and maintenance, regardless of passage.  However, passage will expedite road, bridge and maintenance projects needed to get our roads back in shape.  It will put people to work, helping businesses and the tax base.


Passage will not raise taxes.  The funding stream is already in place to secure the bond debt.  Citizens and businesses expect and deserve safe highways.  Ultimately, it’s up to you and me, the voters to decide.  Whatever you ultimately decide, make it an informed, fact-based decision.

Please send your inquiries to the Capitol office:  Building 1, Room 258-M, Charleston, WV 25305.  My home number is 304.364.8411; the Capitol office number is 304.340.3142.  If you have an interest in any particular bill or issue, please let me know.  For those with Internet access, my legislative e-mail address is:

You may also obtain additional legislative information, including the copies of bills, conference reports, daily summaries, interim highlights, and leave me a message on the Legislature’s web site at www.legis.state.wv.us/.  When leaving a message, please remember to include your phone number with your inquiry and any details you can provide. Additional information, including agency links and the state government phone directory, may be found at www.wv.gov. Also, you may follow me on Facebook at “Brent Boggs”, Twitter at “@DelBrentBoggs” , as well as the WV Legislature’s Facebook page at “West Virginia Legislature” or on Twitter at twitter.com/wvlegislature.

Continue to remember our troops - at home and abroad - and keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers.  Until next week – take care.

Glenville State Implements Milestone Initiative to Celebrate Student Success

Forty Glenville State College students recently received their associate degree at the College’s first Milestone Ceremony. While Glenville State College currently marks the beginning of a student’s college experience with Fall Convocation, little has been done to celebrate student accomplishments prior to commencement. “The ‘Milestone Initiative’ is meant to signify important academic events in the life cycle of a student, particularly students that initially intend to complete a baccalaureate degree,” stated Dr. Gary Morris, Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs. Morris further added that creating and encouraging the completion of milestones such as the associate degree has the potential to encourage students to continue on and provides a tangible credential if they opt not to or cannot complete a baccalaureate degree or their next milestone.

“Based on the number of students that transfer or discontinue their studies prior to completing a baccalaureate degree (more than 50% locally and nationally), it makes sense to award students the highest degree or credential possible for which they are eligible,” said Glenville State President Dr. Tracy Pellett. He also asserted that research by the Lumina Foundation supports this stance by reporting that students who earn an associate degree are 30 percent more likely to earn a bachelor’s degree. “I am very heartened by this positive academic initiative to reward and reinforce positive degree progression and student success. Our faculty and staff are committed to seeing students achieve their educational goals and this initiative is a symbolic and tangible way to recognize progress towards that accomplishment,” Pellett added.


The students who received an associate degree through the first Milestone Ceremony included:

  • Mariah Beam from Weston, WV
  • Jessica Bird from Summersville, WV
  • Julie Bishop from Glenville, WV
  • Ally Brown from Madison, WV
  • Angeles Burgess from Glenville, WV
  • Lauren Chancey from Red House, WV
  • Sara Coombs from Cedarville, WV
  • Hannah Curfman from Weston, WV
  • Bryan Foster from Gassaway, WV
  • Madison Frame from Birch River, WV
  • Travis Gibson from Oceana, WV
  • Ashley Hamilton from Summersville, WV
  • Matthew Herrald from Weston, WV
  • Chelsea Hicks from Big Bend, WV
  • Jaylin Johnson from Glenville, WV
  • Autumn Jones from Brohard, WV
  • Taylor Keenan from Gilboa, WV
  • Donell Lockett from Washington, DC
  • Cameron Loftus from Uneeda, WV
  • Paxton Maher from Buckhannon, WV
  • Ryan Mizia from Salem, WV
  • Matthew Montgomery from Linn, WV
  • Cody Moore from Glenville, WV
  • Mark Moran from Weston, WV
  • Angela Myers from Parsons, WV
  • Kelsey Norris from Fayetteville, WV
  • Kayla Palmer from Montrose, WV
  • Kaitlyn Peyatt from Summersville, WV
  • Kylee Radabaugh from Mineral Wells, WV
  • Wiley Raines from Parsons, WV
  • Megan Ruppert from Salem, WV
  • Marcus Schofield from Mullens, WV
  • Stewart Sink from Normantown, WV
  • Mackenzie Smith from Sylvester, WV
  • Wesley Stauffer from Orrville, OH
  • Sebastian Swartz from Burnsville, WV
  • Miranda Taylor from Sistersville, WV
  • Kelsie Tonkin from Sutton, WV
  • Kahla Von Bergen from Sterling, OH
  • Maren Wentzel from Weston, WV

Some of the students who attended the ceremony are pictured above with Pellett.

According to the 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers with an associate degree earn, on average, $126 more per week than a worker with a high school diploma and $50 more per week than a worker with some college credit but no degree. This initiative is supportive of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission’s Master Plan – Leading the Way.

For more information about the Milestone Ceremony, contact Glenville State College’s Office of Academic Affairs at or 304.462.6110.

Pat’s Chat

The Free Press WV

The book, “Walking Through the Bible with H.M.S. Richards” was first published in 1948 and yet the reading for September 7 has a statement that I believe would perfectly match our world of 2017.  “This age of great intellectual and scientific light is a dark night spiritually for the world.  The revelry goes on about us today amidst our economic anxieties.  Our amusement life is largely non-Christian—- in fact, anti-Christian.  We may put ‘In God we trust’ on our money, but do we trust Him?”

There were not the scientific light then that we have now, and still we could more easily describe our “amusement life” in the same words that he used.  The movie “Gone with the Wind” was released in 1940 and for the first time the word “damn” was used by Clark Gable.  It has been downhill ever since.  One time there were always twin beds for the parents.  It has gone the same direction as the language, maybe faster.  It is difficult for my kids to find a movie that I will watch with them.  Even those rated PG 13 or 14 are too raw.  I watch Hallmark movies or series sometimes, but I don’t like it that at every gathering in the movies, or at almost every scene early within the movie, they have to make an excuse for wine or stronger.  At least one good thing about it is that I have noticed they keep the alcohol or wine away from the expectant mother.  How can our children grow up with morals if all they see and hear are vulgar or cursing or dirty words and movies that show adultery, and pre-marital sex.  And I have not even touched on the violence that is shown!  Horrible violence.  People say about all this, “It’s just life.” 

Which brings me to the reasons that the seminars we are having at the Adventist Church are is so timely and interesting.  The lessons are deep and to the point.  We are learning all the “signs” of Jesus’ soon return and that it is going to happen soon.  One thing is sure, he never runs overtime.  We end at 8:00.  There is always special music from different people.  Mary Ellen Davidson and Halley Hurst brought to us a beautiful duet called, “Open My Eyes That I May See.”  Bonnie Cutright and Darlene Parker are leaders of the’’’’ the children who attend

Adventist Pastor Finds Suspected Burglar Sleeping in His Bed

Neighbors think the Holy Spirit may have helped with the arrest.

A Seventh-day Adventist pastor in Ghana returned home after a busy Sabbath day to find a suspected burglar sound asleep in his bed.

Asare Nyarko, a pastor in Asamankese, a city of 40,000 people in southern Ghana, arrived home with his family around midnight last Saturday to find signs that someone had broken in, Ghana’s Graphic Online newspaper reported.

Nyarko rushed to the police station to file a report, but the officers did not immediately accompany him to his house. So he returned home with several elders from his church and found a man sleeping in his bedroom.

“The man was fast asleep on my bed, to the extent that not even the noise we made could wake him up,” Nyarko told the Graphic Online.

The man, identified as Richard Yeboah, 27, had apparently broken into the room through the ceiling and had fallen asleep before he could steal anything.

It was unclear why the man fell asleep on the pastor’s bed. Neighbors think that the Holy Spirit might have played a role.

“Neighbors believe the suspect was arrested by the Holy Spirit,” the Graphic Online reported. . . 


Maranatha!

WV Legislative Update: Delegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman

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The 9/11 anniversary that calls into remembrance the tragic terrorist attack in New York City, the Pentagon and plane crash in rural Pennsylvania is etched in our national memory.  However, we, as a nation, have been following violent and deadly storms in Texas, Florida and the Caribbean for nearly three weeks.  As I write on Sunday night, the concerns for the safety and well-being of those affected by the most recent hurricane are at the forefront.  As the damage reports will start to roll in this week, the monetary costs to citizens, insurance companies and state and federal government will certainly be reported in the multiple billions of dollars.  This, stacked on the devastating hurricane flooding last a couple weeks ago, and the amounts are staggering.  All this and we’re only half way through the hurricane season.

The real toll – the factor that cannot be calculated in monetary terms – will be in lives lost.  After that, the lasting effects on those that lost homes; the flooding and wind damage; lost income; utility disruptions that may last for days or weeks.  This storm necessitated the largest mass evacuation in the nation’s history.

One thing is certain:  despite the high technology, computer modeling, satellite imagery and every scientific and meteorological tool at our disposal, we have no control or certainty of where these storms will ultimately hit and the damage that will result.  I am thankful that first responders and law enforcement made the proactive decisions to evacuate residents from areas that were thought to be in danger.  Lives were saved as a result.

To conclude on a much different note, the Legislative interim schedule for September 17 – 20 is included from the Legislative Manager’s office. 

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Convene Adjourn Committee Location
01:00 PM 02:00 PM Legislative Oversight Committee on Regional Jail and Correctional Facility Authority House Gov. Org.
01:00 PM 02:00 PM Post Audits Subcommittee Senate Finance
02:00 PM 03:00 PM Commission on Special Investigations Senate Finance
02:00 PM 03:00 PM Select Committee on Infrastructure Senate Judiciary
03:00 PM 04:00 PM Joint Standing Committee on Education House Gov. Org.
03:00 PM 05:00 PM Joint Committee on Government Operations - JOINT MEETING House Chamber
03:00 PM 05:00 PM Joint Standing Committee on Government Organization - JOINT MEETING House Chamber
04:00 PM 06:00 PM Legislative Oversight Commission on Education Accountability House Gov. Org.


Monday, September 18, 2017

Convene Adjourn Committee Location
08:00 AM 10:00 AM Joint Government Accountability, Transparency and Efficiency Committee Senate Judiciary
09:00 AM 10:00 AM Agriculture and Rural Development Senate Finance
10:00 AM 12:00 PM Joint Standing Committee on Finance House Chamber
10:00 AM 12:00 PM Joint Standing Committee on the Judiciary House Gov. Org.
12:00 PM 02:00 PM Joint Committee on Health House Chamber
12:00 PM 02:00 PM Joint Standing Committee on Energy House Gov. Org.
02:00 PM 03:00 PM Commerce Secretary Presentation House Chamber
03:00 PM 04:00 PM Joint Standing Committee on Education House Chamber
03:00 PM 05:00 PM Legislative Oversight Commission on Health and Human Resources Accountability House Gov. Org
05:00 PM 06:00 PM Commission on Interstate Cooperation Senate Finance


Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Convene Adjourn Committee Location
08:00 AM 09:00 AM Joint Commission on Economic Development - JOINT MEETING House Gov. Org.
08:00 AM 09:00 AM Legislative Oversight Commission on Workforce Investment for Economic Development - JOINT MEETING House Gov. Org.
08:00 AM 09:00 AM Legislative Intern Committee Senate Finance
09:00 AM 10:00 AM Select Committee on Veterans’ Affairs House Gov. Org.
09:00 AM 11:00 AM Joint Legislative Oversight Commission on Dept of Transportation Accountability Senate Judiciary
10:00 AM 11:00 AM Joint Committee on Government Operations - JOINT MEETING House Chamber
10:00 AM 11:00 AM Joint Standing Committee on Government Organization - JOINT MEETING House Chamber
11:00 AM 12:00 PM Joint Committee on Children and Families House Finance
11:00 AM 12:00 PM Joint Committee on Government and Finance Senate Finance
12:00 PM 01:00 PM Joint Standing Committee on Pensions and Retirement Senate Finance
12:00 PM 01:00 PM Parks, Recreation and Natural Resources Subcommittee Senate Judiciary
01:00 PM 03:00 PM Joint Committee on Volunteer Fire Departments & Emergency Medical Services House Gov. Org.
01:00 PM 03:00 PM Joint Committee on Natural Gas Development Senate Judiciary
03:00 PM 05:00 PM Select Committee on PEIA, Seniors and Long Term Care Senate Finance
03:00 PM 05:00 PM Joint Legislative Committee on Flooding Senate Judiciary


Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Convene Adjourn Committee Location
09:00 AM 12:00 PM Legislative Rule-Making Review Committee Senate Judiciary


Please send your inquiries to the Capitol office:  Building 1, Room 258-M, Charleston, WV 25305.  My home number is 304.364.8411; the Capitol office number is 304.340.3142.  If you have an interest in any particular bill or issue, please let me know.  For those with Internet access, my legislative e-mail address is:

You may also obtain additional legislative information, including the copies of bills, conference reports, daily summaries, interim highlights, and leave me a message on the Legislature’s web site at www.legis.state.wv.us/.  When leaving a message, please remember to include your phone number with your inquiry and any details you can provide. Additional information, including agency links and the state government phone directory, may be found at www.wv.gov. Also, you may follow me on Facebook at “Brent Boggs”, Twitter at “@DelBrentBoggs” , as well as the WV Legislature’s Facebook page at “West Virginia Legislature” or on Twitter at twitter.com/wvlegislature.

Continue to remember our troops - at home and abroad - and keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers.  Until next week – take care.

WVDEP Approves Cleanup Method Submitted by WV DOT-DOH for Site in Heaters, WV

The Free Press WV

The Office of Environmental Remediation (OER) at the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) has approved a cleanup method submitted by the West Virginia Department of Transportation Division of Highways (DOT/DOH) to address environmental conditions through the Uniform Environmental Covenant Act (UECA) Program at Heaters Substation in Braxton County.

The site is located at US Route 19/State Route 4 in Heaters and includes approximately 0.57 acres. The Heaters Substation has historically been used for the storage of road and highway maintenance materials and as a fueling station for state-owned vehicles. The facility previously operated a gasoline underground storage tank (UST) until 1991, when it was removed and replaced with a diesel UST. The diesel UST was installed within the former gasoline UST pit and covered with a concrete pad. In 2013, the diesel UST was excavated and removed from the site. Environmental investigations at the site between 2004 and 2013 have documented that both soil and groundwater at the site were impacted by activities associated with the operation of a retail gasoline service station. The current use of the site is for highway maintenance related activities. The future land use of the site will be as non-residential.

A total of 593.88 tons of petroleum impacted soil and 3,300 gallons of pit water were removed during remediation activities. Chemicals of concern (COC) were determined by screening maximum concentrations in soil and groundwater against conservative benchmarks developed to be protective of human health for direct contact exposure, potential migration to groundwater, and potential migration to indoor air.

Constituents exceeding the screening criteria were selected as COCs, and evaluated further in the risk assessment. COCs in soil included total xylenes and COCs in groundwater included benzene and naphthalene. The applicant has submitted a Final Report to OER to confirm that the work met all applicable remediation standards. A deed restriction in the form of a Land Use Covenant (LUC) will restrict future use of the property to non-residential and prohibit the extraction of groundwater for any use except groundwater monitoring and/or remediation.

UECA encourages risk-based assessments and cleanups of petroleum-contaminated sites with an objective of counteracting the lack of development on sites with contamination or perceived contamination. The UECA Program identifies and addresses potential contamination at a given site; sets applicable remediation standards; and ensures that the standards are maintained at the site. By providing financial incentives to invest in petroleum leak sites, this approach protects communities and the environment while still promoting economic development in West Virginia.

Pat’s Chat

The Free Press WV

We (my family, friends, and I) like to explore our area for good eating places.  One of those we found is Country Time Cooking at 1024 Old Elkins Road (close to the Bowling Alley, and across from Rite-Way Plumbing).  They have a site on Facebook where they will tell you what the specials are that day.  They serve breakfast all day.  Certain specials are available on the same day of the week, each week.  One of those is tomato gravy, which I love on a biscuit and have memories of Mom making for us at our wonderful home in Burnsville.  (Mary Ellen always asks for cornbread for her tomato gravy, which most of the time they have for her).  It is not a large place and the cooks and waitresses are right there and become friends with their customers.  I went to the site and saw several comments giving Country Time Cooking five stars.  I agree.

The Free Press WV


The quarterly newsletter of the Mountain View Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, Sonrise, had a column this time that I could have written if I were talented enough.  Most of it said what I feel at times but never put into words.  I am sure some of you will have the same thoughts.  I am going to share it with you:

 

I Miss Church When I Miss Church

I mean, it’s a habit I’ve established over a lot of years, and I’m not happy when something happens that breaks the pattern.  I feel like I’ve missed a meal, or like I made an appointment and then didn’t keep it.  Like I was starting out on a week-long trip but didn’t put gas in the car.

I’ve learned that if I’ve had a hard week, there will likely be someone there who has seen God work in a wondrous way and I can soak up some of their spiritual energy.  Or maybe my week has gone well but someone else has struggled.  My testimony may encourage them.  It works both ways.  If I had missed it, one of us might have missed what we needed.  Either way I miss something if I miss church.

Then there’s the music.  I love to join the congregation, especially if it’s a grand praise anthem.  When the five parts – soprano, alto, tenor, bass, and nondescript – raise their united voices I have the sense the angels love to join in.  If I miss church I miss the honor of bringing Him that adoration.  “O, Come Let Us Adore Him. . . .”  It doesn’t get any bigger than that.

But the morning prayer time, that’s when I get the sense that I have been swept into His presence.  Someone at the front is speaking on my behalf but my heart is in echo-mode.  We praise God for who He is, for what He’s done.  We use words here we don’t use any other time in the week nor for anyone else.  We try to grasp His greatness, understand His heart so we resonate with His passions, His will.  We do not seek to send Him on our errands, we plead that He will make us available so we can go on His.

We plead for the lost, the least, and the last and ask that He will help us know how we, as heart-driven under-shepherds, can help love them home.  This conversation with the King can never run too long for me; He and I have so much to discuss . . . and I need help in learning to listen.  But think with me of what I would have missed had I not been there.

By this time I’m ready to hear from His Word and I have intentionally come to church hungry.  I am encouraged to know that the pastor has walked all week by the side of One who wrote the very Book.  It’s not so much a Book that tells me what to do as it is a Book that tells me what’s already been done.  What if I had not been there to peer into the heart of God and have the trajectory of my life changed?  I’d have missed so much that I cannot afford to miss if I had chosen to miss church.

By Don Jacobsen


I am saddened to hear of the death of my friends, Paul and Rosemary Crutchfield’s grandson, Adam Ramsey.  My sympathy is extended to his family and friends, and also to the family and friends of Gary Drake, Catherine Wine, Stanley Wine, and Emogene Baker.

Maranatha

WV Legislative Update: Delegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman

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I know each of us join in thoughts and prayers for the Gulf Coast residents of Texas and other areas affected by Hurricane Harvey.  The resulting devastation from unprecedented rainfall and flooding that resulted will likely make this the most costly natural disaster in our nation.  Meanwhile, as the rainfall worked its way toward us, memories of the deadly 2016 floods in West Virginia vividly remain in our memories.  Our local communities and residents are still struggling to recover, one year later.

Put in perspective, had we received the amount of rain in the hills and narrow valleys of West Virginia in 2016 that Hurricane Harvey dumped on the Houston area last week, dams, bridges and entire communities would likely have been overwhelmed.  During the 2016 flood, parts of our State received as much as 10 inches of rain over a 24 hour period.  Houston received up to 50 inches during the duration of the storm.

We always have much for which to give thanks.  So, even though we experienced a soggy few days here in West Virginia, a rain-interrupted Labor Day weekend just doesn’t seem important.  The national emergency has focused our attention on the importance of helping others, as it should be.

West Virginians are always the first to step up to help neighbors in need.  Churches are planning work trips to the Houston area to assist in recovery efforts to help residents in the clean-up.  Also, there will be groups and churches that will be collecting water, cleaning supplies, clothing, toiletries, and personal hygiene items for transportation to the area.  Others that cannot make the trip due to work or family responsibilities can make financial contributions to various non-profit organizations, such as the Red Cross, that will get the dollars where they are most needed.

A note of caution when making financial donations: Human suffering always brings out those despicable crooks that seek to target generous donors by setting up fraudulent organizations or fundraising by deceptive practices, designed to bilk millions from well-meaning citizens.  I tend to agree with the Arizona Attorney General’s comment to Forbes.com: “Low-life cyber scum are exploiting this disaster using fake social media accounts.  When a natural disaster strikes, many of us ask, how can we help? Giving is good, but it’s important to donate to a legitimate charity that has experience helping victims quickly.”

In addition to the well-known, well-established charities, such as Salvation Army, American Red Cross, Samaritan’s Purse and other legitimate organizations that are accepting donations, Forbes recommends checking out Charity Navigator.  Their website is charitynavigator.org

Forbes also recommends that beyond the big name charities, there are a number of smaller organizations in Texas that can use your donation help, including the Houston Food Bank, Food Bank of Corpus Christi, Houston Humane Society, Houston SPCA, or San Antonio Humane Society.

We’re all Americans, and we step up in times of disaster, just as in times of war or conflict.  West Virginians will always be first to do our part.

Despite the fact that we’re well inland, a leftovers hurricane can be devastating to West Virginia.  Thankfully, the remnants of Hurricane Harvey did not cause any flooding locally.  With a new storm brewing at this writing, our prayers are that it remains far, far away.


Please send your inquiries to the Capitol office:  Building 1, Room 258-M, Charleston, WV 25305.  My home number is 304.364.8411; the Capitol office number is 304.340.3142.  If you have an interest in any particular bill or issue, please let me know.  For those with Internet access, my legislative e-mail address is:

You may also obtain additional legislative information, including the copies of bills, conference reports, daily summaries, interim highlights, and leave me a message on the Legislature’s web site at www.legis.state.wv.us/.  When leaving a message, please remember to include your phone number with your inquiry and any details you can provide. Additional information, including agency links and the state government phone directory, may be found at www.wv.gov. Also, you may follow me on Facebook at “Brent Boggs”, Twitter at “@DelBrentBoggs” , as well as the WV Legislature’s Facebook page at “West Virginia Legislature” or on Twitter at twitter.com/wvlegislature.

Continue to remember our troops - at home and abroad - and keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers.  Until next week – take care.

Why a Rosie the Riveter BELL ?

In 1954 The Netherlands gave a carillon tower to the United States in gratitude for our contribution to winning WWII.  America freed not only the Dutch but all Europeans from Nazi domination.  The Netherlands Carillion’s fifty bells now ring out concerts on summer Saturdays in Arlington near the National Cemetery. 

The Free Press WV


This past January several WV Rosies were invited to meet The Netherlands’ King and Queen and be thanked for their invaluable work in liberating the allied nations.  West Virginia’s Rosie organization, called Thanks!  Plain and Simple, has adopted the ringing of bells as the appropriate commemoration of the women who left their homes to take the place of men then at war, keep the factories producing war materials, and win WWII.  On Labor Day, local girl scouts with Thanks! will ring bells for Rosies at Flatwoods.  Rosies will be there and we hope you will, too.

Gilmer County is joining the International Rosie the Riveter Movement with this antique bell. It is 15 ½ inches of steel alloy weighing over forty pounds and will be mounted in Glenville City Park. The bell is being donated by a local Rosie, but the $2500 matching pole must be funded by donations.  Not only will this put Gilmer County on the map of the growing number of those honoring the Rosies work (Belgium, The Netherlands and the UK have all offered memorial events) but the bell itself, permanently installed in the City Park, will be used for all types of celebrations – marking the start of parades, opening the Folk Festival, ringing in the holidays, and more.

Wouldn’t you like to participate?  We can all help in this project by contributing for the installation at: WV Rosie the Riveter Bell, P. O. Box 163, Glenville, WV 26351.

Weekly Update for Gilmer County High School

The Free Press WV

Students at Gilmer County High School enjoyed viewing the eclipse with the eclipse-approved sunglasses provided to Gilmer County Schools’ students by Glenville State College.

Students were treated to popsicles during the eclipse by Mrs. Butcher.

Everyone enjoyed the afternoon and the viewing party.



The Free Press WV

David Brannon, a 7th grade student at GCHS, was invited to speak to Mrs. Sandy Pettit’s Business & Marketing class at Glenville State College on August 23.

David’s presentation was on couponing and the GSC students were amazed at his knowledge of couponing as a business and corporations and their subsidiaries.

When asked by one of the GSC students what he wanted to be when he grew up, David replied, “I want to be a CEO.“  David is the son of David and Izetta Brannon of Cedarville.



The Free Press WV

Lindsay Chapman, junior, and Baylee Wellings, senior, both were medalists at the Charles Point Cross Country Meet in Bridgeport on Saturday, August 26.

Medals were awarded to the top 30 runners in high school boys and girls and middle school boys and girls.

Lindsay placed 28th and 30th.

Lindsay is the daughter of Lora and Jimmy Chapman of Burnsville.

Baylee is the daughter of Jenny and Tom Wellings of Glenville.

Mountaineer Food Bank in Gassaway Installs Emergency Generator

Mountaineer Food Bank, a nonprofit organization in Gassaway, held a ribbon-cutting ceremony Wednesday to celebrate the installation of a new $150,000 natural gas generator capable of keeping the 20,000-square-foot facility operational during an extended power outage.

The new equipment and installation were made possible thanks to financial donations.

Representative from many of the organizations that donated attended the ribbon cutting.

The Free Press WV


“Mountaineer Food Bank is the largest emergency food distributor in West Virginia,” Mountaineer Food Bank Executive Director Chad Morrison said. “This backup generator can provide enough electricity to keep important equipment running during a power outage so we can keep operating and feeding people in an emergency situation.”

The project began through the efforts of WV Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, local foundations and community organizations after the 2012 derecho.

The Food and Medicine Committee developed and implemented a plan to place generators in areas with frequent power outages and significance throughout the state, officials said.

Last year, Mountaineer Food Bank provided 13.7 million pounds of food to 400-plus feeding programs in 48 counties in West Virginia.

Feeding programs include pantries, shelters, soup kitchens, day-care centers, school pantries, school backpack programs and senior and veteran distribution programs.

WVDEP-REAP Tire Collections Set For Fall

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s (WVDEP) Rehabilitation Environmental Action Plan (REAP) is holding several tire collections across the state this fall.


- Randolph 08.25.17 8:00am-4:00pm Leslie Equipment County on Rt. 33

- Randolph 08.26.17 8:00am-4:00pm Dailey, Tygart Valley Transfer Station

- Cabell 08.26.17 9:00am-3:00pm Huntington, National Guard Armory

- Logan 08.25-26.17 8:00am-5:00pm Riverview Ave.

- Wood 09.09.17 8:00am-Noon Belleville, Belleville Community Center

- Braxton 09.09.17 9:00am-3:00pm Flatwoods, Braxton 911 Center, Days Drive

- Mineral 09.09.17 8:00am-3:00pm Ft. Ashby Fairgrounds

- Raleigh 09.12.17 9:00am-3:00pm Dameron, “Green Box Curve” on Rt. 3

- Kanawha 09.16.17 8:00am-4:00pm Sissonville, Call Road by Sissonville VFD

- Raleigh 09.19.17 9:00am-3:00pm Beckley, Raleigh County Conv. Center, Upper Lot

- Wirt 09.23.17 9:00am-3:00pm Elizabeth, Wirt County Recycling Center

- Putnam 09.23.17 9:00am-2:00pm Winfield, Putnam County Courthouse

- Greenbrier 09.27.17 8:00am-4:00pm Rainelle, US Army Reserve Center

- Kanawha 09.30.17 8:00am-4:00pm Cabin Creek, AEP Property behind GoMart

- Barbour 09.30.17 8:00am-2:00pm Barbour County Fairgrounds

- Mingo 10.03.17 9:00am-3:00pm Rt. 52, Old County Bus Garage

- Wetzel 10.07.17 8:00am-2:00pm New Martinsville, Bruce Park

- Lincoln 10.07.17 9:00am-3:00pm Lincoln County High School

- Grant 10.07.17 8:00am-3:00pm Grant County Industrial Park

- Ohio 10.14.17 8:00am-2:00pm Cabela’s Parking Lot

- Kanawha 10.21.17 8:00am-4:00pm Intersection of 4th Ave. and C St. in South Charleston


More events could be added. Check the WVDEP website for an updated list.

Residents may dispose of up to 10 tires per person with a valid West Virginia ID for the county in which the tire collection event is being held. The tires must be off the rims. Only car and light truck tires, 16-inches or less, will be accepted. Haulers and businesses are not allowed to participate.

This tire collection is made possible, in part, through REAP, which brings together all of the state’s cleanup programs to maximize West Virginia’s cleanup efforts.

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