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Gilmer County

Jeanette Riffle: Coldest Day Yet for 2019

The Free Press WV

A few days ago, it was 60 degrees and this morning we got up to 23 and a wind chill of 13. What a surprise!  I am happy to stay in by the fire and look out the windows and watch it snow. So far, it is just flurries and not much accumulation. It really makes a person thankful for a good warm house, plenty of food, warm clothes and so many other things. I’m glad that we don’t have to go outside to the outhouse or pump water up from the pitcher pump on the back porch like we did when I was growing up. We got running water, a bathroom and the whole works when I was 9 years old.  My mind goes back to old time winters and Mom worrying that us kids would get cold at night. Every bedroom had a gas stove on the floor but sometimes I would wake up to her putting another quilt on the bed and she would ask if I was cold. Duane remembers quilts piled so high on his bed at the Shock log cabin that you couldn’t hardly turn over. It was drafty and our house was, too. Mom would stuff big rags up around the bottom of doors to keep some of the draft out. It came in around windows and sometimes she put old quilts up over the curtain rods to keep the cold out. We went on to school rain, snow, or shine.

Back then there weren’t any snow days off school. There was a bus house down at the Chesnut Lick Bridge to get in for shelter and the bus came by about 8:20 every morning, so we knew when to go down there.  When Mom went to work, she put me in charge and I had to get up and make breakfast for the four of us kids. Mom always had chickens and I fixed scrambled eggs, toast and hot chocolate to give us all a good start.  Then, I had to do dishes and clean up the kitchen, get myself dressed and ready for school. We weren’t allowed to wear slacks to keep our legs warm. Mom got me warm knee stockings and long wool winter skirts. I’m glad that one got changed somewhere along the years. Some of us women even wear slacks to church in winter to keep warm. I was reminded of a promise in the Holy Bible, from Alyce Faye Bragg’s column of the Charleston Gazette-Mail . It is found in Genesis 8: 21-22. It reads, “And, the Lord smelled a sweet savor; and the Lord said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man’s sake; for the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more everything living, as I have done. While the earth remains, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease.”

Until next time, take care and God bless.

WV Legislative Update

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As we plow headlong into the first full week of the 2019 legislative session, new and returning members are becoming familiarized to the new leadership, committee assignments, offices and duties.  With the major construction underway to repair the interior support system of the Capitol dome, the center of the main Capitol building is completely enclosed and blocked off from the basement, first floor, the rotunda “well” on the second floor and up to the interior dome ceiling. The damage caused by decades of water infiltration has corroded the support superstructure and estimates are it could possibly be sometime in late 2020 before the repairs are completed.  It’s definitely a different atmosphere in the remaining space between the House and Senate chambers.  It’s claustrophobic but there is a narrow walkway around the construction to get from the east and west sides of the building and the wings.  If you’re visiting the Capitol, be prepared for the construction detours inside.

The Governor covered a few of my concerns during his State of the State address last week, and without his usual whiteboard and markers.  Unfortunately, many items were only given a brief overview without any substantial follow-up later in the week with more specifics.  Of equal concerns is that the items he mentioned total roughly $500 million dollars, thereby fully obligating all or more than any conceivable budget surplus that may be available after June 30 of this year.  True, the State is enjoying a considerable uptick in revenue collections for the general fund and road fund.  However, what goes up can easily go in the opposite direction. While we have pressing needs, this may be a time to exercise careful spending practices.

I’m pleased that the Governor recognized the need to exempt Social Security income from state income taxes which will greatly help retirees.  Hopefully, this can be expanded to include other pension benefits that are similar to Social Security.  Likewise, I’m pleased that he’s committed to divert several million dollars from the Roads to Prosperity program to much-needed secondary road maintenance – the roads where West Virginians live and work.  This is long overdue and should provide funding for projects in counties when the fiscal year begins on July 1.  The record-breaking rainfall in 2018 caused many unforeseen slips and slides that must be repaired.

PEIA was mentioned, but the method by which he intends to inject $150 million into the plan is unclear and from what source – all or in part.  There was no mention of higher education funding restoration.

While drug treatment is high on everyone’s list of needs, the plan he outlined – “JIM’S Dream – is a $25 million request that is short on details at this time.  I attempted to get some clarification during our first budget hearing on the Governor’s executive budget last Thursday morning.  Unfortunately, no one in attendance from the Governor’s office, Tax & Revenue, or DHHR had a firm grasp on implementation or details.  While the plan is good in theory – providing vocational and job training, education assistance and drug treatment to get our citizens back into the workforce – my questions hinged on where this program would be available.  For instance, if it will just be at a few large cities or counties around the state, then it will be essentially worthless to the rural areas of West Virginia.  Without it being available nearby and without any public transportation options, our rural families will continue to endure a great unmet need that selectively helps some but leaves other without any meaningful assistance.  That scenario sounds similar to the approach on broadband for unserved and underserved areas.

I truly hope this turns out to be something meaningful that I can support, but whether it will realistically help our citizens in central West Virginia is an unanswered question at this early point in the session.

The Governor also proposed an intermediate court of appeals.  This is a long-sought dream of big business that will simply drive the time and cost of justice for individuals and small businesses even higher.  Considering the ever-shrinking population of West Virginia and given that the State Supreme Court of Appeals reviews every case that is sent to them, I’m left wondering why we should spend millions on another layer of judicial bureaucracy.  If someone can provide me evidence that there truly is a need, I’m willing to listen, providing that there are assurances that it won’t be used as another technique to hurt working families and consumers,

The Governor introduced the new Commerce Secretary, former State Senator Ed Gaunch.  I’m looking forward to speaking with him regarding central West Virginia soon. It’s time to lift all boats - not just in the more prosperous and populous counties.

While the Governor’s speech left many unanswered questions, I realize it’s impossible to outline the entire agenda in an hour. Hundreds of votes and thousands of bills and resolutions will be introduced in the coming weeks.  I’ll do my best to keep you updated and informed.

During the legislative session, please send your inquiries to the Capitol office: State Capitol Building 1, Room 258 M, Charleston, WV 25305. My office telephone number is 304.340.3142; home number is 304.364.8411. .  If you have an interest in any particular bill or issue, please let me know.  For those with Internet access, my legislative e-mail address is:

You may also obtain additional legislative information, including the copies of bills, conference reports, daily summaries, interim highlights, and leave me a message on the Legislature’s web site at www.legis.state.wv.us/.  When leaving a message, please remember to include your phone number with your inquiry and any details you can provide. Additional information, including agency links and the state government phone directory, may be found at www.wv.gov. Also, you may follow me on Facebook at “Brent Boggs”, Twitter at “@DelBrentBoggs” , as well as the WV Legislature’s Facebook page at “West Virginia Legislature” or on Twitter at twitter.com/wvlegislature.

Continue to remember our troops - at home and abroad - and keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers.  Until next week – take care.

Gilmer County Residents Graduate from GSC

The Free Press WV

Three students from Gilmer County were awarded degrees during the Glenville State College December Commencement Ceremony held on Saturday, December 08, 2018.

  • Amanda Lamb of Normantown, WV graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Early Education (PreK-K), Elementary Education (K-6), and Multi-Categorical Special Education (K-6).

  • Samantha McCune of Linn, WV received a Bachelor of Science degree in Behavioral Science with a minor in Social Work.

  • Carissa Wood of Shock, WV graduated Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Behavioral Science with a minor in Music.

Founded in 1872, Glenville State College is a public liberal arts college located in Glenville, West Virginia.

The college offers a variety of four-year degree programs and several NCAA Division II athletic teams.

 

The Free Press WV

City of Glenville Police Report

The Gilmer Free Press
City of Glenville, WV Police Report
Crime/Ordinance Violation
Officer
Disposition
Location
MVC Huffman/Braniff Vehicles left the area prior to our arrival N. Lewis Street
Assist another agency Huffman/Braniff Assisted WVSP and CPS  on a removal Normantown
Dog Bite Huffman Dog was quarantined and owner was able to provide verification that the dog was up to date on shots Pine Street
Suicidal Threats Huffman Spoke to the subject she advised that she was in bed and made no threats and had no intentions of harming herself or anyone else College Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning Mineral Road
Speeding Jenkins Warning Mineral Road
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning Mineral Road
Defective Equipment Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warnings for speeding and No Operators carried N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warnings for speeding and No Operators carried N. Lewis Street
Left of Center Jenkins Warning for Left of center and Cited for Possession of Marijuana  Mineral Road
Speeding Jenkins Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning for Speeding and Cited for Driving while Suspended  N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning for Speeding and cited for No Proof of Registration and No Proof of Insurance N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning for Speeding and Cited for No seatbelt  Mineral Road
Assist another agency Huffman/Braniff Assisted GCSD, WVSP,  and CPS on a child removal 4 subjects arrested Normantown
Football game Huffman/Braniff Provided extra security for High School football game Football field 
Fans throwing things Huffman/Braniff Students throwing bottles and candy at other fans principal dealing with the issue Football Field
Juvenile in Possession of Tobacco Huffman/Braniff Juvenile escorted from the game and turned over care custody and control to his mother juvenile petitions filed and 1 female cited for juvenile in possession of tobacco Football Field
Loud Party Huffman Called to a party that turned into several people fighting in the street, all subjects had left prior to my arrival Walnut Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and No Insurance and warning for expired MVI W. Main Street
Stop Sign violation Huffman Warning x2 High Street
Suspicious Person Huffman/Braniff Subject was waiting on a ride I advised him that he had to stay off of other people’s property W. Main Street
Vehicle unlock Huffman Vehicle unlocked Go Mart
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and expired registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and no proof of registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding, unsigned registration, and no proof of insurance N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and unsigned registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and unsigned registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and no proof of insurance N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and failure to change address N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning for Speeding and cited for no Proof of insurance N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding, unsigned registration, and no proof of insurance W. Main Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning Mineral Road
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning Mineral Road
Speeding Jenkins Cited Mineral Road
Assist another agency Huffman/Braniff Assisted Drug Task force serve a search warrant E. Main Street
Custodial Transport Huffman/Braniff 1 male subject transported to DPS office E. Main Street
Courtesy Transport Huffman/Braniff Transported 1 female back to Glenville for WVSP WVSP office
Custodial transport Huffman/Braniff Transported 1 male subject to magistrate court then to CRJ Glenville
Assist another agency Huffman Assisted WVSP attempting to locate a vehicle negative contact US HWY 33 E
Suspicious person Huffman Attempted to locate a suspicious person on Walnut Street no one matching the description was given Walnut Street
Possible domestic Huffman Spoke to subjects in the home both parties advised there was no domestic Kanawha Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and warnings issued for no proof of registration and failure to carry operators College Street
Speeding Huffman Cited  N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for No Proof of insurance and warning for Speeding N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Cell phone violation Huffman Cited for Cell phone violation and No Proof of Insurance N. Lewis Street
Cell phone violation Huffman Cited for Cell phone violation and Defective Equipment N. Lewis Street
Leaving the scene of an accident Huffman/Braniff Stop Sign ran over by a tractor trailer unable to locate the vehicle, contacted DOH to repair the sign Hay city intersection
Speeding Jenkins Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for speeding and warnings issued for no proof of registration and no proof of insurance W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings issued for speeding and unsigned registration W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Defective equipment Huffman Warnings issued for Defective equipment x3 and unsigned registration N. Lewis Street
No taillights  Huffman Warnings issued for No Taillights and unsigned registration S. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited S. Lewis Street
Alarm investigation Huffman All the doors were secure unable to make contact with a key holder Advanced Auto
Neighbor dispute Huffman Both parties advised to leave each other alone W. Main Street
Welfare check Huffman Negative contact with that subject N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and Unsigned registration W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and Warning for Unsigned registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding  Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Assist another agency Huffman Assisted GCSD and WVSP with an altercation with weapons one subject arrested Sliding Run
Animal cruelty Complaint Braniff Owner put a do box out for the dog River Street
Assist EMS Huffman Assisted EMS with lifting assistance Johnson Street
Drug Class Huffman/Braniff Taught a drug class at the high school Gilmer Co High
Juvenile in possession of tobacco Huffman/Braniff Cited for possession of tobacco High School
Speeding Jenkins Warnings for Speeding and No Proof of insurance Mineral  Road
Expired registration Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning N. Lewis Street
Unsecure Load Jenkins  Warning for Unsecure load Cited for Driving while Suspended WV HWY 5 E
Permitting unlicensed Driver Jenkins Cited WV HWY 5 E
Defective equipment Jenkins Warning
Speeding Jenkins Warnings Issued for Speeding, No Proof of Insurance, no Proof of registration and expired Registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warning for Speeding and Cited for cell Phone violation N. Lewis Street
Left of center Jenkins Warning for Left of center and Cited for Possession of marijuana <15 Mineral Road
MVC Huffman Accident report completed Walnut Street
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited N. Lewis Street
No Seatbelt Huffman Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Jenkins Warnings for Speeding, no Operators Carried, and no proof of insurance N. Lewis Street
MVC Huffman Accident report completed N. Lewis Street
Alarm investigation Huffman/Braniff All doors were secure Advanced Auto
Citizen Assist Huffman/Braniff Attempted to get a cat out of the engine block of a car W. Main Street
Assist another agency Huffman/Braniff Assisted GCSD 1 female arrested on multiple charges Dollar General
Speeding Huffman/Braniff Cited  N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman/Braniff Cited for Speeding and warning for unsigned registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and warning for no proof of registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and warning for unsigned registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited  N. Lewis Street
Improper backing Huffman Cited for improper backing and one way street violation E. Main Street.
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for speeding and no proof of insurance N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings for Speeding and unsigned registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Dog bite Huffman/Braniff Victim had left prior to our arrival and the owner was advised to keep the dog quarantined for 10 days  S. Lewis Street
Funeral detail Huffman Funeral detail for officer Gary Smarr Ellyson’s
Funeral detail Huffman/Braniff Funeral detail for Bill Cottrill Ellyson’s
Funeral detail Huffman/Braniff Funeral detail for Rose Ball Ellyson’s
Wrestling tournament Huffman Provided security for a wrestling tournament Waco Center
Speeding Huffman Warnings issued for speeding and failure to change address W. Main Street
Defective equipment Huffman Warnings issued for Defective equipment and unsigned registration S. Lewis Street
Defective equipment Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective equipment Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Defective equipment Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Possible intoxicated driver Huffman Made contact with vehicle.  Driver was not intoxicated N. Lewis Street
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle unlocked US HWY 33 E

 

GCHS: Honor Roll - 2nd Nine Weeks - 2018-19

The Gilmer Free Press
GILMER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
HONOR ROLL
2nd Nine Weeks
2018-2019
7th Grade 8th Grade
Anderson, Kara Amos, Riley
Ball, Dakota Arden, Lucas
Blake, Micca Ball, Brianna
Bourn, Elijah Bill, Vanessa
Brenwald, Jozlyn Bourn, Ashlyn
Butler, Grant Brannon, David
Cain, Logan Cogar, Cole
Casto, Dyson Drennen, Cassandra
Foster, Keven Freeman, Jacob
Frame, Madison Hale, Lilith
Frashure, Bayley Harubin, Ryleigh
Frymier, Destiny Jenkins, Taylor
Gibson, Kaley Kumpis, Mykolas
Gray, Alena McCord, Seanna
Hess, Samantha McHenry, Harlee
Hough, Mya Miller, Samuel
Hulse, Skylar Mims, Jailyn
Junkins, Christopher Naimark, Lena
Nolan, Destiney Patterson, Dakota
Norman, Jackson Pendergrass, Justin
Phares, Kathrine Peters, Haylea
Pinckney, Tyler Simmons, Tessa
Puchalski, Madison Smith, Morgan
Putnam, Morgan Snyder, Daisy
Ratliff, Jessica Thompson, Elexis
Richards, Kiley Wine, Christian
Snider, Casey Wood, Allison
Sprouse, Sydney   
Starsick, Stevie
Taylor, Mikayla
Thompson, Courtni
Yeager, Olivya
  
9th Grade 10th Grade
Anderson, Kaitlyn Bourn, Shayla
Bancroft, Trinity Canfield, Logan
Barger, Layna Cawthon, Caliegh
Beron, Ryan Clark, Athena
Carpenter, Ryan Clevenger, Misty
Carr, Christopher Collins, Zackery
Chapman, Avery Dobbins, Damon
Chapman, Jacob Drake, Trevor
Conrad, Alex Eberly, Arista
Facemire, Elijah Fox, Emma
Ferguson, Carrah Frame, Christopher
Gonzalez, Sean Frymier, Allyson
Hamric, Ean Gibson, Autumn
Landis, Jesse Gray, Jada
Liu, Justin Grove, Corbin
McHenry, Taylor Hale, Wyllow
McWhirter, Keely Lang, Rachel
Minigh, Lilly Law, Tierra
Mohr, James Mathess, Taylor
Morgan, Malaysia McCumbers, Sara
Moyers, Autumn Mohr, Eve
Price, Scott Moss, Kyle
Self, Levi Phares, Rachel
Stewart, Adam Poole, Jacob
Stewart, Amiah Ratliff, Landen
Taylor, Emma Stanley, Kenya
Thorne, Carissa Taylor, Dakota
White, McKinzie Wellings, Thomas
Young, Lucas White, Gabriel
   Williams, Tori
  
11th Grade 12th Grade
Clegg, Kelsey Barger, Emily
Cogar, Zane Barnhouse, Ezekiel
Dobbins, Michaela Boggs, Maysen
Finley, Rhea Bossert, Logan
Fitzwater, Brady Bossert, Morgan
Frederick, Jared Chapman, Lindsay
Furr, Jagger Cole, Tiffany
Garcia, Savanna Facemire, Lucas
Hale, Natalie Frymier, Autumn
Haley, Ty Grove, Hannah
Harper, Jonathan Hardman, Faith
Hinter, Hannah Lipscomb, Johntae
Johnson, Jaycie Miller, Colten
Jones, Indica Mohr, Madison
Langford, Alyssa Moore, Cheyenne
Lemon, Hunter Page, Daydra
Liu, Andrew Phares, Hailey
McCord, MacKenzie Phares, Logan
McHenry, Cameron Powell, Brianna
Miller, Clifford Pritt, Richard
Minney, Hannah Pyles, Brandon
Morris, Maria Raulston, Cassandra
Phares, Ethan Roy, Michael
Roberts, Jon Smith, Donald
Skeens, Makayla Snyder, Kaylene
Starsick, Macee Steele, Kollin
Stewart, Christopher Watts, Garrett
Sumpter, Kandus Wood, Sierra
Waddell, Harley Yoak, Morga
Watkins, Kerry   
Wellings, Grace
Wine, Katelyn
Yoho, Anna
The Gilmer Free Press

Jeanette Riffle: Options on Cars

The Free Press WV

Our son and granddaughter from Taylor, Michigan, were home for a couple days after Christmas. Shelby only had four days off work and it took one day to drive down and a day to drive back, so that only left them two days here to visit.  We were glad that the weather cooperated though and they were able to come home. Last year, they didn’t make it because of bad weather and bad roads. They didn’t get down until July, so we had Christmas in July.

Anyway, we enjoy having them here anytime they can come and this time we enjoyed our gift exchange and good food in December.  I had crockpot macaroni and cheese with hamburgers waiting on them the first evening. For breakfast, our son likes sausage gravy, biscuits and eggs and our granddaughter likes fried potatoes, bacon and homemade applesauce. I fixed it all and Myron ate some of all of it. He also likes hot peppers in sauce with his breakfast, but we still haven’t gotten into that project. We are running late on that one this year. Duane has been sick for a month with bronchitis. He is over it but having trouble getting his strength back.  That pepper project takes both of us working on it, to get it all done in one day.  We will get to it, yet.

My husband and son got into a conversation about options on cars nowadays and Duane said he could remember when the radio and heater were options. I thought back and I don’t remember a radio on Dad’s first car, the grey Studebaker that looked like an airplane. I don’t remember getting cold in winter, so he must have had a heater. I was about five when Dad got his first car. My grandparents took us places before that.  I can’t imagine riding around in a cold vehicle with no heater, but our son said he went one whole Michigan winter like that. Something went wrong with the blower in his van that he had at the time and it wasn’t blowing enough heat out. It is always cold and windy up there in winter.  You would have to really dress warm with no heater.

Our weather here has been milder than usual with lots of rain. Old Farmer’s Almanac has us for a mild, wet winter for our region. We were thankful for the sunny days that we got this past week, today being one of them. We went to church this morning in the sunshine and it was sunny when we came out. Most of us need more Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, this time of year.  We sometimes would go for two months with no sunshine in Michigan and people were getting depression from it. Doctors were advising people to sit under a sun lamp to get that heat and light that was needed. Until next time try to stay away from sick people, wash hands often, and if you get flu, stay home and don’t spread it. It is supposed to peak here next month.

Take care and God bless!

WV Legislative Update

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Life is full of milestones and this week, Jean and I celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary.  We both have our own version of how we met and dated (I think my version is more accurate; she disagrees) but we’ve been truly blessed.  Life has its ups and downs and I’m thankful for many things in life.  My love and appreciation for Jean grows as the years roll on.

With this first column for the New Year, there is a flurry of activity from legislative staff and support personnel, preparing for the influx of legislators this week.  As with any new legislative term, this First Regular Session of the Eighty-fourth West Virginia Legislature begins with many new members, new leaders, and an opportunity to address new and existing challenges for our State.  On a personal note, this will begin my twenty-third year representing the citizens of Braxton and Gilmer Counties in the House.  It continues to be an honor and privilege to serve each of you, whether at the Capitol, in the district, and in keeping you informed all year long.

Unknown at this writing is what Governor Justice will highlight and prioritize for the upcoming session.  Likewise, it remains to be seen if the new Speaker will set the tone for House bipartisanship.  It’s an unknown if the minority leader will choose to work across the aisle.  These and many other factors will shape the tone and tenor of the session from the inside out.

This is not by any means and exhaustive, all-inclusive list, but here are a few basic needs that are overdue for meaningful action:

  • Despite high-profile committees established by the Governor, PEIA is still in limbo and thus far the only plan to date is temporary at best.

  • No meaningful movement has been made to address recruitment, retention and needed funding for our volunteer firefighters.

  • Higher education funding restoration has been hijacked by a few regional institutions at the expense of the others.  Meanwhile, the Higher Education Policy Commission is once again on life support, barring legislative or gubernatorial intervention.

  • Despite lots of talk in the Judiciary Committees, there remains no meaningful movement on legislation to protect the rights of grandparents.  Considering we have a tremendous number of dedicated grandparents raising grandkids and great-grandkids, protecting their rights should be a priority.

  • Drug-related crime is rampant.  Time to enact policies that recognize this is an addiction problem that needs treatment and concentrate on getting rehab to help our citizens return to the workforce.  Punish the crime.  Treat the addiction.

  • Regional drug treatment options remain virtually non-existent if you live in a rural area – which is most of West Virginia.

  • Expedite the use of non-violent prisoners in our regional jails for public service projects.  Litter pick-up along our highways and parks should be a priority.

  • The WV Development Office still is failing to address rural West Virginians when working to bring in new jobs for our citizens.  Small Business Development Centers are the bright spots that need additional resources and incentives.

  • High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).

One bill that I hope gets moving early is one that exempts all or a portion of Social Security benefits from state income tax.  Depending on the threshold used to determine an exemption, the costs in the state budget vary greatly.  However, this is a bill that I’ve work on for years, but we’ve never had the House, Senate and Governor all on board.  Since West Virginia is one of only a few states that taxes Social Security income, changes made would help senior citizens now and eventually all when reaching retirement age.  It would also send a positive signal to retirees in attracting them to stay in, or to return or relocate to West Virginia.

Likely one of the most significant issues we can address is the massive population loss our State has experienced for decades.  So, policies that will create jobs will give our young adults an incentive and opportunity to stay in West Virginia and attract others to all the good things our State has to offer.

Over the next several weeks, I’ll attempt to keep you updated as column space allows and via social media.  I look forward to hearing from you and hopefully seeing many of you at the Capitol in the weeks ahead.

Please send your inquiries to my home office:  151 Park Street, Gassaway, WV 26624.  My home number is 304.364.8411; the Capitol office number is 304.340.3142.  If you have an interest in any particular bill or issue, please let me know.  For those with Internet access, my legislative e-mail address is:

You may also obtain additional legislative information, including the copies of bills, conference reports, daily summaries, interim highlights, and leave me a message on the Legislature’s web site at www.legis.state.wv.us/.  When leaving a message, please remember to include your phone number with your inquiry and any details you can provide. Additional information, including agency links and the state government phone directory, may be found at www.wv.gov. Also, you may follow me on Facebook at “Brent Boggs”, Twitter at “@DelBrentBoggs” , as well as the WV Legislature’s Facebook page at “West Virginia Legislature” or on Twitter at twitter.com/wvlegislature.

Continue to remember our troops - at home and abroad - and keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers.  Until next week – take care.


NewsWest VirginiaRegionBraxton CountyGilmer County

(2) Comments

Permalink - Link to This Article

~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

“High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).“

I disagree with much of what Mr.Boggs believes.  That said, high-speed broadband is the single most important step the State of WV could take to improve the business climate and provide more opportunities for its citizens.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne  on  01.08.2019

Pat McGroyne is spot on.
High speed internet is simply another failure of WV state government.

If the elected in our state, were doing the job expected by voters….we should have very few problems or issues?

By Gilmer resident  on  01.14.2019

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Community Foundation Grant Application Deadline February 15

The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates of Doddridge County, Ritchie County, and the Little Kanawha Area (PACF) is currently accepting applications for grants for the spring cycle of its Community Action Grants Program. 

The Foundation’s application process is online; the application deadline is midnight on February 15.

Organizations apply to the Foundation and/or any of the affiliates on the same online application form, the Foundation’s Community Action Grants Application. 

To access the online application form, visit the Foundation’s website, www.pacfwv.com/Grants.

To be considered for a Community Action Grant, an applicant must be a private, nonprofit organization, tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or a public institution. 

Either the applicant or program to be funded must be located in the Foundation’s eleven-county geographic service area (Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Jackson, Mason, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Wirt, and Wood counties in West Virginia, and Washington County, Ohio).

Priority counties for grant support are: Wood, Wirt, Doddridge, Ritchie, Roane, Calhoun, and Gilmer.

The Foundation provides support for capital and equipment projects, program development, technical assistance, training, capacity building projects, and, under special circumstances, operating support.  Submitted applications are considered for support from a wide variety of grant funds available to support charitable projects throughout the region.

The Foundation’s grantmaking guidelines provide additional information on eligibility and priorities for all types of grants; visit the Foundation’s website at www.pacfwv.com/Grants to access the grant guidelines and application forms. For more information, contact Marian Clowes at 304.428.4438 or ‘info@pacfwv.com’.

The Free Press WV

New Year’s Day baby arrives in area hospital

The Free Press WV

The Shackleford family celebrated the New Year Tuesday by welcoming a new life into the world.

Their family grew by one with the birth of a son, Gracin Issac-Zander, at 3:18 PM on New Year’s Day at United Hospital Center in Bridgeport.

The parents, Dawn and Devin Shackleford of Linn, Gilmer County, WV, said Gracin was an early arrival.

“I was a little surprised, considering we wasn’t even expecting him for another three weeks at least,” Devin said.

“It’s a little shocking,” Dawn said.

The Free Press WV
The Shackleford family celebrated the New Year Tuesday with the birth of a baby boy at United Hospital Center in Bridgeport. In the hospital bed is the mother, Dawn, and the baby, Gracin Issac-Zander.
Standing, left to right, are the father, Devin, and siblings, Brentin, Evin, Riley and Madison.


On the morning of Dec. 31, Dawn went to her clinic in Fairmont for an ultrasound, and then to the physician’s center at United Hospital Center to get the results from her doctor. Dawn said her doctor told her she had to take a stress test, and if she failed — which she did — she would be delivering Tuesday.

As a result of the rush of events, the couple didn’t have anything with them, like diapers or even a change of clothes. Family members helped them out by bringing them the things they needed,

The Shacklefords already have four children: Evin, 12; Brentin, 11; Madison, 6; and Riley, 5.

On Tuesday evening, the siblings were getting acquainted with the newest member of their family, as they gathered around the hospital bed.

“We planned on spending New Year’s playing games and having appetizers and having a fun evening,” Devin said.

“We got a better present,” Evin said.

Devin said the children’s grandmother always fixes a big dinner on New Year’s Eve, which they will use in years to come to mark Gracin’s birthday.

Gracin was the second New Year’s Day baby born at the hospital. A third was expected to be born Tuesday evening.

~~  Eric Hrin ~~

The Free Press WV

Registration Open for Two-Week Winter Term at GSC

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College will be offering a variety of courses during the upcoming winter term to accommodate students who might wish to repeat a course or who just want to speed up their degree progression. The courses are delivered both online and in person. All of the classes, which are part of the accelerated two-week winter term, will begin on Thursday, January 3 and run through Wednesday, January 16.

Class offerings include: Computer Skills for Education (online), Introduction to Fine Arts (online), Physical Geography (Monday-Friday 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.), Lifetime Fitness/Wellness (online), ST&P: Practice CORE Math Prep (Monday-Friday 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.), Music Theory I (Monday-Friday 8:00 - 12:00 p.m.), Music Theory I Lab (Monday-Friday 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.), Survey of Music (Monday-Friday 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.), First Aid and Safety (Monday-Friday 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.), American National Government (online), and ST&P: Introduction to Behavior Modification (online).

“This is the first time in recent College history that Glenville State College has offered a winter term, which was implemented because we believe it can benefit our students by helping them reduce their time to graduation. It can also help reduce the course load in a given semester for students that need this relief. Students should also be aware that financial aid can be applied toward courses taken during the winter term. Moving forward we would like to see more courses offered during the winter term, that other opportunities be made available to our students such as offering courses abroad for credit, and that opportunities for professional development to be made available to the community at large. The Office of Academic Affairs will be monitoring what does and doesn’t work this term and making changes accordingly moving forward,” read a statement from the Office of Academic Affairs.

Tuition for GSC’s winter term is a $300 flat rate per credit hour with no extra fees. On campus students will be able to reside in the residence halls during winter term for free with arrangements for food at a discounted price through meal tickets from local restaurants.

The last day to sign up is Friday, January 04, 2019.

Current students who wish to enroll in these courses should contact the Academic Success Center or their academic advisor. New students who are interested should contact the Office of Admissions at or 304.462.4128.

WV Legislative Update

image

Other than a few snowflakes on Christmas Day, we missed a white Christmas for another year.  However, I’m sure snow and ice are in our future.

Now, the New Year has arrived and with it, lots of challenges for our nation and state.  While there doesn’t seem to be any end to the dysfunction in Washington, DC on the federal government level, I’m cautiously optimistic that there is a possibility of some bipartisanship in the state legislature this year.  As the margins have narrowed slightly, it will be interesting to see if leaders from both parties and the Governor determine to do what is best for all our citizens and work together; or, continue the partisan “my way or the highway”  attitude that has proved detrimental to every West Virginian, every working family and every small business.

As the Christmas break begins to wind down for students with the second semester about to begin, the real winter weather season is yet to come.  Also, in less than two weeks, the 2019 legislative session officially begins.  January interim meetings will begin on Sunday afternoon, January 6 and continue through January 8, with Day 1 of the 60-day regular session on January 9th, here is the 2019 Legislative calendar key dates, along with the WV Constitution reference, WV Code citation or rule that requires these key dates in the process:


2019 LEGISLATIVE CALENDAR

  • First Day - January 09, 2019: First day of session. (WV Const. Art. VI, §18)

  • Twentieth Day - January 28, 2019: Submission of Legislative Rule-Making Review bills due. (WV Code §29A-3-12)

  • Thirty-fifth Day - February 12, 2019: Last day to introduce bills in the House. House Rule 91a does not apply to originating or supplementary appropriation bills, and does not apply to Senate or House resolutions or concurrent resolutions.

  • Forty-first Day - February 18, 2019: Last day to introduce bills in the Senate. Senate Rule 14 does not apply to originating or supplementary appropriation bills, and does not apply to Senate or House resolutions or concurrent resolutions.

  • Forty-seventh Day - February 24, 2019: Bills due out of committees in house of origin to ensure three full days for readings.

  • Fiftieth Day - February 27, 2019: Last day to consider bill on third reading in house of origin. Does not include budget or supplementary appropriation bills. (Joint Rule 5, paragraph b)

  • Sixtieth Day - March 09, 2019: Adjournment at Midnight. (WV Const. Art. VI, §22)


While the first day of the session beginning at noon involves mostly procedural motions and ceremonial notifications to the House, Senate and Governor, the most anticipated event of the day will be the delivery by Governor Justice of the State of the State Address in the House Chamber at 7 PM.  The speech always begins with far too much fanfare and polite applause, but waiting out the preliminaries is necessary to get to the most important parts of the evening – receipt of the executive state budget proposal and hearing the Governor reveal some of his major legislative initiatives for the upcoming fiscal year.  Historically, governors keep this information close to the vest until after the State of the State. Then, the real work begins in committees on January 10.  For Finance Committee members, the next thirty days are filled with mountains of spreadsheets, reports, financial data, and finance budget hearings.  While some of these are fairly standard, others will generate heavy questioning and justification for their budget requests.  Every state agency will appear before both the House and Senate Finance Committees during the first half of the session.

That’s where long-term continuity comes into play.  Working with these budgets year after year in great detail provides a good overview of how State government operates.  To quote the late Bob Basil, former Finance staff member, mentor and legislative analyst, “If you really want to know how state government operates, follow the money”.  His advice was true then and just as valid today.

Finally, WVU Professor of John Deskins will provide his 2019 Economic Outlook presentation to the full Legislature on the morning of January 9.  This is a comprehensive overview of the past several years and what to expect in 2019 and beyond for the West Virginia economy.  This is always good information and provides some valuable insights as we begin to construct the multi-billion dollar budget for FY 2020.

At this point, I’ve been notified by the Speaker that I will continue to serve on the Finance Committee, along with the Energy, Senior Citizen Issues and Transportation committees.  Beyond that, we’ll have to wait until after the first of the year to get more details from the new Speaker and his new leadership team.

Thank a veteran every day for their service and remember our troops - at home and abroad - and keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers.  Until next week, our family wishes each of you a happy, safe and prosperous New Year.  Until next week, take care. 

Please send your inquiries to my home office:  151 Park Street, Gassaway, WV 26624.  My home number is 304.364.8411; the Capitol office number is 304.340.3142.  If you have an interest in any particular bill or issue, please let me know.  For those with Internet access, my legislative e-mail address is:

You may also obtain additional legislative information, including the copies of bills, conference reports, daily summaries, interim highlights, and leave me a message on the Legislature’s web site at www.legis.state.wv.us/.  When leaving a message, please remember to include your phone number with your inquiry and any details you can provide. Additional information, including agency links and the state government phone directory, may be found at www.wv.gov. Also, you may follow me on Facebook at “Brent Boggs”, Twitter at “@DelBrentBoggs” , as well as the WV Legislature’s Facebook page at “West Virginia Legislature” or on Twitter at twitter.com/wvlegislature.

Continue to remember our troops - at home and abroad - and keep them and their families in your thoughts and prayers.  Until next week – take care.

Jeanette Riffle: Holiday Memories

The Free Press WV

Lately, I have been thinking back, about how things were this time of year, when I was growing up. My, how things have changed! We never heard of ordering up a holiday meal from the deli of a supermarket. As a matter of fact, we didn’t even have supermarkets. We had the A&P store at Glenville and the country stores. My grandma on Mom’s side cut up a big fat hen and boiled it and then made drop dumplings in the rich yellow broth. She had her own words for things and so did Mom. Mamaw called her chicken and dumplings, “Chicken Pop Eye. “  My youngest brother would get so tickled at her when she said she was making that. I think maybe she just said crazy things sometimes to get us to laugh.  She and Mom called their vegetable dishes, “holdin dishes.”  One time my oldest brother, Brock, and I took a shopping trip to Clarksburg to look for Christmas gifts. We were teenagers and I had my driver’s license. He had a sport’s injury and was on crutches, but he could get around pretty good. Once there, we headed for Montgomery Wards. Mom and Dad shopped there a lot at Christmas time, so we knew how to get there.  Mom needed some dishes and we decided that they must be downstairs. Down the steps we went. There weren’t very many to go down and climb back up.

We were met by a friendly sales lady who asked if she could help us.  Brock told her we were looking for some “holdin dishes.”  She laughed and asked me what they were. We proceeded in telling her what our Mom put in those dishes…….mashed potatoes, green beans, corn, etc. She finally figured out what they were and she said, “Oh, you mean vegetable dishes.” She led us over to a table of assorted dishes and picked up a big dish. She asked it that was what we were looking for.  We told her, “Yes, that’s them.” I thought, “That’s a new one to me.”

Anyway,  we bought some of her, “ vegetable dishes” and went on about our shopping. When we got home that evening, I told Mom what those dishes were called and how that sales lady had acted. The best I remember, Mom needed them right then, and we didn’t wait until Christmas.  No matter what the proper name was for those dishes, Mom continued to call them her, “holdin dishes.”  Mamaw and her siblings had words that were different than anyone else in our family.  She called my friends, my “chaps” and pots and pans were, “vessels.”  Quilts were, “kivers” and old shoes were, “clod hoppers.”  There were more names and expressions that were different.  She made these huge sugar cookies as big as a saucer that she called, “Dutch Cakes.” Those were made not only for holidays, but almost every Friday for Weekend Company. They were flavored with lemon and nutmeg. They aren’t very rich, and you just keep running back for more.  When I make them, I sprinkle sugar on the tops.  It is a big recipe and takes a long time to bake all those trays of cookies.

Until next time, enjoy your holiday meals with the family and be thankful for all the many blessings the Lord has bestowed upon us.

Most WV Counties Show higher unemployment in November 2018

The Free Press WV

A majority of the state’s 55 counties showed an increase in unemployment in November.

According to to county jobless numbers released Friday by WorkForce West Virginia, 26 counties had an increase in joblessness last month, 21 counties showed a decrease while eight counties remained the same.

The counties with the highest unemployment last month were McDowell (9.2), Calhoun (8.8) and Wyoming (8.0) counties.

The county with the lowest unemployment rate was Jefferson County (2.9).

WorkForce West Virginia released the overall state unemployment rate for November, 4.6 percent, last week.

That was unchanged from October.

Mountaineer Food Bank Receives Grant for New Equipment

The Parkersburg Community Foundation and the Doddridge County Community Foundation recently provided funds that will allow Mountaineer Food Bank to purchase a scissor lift for their warehouse.

Mountaineer Food Bank was awarded these funds at a banquet held at the Doddridge Community Park, November 27th.

The equipment would have cost Mountaineer Food Bank $7,500.00, which was fully funded by both foundations.

The Parkersburg Community Foundation awarded $7,000.00, while the Doddridge County Community Foundation awarded the remaining $500.00.

The new scissor lift will help Mountaineer Food Bank better navigate hard to reach places in their 20,000 square foot facility.

The Free Press WV


The new lift will allow Mountaineer Food Bank staff to be more proficient in warehouse cleanliness and the standards to which they are set to meet.

Meeting these standards sets Mountaineer Food Bank up to achieve a high mark on their annual AIB audits.

The AIB audit ensures facilities and processes uphold product integrity, comply with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMS), and achieve Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) recognition through the American Institute of Banking.

With a new racking system recently installed in Mountaineer Food Bank’s warehouse, the use of the scissor lift will be vital in maintaining the standards given by AIB.

Complying with AIB standards sets Mountaineer Food Bank up to be a more efficient distribution center.

The purchase of this new equipment will helps Mountaineer Food Bank’s warehouse staff better operate, which in turn will allow more individuals facing food insecurity to receive the help and assistance they need more efficiently.

The purchase of the new equipment would not have been made possible without the funds given from both foundations.

EQT Students of Excellence Scholarship 2018 Recipients

The Free Press WV

EQT Foundation, the philanthropic arm of EQT Corporation, is proud to announce the 2018 EQT Students of Excellence Scholarship recipients.

The accomplished students come from both large and small schools across West Virginia.

As an integrated energy company with an emphasis on Appalachian-area natural gas production, EQT has awarded $1,000 scholarships for one student from West Virginia counties, four at-large $1,000 scholarships scattered throughout the state, as well as six “full-ride” four-year scholarships, each up to $18,000 per year, to students interested in studying engineering, geology, computer science/information technology, energy or land management and environmental or safety science.


The “full-ride” scholarship winners are:

  • Tylee Oldham - Hurricane High School in Putnam County
  • Brooke Burns - Scott High School in Boone County
  • Catherine Stodola - Herbert Hoover High School in Kanawha County
  • Lian Dunlevy - Morgantown High School in Monongalia County
  • Justin Lovell - Shady Spring High School in Raleigh County
  • Safa Afnan - George Washington High School in Kanawha County


The $1000 scholarship winner’s are:

  • Zoe Payne - Barbour County
  • Victoria Parello - Berkeley County
  • Kayla Hartsell - Boone County
  • Michael Lemon - Braxton County
  • Abigail Nickerson - Brooke County
  • John Swanson - Cabell County
  • Megan Meadows - Calhoun County
  • Michael Willis - Clay County
  • Emily Spadafore - Doddridge County
  • Mason Harp - Fayette County
  • Kaylene Snyder - Gilmer County
  • Megan Kite - Grant County
  • Kara Vaughan - Greenbrier County
  • Della Moreland - Hampshire County
  • Chloe Molish - Hancock County
  • Aden Funkhouser - Hardy County
  • Hayley Woods - Harrison County
  • Brandon Cochran - Jackson County
  • Haya Moushmoush - Kanawha County
  • Kenton Linger - Lewis County
  • Lillian Lucas - Lincoln County
  • Elijah McComas - Logan County
  • Kristine Waddell - Marion County
  • Lydia Knutsen - Marshall County
  • Allison Henderson - Mason County
  • Hailey Mitchem - McDowell County
  • Trey Lennox-Kowalewski - Mercer County
  • Kyle Breedlove - Mineral County
  • Hannah Vorndran - Monongalia County
  • Chandler Mills - Monroe County
  • Logan Riffey - Morgan County
  • Anna Hamilton - Nicholas County
  • Norman Lee - Ohio County
  • Claire Heavner - Pendleton County
  • Laci Hashman - Pleasants County
  • Mathias Solliday - Pocahontas County
  • Henry Cerbone - Preston County
  • Olivia Hart - Putnam County
  • Victoria Mackowiak - Raleigh County
  • Susan Riggleman - Randolph County
  • Nikita Collins - Ritchie County
  • Dylan Hammack - Roane County
  • Marcella Aguilar - Summers County
  • Amy Frosch - Taylor County
  • Matthew Dellinger - Tucker County
  • JoLee Walton - Tyler County
  • Logan Whithair - Upshur County
  • Nicholas Bowen - Wayne County
  • Erin Kidd - Webster County
  • Hannah Loy - Wetzel County
  • Sara Almashy - Wirt County
  • Josie Brothers - Wood County
  • Myleigh Stewart - Wyoming County


The “At Large” $1000 recipients are:

  • Noah Sampson - Monongalia County
  • Davis Warmuth - Ohio County
  • Eric Hamilton - Kanawha County
  • Jay Wessels - Kanawha County.

A total of 345 high school students from across West Virginia was nominated by teachers, principals, guidance counselors, family members and the students themselves. A team of volunteer judges were then tasked with the difficult responsibility of choosing the “best of the best.” The judges looked for students who demonstrated strong academic performance and who participated in community service and extracurricular activities.

The scholarship program which is presented in cooperation with NCWV Media and The State Journal, has grown each year since EQT became the title sponsor in 2009.

An awards event where all the recipients will be recognized will take place in March at the State Capitol in Charleston. The date and time of the event will be announced in January

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West Virginia

Gilmer County

Two people from Gilmer County charged after children found in trash filled, bug infested home

The Free Press WVLosh and Wiliams are both charged with child neglect and 5 counts of conspiracy on child neglect [ .... ]  Read More

Woman arrested for child abuse after a child is found with a chunk of hair missing in Glenville, WV

The Free Press WVPolice say that the child told the doctor during a visit her hair was pulled by Alicia Wyant [ .... ]  Read More

A man was arrested after drugs were found in his home during a search.  Braxton County Sheriff’s dep

The Free Press WVA Glenville man was arrested after drugs were found in his home during a search [ .... ]  Read More

Lewis-Gilmer E911 awarded $60,000 grant by WV Department of Homeland Security

The Free Press WVAccording to 911 official James Gum, these radios will be at every fire department and emergency vehicles [ .... ]  Read More

Stellar performance earns State Star honors for WV SBDC coach Susie Higgins

The Free Press WVHer office, based in Buckhannon, serves Barbour, Braxton, Gilmer, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur and Webster counties [ .... ]  Read More

WV Legislative Update

imageDelegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman…  Read More

WV Legislative Update

imageDelegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman

WV Legislative Update

imageDelegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman

Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting

The Free Press WV
Monday, December 11, 2017 – 5:00 PM

Jeanette Riffle: Middle Run Memories

The Free Press WVThis is some of my memories of the Middle Run.

WV Legislative Update

imageDelegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman

Gilmer County Commission Regular Meeting

The Free Press WV 9:00 AM

Jeanette Riffle: Albino Deer

The Free Press WV Back in 1805, young Jacob Shock, 15 years old, had watched the salt lick since early in the afternoon.

WV Legislative Update

imageDelegate Brent Boggs - Minority House Finance Chairman

Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting

The Free Press WV   Monday, November 27, 2017 – 6:00 PM

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Gilmer County

Patty Jane (Ratliff) Putnam

The Free Press WV Age 81 of Turkey Fork Road, Sand Fork, WV; went to be with the Lord on January 12, 2019 at United Hospital Center, Clarksburg, WV; following a brief illness. She was born on August 13, 1937 in Sutton, WV; daughter of the late Dasiel Ratliff [....]  Read More

Marshall Eric Thompson

The Free Press WV After an extended illness on Saturday January 05,2019. Marshall Eric Thompson, (Pap) age 60, of Turkey Fork, Gilmer County WV, departed this life to begin “his journey to eternal life and enlightenment”  [....]  Read More

Thomas Jefferson Luzader

The Free Press WVAge 98 of 33 Gateway Lane,Glenville, WV departed this life on Friday January 11, 2019 at 9:30 AM; at Genesis Health Care Center following an extended illness. Tommy was born September 12, 1920 in Glenville WV.  He was the son of the late Raymond and Melva Danley Luzader [ .... ]  Read More

Joyce Ann Frashure

The Free Press WVAge 60 of Sheridan Street, Glenville, WV; departed this life suddenly on the morning of Saturday, January 12, 2019 following a courageous battle with cancer. She was born July 21, 1958 in Weston, WV; daughter of the late Leo and Lizia Radcliff Sprouse [ .... ]  Read More

Buddie Ross Cain

The Free Press WVAge 80 of Tanner, WV; got the ultimate healing from his cancer on Wednesday evening, January 09, 2019 at the Miletree Center Nursing Facility in Spencer, WV; following a short battle with cancer. He was born December 05, 1938 in Tanner, WV; son of the late Hartzel and Glenda G. Ferguson Cain [ .... ]  Read More

Mike Westfall

The Free Press WVAge 56, of Parkersburg, WV, passed away on January 09, 2019 at the Ohio State Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. He was born in Grantsville, WV on May 31, 1962, and was the son of the late Don Miller and Greta Hope Johnson Westfall [ .... ]  Read More

Mary Louise Umstead

The Free Press WV Passed away on January 10, 2019 surrounded by family at her oldest daughter’s home near Durbin. She was born August 23, 1935 in Charleston, WV to the late John R. and Lessie B. (Ranson) Gillespie [....]  Read More

Kenneth Basil Alltop

The Free Press WVAge 86 of Cox’s Mills, WV; departed this life peacefully on the morning of Thursday, January 03, 2019 at his home with his loving wife Elise by his side. He was born May 11, 1932 in Gilmer County, WV; son of the late Dorsey and Stacy McHenry Alltop [ .... ]  Read More

Esther Alice Murphy

The Free Press WVAge 90, of Glenville, WV passed away on January 01, 2019 at Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital in Weston, WV following a lengthy illness. Esther was born on December 26, 1928 in Glenville, WV to Ira and Jesse (nee Kelley) Murphy [ .... ]  Read More

Wanema Pritt

The Free Press WV Age 86, of Vienna, WV passed away December 22, 2018 at Cedar Grove Assisted Living Facility. She was born on November 30, 1932 in Glenville, WV and was the daughter of the late Audie and Winnie Jones Davidson [....]  Read More

Edmund Dayton Reaser

The Free Press WVAge 84, of Frametown, WV passed away on January 02, 2019 at his home. He was born at Cedarville, Gilmer County, WV a son of the late Paul Monroe Reaser and Alva Ava Reaser [ .... ]  Read More

David Lee Tomblin

The Free Press WV Age 53, of Pennsboro, WV;  went to be with his Lord and Savior at 8:21 PM; Monday, December 31, 2018, at the Miami Valley South Hospital ER in Dayton, Ohio following a short illness. He was born November 10, 1965 in Weston, WV; son of the late Eustace Monroe (November 15, 2014) and Ruth Collins ( November 27, 2014) Tomblin [....]  Read More

Pauline E. (Pyne) Richards

The Free Press WV83 years old, passed away on Tuesday January 01, 2019 after an extended illness. Pauline was born June 28, 1935 at Zenith, WV. She was the daughter of the late William W. Pyne and Manerva Cole Pyne [ .... ]  Read More

Lois Louise Corder

The Free Press WVAge 87, of Buckhannon, WV, passed away Monday, December 31, 2018 at the United Hospital Center in Bridgeport, WV. She was born June 21, 1931, in Upshur County, WV, a daughter of the late Eli Hugh and Iona Kidd Ours [ .... ]  Read More

Margaret “Ruth” Hacker

The Free Press WVAugust 29, 1940 – December 29, 2018 [ .... ]  Read More

William “Bill” Jones

The Free Press WV Age 80, of Harlingen, TX (formerly of Grantsville, WV) passed away on November 26, 2018. He was born April 08, 1938 in Gilmer County, WV, a son of the late Tom Jones and Francis Madelyn Knight Jones Hathaway [....]  Read More

Jimmie George Smith

The Free Press WV Age 76, of Sand Fork, WV, unexpectedly went to be with his Lord at 7:00 PM on Thursday, December 27, 2018. He was born in Ravenna, OH on March 15, 1942 a son of the late George Clark Smith and Ella Mae Jeffries Smith Jewart [....]  Read More

Ruth Claire Garrett

The Free Press WV Age 83, of Linn, WV passed away on December 28, 2018 at Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital. She was born January 22, 1935 to the late Ira and Ava Mason of Newberne, WV.  [....]  Read More

Letha Lenora Sidwell Metz Keener

The Free Press WVAge 86, of Grantsville, WV passed away December 24, 2018 at MHHS Acute Care Unit. She was born in Gilmer County, WV, the daughter of the late Eli and Mary Barnes Sidwell. She was a homemaker all her life [ .... ]  Read More

Helen Regina Garton Jett

The Free Press WVAge 75, of Jane Lew, WV passed away unexpectedly at 4:53 PM on Tuesday, December 25, 2018 at United Hospital Center in Bridgeport. She was born in Jane Lew, WV on March 04, 1943 a daughter of the late Brent Orville and Iris Maude Wymer Garton [ .... ]  Read More

Viva Elaine White

The Free Press WVAge 90, of Weston, WV passed away Thursday, December 20, 2018 on Colonial Place of Elkins following an extended illness. She was born in Gilmer County, WV on August 31, 1928: daughter of Dewey Mick and Midget (Wiant) Mick [ .... ]  Read More

Shirley Patrick Hite

The Free Press WVof Grafton, the beloved first of twelve children of the late Loretta and Leland Hite, died on Sunday, December 16, 2018, at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Buckhannon. He was born April 01, 1924, at Dusk Camp, Gilmer County, WV [ .... ]  Read More

Richard Dennis “Denny” Lewis

The Free Press WVAge 83, of Edgewood Drive Weston, WV passed away peacefully surrounded by his children on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 at his residence following an extended illness. He was born in Buckhannon, WV on October 21, 1935: son of the late Richard “Dick” Lewis and Creola (Mullenix) Lewis [ .... ]  Read More

Marvin Lee Gaines

The Free Press WVAge 68, of New Milton, WV, and formerly of Charleston, WV, went to be with the Lord due to a tragic tractor accident on December 16, 2018. He was born in Glenville, WV on May 03, 1950, the son of the late Homer Lawson Gaines and Opal Sanders Gaines [ .... ]  Read More

Dreama Lee McCloy

The Free Press WV Age 61, of Troy, WV (Fallen Timber Community of Doddridge County, WV) departed this life on Monday, December 17, 2018, at United Hospital Center in Bridgeport, WV. Dreama was born November 19, 1957 in Weston, WV, a daughter of the late Dorsey S. and Gladys E. (Allman) Snyder.  [....]  Read More

Rose Ada Ball

The Free Press WV Age 67 of East Valley Drive, Glenville, WV, departed this life suddenly on Saturday, December 15, 2018 at her residence following a sudden illness. She was born January 12, 1951 in Cabin Creek, Kanawha County WV, daughter of Thelma Webb Conley of Smithers WV, and the late John Conley [....]  Read More

William Russell “Wild Bill” Cottrill

The Free Press WV Got on his dozer and headed off to Heaven on December 14, 2018 at 6:15 AM at his residence where he wanted to be. He was born April 23, 1955 at Shock, (Gilmer County) WV, to the late Russell Cottrill and Violet Howes Cottrill [....]  Read More

Gary Wayne Smarr

The Free Press WVAge 53 of Glenville, WV; departed this life on Monday, December 10, 2018 at the Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown following a sudden illness. He was born April 23, 1965 in Braxton County, WV, son of Dora Reed Smarr of Glenville, and the late Murl Junior Smarr [ .... ]  Read More

Alma Grace Minney

The Free Press WV Age 83, of Parkersburg, WV and Grantsville, WV went to be with her Lord and Savior on December 08. 2018. She was born at Gilmer County, WV, a daughter of the late Orville and Edna Sprouse Smith [....]  Read More

Earl Cleo Peters

The Free Press WVAge 92, of Burnsville, WV passed away at 2:20 PM on Saturday, December 08, 2018 following an extended stay at Genesis Glenville Center. He was born in Sand Fork, WV on April 08, 1926 the son of the late Albert and Dorothy McHenry Peters [ .... ]  Read More

Seymour Settle

The Free Press WV Age 80, of Newark, WV departed this life December 01, 2018. He was the son of the late Otho and Goldie Campbell Settle of Apple Farm, WV [....]  Read More

Aubrey Matthew Blake

The Free Press WVAge 74, of Horne, WVr passed away surrounded by loving family at 4:33 PM on Wednesday, December 05, 2018 in the comfort of his own home. He was born in Weston, WV on May 27, 1944 a son of the late Richard Arthur and Elsie Bell Conrad Blake [ .... ]  Read More

Lacy ‘Brooks’ Norman

The Free Press WVAge 82, of New River, Arizona passed away suddenly on November 25, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. Born in Shock, West Virginia, he was the eldest son to Escue and Edna (Lambert) Norman [ .... ]  Read More

Lulu Elaine Sprouse Morris

The Free Press WVAge 82 of Cox’s Mills, WV, formerly of Normantown, WV,  went to be with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ on Thursday, November 29, 2018 at her residence on Garfield Run Road with her loving husband and daughters by her side. She was born February 24, 1936 in Lockney, WV, daughter of the late Edgar Lytle & Hazel Grimes Sprouse [ .... ]  Read More

Charles Edward Durgett

The Free Press WV Age 71 of Spruce Run Road, Glenville, WV; formerly of New Jersey, departed this life in the early morning hours of Friday, November 30, 2018 at his home with his living wife by his side. He was born March 14, 1947 in Waldwick, NJ; son of the late William and Margaret Zurawski Durgett [....]  Read More

Roland “Jake” Keith Sigman

The Free Press WVof Birch River, WV passed away Monday, November 26, 2018 at the Summersville Regional Medical Center. He was born April 22, 1941 at Charleston, WV to the late Verl Sigman and Martha (Frame) Sigman [ .... ]  Read More

Robert (Bob) Clarence Richards

The Free Press WVOn November 25th, 2018, heaven gained a new angel, Robert (Bob) Clarence Richards.  Bob was born on July 13, 1933 in Gilmer County, WV to the late Clarence and Bernice Richards [ .... ]  Read More

Gary Eugene Layne

The Free Press WV Age 54, of Glenville, WV went Home to be with the Lord at 7:25 AM on Saturday, November 24, 2018 in the comfort of his own home. He was born in Weston, WV on April 02, 1964 to Sharon Yvonne Layne Riffle [....]  Read More

Paul William “Bill” Tallman

The Free Press WV Age 81, of Wilsie, WV passed away Wednesday, November 21, 2018 at CAMC Memorial Hospital. He was born April 11, 1937 in Gilmer County, WV, a son of the late Trader Beal and Thelma Agnus Ferrell Tallman [....]  Read More

Bruce Lynn Garrett, II

The Free Press WVAge 45 of Cedarville, WV passed away on Sunday, November 18, 2018 at his home. He was born January 24, 1973 in Farmington, MI to Bruce Garrett and Bonnie (Riffle) Garrett who survive [ .... ]  Read More

Goldie Marie Holmes

The Free Press WV Age 74, of Sand Fork, WV went home to be with the Lord on Tuesday, November 13, 2018 at Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital, Weston. She was born August 01, 1944, in Sutton,WV,  the daughter of the late Minter & Rhoda Lewis Cottrill [....]  Read More

Randall Azz Collins

The Free Press WV Age 61, of Atlanta, GA passed away November 06, 2018 at Gwinnett Hospital, Atlanta, GA. He was born November 23, 1956 in Grantsville, WV, the son of the late Velda Collins Wade and step-father, Oras H. Wade [....]  Read More

Carol E. Kimble

The Free Press WVAge 83 of Glenville, WV departed this life suddenly on Wednesday, November 07, 2018 at her residence, following a short illness. She was born June 13, 1935 in Rosedale, WV; daughter of the late Trader and Thelma Ferrell Tallman [ .... ]  Read More

Dessie Louise Wolfe

The Free Press WV Age 95 of Glenville, WV (Kanawha Drive Community) departed this life peacefully on Tuesday, November 06, 2018 at her residence, surrounded by her living family. She was born April 12, 1923 in Gilmer County, WV daughter of the late Willie L. and Blanche Ellyson Jones [....]  Read More

Iona Lee Arbogast

The Free Press WVAge 84, of Star City, WV passed away on Sunday November 04, 2018 at the Grandview Estates, Elizabeth, PA. Iona was born in Gilmer County, WV on May 29, 1934 daughter to the late Leslie and Jessie Swiger Stout [ .... ]  Read More

William “Bill” D. Woodson

The Free Press WVAge 85, formerly of Jane Lew, WV passed away peacefully in Florida on October 29, 2018. Bill was born in Linn, WV, on November 11, 1932 a son of the late Walter C. and Agnes Neal Woodson [ .... ]  Read More

Travis Lee Kelley

The Free Press WVAge 31, Glenville, WV passed away unexpectedly Saturday, October 27, 2018, at Stonewall Jackson Hospital. He was born July 12, 1987, in Buckhannon, WV to Michael Lee Kelley and Carol Louise (Brown) Kelley who survive [ .... ]  Read More

Olan E. “Bud” Hitt Sr.

The Free Press WVAge 82 and a part-time resident of Linn, WV passed away from cancer on Sunday at Seasons Hospice at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center near Baltimore, MD. Mr. Hitt’s family was from Linn and he was born in Morgantown, WV to Hugh Hitt and the former Freda Mae McGarry [ .... ]  Read More

Yvonne M. Morrison

The Free Press WVAge 83, of Stumptown, WV passed away peacefully on October 28, 2018. Yvonne was born in Shock, West Virginia on September 14, 1935 [ .... ]  Read More

Robert Lee “Bobby” Woodford II

The Free Press WVAge 45 of Linn, WV departed this life unexpectedly on Friday October 26, 2018 at his residence. He was born in Wood County, WV son of Robert L. Woodford of Williamstown, WV and the late Lorena Clark Woodford [ .... ]  Read More

David Burl Pierce

The Free Press WV Age 88 of Letter Gap, WV (Gilmer County) departed this earthly life, peacefully on the evening of Sunday, October 28, 2018 at his residence surrounded by his loving family. He was born December 07, 1929 in Oxford, WV (Doddridge County); son of the late Lincoln and Felsie Miller Pierce [....]  Read More

Georgia Grace Hitt

The Free Press WVAge 78, of Lost Creek, WV, passed away at 7:12 p.m. on Friday, October 26, 2018, at Ruby Memorial Hospital surrounded by her loving family. She was born March 22, 1940, in Gilmer County, West Virginia, a daughter of the late George Wilcox and Genevieve Greenleaf Wilcox [ .... ]  Read More

Stephen Blair Marks

The Free Press WVAge 77, passed away Friday, October 26, 2018, at Pomerene Hospital Millersburg, OH. He was born June 18, 1941, in Sandfork, WV. The youngest of 13, son of the late John Marks & Nellie (Burkhammer) Marks [ .... ]  Read More

Rolland “Pod” Ernest Miller II

The Free Press WVAge 66, of Claudia Lane, Flatwoods, WV floated to Heaven to be with the Angles on Monday, October 22, 2018, at his home with his wife and son by his side. Pod was born on May 23, 1952 in Glenville, WV, the son of the late Rolland Ernest Miller I and Kathleen (Boggs) Miller [ .... ]  Read More

Morris Edwin Lay

The Free Press WVAge 86, of Smithsburg, MD, passed away Wednesday, October 17, 2018, at his home. Born in a log cabin in Pine Knot, Kentucky, Morris was the second of three children to parents, E. Manuel Lay and Kizzie Kathren (King) Lay [ .... ]  Read More

Forrest C. “Buzzy” Wilt

The Free Press WVAge 78, of Buckhannon, WV, died Tuesday, October 23, 2018, at the Louis A. Johnson V. A. Medical Center in Clarksburg, WV. He was born October 30, 1939, in Tanner, WV, a son of the late Charles Chester and Opal Dale Snyder Wilt [ .... ]  Read More

Marie Chapman

The Free Press WVAge 77, of Weston, WV passed away on Monday, October 22, 2018 in the comfort of her own home surrounded by family and under the compassionate care of WV Hospice. She was born in Gassaway, WV on June 06, 1941 a daughter of the late Clyde and Mary Bell Carr Skidmore [ .... ]  Read More

Carl Ray James

The Free Press WVAge 78, of Fowler Road Jane Lew, WV (Good Hope community) passed away on Friday, October 19, 2018 at his home surrounded by his loving family. He was born in Gilmer County, WV on February 04, 1940, son of the late Freddie Charles James and Geneva Marie (Snyder) James [ .... ]  Read More

Millard Ray Wiant

The Free Press WV Age 82, of Spencer, WV, passed away October 03, 2018, at home. Ray was born July 01, 1936, at Glenville, WV, the son of the late Ray and Katrina Powell Wiant [....]  Read More

Rodger William Byrd

The Free Press WV Age 66, of Smithville, WV, departed this life on Friday, October 12, 2018, at his residence. Rodger was born January 31, 1952 at home in Ritchie County, WV, a son of the late Glenmer “Dude” and Dolly (Pugh) Byrd [....]  Read More

Readers' Recent Comments

During intervention the State had dictatorial control of our school system to include all decisions related to the GCES.

One result is that the GCES was built too small.

An investigation is needed to determine who was responsible for the bad decision, and what role the no-bid architectural firm had in designing and constructing the school.

Something major happened to cause the GCES to be built too small. Was something dropped at the expense of adequate class room space as a result of having to spend extra money because a poor site was selected?

Minimally, gross incompetency on the State’s part is the explanation for the disaster foisted onto the County.

A question pertains to the new gym. Lots of effort was taken by the State to try to convince the public that a competition gym instead of a regular gym was needed.

Did the competition gym cost extra money at the expense of needed classroom space? If the answer is affirmative who was responsible for deciding on the more expensive gym?

What about the enormous pit at the GCES? Was money spent on it at the expense of classrooms because something was wrong with the school’s site that was selected by the State?

Nothing similar to the pit has been seen at other sites where new WV schools were built.

Why has there been a failure for a thorough investigation to have occurred to expose the facts?

The obvious explanation is that powerful elitists in control do not want tracks leading to them, and they have veto power over a meaningful investigation including one done by a leading newspaper.

By GCES Built Too Small Scandal on 01.15.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Pat McGroyne is spot on.
High speed internet is simply another failure of WV state government.

If the elected in our state, were doing the job expected by voters….we should have very few problems or issues?

By Gilmer resident on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Muddling has another distinct symptom. It is the tendency for administrators in control to emphasize processes and procedures while avoiding disclosure of progress, or the lack thereof, in achieving learning results.

The purpose is another way to avoid personal accountability for school system failures.

By Muddling Epidemic In WV School Systems on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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West Virginia is number one!
Our politicians are the best that can be had.
They are also the lobbyers dream come true.
No one—-can out-muddle our elected reps !

By we know it on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Suggestion after reading strategic plans for the GCHS and the GCES.

How about the school board requiring that for each school an informative executive summary be written to include——where each school stands on reading, math, and science proficiency, what the term proficiency means to eliminate the confusion, student proficiency goals for the two school, target time to expect goals to be achieved, and a statement to commit to keeping the public informed of progress in achieving the goals at designated intervals (e.g. quarterly) during a school year.

Omit confusing abbreviations and technical terms understood only by a select few in the education field, and written for comprehension by reasonable persons.

Leave it up to the County’s professional educators to determine how to get the job done with continual laser-like focus on getting results.

By Student Learning at GCHS and GCES on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Muddling infects federal, state, and local government entities where personal accountability for top officials to get measurable results rarely exists.

Muddling practitioners are famous for passing off information unrelated to measurable proof that effective problem-solving has occurred. A common example is emphasizing how much public money is being spent to attempt to convince tax payers that magnitudes of expenditures are always directly correlated to levels of problem-solving successes.

Muddling by an organization is characterized by the existence of thick planning documents replete with vagueness and lack of clarity, undefined technical terms, and mysterious acronyms.

Muddling thrives on intentional ambiguity and confusion designed to protect muddlers and their organizations.

By Muddling 101 on 01.11.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Gilmer County is not the only place in the USA that has been faced with its students failing to meet proficiency standards for science, reading, and math.

The difference here is that evidence is lacking to conclusively demonstrate that Gilmer County’s officials in control have exerted proper efforts to profit form powerful lessons learned elsewhere to use that knowledge to help solve learning deficiencies in our schools.

In fact, a convincing argument could be made that the approach in the County has been the one professional planners designate as muddling through.

Classic symptoms of muddling through include failure to thoroughly analyze categories of causes contributing to problems followed up by using the information to develop a comprehensive plan to do the most good in getting better results by treating key causes instead of symptoms.

Muddling typically involves officials assigning blame for lack of progress to outside forces e.g., the “culture”, the State did it to us, and poverty. Haven’t we heard plenty of that?

Muddling must be eliminated if we want progress in solving non-performance problems within the County’s school system. Does anyone disagree?

By End School System Muddling on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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It is unclear after reading school board meeting minutes what progress if any is being made by GCHS and GCES principals in improving student proficiency in reading, math and science.

Why not allocate a few sentences in the minutes to summarize what the two principals reported to the school board?

All it would take to get the critical information out to citizens would be for the new school board to act on this.

Does anyone have a problem with the suggested change to keep Gilmer’s bill paying public informed?

By Need Specifics For Principal's Reports on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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“High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).“

I disagree with much of what Mr.Boggs believes.  That said, high-speed broadband is the single most important step the State of WV could take to improve the business climate and provide more opportunities for its citizens.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Conversation at local eatery.
Shortly after election.
Individuals were educators.

‘You think we have school problems now, wait until these new folks take the steering wheel’.

‘Students, parents, staff are all going to be in the soup’.

Sounds as if Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving vacation-deer season times have all taken a big hit.  If that is true, the union teachers need to come together, stand their ground, along with parents, and hold this new board accountable.

Have a local strike if need be.
Request resignations.
Vote of no confidence.

Schools employees can win.
You have done it before.
Just stick together.

By overheard conversation on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Scholarship must be the most important focus in Gilmer County’s schools.

Brought up the ZOOMWV Data Dashboard site to review the most recent State achievement test results for GCHS’s 11th grade.

Folks, Gilmer is in serious trouble. Proficiency for math=24%, reading=41%, and science=24%.

On an A through F grading scales the GCHS gets an F for all three subject areas.

What does the new school board have to show for inroads it has made since last July to make critically needed proficiency improvements at the HS? Citizens deserve answers to the question.

By ZOOMWV Data Dashboard on 01.07.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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A thorough accounting for where all the public money went could be easily achieved by a competent accountant.

Isn’t there a special account at the County’s school board office for expenditures related to all bills paid and who got the money?

Following the money trail always gets results along with verification of means, motives, and access.

By Let An Accountant Dig It Out on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If central office financial records for all public money paid out for everything from site planning, site studies and development, and everything else to get to completion of the GCES and the LES—- what is the reason?

It is known that money was spent on the Arbuckle site and Cedar Creek, and public money was paid out for the LES too.

Were County records for the spending purged and if that happened who ordered the action? The records are either in the County’s central office or they aren’t.

By End Financial Secrecy on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Hasn’t the time come to finally start naming names and making people accountable?

By Get It Done on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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How about the “BIG WV WINDFALL”....?

For 3 or 4 months now we keep hearing about the millions of dollars of tax revenue collected.

Millions and millions above ‘estimates’.  Were those ‘estimates’ honest, or fudged to begin with, so as to request higher tax rates?

Well, Justice and the Legislature now have our dollars, what will become of this windfall? Will we see tax rates lowered?  Doubt full, but we should.

Likely this windfall, created by “over-taxation”, will simply create a “party atmosphere” of legislative spending. Watch the Charleston ‘gangsters’ get their wish lists ready this coming session.

By taxpayers always lose on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Yes.  The blame Does seem to fall to ‘local’ people. In small places like Gilmer County, it’s just a poker game, boys, and the deep pockets win.  Money speaks volumes where ‘officials’ stay silent.  Go ask for the records, see what they’ve got.

By CheatersNeverWin on 11.20.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Teachers and staff knew from the beginning that the GCES was going to be too small. They were ordered by the State to keep quiet about the shortfall and other serious concerns too.

A sixth grader could understood how many rooms were needed by dividing total student numbers to attend the school by how many students should be in a classroom.

Under sizing was the State’s fault and it cannot be rationalized any other way including to assign the blame to local people. Same applies to the over sized LCES.

By Corrupt State Intervention on 11.19.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There will never be a full, public accounting of the gross mishandling of tax dollars during WVDOE intervention.
Too many local jobs and too many embarrassments of both elected and appointed bureaucrats.
These types cover dirt for each other.

Any local whistle blowers?  Doubtful.

One school built short 4 classrooms and another built with 5 too many.  Can it get more stupid than that?
Mr. Degree and Ms. Common Sense seldom travel together.

By Full accounting will never be revealed. Never. on 11.18.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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GCBOE when the two principals give reports at board meeting could the gist of what they said be summarized in minutes to keep the County informed?

It was a welcomed development by the Board to require principals to give reports particularly if there are required updates on progress designed to improve student learning for reading, math, and other subjects.

We still have not been informed about the status of science proficiency at the GCHS based on the latest testing. Why has the State failed to release the data? Were results too dismal?

By More Specifics For Principal's Reports on 11.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If it is going to cost extra money to eliminate over crowding at the GCES the financial information referenced by Do It Ourselves should be presented to Charleston and the press too.

That would help frame a solid case that crowding problems were not caused by Gilmer County because all decisions related to facilities were dictated by officials over whom the County had no oversight authority during the State’s intervention.

By Follow The Money on 11.16.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is assumed that all records for spending to include money paid out for the LCES, dropped Arbuckle site, dropped Cedar Creek site, and all bills for the GCES are in the Gilmer Schools central office.

The new GCBOE has authority to get to the truth by demanding a thorough accounting for all the spending.

Afterwards the financial officer in the central office could easily access existing computerized records and to use the information for a report to the GCBOE and the public.

By Do It Ourselves on 11.15.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Notice that most of the ‘officials’ in Gilmer County also hold regular day jobs - sometimes working on more than one paying ‘job’ at a time in the same office space. This common practice is concerning for many reasons, and it needs to be talked about when so many go without.

By QuestionablePractice on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There are two views in the County related to the under built GCES. Although the State built the school with inadequate classrooms one group believes that we should move on to let go of the past.

Isn’t this a form of advocacy for a coverup to prevent accountability for the State’s incompetence and mismanagement?

The other group believes that there should be a full accounting for all public money spent up to the time the GCES was completed to include disclosure of recipients of the public money. 

The accounting should be done for all public money spent at the LCES, the Arbuckle site, Cedar Creek, and finally the GCES.

Reasons for the under built GCES should be fully disclosed too. When the State was in control this information was kept secret from the public with loud claims that there was adequate space at the GCES.

Now it is known that there is inadequate space at the GCES and the problem is left to Gilmer County to fix. Only in WV!

By Citizens For Financial Disclosure on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Unprofessional issues,rude commentsand rolling eyes at the high school has become an issue. Being on cell phone talking to boyfriends,when parents etc.going into the office. Since the teachers were ask not to be on them while students in the classroom. The one in the office should not be allowed to talk personal to her boyfriend, or whoever. Also, I hope this is corrected, the personal days, etc that the board provides to staff shouldn’t be allowed to use to work or operate a second job. Let’s get the priorities straight.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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GULMER COUNTY BOE. It is time for me to let you know some issues that is going on at the High school.  I’m hoping this will be addressed at the next board meeting. 1. It should not matter if an employee has a second job or run a business. The priority job is for the board. One should not be allowed to use any time from the board to run your business. There is going on
If they want to run your business than go but not on the boards time. I would like for all employees be treated the equal. They should not be allowed to use the time the board gives them for other jobs.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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While at it there should be an investigation of why the LES was build with too many classrooms and the GCES was built with too few. At the very least what happened is a WV horror story example of the State’s waste and mismanagement.

By Where Is The Investigation? on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is obvious that the GCES has a major space problem.

What options for dealing with the State’s mismanagement to cause the serious blunder are being considered by the Board of Education?

Could the original architectural design for the dropped Cedar Creek site be compared to what resulted at the GCES to accurately determine the extent of classroom space alterations?

If the architectural design at the GCES is different than the original plan for Cedar Creek the next step should be to determine reasons for the changes and where the money originally planned for needed classrooms went.

By INFO REQUEST TO GCBOE on 11.09.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It’s long been known that Justice doesn’t happen in Gilmer County “because it all comes down to money”. And for those in charge of handling it and making decisions, it comes down to being competent to do the job,  keep accurate books and accounts and I’m sorry to say, that is seriously lacking in Gilmer County.

By Follow the Paycheck(s) on 11.06.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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What is GSC’s BOG’s plan for getting money for the next payment on the $38,000,000 bond loan the Gilmer County Commission approved?

Will the State pay or will the money come from private donations?

Money will have to come from somewhere to avoid a default.

By Where Is The Money? on 11.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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So sorry to hear of Kendall’s passing. I have fond memories of him at Uncle Paul’s store and the family reunions. I’m sure he will be missed greatly by those closest to him.
Please accept condolences from me and my family.

By Steve Lewis on 11.04.2018

From the entry: 'Kendall Goodwin'.

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GSC’s present plight is no secret and its future existence is in question.

Instead of expressing attitudes that GSC is being picked on could the Blue Ribbon Commission reveal why the College “tested out” as it did to fail to get more State money?

Was the “grading system” based on student enrollment trends, retention, time taken to get a degree, academic reputation, inept governance and administration, and other factors to block more funding? Informative specifics were not disclosed.

Teachers know that concerned students who want to do better always seek advice on what needs to be done to get better grades.

Similar to concerned students GSC’s supporters should be informed of what needs to be done to position the College for improved chances for survival to include eligibility for more State funding.

Saying that GSC is being picked on does nothing to help solve its nagging problems.

By What Was The Grading System? on 10.30.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Well thank you, Details Please,  for asking!  So many problems in Gilmer and education is just one.  Look at the town, take a good look around.  Remember who runs unopposed at election time.  Vote.  Make a difference.  Hold authority figures responsible.  Allow videos, minutes and more to be shared on GFP again, for transparency.  Know your neighbors, help a friend.  Be good to each other. Amen.

By Reader7 on 10.29.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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I will truly miss my Uncle Stephen.  Telling me so much information about from gardening to canning. Just to listening to him talk with such passion for everything that he does… he had a sense of humor that always warms my heart.. listening to him play the banjo sometimes even when he didn’t feel good. he is always willing to share his recipes and his ways of doing things… his solar information he was always studying something ... I’m remember one time we asked him where he got his blackberries when it wasn’t Blackberry season and he go there’s a store down the road it’s called Walmart they have everything… He was so funny.  I love you.. xoxo.

By Robin Nunez on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Sorry for your loss. He sure did look like his father.

By Buck Edwards on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Reader 7, please give details for your suggested solutions to the County’s concerns you addressed.

The information would be helpful for consideration by school system administrators and the general public.

By Details Please on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is speculation that the plan is for GSC to convert to an education center for low risk federal inmates. Is this something the County and central WV needs?

By GSC's New Mission? on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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Dr. Pellett’s commentary in the 10/26/2018 issue of the Gazette includes a statement that GSC is responsible for injecting $28,000,000 into the local economy.

If GSC were to close loss of the money would cause the County to have more severe poverty than it has now.

The pressing challenge is for GSC’s administrators including its Board of Governors to exercise effective leadership to prevent closure.

Why can’t GSC take action on the long standing suggestion for it to be an innovator by establishing a five year teacher education program to enable students to earn a masters degree by graduation time?

Something must be done in WV to deal with the 700 positions for which certified teachers including those for math, science and special education are not in the classrooms.

Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors why is a new teacher education program at the College not a viable option? Nothing else seems to be working.

The need exists, a similar program of excellence does not exist anywhere in the State, and GSC’s status would be elevated by having a masters degree program.

By GSC Alumni on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Paine: Plan to improve math scores to focus on algebra where a third of teachers aren’t certified'.

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GSC could make a valuable contribution to WV by doing a study to report on how grade and elementary schools with excellent results in math and reading did it.

Then, other schools could use the information as guidance instead of going it alone to reinvent the wheel.

With the Ed.D. expertise at GSC it would be a natural to take on the assignment. Dr. Pellett, would you back the initiative?

By Opportunity for GSC on 10.23.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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There is reference to signing an agreement with the State for math4life for all WV school districts. What has Gilmer County agreed to do to fix our problems?

By Agreements Matter on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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This important news has potential for making significant progress in improving math and reading outcomes in WV.

It hinges on how quickly advantage can be taken from lessons learned in schools that excelled.

The WVBE could do an analysis of reasons for excelling and to quickly provide guidance information to other schools.

That is the way the private sector approaches problem-solving because chronic failures have consequences and the unfit are weeded out.

Dr. O’Cull could help if the WVBE is not responsive. There could be panels of individuals from excelling schools to make presentations at WV School Board Association meetings to explain what their schools did to make the achievements.

By Why Reinvent The Wheel? on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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A characteristic of a good strategic plan is to simplify language to enable a clear understanding of all its details.

Regarding the comment about abbreviations, a simple fix for them and terms (e.g. lexile) would be to insert an asterisk or a footnote symbol the first time one of them is used to refer readers to a section at the end of the documents where the entries are defined.

This comment is not intended to be a criticism. All specialty fields have a language of their own including the teaching profession.

Suggested clarity improvements in the plans would not be time consuming for principals at the County’s two schools.

By Clarity Is Always Good on 10.18.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Looked at the strategic plan for the GCES. It is a major achievement for the new GCBE to provide the information to the public.

Suggestion. Could the GCBOE post a meaning of all abbreviations in the plan? Doing that would make it far easier for readers to understand details in the plan.

By Help Understanding on 10.17.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Thanks Mrs. Lowther and the BOE for providing meeting minutes for the public to read.

Those of us who voted for the levy would appreciate receiving specific information for what is being done at the grade school and the high school to make needed improvements for college and career readiness.

Could a current overview and updates throughout the school year be provided to the public?

Why not put the details on websites of the two schools to give the principals a chance to shine?

By Levy Supporter on 10.16.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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“engage in pedantic colloquy?“

No Bill.

By WEKNOWYOU on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Correct.  I do not wish to engage in back and forth useless ‘banter’ with big words and no results.  What I AM interested in is Gilmer County, in all it’s ways.  Education, Food, Law and Transparency.  Fancy words are often used to hide, divide, and distract..  Plain words speaking truth for the safety and well being of the people is what I’m looking for..  Gilmer is suffering… I want it to stop. I want to see the citizens healthy, educated and strong. I want to see more jobs instead of food banks.  I want Committee meetings for all to see. I want the law to do what it should, when it should.  Plain english would work fine.  Thanks for asking.

By Reader7 on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Lol 7, you do not wish to engage in a pedantic colloquy?

By Smart Feller on 10.13.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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All nice but a small request? Can we simplify some of the language?  Don’t mean to be rude, but fancy works aren’t needed for the Truth.

By Reader7 on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Stop living the delusion the state will fix education.
They have caused the problem.
Remember, for them, job one IS job protection.

Rare in history, that the cause of a problem, has come forth with a solution to what they have caused. They keep resetting testing standards so as not have any ‘yardstick’ they can be measured against.  Apparently people just don’t get it?  And the WVBOE is so happy about that.

By it-ain't-a-gonna-happen. period. on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is a continuum for sophistication regarding what is done with data.

Collecting and compiling it is at the low end of sophistication.

Synthesis is at the high end.

This means using results and other information to make specific recommendations for making improvements.

The State took its typical easy way out by failing to go beyond the data compilation stage.

By Easy Way Out on 10.10.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The comment about need to find out what was done at high performance schools to determine what we could do in Gilmer County to get the same results merits a comment.

The comment flags what is wrong with the State BOE in failing to provide effective leadership.

Does anyone recall a single instance, after tens of millions of dollars were spent on amassing data, when the State BOE did anything to effectively address lessons learned at high performance schools for application at other schools?

Of course not! It is the easy way out for those in high income brackets in Charleston to collect data instead of using it to the maximum to take full advantage of lessons learned.

Could the WV School Board Association help fill the gap?

By Lost Opportunity on 10.07.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Harry, So sorry to hear of the passing of your wife.  I’m also sorry that I never got to know her because if she was anything like you, I’m sure she was pretty special.  Please know that you and your family will be in my thoughts and prayers.  May God’s love be with you my friend.

By Greg Garvin on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Judith “Judy” Carolyn Buckley Rich'.

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What is the BOE’s proficiency goal for English and mathematics and what is the time frame for achieving the goal? That is news citizens want.

Then too, how can citizens at large get involved to honor and to encourage students who improve, and what of a similar nature could be done to give special recognition to outstanding teachers who contribute to improved learning for English and math?

By Positive Changes Made By New BOE on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The BOE and Mrs Lowther deserve high praise for disclosing proficiency information to the public.

It is the first time since 2011 anything like this has happened.

We still do not know about results for science, and it is understood that Charleston is still “working” on it.

Now we know our serious shortcomings in math and English and there is new hope for burrowing out of the mess with everyone in Gilmer working together.

By Thanks Gilmer BOE on 10.03.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Well, dear citizen… sometimes the local ‘law’ gets it wrong.  #truth #JusticeForGilmer

By Transparency matters on 09.30.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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Soooo…...why do we never see a big drug bust in Gilmer?
With the college and others, there are plenty sources.
Seems strange?

By citizen 3 on 09.23.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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If you access http://www.mywvschool.com it is evident that some schools outpace others for math and English.

For examples look at data for Lizemore Elementary in Clay County, Alum Creek Elementary in Kanawha County, Rock Branch Elementary in Putnam county, and Greenmont Elementary in Wood County.

Gilmer BOE why not assign someone to evaluate what is being done at those school and others to make them State standouts and to apply lessons learned to our elementary schools?

The same applies to learning from others regarding how to get high marks at GCHS.

By Learn What Works From Others on 09.23.2018

From the entry: 'WV and Area Counties Balanced Scorecard for School Year 2017-2018'.

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I have not read anyone blaming our teachers.  Quite the contrary.
There have been some well thought out comments submitted too.
I am old enough to remember when we had few issues about quality education.

Forget Charleston? Better not.
Believe we are still in their “probation” period.
You better check out just what that means.

By GC--still on state probation? on 09.22.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Why not go for it on our own and use the tried and widely accepted Iowa Test of Basic Skills to evaluate learning proficiency of our children?

It is the longest running test in America and it goes back to 1936.

One outcome of using the test is that each grade would be evaluated and compared to performances to schools in other parts of America.

We would probably have to go through hoop jumps of the State’s everchanging testing too.

By Iowa Test For Gilmer on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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To compound complexity of the issue, Gilmer is different from McDowell and both are different than Monongahela.

The implication is that getting out of the crisis must be county-specific and there is no one size that will fit all of WV’s 55 school systems.

Each county is on its own and ones with the best planning, local boards of education, and administrators will shine. Forget about Charleston!

By County-Specific on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Similar to most complex problems there are several categories contributing to WV’s dismal failure in improving education results in our grade and high schools.

Information in referred journal is beginning to show up. Some of the categories include curriculum issues in high schools, block scheduling failures in high schools, inordinate emphasis on sports at the expense of academics, inadequate prep of grade schoolers to ensure that they get firm foundations in math and English Language Arts, failure to instill need for life long learning at early ages, failure for school systems to fund continuing education of teachers to prepare them for newly emerged practices for enhanced student learning, cultural impediments including failure of some families to encourage children and to give them extra learning help at home, dysfunctional families for children to grow up in caused by drug and alcohol abuse and chronic unemployment, grade inflation characterized by too many As and Bs and attitudes that nobody fails so pass them along, failure of school boards to hire the best qualified superintendents and teachers because of local emphasis on favoring “home grow” individuals, failure of school boards to define performance expectations for superintendents to make effective accountability impossible, constantly changing types of State mandated testing to cause chaos and morale problems, poor compensation of teachers necessary to attract and keep the best and the brightest, etc.

To blame all problems on teachers is a cruel travesty.

One of the weakest links contributing to a lack of progress in improving WV schools is that instead of analyzing the full spectrum of contributing problems and focusing on ones with the biggest payoff potential, the trend in Charleston is to constantly apply band aid approaches with hopes that “cures” will be stumbled on accidentally.

By Do Not Blame It All On Our Teachers on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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The problem with preK-12 education in WV is that a holistic and and technically defensible evaluation of contributing factors to cause WV’s problems and how to deal with them has not occurred.

Instead, under direction of clueless politicians ineffective muddling prevails while selling what is done at a particular time as the definitive solution.

How many times have we witnessed muddling over the past 20-30 Years? It still goes on in Charleston.

Why not obtain a grant to have qualified experts analyze success stories around the Nation and use findings to craft a demonstration project in Gilmer County to improve our school system?

Regardless of what we do there must be open minds in seeking out what to do in homes, schools,  teacher education programs in our institutions of higher learning, continuing education for classroom teachers, and to involve various factions in our community to achieve acceptable results. Everyone must band together as a unified team to make it work.

One trap is over emphasis of sports. If the same magnitude of attention and importance were to be focused on solving preK-12 education problems in WV, great strides could be made to benefit deserving children.

By Muddling on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Our heartfelt condolences on the passing of Mr. Ron. I too know this pain of losing a beloved father. Both of these men were taken way too soon. Praying maybe Mr.Ron, my Dad, and all the former Westinghouse employees in heaven are getting together. Love and prayers from, Adrienne and family.

By Adrienne (Trimper) Johnson on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'Ronald J. Vanskiver'.

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West Virginia’s educational failures is NOT because of classroom teachers.

It IS because of the WV Board of Education’s failures of the past 20-30 years.

That 9 member, lopsided governor board is a crime against children and education in WV as a whole.

It needs 3 teachers, 3 general public parent members, and 3 governor appointees.

Until that governors click gang is broken up, you simply see repeats of the past.  NO progress in education.

It will take the legislature to fix it, but they are too busy with the legislature created court system failure, while trying to line pockets with gas and oil money.

By Tell It Like It Is ! on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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What is the plausible rationale for Gilmer not disclosing detailed facts similar to what Superintendent Hosaflook did?

Wood County reported 11,176 students in its 27 schools for the full FY 2018 school year.

In comparison Gilmer had 734 reported students in our two schools for the full FY 2018 school year.

Wood County had 15 times more students than Gilmer and it is reasonable to assume that it was 15 times more demanding to administer with its 27 schools.

If Wood County could get detailed facts out to the public with its significantly higher work load what keeps tiny Gilmer from doing the same?

By Why Gilmer BOE? on 09.18.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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We have not had a responsible, functioning, WVBE for 20 years.
Not one that would accept any responsibility.

They just keep changing ‘score keeping’ so there can be no accurate tracking of student progress.

State ranks 48th or 49th on educational outcomes. Still.
Colleges still have to give remedial classes.

The ONLY thing that changes are the names of the governor appointed players.
And just look at the ‘cost-per-pupil’ spending!
We are about the highest in the nation.

West Virginia State Board of Education = complete failure.  Nothing less.

By just more smoke and mirrors on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released for Public Schools in West Virginia'.

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Never could figure out why working people, retirees, volunteers are picking up trash left by adults?

Not when we have the numbers of bored prisoners we have locked up doing nothing??

By No solution here- on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Adopt-A-Highway Fall Statewide Cleanup Set for September 29'.

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Go to http://www.mywvschool.org to access more official State information about Gilmer’s schools. There are serious red flags in need of immediate corrective attention.

If you access Lewis County schools on the same web site you can review info for LES. Look at the red flags there. Worse than GES.

Instead of using the info to criticize it can be useful in seeking out opportunities for making immediate improvements.

For those who take apologetic stands that Gilmer is doing as well as some other WV counties and everything is fine, it does not mean that inferior educations for our children are acceptable.

By Look At Red Flags on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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Who is responsible for Gilmer’s oversight of the LES?

If you access the State’s website you will learn that math and reading is red flagged for the LCES to be as bad as it can get.

Why is it that nothing is reported in Gilmer County about how that school is doing when we know that our sixth grade finishers from over there will go to the GCHS to finish their educations? 

It is like our students who attend LCES are forgotten about. Someone needs to be watching out for them.

By Who Minds The Store on 09.15.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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The really sad stories are left out.
The students who accrue debt and for whatever reasons, drop out of school after a year or two.

They have little hope of improving incomes, but still have debt.
More of them than you think.

By More sad ones to be told. on 09.14.2018

From the entry: 'Student-Loan Debts a "Loss of Freedom" for Some in WV'.

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Information made ‘public’ forces accountability.
Do not hold your breath lest you turn blue.

‘They’ want elected. Get their place at the trough.
Then discover ‘exposure’ makes their work more difficult.

Informed citizens make informed decisions.
Why do we see the same names being elected over and over and over?

By WHEN we're allowed to see it......? on 09.14.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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Lots of work to be done with schools in Gilmer County. 2017-2018 Summative Assessments out today for student achievement.

Gilmer County High School.

For Math
*Exceed or Meet Standards=40% of Students.
*Fail to Meet Standards=60% of Students

For Reading
*Exceed or Meet Standards=36% of Students
*Fail to Meet Standards=64%

The scores speak volumes. What was done to accurately determine causes of failures and what will be done about it? BOE, the public has a right to know answers.

By Public Demands Answers on 09.13.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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The Founding Fathers screwed up, we should not have to work and pay our bills. Let that man behind the tree work and pay for it all.
Free education should be a right.
Free food should be a right.
Free healthcare should be a right. 
Free transportation should be a right.
Free entertainment should be a right.

By Smart Feller on 09.13.2018

From the entry: 'Student-Loan Debts a "Loss of Freedom" for Some in WV'.

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Thank you BOE members and Mrs. Lowther. Let’s work together at all community levels to make Gilmer County an educational power house in West Virginia. We can do it as an effective team and provision of information will be the key to success.

By Better Times On The Way on 09.12.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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Accountability - good point - and across Gilmer County.  We’ve seen glimpses and pieces of news WHEN we’re allowed to see it, mere mortals that we are. But never any follow up.  And the information come in bits and pieces (remember when we actually got to SEE what the Gilmer County Commission was up to?)  My question is, why do we never see the accountability or repercussion for actions of current Gilmer ‘elite’??

By Transparency matters on 09.12.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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Encouraging news that the superintendent will present her goals for Gilmer Schools on 9/10.

We assume that there will be a commitment for specific goals to achieve, measurable outcomes, completion dates for different steps and final goal achievement, and a meaningful monitoring program to determine if we are on track or there is need for mid-course fine tuning.

If any of this is missing there will not be meaningful accountability. Excellent business plans have all the components addressed above.

By Waiting To See on 09.09.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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