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Hunting & Trapping

Hunting & Trapping

Wild Game is a Nutritional, Natural Source of Protein

The Free Press WV

West Virginia’s abundance of wildlife and hunting seasons provides opportunities for many families to fill their freezers with highly nutritious wild game.

Wild game provides a low-fat, high-protein alternative to beef or other commercial meats. For example, white-tailed deer (venison) contains fewer calories and approximately five times less fat than the equivalent serving of beef.

“Wild game that is legally harvested during one of West Virginia’s hunting seasons provides a healthy source of protein for many West Virginians,“ said Tyler Evans, wildlife biologist with the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources. “Many West Virginians incorporate venison, wild turkey and other wild game into their diets on a regular basis.“

Hunters and their families are not the only West Virginians who benefit from the state’s abundant supply of wild game. The DNR-sponsored Hunters Helping the Hungry (HHH) Program processes deer for needy families and individuals in the Mountain State.

Since the program’s inception in 1992, approximately 979,549 pounds of venison have been donated. In 2017 alone, 554 deer (19,702 pounds of nutritious venison) were donated to the HHH Program and contributed to approximately 26,269 family-style meals.

For more information about the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program, please visit the DNR website at www.wvdnr.gov or call the DNR district office in French Creek (304.924.6211).

Applications accepted for McClintic WMA controlled waterfowl hunt

The Free Press WV

Waterfowl hunters who wish to hunt from a shooting station in the controlled waterfowl hunting zone of McClintic Wildlife Management Area (WMA), located near Point Pleasant, must submit an application by midnight August 12.
Hunting is by permit only on a portion of McClintic WMA during the October split of the waterfowl season.

Hunters chosen in the lottery draw will be assigned an area free of charge and may bring one guest.

A shooting station also is available for physically-challenged waterfowl hunters.
Hunters may apply online at www.wvhunt.com by logging into their account, choosing “enter lottery” on the individual’s home screen and choosing “2018 McClintic Duck Hunt.”

Successful applicants will be notified by mail by the second week of September.
Selected hunters will be randomly assigned a day to hunt and must report to the McClintic WMA office before 6 a.m. that day.

Applicants not selected may come to the McClintic office on the morning of each day’s hunt to sign up for an opportunity to hunt shooting stations not filled by selected hunters.
Consult the 2018-2019 West Virginia Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations for season dates and additional information.

Migratory bird regulations will be available at DNR offices by early August and will be on the DNR website at www.wvdnr.gov.

Sunday hunting on public lands, $50,000 donation for Hunters Helping the Hungry

The Free Press WV

Governor Jim Justice signed SB 451 on Thursday, allowing Sunday hunting on public lands in West Virginia. The bill was passed overwhelmingly during the recently completed legislative session.

Last year, Governor Justice signed a bill permitting Sunday hunting on private land with written permission of the landowner. This new bill will open more than 1.5 million acres of public land to Sunday hunting, provide several additional hunting days each year and make West Virginia more attractive to out-of-state hunters. The bill will take effect in early June and affect the 2018 hunting and trapping seasons thereafter.

“People drive right through West Virginia to Ohio or wherever it may be to be able to hunt on Sunday,” Governor Justice said. “We lose those dollars because they want to be able to hunt an entire weekend. This will provide additional hunting recreation for our visitors and residents and result in a major economic impact for our small rural businesses. Today is truly historical.”

A study by the National Shooting Sports Foundation projects Sunday hunting adds $155 million to the state’s economy each year.

Governor Justice spoke about the bill during a ceremonial signing on Thursday in the Governor’s Reception Room before a crowd of officials from the Division of Natural Resources, state legislators and Sunday hunting supporters.

Also at the event, Gov. Justice accepted a $50,000 donation from the West Virginia Governor’s One Shot committee for the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program (HHH). The money was raised by volunteers during last fall’s West Virginia Governor’s One Shot Whitetail Deer Hunt. During the annual event’s 11 years, sponsor corporations, land owners and hunters have raised more than $555,000. The money helps pay for processing hunter-donated venison, which is distributed to the state’s needy residents through a network of more than 600 food pantries, senior centers, shelters and the Mountaineer Food Bank in Gassaway.

“This is just another example of the great things hunters do across our state and across our nation. It helps so many people and touches so many lives,” Governor Justice said.

DNR has sponsored the Hunters Helping the Hungry program for 26 years, during which hunters have donated 24,630 deer, or 941,000 pounds of venison. Donations have provided 1,266,000 meals for West Virginia families in need. More information about HHH can be found at www.wvdnr.gov/Hunting/HHH.shtm .

Mountaineer Food Bank Receives $50,000 Donation from 2015 Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt

Mountaineer Food Bank receives $50,000 donation from 2015 Governor’s
One Shot Deer Hunt event for Hunters Helping the Hungry;
Total of more than half-a-million dollar raised over nine years

The Free Press WV

CHARLESTON, WV – Governor Earl Ray Tomblin, members of the Governor’s One Shot Committee and several state senators and delegates recently presented a check to the Mountaineer Food Bank, representing $50,000 raised during the ninth annual Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt, held Oct. 23-25, 2015, at Stonewall Resort State Park. Brig. Gen. Chuck Yeager, USAF, Ret., was the featured guest at the event.

The first event in 2007 raised $17,000, the second in 2008 raised $35,000, the third in 2009 raised $50,000, the fourth in 2010 raised $75,000, the fifth in 2011 raised $75,000; the sixth in 2012 raised $70,000, the seventh in 2013 raised $65,000, and the eighth in 2014 raised $65,000. Donations received at the 2015 event brought the total amount raised to more than half-a-million dollars over the life of the event.

The money will go toward expenses associated with the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program (HHH), administered by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, to distribute venison to needy families across the state through the Mountaineer Food Bank. The check was presented Jan. 21, 2016, during a ceremony at the State Capitol in Charleston.

The Governor’s One Shot event is sponsored by WVDNR and the Governor’s One Shot Committee, which organizes the event each year. Official with the Mountaineer Food Bank, accepted the check with thanks to everyone who contributed to the Governor’s One Shot.

Private individuals and businesses donate money for the opportunity to participate in guided antlerless deer hunts on private property near Stonewall Resort State Park. The event wraps up with an auction and an award banquet. All venison from the hunt, along with profits from the sponsorships, goes to the Mountaineer Food Bank.

The HHH program allows hunters to donate legally harvested deer to certified processors so the meat can be distributed to a network of more than 550 local soup kitchens, food pantries, shelters, senior centers, missions, churches and community centers around the state.

The HHH program has been highly successful since it began in 1992, providing more than a million family style meals to the neediest of West Virginians. However, the program also requires cash donations to pay for processing and distribution costs to benefit these needy individuals. More information about the HHH program is available at wvdnr.gov/Hunting/HHH.shtm.

West Virginia Buck Season Delivers Dollars To The State

The Free Press WV

The state estimates that the West Virginia economy gets a big boost from the annual buck firearms season.

The Division of Natural Resources estimates that more than 330,000 hunters will spend a total of $230 million in the state during the two-week season, which began Monday.

That spending means $34 million in tax revenue.

The DNR also estimates that 5,700 West Virginians are employed as a result of the hunting industry.

Motels throughout the north-central region of the state are already booked.

Hunters travel from neighboring states to stalk deer in West Virginia woods.

Passage of Sportsmen’s Act OF 2015

Legislation will increase public lands access for sportsmen and promote West Virginia’s outdoor recreation economy

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV), co-chair of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus and member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) Committee, applauded the bipartisan passage of the Sportsmen’s Act of 2015. The legislation will enhance hunting, fishing and recreational shooting opportunities by increasing access to federal lands. It also includes the permanent authorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The bill passed the ENR Committee by a voice vote.

“As a lifelong, avid sportsman, I know firsthand that our hunting, fishing and outdoor heritage is so important to who we are as West Virginians and as Americans,” Senator Manchin said. “In West Virginia, it’s a family affair and an opportunity to pass along, from one generation to another, a deep and lasting appreciation for all the outdoors have to offer. I believe that we should protect these traditions that help define who we are. This bipartisan bill will boost West Virginia’s economy while expanding hunting and fishing rights and allowing people a greater ability to enjoy the outdoors.”


Senator Manchin’s remarks, as prepared for delivery, are below:

As an avid sportsman, I believe that hunting and fishing are an integral part of the American culture and a powerful force of good protecting and preserving the natural world around us.

In West Virginia, it’s a family affair and an opportunity to pass along – from one generation to another – a deep and lasting appreciation for all the outdoors have to offer.

One of my top priorities is to make sure that the people I represent can carry on that tradition by ensuring they have access to hunting, fishing and recreational shooting on our nation’s public lands.

In my home state, we have more than 1.6 million acres of public land open to hunting with 28 shooting ranges on these lands.

We have a year-round fishing season, with more than 20,000 miles of streams and more than 100 public fishing lakes.

But this is about more than heritage and family tradition – hunting and fishing are big business in the Mountain State.

In 2011 alone, sportsmen and women spent $870 million on hunting and fishing in West Virginia and paid $81 million in state and local taxes.

Title II of this bill establishes an important precedent that seems pretty common sense to me – Federal land should be open to hunting and fishing, within existing laws, unless there is a reason for it not to be.

Nothing in the bill opens any sensitive areas that are already closed to these activities.

It merely establishes the precedent that our public lands should be open to the public so that people can enjoy them.

I think it’s a shame that we all too often get caught up in debates between environmentalists and sportsmen – both of whom want to preserve and protect the great outdoors.

Gale Norton, Secretary of the Department of the Interior under President George W. Bush, once said:

“Dating back to Teddy Roosevelt, hunters have been the pillar of conservation in America, doing more than anyone to conserve wildlife and its habitat.”

I’m a firm believer that introducing someone to the great outdoors through hunting and fishing is one of the easiest and most effective ways to show them why conservation matters.

I was also very pleased to see that the permanent authorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was included in this bill.

In West Virginia, LWCF has helped maintain and expand access to some of our State’s natural treasures for the benefit of all.

Access projects funded by LWCF, in places like the Monongahela National Forest, Canaan Valley, and the Gauley River, not only keep public lands public for sportsmen, but also promote West Virginia’s thriving and growing outdoor recreation economy.

A Section 6 habitat grant was the centerpiece of a project up in Cheat Canyon that leveraged state, local, and private funds to protect another incredible river that provides outdoor recreation in the northern part of the state.

A different type of grant protected key battlefield areas around Harper’s Ferry last year. 

The permanent reauthorization of the LWCF is another one of my top priorities, and I commend my colleagues for working together, across partisan lines, to include it in this bill.

For the past two Congresses, we have tried and failed to pass a Sportsmen’s package through the Senate despite strong bipartisan support.

I commend Senator Murkowski and Senator Heinrich for their leadership on the Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act this Congress, and I urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill.

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation presents $50,000 donation for West Virginia Elk Restoration Project

At the regular quarterly meeting of the Natural Resources Commission held Sunday February 22, 2015, in South Charleston, Bill Carman, Regional Director for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF) and its West Virginia State Chapter President Brian Satterfield presented a Seed Grant check in the amount of $50,000 to the West Virginia DNR for its active elk restoration program.

These funds can now be used by WVDNR to support its active elk restoration program.  RMEF has been instrumental with the restoration of elk in Kentucky and Virginia just astride of the Mountain State’s designated southwestern coalfields elk zone consisting of all or parts of Logan, Mingo, Wyoming, McDowell, Lincoln, Wayne and Boone counties.

The Gilmer Free Press


The commissioners and WVDNR Chief of Wildlife Resources Curtis Taylor thanked RMEF for this generous contribution, which is designated to kick-off the program. Revenues for such grants are generated by fundraising banquets held by local chapters here and elsewhere. West Virginia presently has four active chapters.

“The mission of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage,” Carman said.

Accepting the contribution on behalf of WVDNR were elk zone wildlife and law enforcement coordinators Randy Kelley and Sgt. Terry Ballard, respectively.

**DNR**

Photo courtesy of the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources

In photo, left to right: WVDNR Sgt. Terry Ballard, RMEF Regional Director Bill Carman, West Virginia State Chapter President Brian Satterfield, WVDNR District Biologist Randy Kelley.

Proposals for Doe Hunting

The drastic drop in the number of bucks hunters killed in 2014 is reflected in the proposed regulations for the 2015 antlerless deer hunting season in West Virginia. Whether the changes are enough to satisfy hunters remain to be seen.

“The season framework is very similar or the same as in years past,” said DNR Game Management Supervisor Gary Foster. “There will be a lot of counties that are the same, but a lot of counties will be a lot more restrictive. That’s primarily due to that decreased buck gun harvest.”

Under the proposed regulations for 2015 Boone, Tucker, Wayne, Webster and portions of Clay, Fayette, Greenbrier, Kanawha, Mineral, Pendleton and Raleigh counties would have no antlerless hunting season.

Hunters in Randolph, Mercer, Nicholas, Pocahontas and portions of Clay, Fayette Raleigh counties will need to apply for a limited number of tags in 2015 and the bag limit will be one antlerless deer.

The biggest change may be a reduction in the antlerless bag limit in selected counties. Hunters in Barbour, Braxton, Cabell, Grant, Hancock, Kanawha (north of Elk River and west of Corridor G), Lincoln, Marshall, Pleasants, Preston, Summers, Taylor, and Upshur Counties will see their bag limit for 2015 set at one antlerless deer.

The Gilmer Free Press


The other major change will be in the number of counties where hunters are required to kill an antlerless deer before they could kill their second buck.  Thirty-one counties carried the so called “earn a second buck” restriction in 2014. The number this year is down to nine counties or parts of counties.  Those are Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, part of Greenbrier, Hampshire, Part of Mineral, Morgan, Ritchie, and Wood Counties.  The bag limit in those counties for antlerless deer remained at three as proposed by game biologists.

The bag limit will also remain at three without the “earn a second buck” restriction in Berkeley, Brooke, Hardy, Harrison, Jackson, Jefferson, Lewis, Marion, Mason, Monongalia, Monroe, Ohio, Putnam, Roane, Tyler, Wetzel, and Wirt County.  The eastern portion of Pendleton County was also added to the three antlerless deer limit for 2015.

“The 2014 harvest was definitely low, but I don’t think it’s a reflection of a lower deer population,” said Foster. “There are a lot of other factors that came into play including the really strong mast crop and terrible weather in the first week of buck season, particularly on the first day.  The data looks very similar to what we had in 2010 after the bumper crop when mast was at an all time high.”

The proposals keep the season framework intact.  The season would be October 22-24, November 23-December 5 concurrent with the buck season. December 17-19 and December 29-31 on private land.  The season dates for public land include November 23-December 5 concurrent with buck season, December 17-19, December 29-31.

The agency indicated harvest objectives and population density is more inline with management plans on the state’s public hunting areas. The proposals include a limited antlerless hunt with a bag limit of one on the Elk River, Big Ugly, and Wallback WMA’s and Greenbreir State Forest and Kumbrabow State Forest.

Biologist suggest unlimited hunting with a one deer bag limit for does on Castleman’s Run, Stonecoal Lake, Camp Creek, McClintic, Stonewall Jackson Lake, Amherst/Plymouth, Cross Creek, Beury Mountain, Chief Cornstalk, Lewis-Wetzel, Bluestone, and Greenbottom Wildlife Management Areas as well as Cooper’s Rock State Forest.  Any public hunting area not specified in the proposal would follow the county’s proposed regulations for antlerless deer hunting.

The dates and bag limits are only proposals at this point. They will go out for public comment and the agency will accept comments on the ideas during the upcoming sectional meetings in March.  The state Natural Resources Commission will vote on the proposals at their next meeting.

~~  Chris Lawrence ~~

West Virginia Seasons End for Furbearer Trapping and Hunting February 28, 2015

The Gilmer Free Press

The West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (DNR) reminds sportsmen and women that the hunting and trapping seasons for red fox, gray fox, bobcat and raccoon ends February 28, 2015.

The trapping seasons for coyote, otter, mink, skunk, opossum, weasel and muskrat also will end February 28, 2015.

The trapping season for beaver ends March 31, 2015.

Beaver trappers are reminded that it is illegal to set traps during the month of March for beaver, unless those traps are in water.

Trappers should be aware that it is illegal to set traps or leave traps set after Noon on the last day of the respective season.

The trapping season for fisher ended January 31, 2015.

All beaver, bobcat, otter and fisher pelts are required to be checked at an official game checking station within 30 days of the close of their respective seasons.

Beaver trappers should be aware that starting April 01, 2015, they must check game by one of the following three ways:

•  Internet - www.wvhunt.com

•  Stopping at any license agent (you will not have to bring the animal with you)

•  Telephone - Call 1.844.WVCHECK (1.844.982.4325) - DNR ID number required.

Trappers, hunters and fur dealers are reminded that furs shipped out of West Virginia must have a fur shipping tag, which is available at DNR District Offices.

Anyone who plans to sell an otter or bobcat pelt outside of the state of West Virginia should obtain a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) seal for each pelt.

All otter and bobcat pelts, usually exported from the United States by licensed fur buyers, must have a CITES seal from the state where the animal was harvested.

The general public is reminded that now, before the trapping season ends, would be a good time to deal with nuisance furbearer problems.

Trappers may be more likely to assist landowners with nuisance problems while their gear is in working order and pelts are prime.

Senior Lifetime Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping License designation on driver’s licenses and ID Cards

West Virginia DMV and DNR working together to provide opportunity

Division of Natural Resources Director Bob Fala and Division of Motor Vehicles Commissioner Pat Reed announce the opportunity for seniors who have purchased the Class XS Senior Lifetime Hunting and Fishing License to obtain a Class XS designation on their West Virginia driver’s license or identification card.

The Gilmer Free Press


According to Commissioner Reed, “DMV is pleased to offer a new, convenient driver’s license and ID card designation for our customers, in addition to other designation opportunities already available, including veteran, hearing impaired and organ donor.”

Working together with other organizations to further enhance good customer service is important to both agencies.  “We are pleased to partner with the DMV to make it easier for our Senior Lifetime License holders to show proof of a license while in the field,” said Director Fala.  “The Class XS License endorsement printed on the West Virginia driver’s license means they only would be required to carry that one proof of identification with them.”

The Senior Lifetime Hunting, Fishing and Trapping license can only be purchased through the DNR South Charleston Office at 324 4th Avenue. To obtain the Senior Lifetime Hunting, Fishing and Trapping designation, customers may visit their nearest DMV regional office and apply for the designation to be added to their driver’s license or ID card.  Customers will need to present the bill of sale for the license, or their permanent Class XS license card as proof of licensure, as well as all applicable documentation for a driver’s license or ID card.

Documentation required includes one proof of physical residency for a Not For Federal driver’s license or ID card and two proofs of physical residency for a For Federal card.

No fees will be collected by the DMV for the designation if the applicant is already renewing their license or ID card.

A $5 duplicate fee will be charged for the Not For Federal driver’s license or ID card if the customer is wanting to just add the designation.

A $15 fee will be collected for the For Federal driver’s license or ID card.

Commissioner Reed encourages all applicants to call the DMV Call Center at 1-800-642-9066 or visit the DMV website at www.dmv.wv.gov with any questions before going to a regional office.  “Our focus is customer service, and we want our customers to have a pleasant and efficient visit to the DMV.  Our fully-staffed Call Center and website are both great information resources to ensure that all of the necessary documents are in place before going to the DMV.”

For additional information about the senior lifetime hunting, trapping and fishing license, please call 304.558.2771 and ask for the licensing office.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 1,016 Fall Turkeys in 2014

The Gilmer Free Press

Preliminary figures for the 2014 fall turkey hunting season reveal that 1,016 turkeys were checked in.

Statewide, the 2014 harvest was very similar to the 999 reported in 2013.

Three of the six administrative districts reported increases in harvest from 2013 levels ranging from a modest 4% increase in District 1 to a 69% increase in District 6, despite having two additional counties closed to hunting.

Districts 2, 4 and 5 reported declines in harvest.

The decline in District 5 was likely due to only one county being open to hunting in 2014, compared to five counties in 2013.

“Fall turkey harvests are highly influenced by hunter participation and interest, annual recruitment and hard mast conditions,“ said Curtis I. Taylor, chief of the Wildlife Resources Section of the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

“Turkey brood production was fairly good this year and it mimicked the 5-year average. Brood observations were 30% higher than last year and 15% better than 2012. These production improvements and better mast conditions led us to anticipate a similar fall harvest, which happened even with six fewer counties open to hunting.“

Top counties for 2014 were Nicholas (90), Greenbrier (84), Randolph (83), Pocahontas (54) and Preston (53).

WEST VIRGINIA FALL WILD TURKEY
  HARVEST, 2010-2014

County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Barbour C C 30 C 18
Brooke 6 6 7 9 2
Hancock 24 8 11 8 5
Harrison 0 20 26 20 20
Marion 12 C 15 4 6
Marshall 15 11 28 10 22
Monongalia 24 13 18 24 15
Ohio 16 12 12 9 3
Preston 80 76 63 77 53
Taylor 7 C 11 8 5
Tucker 28 17 25 14 25
Wetzel 9 C 14 2 18
District 1 Subtotal 221 163 260 185 192
Berkeley 18 35 18 36 19
Grant 42 31 31 41 31
Hampshire 30 22 22 41 25
Hardy 33 27 30 34 27
Jefferson C C C C C
Mineral 17 32 22 28 21
Morgan 14 18 5 13 15
Pendleton 38 38 46 26 31
District 2 Subtotal 192 203 174 219 169
Braxton C C C C C
Clay C C C C C
Lewis 12 22 C 8 C
Nicholas 46 61 98 39 90
Pocahontas 47 68 79 57 54
Randolph 58 142 77 59 83
Upshur 40 42 43 24 C
Webster 37 44 58 35 52
District 3 Subtotal 240 379 355 222 279
Fayette C C C C C
Greenbrier 92 90 138 58 84
McDowell 16 C C 33 C
Mercer C 52 C C C
Monroe 59 63 89 71 52
Raleigh C C C C C
Summers 36 31 71 42 41
Wyoming 31 C C 37 34
District 4 Subtotal 234 236 298 241 211
Boone C C C C C
Cabell 6 5 10 1 C
Kanawha C C C C C
Lincoln 41 C C 14 C
Logan C C C 17 C
Mason 46 57 37 20 33
Mingo C C C C C
Putnam 38 21 21 2 C
Wayne C C C C C
District 5 Subtotal 131 83 68 54 33
Calhoun C C 14 8 C
Doddridge C C C C C
Gilmer C C C 6 C
Jackson 19 33 35 18 36
Pleasants 2 2 5 4 3
Ritchie 12 C C 2 31
Roane C C C C C
Tyler 17 9 6 1 8
Wirt 21 34 22 19 23
Wood 37 43 35 20 31
District 6 Subtotal 108 121 117 78 132
Unknown 0 0 1 0 0
State Total 1126 1185 1186 999 1016

2015 Hunting and Fishing Show in Charleston

The Gilmer Free Press

The annual West Virginia Hunting and Fishing Show is this weekend at the Charleston Civic Center.

The largest outdoor theme gathering in the state is now in its 29th year.

The show features more than 200 exhibitors, including approximately 30 new vendors for 2015.

The exhibitors include product vendors and hunting and fishing outfitters from around the world.

All will be set up in the Civic Center’s Grand Hall from Friday thorough Sunday.

Hours are 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM Saturday, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday.

Admission is $8 for adults, children 6-12 $1, and under 6 admitted free.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 104,223 Deer in 2014

The Gilmer Free Press

Preliminary counts of game checking tags indicate West Virginia hunters harvested 104,223 white-tailed deer during the recently completed bucks-only, antlerless, muzzleloader, archery and youth/Class Q/Class XS deer seasons.

This year’s total harvest was 31 percent less than the 2013 deer harvest of 150,877 and 23 percent below the five-year average of 136,168.

The 2014 harvest is very similar to the 2010 harvest of 106,499, the last time acorns were exceptionally abundant. Successful buck hunters this year had an excellent chance to harvest an older-age buck as the preliminary analysis of deer age data indicates that 25 percent of the antlered bucks brought to the game checking stations during the first three days of traditional buck firearm season were 3.5 years of age or older. A breakdown of the combined 2014 deer seasons reveals hunters harvested 37,766 bucks during the traditional buck firearm season, 39,514 antlerless deer during all antlerless firearm hunting opportunities, 21,653 deer during archery season, and 5,290 deer during muzzleloader season.


Antlerless Deer Season

The 2014 antlerless deer season harvest, which includes the youth/Class Q/Class XS deer season, was 30 percent less than in 2013 and 14 percent below the five-year average of 46,204.

“It is important to note that the antlerless harvest is the key component to any deer management strategy, as it controls the future deer population,” said Director Fala.

In 2014, all or portions of 50 of the 55 counties were open to antlerless firearms season for hunters to harvest one to three antlerless deer, depending on the county. Next year’s antlerless deer hunting opportunity will depend on the need to increase, decrease or stabilize deer populations in each of the 51 counties where firearms deer hunting is permitted.

The top 10 counties are: Preston (1,859), Mason (1,446), Lewis (1,421), Upshur (1,365), Jackson (1,296), Ritchie (1,291), Randolph (1,285), Braxton (1,254), Harrison (1,253) and Monroe (1,214).


Muzzleloader Deer Season

The 2014 muzzleloader harvest of 5,290 was 32 percent less than the 2013 harvest of 7,739, and 28 percent below the five-year average of 7,341. However, this year’s harvest was within 95 deer of the 2012 recorded harvest of 5,385.

The top 10 counties are: Randolph (295), Preston (265), Nicholas (251), Braxton (195), Lewis (193), Harrison (182), Fayette (164), Barbour (156), Mason (149) and Jackson (143).


Archery Deer Season

The bowhunter take of 21,653 deer was 28 percent less than the 2013 harvest of 29,979, 19 percent below the five-year average harvest of 26,721 and is very similar to the 2010 harvest of 21,962. Archery harvests are correlated to hard mast crops, and the above average acorn crop in 2014, like that of 2010, was a significant factor for the lower harvest in 2014.

The top 10 counties are: Preston (968), Randolph (759), Kanawha (757), Mason (710), Wyoming (683), Nicholas (673) Fayette (647), Raleigh (635), Wood (602) and Logan (601).

2014   WEST VIRGINIA DEER HARVEST

County Buck   Gun Antlerless Muzzleloader Archery Total
Barbour 892 1076 156 407 2531
Brooke 255 407 30 302 994
Hancock 201 359 36 374 970
Harrison 946 1253 182 488 2869
Marion 706 949 107 427 2189
Marshall 709 940 108 305 2062
Monongalia 688 879 87 574 2228
Ohio 235 368 37 155 795
Preston 1533 1859 265 968 4625
Taylor 457 529 79 254 1319
Tucker 497 395 87 304 1283
Wetzel 893 938 91 241 2163
District I   Subtotal 8012 9952 1265 4799 24028
Berkeley 528 764 68 378 1738
Grant 800 615 71 269 1755
Hampshire 1111 1048 122 251 2532
Hardy 926 844 106 218 2094
Jefferson 385 474 54 354 1267
Mineral 839 1101 75 428 2443
Morgan 414 544 47 152 1157
Pendleton 891 606 94 245 1836
District   II Subtotal 5894 5996 637 2295 14822
Braxton 936 1254 195 371 2756
Clay 361 99 25 188 673
Lewis 1167 1421 193 366 3147
Nicholas 827 460 251 673 2211
Pocahontas 831 348 121 170 1470
Randolph 1301 1285 295 759 3640
Upshur 1016 1365 142 436 2959
Webster 642 128 33 418 1221
District   III Subtotal 7081 6360 1255 3381 18077
Fayette 746 292 164 647 1849
Greenbrier 1399 887 110 506 2902
McDowell       446 446
Mercer 409 255 33 411 1108
Monroe 1015 1214 125 430 2784
Raleigh 514 222 78 635 1449
Summers 660 903 107 329 1999
Wyoming       683 683
District   IV Subtotal 4743 3773 617 4087 13220
Boone 527 199 131 427 1284
Cabell 424 498 58 280 1260
Kanawha 731 490 57 757 2035
Lincoln 724 739 102 414 1979
Logan       601 601
Mason 1005 1446 149 710 3310
Mingo       284 284
Putnam 571 803 87 431 1892
Wayne 530 284 57 271 1142
District V   Subtotal 4512 4459 641 4175 13787
Calhoun 519 591 75 203 1388
Doddridge 624 748 72 192 1636
Gilmer 673 781 108 159 1721
Jackson 999 1296 143 472 2910
Pleasants 275 276 22 78 651
Ritchie 1164 1291 82 412 2949
Roane 964 1175 97 333 2569
Tyler 579 748 91 229 1647
Wirt 694 917 85 236 1932
Wood 1033 1151 100 602 2886
District   VI Subtotal 7524 8974 875 2916 20289
State   Total

37766

39514

5290

21653

104223

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 2,385 Black Bears in 2014

West Virginia hunters harvested 2,385 black bears during the combined 2014 archery and firearms seasons, according to Colin Carpenter, Black Bear Project Leader for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources. The preliminary harvest data for the combined 2014 seasons were 11 percent lower than the 2013 harvest of 2,692 bears. The black bear harvest of 2014 marks the fifth time in five years that the harvest has topped 2,000 and is tied for the third highest harvest on record.

“Mast conditions in 2014 helped some hunters and hurt others,” said Carpenter. “The 2014 Mast Survey and Hunting Outlook documented vastly improved oak mast conditions over 2013. Historically, abundant oak mast has led to a decreased archery harvest and an increased December firearms harvest, and that scenario held true in 2014. Abundant oak mast statewide prevented archers from patterning bears effectively and led to a decreased archery harvest. However, abundant mast kept bruins out of their winter dens and available to be harvested in the December firearms season.”

Carpenter attributed the decrease in harvest during the September/October firearms seasons to a decrease in hunting days from six in 2013 to three in 2014 in the 16 counties that were open. There was a slight increase in harvest during the concurrent buck-gun/bear season over 2013. Overall, the decrease in archery and September/October firearms harvest was not offset by the increases in the buck-gun and December firearms harvest.

Hunters took 516 bears during the 2014 archery season. The top five counties were Webster (53), Preston (45), Fayette (42), Nicholas (39), and Randolph (39).

Firearms hunters harvested 1,869 bears during 2014. Hunters took 457 bears in September and October, 397 during the concurrent buck-gun/bear season, and 1,015 during the traditional December season. The top five counties were Pocahontas (182), Randolph (172), Greenbrier (167), Pendleton (167) and Webster (160).

The Gilmer Free Press



2014 WEST VIRGINIA BLACK BEAR HARVEST

County

Archery

September/October

Buck Gun

December

Total

Barbour

15

3

13

9

40

Brooke

0

0

0

0

0

Hancock

0

0

0

0

0

Harrison

1

0

0

0

1

Marion

0

0

0

0

0

Marshall

0

0

0

0

0

Monongalia

4

0

3

0

7

Ohio

0

0

0

0

0

Preston

45

16

30

22

113

Taylor

3

0

1

2

6

Tucker

17

23

7

55

102

Wetzel

2

0

0

0

2

District I Subtotal

87

42

54

88

271

Berkeley

0

0

0

0

0

Grant

5

5

9

57

76

Hampshire

3

0

12

7

22

Hardy

5

24

16

76

121

Jefferson

0

0

0

0

0

Mineral

1

2

0

7

10

Morgan

3

0

6

2

11

Pendleton

25

50

14

103

192

District II Subtotal

42

81

57

252

432

Braxton

9

7

13

11

40

Clay

9

5

2

17

33

Lewis

2

0

5

4

11

Nicholas

39

44

35

46

164

Pocahontas

19

48

14

120

201

Randolph

39

52

11

109

211

Upshur

10

6

7

10

33

Webster

53

36

29

95

213

District III Subtotal

180

198

116

412

906

Fayette

42

13

39

17

111

Greenbrier

23

37

20

110

190

McDowell

18

14

0

17

49

Mercer

8

0

4

1

13

Monroe

8

9

11

23

51

Raleigh

18

10

24

11

63

Summers

7

0

5

3

15

Wyoming

20

3

0

8

31

District IV Subtotal

144

86

103

190

523

Boone

16

25

24

35

100

Cabell

0

0

0

0

0

Kanawha

13

18

43

21

95

Lincoln

1

0

0

0

1

Logan

17

5

0

11

33

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

Mingo

8

2

0

2

12

Putnam

0

0

0

0

0

Wayne

0

0

0

0

0

District V Subtotal

55

50

67

69

241

Calhoun

3

0

0

4

7

Doddridge

0

0

0

0

0

Gilmer

1

0

0

0

1

Jackson

0

0

0

0

0

Pleasants

1

0

0

0

1

Ritchie

1

0

0

0

1

Roane

0

0

0

0

0

Tyler

0

0

0

0

0

Wirt

2

0

0

0

2

Wood

0

0

0

0

0

District VI Subtotal

8

0

0

4

12

State Total

516

457

397

1015

2385

MANCHIN ANNOUNCES HIRING OF FRANK JEZIORO AS LIAISON TO SPORTSMEN AND NATURAL RESOURCES GROUPS

The Gilmer Free Press

Jezioro will coordinate state and federal wildlife, sportsmen, and conservation groups

“I am thrilled to announce that a truly dedicated West Virginia public servant, Frank Jezioro, has agreed to join our Senate office as the new Liaison to Sportsmen and Natural Resources. Frank’s vision and foresight coupled with his invaluable support and insight, have always served as an asset to help me better serve the people of West Virginia, whether as Governor or as a United States Senator. As the new Co-Chair of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus and as a member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, Frank’s experience will undoubtedly benefit hunters, fishers and outdoorsmen across the Mountain State and this country.

“It was a privilege to appoint Frank as Director of the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources when I was Governor, where he played a vital role in preserving significant amounts of public land to expand access for hunting and fishing, along with protecting some of our state’s most beautiful landmarks. His intuition and leadership capabilities also helped launch the annual Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt at Stonewall Resort State Park, which since 2007, has raised and donated $455,000 to the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program.”

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WV hunters harvest 108,856 deer during Fall 2018 through January 2019 seasons

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Hunters in West Virginia harvested 44,572 bucks during the traditional buck firearms season

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West Virginia’s 2018 fall turkey harvest up 28 percent

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West Virginia’s muzzleloader deer season opens December 10, 2018

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WVDNR awaits CWD test results

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DNR reminding hunters of the potential consequences of poaching

The Free Press WV After recent incidents of poaching in Nicholas and Webster counties prior to the start of the buck firearms season in West Virginia, the state Department of Natural Resources offered some words of caution about the potential legal consequences of illegal hunting in the state [ .... ]  Read More

Buck Harveting Report

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2018 West Virginia deer firearms season fact sheet

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Readers' Recent Comments

Progress is being made with writing up school board meeting minutes to keep citizens better informed.

For too long the State’s information embargo kept citizens in the dark because information releases of all types were sketchy by design to prevent accountability for officials in charge.

Because more information is being released to citizens there will be enhanced community support for activities in the County’s schools to get our kids career and college ready.

Thank you Gilmer County School Board members. Keep up your good work with making information access improvements.

By Kudos To School Board on 03.21.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Special & Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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Thanks Mr. Boggs for bringing attention to the Rt 5 roller-coaster just west of Burnsville.
At least someone finally made an attempt to smooth it up a bit!  Good job that time.

By Gilmer on 03.21.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Big In-Justice Jim and his “roads to prosperity” program is high grade bs.
You all stole our money.  Fed us bs and lies.

Now Injustice Jim wants to repeat the deal he got away with once all ready!!??  That takes a lot of gall.

And the best is…..30% of road repair funds were not spent last year!!  Shame on the legislature for not being a watchdog.

Shame on Whopper Teller Jim too…for wanting more money!
Shame, shame, shame on Charleston inept management and politics.

By WV are tired of having the wool pulled over our ey on 03.21.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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“All of the research tells us that the formerly incarcerated do not commit violent crimes, or more workplace-related crimes, than people who have no criminal background,” he said.“

This is a patently false statement.  Heyman does this frequently.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 03.19.2019

From the entry: 'In Tight Labor Market, Some Major Companies to Drop Criminal Check'.

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So sorry Jerry. Would love to see you.  I am now at family farm.  Please stop by

By Phyllis Grove on 03.18.2019

From the entry: 'Doris “Geneva” Case'.

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We keep hearing exciting news about GSC’s opportunity for starting a new teacher education academy to train WV’s teachers.

The unique program would provide state-of-the-art preparation for classroom challenges WV’s teachers face.

Based on reported information the prestigious program would be designed to be a WV show piece and graduates would earn a master degrees after five years.

The program would be an Appalachian trend setter to benefit the College, Gilmer County, Central WV, the State, gifted students selected for the program, and most of all the State’s children.

What do you say GSC’s Board of Governors? Citizens want to hear from you. What does the College have to lose?

By GSC Teacher Ed. Academy Needed on 03.18.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Improving teacher quality in West Virginia'.

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After the ipads were purchased what measurable benefits resulted from having them at the GCHS to improve student learning? Does anyone know?

Was a formal plan followed to maximize benefits from the equipment to include provisions for measuring before-and-after results to evaluate if the equipment did any good?

Another case of throwing money at a problem and after spending it taxpayers have no idea if there were any meaningful benefits for students?

More than likely competitive bidding was not used to purchase the ipads to add another wrinkle.

By Did The ipads Improve Learning Results? on 03.13.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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Where oh where did the 200 Gilmer County I-pads go?
Were they bought with federal money?
Attorney General Morrisey are you looking into this?
Someone should get the ball rolling?

By where oh where? on 03.12.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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They is not no flood plane there the water dont get up there i know i catch musk rats in the river

By THE TRUTH WATCHER on 03.08.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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Gilmer County’s school board has full authority to demand a comprehensive accounting for every dime spent on everything leading up to site selection and construction of the LCES and the GCES.

Where did the money go and who got it to include naming names and companies on the receiving end?

Stop hiding behind the excuse that the State “did it to us” and assemble the true facts for taxpayers!

What is the defensible rational for failure of the school board to follow up on this?

By Disclose Financial Facts on 03.07.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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What was in the school board’s 451 resolution? As important as education is more effort should be taken to flesh out what actually happens at school board meeting. Bare minimum information and lack of transparency skirt accountability. Who is responsible for writing up the minutes?

By Transparency and Accountability Needed on 03.07.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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The new Gilmer County Elementary school was built
in a flood plane.  Education fail.

By YOU FORGET on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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Roads are a mess.
Population continues the 50+ year decrease.

But for deep gas, no new employment.

Education system total failure.
Legislature impotent.

Grand finale in Charleston.
We have a brawl in the Capitol Building.

That out-of-control delegate needs to resign!

By WV continues the slow death on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Major Broadband Investment in West Virginia'.

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Broadband coming?  Think we heard this before?
How many times?  I’ve lost count.  You remember?

This will be like JimmyBoys “roads to prosperity” program?
Take the citizens money?  Give ‘em nothing.

Republicans. Democrats. All the same political bs from both.
Voters believe them.  Keep bringing back the old mules so they can give us a repeat performance.

By Just More Dog n Pony Show 4 U on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Major Broadband Investment in West Virginia'.

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Jimmy D, Gilmer County needs a full accounting for every dime spent on school site planning and studies, site preparation, all school construction work, and purchases while the State had us intervened.

For one example of many we do not have an itemized accounting for how our funds were spent on the botched LCES project.

How much more was wasted on the auction barn site, the dropped Cedar Creek site, and the GCES in comparison to what could have been done with our money with full transparency, competent planning, competitive bidding, and proper project oversight?

The fact that the GCES was built too small and the LCES was built too large is one facet of the waste and mismanagement that occurred.

Do not expect valid investigations because WV’s standard approach is cover up when the State is involved.

By Jimmy D--Don't Expect Sunshine on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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Saw the GFP video (citizens refer to it as the ambush video) at the school board meeting at which the pitch was made for the new computers.

The GCHS principal and staff talked about wonders to expect if the 200 computers would be purchased.

Promises were made that if the kids got them they would learn to do advanced math and to make other marvelous learning advances. Any evidence of the promises being kept?

Were the computers purchased through competitive biding? Wanna bet that they were not?

Is this another example of throwing money at technology with no meaningful plan for how to use the equipment to maximize learning benefits without evidence of any before-and-after testing to accurately determine if they did any good?

Could the 200 computers be located and what condition are they in if they could be found?

The new school board is encouraged to check on the issues and to report on the findings.

By Accountability For New GCHS Computers on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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Since the local prosecutor is good for nothing, why doesn’t the federal prosecutors look into all the theft by Gabe DeVano and his buddies during the time Gilmer county was under state control? They stole money, equipment from schools which closed, as well as technology equipment. for example where did the 200 iPads go which gilmer county paid for?

By Jimmy D on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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A major cause of WV’s dismal record with K-12 education is the lack of choice regarding a parent’s right to decide on the school for a child to attend.

The elite get around that by using private schools for their kids.

Under existing conditions what chance do the rest of us have? The answer is none!

Our kids are victimized because competition and accountability do not exist and that is exactly what WV’s entrenched education establishment and the unions want.

By Save WV's School Children on 03.02.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

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Pennybaker is correct.
WV educators keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

Whats the definition of insanity?

By Gilmer on 03.02.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

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An off grid system works great if you want to live like a hippie. One can cover their entire roof and it will barely power your lighting and a few electronics, let alone our transportation and industrial needs. The humaniacs now complain that the giant windmill blades kill the little birdies, and they have never solved the overpass problem in putting windmills on out autos.

By Vern Windsong on 03.01.2019

From the entry: 'Need for Atlantic Coast Pipeline Falls'.

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It amazes me that the so-called “experts” think more and more centralization will improve anything.  Public school education is in terrible condition and doing more consolidation will only make it worse and more expensive.  With all the technology today, there is NO reason for busing children for miles and miles, spending more and more hours under the control of public schools.  The idea that parents are not capable of deciding how to educate their children is insulting.  There was never any good reason for governments to get involved in education.

By Karen Pennebaker on 02.28.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

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Pat, your information is outdated. Solar and wind are increasingly outcompeting fossil fuels, despite the heavy subsidies fossil fuels (and nuclear power) get. They also are getting steadily cheaper, while fossil fuels can be expected to rise as supply diminishes—the pipelines are going in so fast because of the NEED of the gas companies to get their product out to where they HOPE to find better prices—the drillers have been steadily losing money for the whole decade of the fracking “miracle.“ Wall Street is becoming skeptical. The thing about solar and wind is that once they’re built, the fuel keeps arriving, free. Of course, there isn’t much of a wind resource in our area. But there is in the mountain heights, and off the Virginia coast. And solar works fine here—I’ve had an off-grid system for ten years, works great.

By Mary Wildfire on 02.28.2019

From the entry: 'Need for Atlantic Coast Pipeline Falls'.

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Yes, West Virginia spends a LOT of money on education.
But where does it go?  Is it wasted?  Down the drain hole of bureaucracy?

We spend 7th highest per student and what to show for it?
Being 49th or 50th in ratings?

By where does the money go? on 02.27.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

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Seeing the president of the WV AFT shaking his raised clinched fist in disrespect for the WV legislature tells it all.

WV’s teacher unions are allowed to function as separate branches of government with veto power over WV’s elected officials and their only role is to get more benefits for their members.

Where is the evidence that unions have done anything recently in any WV school system to help create an educational show piece? Can anyone cite an example?

Furthermore what have unions done to develop innovative plans for moving the State’s k-12 education system forward to pry us off our bottom rung rankings? The answer is—nothing exists. 

Conditions will not change for the better until the day our legislators quit pandering to unions to end k-12 decision-making driven by mob rule and raw emotions.

By Unions Failed WV's Children on 02.26.2019

From the entry: 'In West Virginia, the Politicians Fail, and the Teachers Rise'.

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The principal reason for opposition to 451 is fear by union chiefs that public charter schools could outshine performances of non-participating schools to embarrass WV’s entrenched K-12 education establishment.

To attempt to scare the public, there were claims that the underlying motive for opposition to charter schools is the sinister plan to privatize them to permit the rich and powerful to make money off education at the expense of WV’s children.

It is alarming that unions failed to propose comprehensive plans, inclusive of meaningful accountability mechanisms, designed to improve WV’s schools.

Their objective seems to be to protect the status quo instead of being effective partners in improving education for the State’s children.

There are examples in the USA where charter schools resulted in significant K-12 education improvements. Of course some failed.

Why is it irrational to establish a limited few charter schools in WV as demonstration projects to incorporate approaches applied in highly successful charter schools while avoiding mistakes of the schools that failed?

Nothing else has worked in getting WV out of being near the bottom with K-12 education quality—-so why continue with business as usual while expecting better outcomes?

By Unions Failed WV Education on 02.21.2019

From the entry: 'In West Virginia, the Politicians Fail, and the Teachers Rise'.

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If passed when will this take effect? I’m a single mother who has a drug felony from another state. I can’t get food stamps to help me because I a drug felon. I work so my income is to much for one person. I have a son whom him and I barley survive. Cause of my record. I’ve held the job I am at now for 5 years. But since they can’t use me. They use my income. But not me and doing it that way I make to much money.

By Kayla on 02.21.2019

From the entry: 'Bill to Let Drug Felons Get Food Stamps Passes WV Senate'.

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John & Family,  Sorry to hear of Nyla’s passing!  GOD will take care of you!!  GOD BLESS EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU IN THIS SAD TIME !!!  RIP Nyla !

By Anita L. Adams - New Concord, Ohio on 02.15.2019

From the entry: 'Nyla Leah Frymier Poole'.

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“But Cathy Kunkel, an energy analyst with the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, said utility filings in those states now show the outlook has changed dramatically - in part because of competition from cheap, renewable energy.“

That is utter rubbish.  There is no “cheap, renewable energy.“  Solar and wind are more expensive, even taking subsidies into consideration.  Hydro is more expensive, nuclear is more expensive.

Claiming otherwise is at best fake news, and at worst deliberate misdirection and lying.  Merely claiming renewable energy is less expensive doesn’t make it so.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 02.15.2019

From the entry: 'Need for Atlantic Coast Pipeline Falls'.

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It was brought to my attention there was an article published in the Gilmer Free Press under Reader’s Comments dated 2-11-19.
This was written by Tammy White which many think it was me (Tammy Foster).  Twenty years (or more) “White” was my last name.
My son does take daily medication at the high school (which somehow this is quite a coincidence).  I want to clarify that I DID NOT write that article!
Now that I have straighten this out….. please read what I have say about this situation at Gilmer County High School:
The secretary or secretaries that were mentioned have never been rude to me or my son in person or by phone.  It is actually the opposite!  They are kind, caring, professional and thorough with distributing my son’s meds.
Not only do they make sure he gets the correct dosage daily but they keep a close inventory on the meds and call me when I need to restock them.
It broke my heart to read the negative article written last week and I was appalled my (old) name was on it.
My son and I trust and depend on these wonderful ladies.  We would like to take this opportunity to THANK them for taking excellent responsibility and care of our child and other students.

By Tammy Foster (not White) on 02.13.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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I’m sorry for your loss.

By Danny Nicholson on 02.12.2019

From the entry: 'Vera Marlene Lyons'.

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There is some issues going on at GCHS. I’m starting here in Hope’s that it will be addressed and corrected.  The secretary was rude when I turned in medicine for my son to be taken on a daily basis. Nor is it her business why he takes it, or how often. Anyway, is she certified in giving meds out.  I thought that the school employed a nurse. Maybe she should answer the phone or should I say message on her cell. She had no idea how many I handed in she didnt count them. Talks about her co workers. Then she gets upset nobody talks to her. She is 2 face. Talking about them is very unprofessional.
I hope this is taken care of or my next step is to the state department. Your choice

By Tammy white on 02.11.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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It is welcomed news as reported in the Democrat that Gilmer’s GCES students are making progress in learning math and English Learning Arts.

The principal, teachers, and all staff deserve high praise for the progress. Let’s not forget efforts of students too plus their parents who encourage them at home.

In addition to rates of increase for learning progress it would be helpful to be informed of percentages of students in the different grades who are at grade level for math and ELA.

Nothing was reported about learning progress at the GCHS and the LCES bi-county school. When are reports for those schools going to be given?

By Positive School News on 02.08.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The lights are up at the Linn school.
Often flashing nights and weekends when NO ONE is on school property.

And you expect lights to work….???
when the WVDE, the WVBE built the school with FIVE TOO MANY CLASSROOMS !!??

*** The WVBE is incapable of meaningful education.
Why do you think the WV Legislature created the current ‘education overhaul’ bill without consulting the WV State Board of Ed? ***

By you are joking I guess? on 02.07.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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“The Environmental Protection Agency issued regular updates for about 100 water pollutants almost four years ago ... “

That would have been the Obama EPA, and the intention wasn’t to provide better water, it was an attempt to control business activity through the use of regulation.

In other words, a power-grab by a politician obsessed with it.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pay McGroyne on 02.06.2019

From the entry: 'One Charleston Manufacturer Pressing for Delay of Water Rules'.

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Would the County’s school board take action to help improve safety conditions at the LCES?

The way it is now it can be uncertain if children are present at the school to require a reduction of speed to 15 mph while on Rt. 33.

It would eliminate uncertainty if a flashing lights system were to be installed so the lights could be turned on when children are present.

By LCES Safety Concern on 01.31.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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Why is it that on Gilmer County’s school system web site biographical information including education backgrounds for all school board members and their pictures are not posted?

Other counties have the information. Why not us?

By School Board Member Backgrounds? on 01.23.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The only reason for our not using a version of the goal-driven Kentucky method would be a veto by controlling elitists opposed to establishing meaningful accountability for Gilmer County’s school system.

Without using the method it would be easier to continue to pawn off information that cannot be used to accurately document progress with student proficiencies for reading, math, science, and college and career readiness.

By School System Accountability Needed on 01.20.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The KY approach would be valuable to Gilmer County for use in disclosing progress of our two schools in contributing to better lives for our children.

For goals for which progress would be off schedule, the tracking approach would be an objective basis for making mid-course adjustments in our school system to get better results.

By using the approach school board members could be more effective with goal-driven governing, and getting results would be the responsibility of the County’s Superintendent of Schools and school principals.

Overall,the approach would establish meaningful accountability which is sorely lacking in WV’s school systems.

By Establish School System Accountability on 01.18.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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Accomplished communicators have a knack for reducing complex information to its simplest form for effectiveness in getting messages across.

WV’s convoluted strategic plans for schools must follow the State’s rigid guidelines. The plans are confusing and inadequately designed for establishing accountability for getting results.

Kentucky is making progress with improving K-12 education outcomes and one reason is the clarity of specific goals for its schools and the job being done with tracking results.

Google—-2018 Prichard Committee Update to glean what is being done in Kentucky. The approach could be used for Gilmer’s two schools with a single sheet of paper for each school.

The beauty of the Prichard approach is that instead of relying on confusing and lengthy written out material with undefined abbreviations, technical jargon, and head scratching generalities, specific goals and annual results in achieving them are presented graphically.

Perfect real world example of a picture being worth a thousand words.

Board of Education members why couldn’t the Prichard approach be used for Gilmer County? It would be inexpensive, it could be updated easily on an annual basis, and everyone in the County would know how the school system is being administered to achieve measurable results.

Perhaps Mr. David Ramezan could post Prichard material on the GFP to show its simplicity.

By Advocate For Clarity on 01.17.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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The scandal of the too small school?
Don’t forget…
The scandal of the too big school is half of the whole state intervention mess.  FIVE rooms more than needed at the Linn, Lewis County school.

Results are from nepotism, cronyism, and educational stupidity….as well as scoffing at those who attempted to sound the alarm.

Bloated egos was the frosting on the Litter Box Cake Mix.

By School Truth is in the Litter Box on 01.17.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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During intervention the State had dictatorial control of our school system to include all decisions related to the GCES.

One result is that the GCES was built too small.

An investigation is needed to determine who was responsible for the bad decision, and what role the no-bid architectural firm had in designing and constructing the school.

Something major happened to cause the GCES to be built too small. Was something dropped at the expense of adequate class room space as a result of having to spend extra money because a poor site was selected?

Minimally, gross incompetency on the State’s part is the explanation for the disaster foisted onto the County.

A question pertains to the new gym. Lots of effort was taken by the State to try to convince the public that a competition gym instead of a regular gym was needed.

Did the competition gym cost extra money at the expense of needed classroom space? If the answer is affirmative who was responsible for deciding on the more expensive gym?

What about the enormous pit at the GCES? Was money spent on it at the expense of classrooms because something was wrong with the school’s site that was selected by the State?

Nothing similar to the pit has been seen at other sites where new WV schools were built.

Why has there been a failure for a thorough investigation to have occurred to expose the facts?

The obvious explanation is that powerful elitists in control do not want tracks leading to them, and they have veto power over a meaningful investigation including one done by a leading newspaper.

By GCES Built Too Small Scandal on 01.15.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Pat McGroyne is spot on.
High speed internet is simply another failure of WV state government.

If the elected in our state, were doing the job expected by voters….we should have very few problems or issues?

By Gilmer resident on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Muddling has another distinct symptom. It is the tendency for administrators in control to emphasize processes and procedures while avoiding disclosure of progress, or the lack thereof, in achieving learning results.

The purpose is another way to avoid personal accountability for school system failures.

By Muddling Epidemic In WV School Systems on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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West Virginia is number one!
Our politicians are the best that can be had.
They are also the lobbyers dream come true.
No one—-can out-muddle our elected reps !

By we know it on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Suggestion after reading strategic plans for the GCHS and the GCES.

How about the school board requiring that for each school an informative executive summary be written to include——where each school stands on reading, math, and science proficiency, what the term proficiency means to eliminate the confusion, student proficiency goals for the two school, target time to expect goals to be achieved, and a statement to commit to keeping the public informed of progress in achieving the goals at designated intervals (e.g. quarterly) during a school year.

Omit confusing abbreviations and technical terms understood only by a select few in the education field, and written for comprehension by reasonable persons.

Leave it up to the County’s professional educators to determine how to get the job done with continual laser-like focus on getting results.

By Student Learning at GCHS and GCES on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Muddling infects federal, state, and local government entities where personal accountability for top officials to get measurable results rarely exists.

Muddling practitioners are famous for passing off information unrelated to measurable proof that effective problem-solving has occurred. A common example is emphasizing how much public money is being spent to attempt to convince tax payers that magnitudes of expenditures are always directly correlated to levels of problem-solving successes.

Muddling by an organization is characterized by the existence of thick planning documents replete with vagueness and lack of clarity, undefined technical terms, and mysterious acronyms.

Muddling thrives on intentional ambiguity and confusion designed to protect muddlers and their organizations.

By Muddling 101 on 01.11.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Gilmer County is not the only place in the USA that has been faced with its students failing to meet proficiency standards for science, reading, and math.

The difference here is that evidence is lacking to conclusively demonstrate that Gilmer County’s officials in control have exerted proper efforts to profit form powerful lessons learned elsewhere to use that knowledge to help solve learning deficiencies in our schools.

In fact, a convincing argument could be made that the approach in the County has been the one professional planners designate as muddling through.

Classic symptoms of muddling through include failure to thoroughly analyze categories of causes contributing to problems followed up by using the information to develop a comprehensive plan to do the most good in getting better results by treating key causes instead of symptoms.

Muddling typically involves officials assigning blame for lack of progress to outside forces e.g., the “culture”, the State did it to us, and poverty. Haven’t we heard plenty of that?

Muddling must be eliminated if we want progress in solving non-performance problems within the County’s school system. Does anyone disagree?

By End School System Muddling on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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It is unclear after reading school board meeting minutes what progress if any is being made by GCHS and GCES principals in improving student proficiency in reading, math and science.

Why not allocate a few sentences in the minutes to summarize what the two principals reported to the school board?

All it would take to get the critical information out to citizens would be for the new school board to act on this.

Does anyone have a problem with the suggested change to keep Gilmer’s bill paying public informed?

By Need Specifics For Principal's Reports on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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“High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).“

I disagree with much of what Mr.Boggs believes.  That said, high-speed broadband is the single most important step the State of WV could take to improve the business climate and provide more opportunities for its citizens.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Conversation at local eatery.
Shortly after election.
Individuals were educators.

‘You think we have school problems now, wait until these new folks take the steering wheel’.

‘Students, parents, staff are all going to be in the soup’.

Sounds as if Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving vacation-deer season times have all taken a big hit.  If that is true, the union teachers need to come together, stand their ground, along with parents, and hold this new board accountable.

Have a local strike if need be.
Request resignations.
Vote of no confidence.

Schools employees can win.
You have done it before.
Just stick together.

By overheard conversation on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Scholarship must be the most important focus in Gilmer County’s schools.

Brought up the ZOOMWV Data Dashboard site to review the most recent State achievement test results for GCHS’s 11th grade.

Folks, Gilmer is in serious trouble. Proficiency for math=24%, reading=41%, and science=24%.

On an A through F grading scales the GCHS gets an F for all three subject areas.

What does the new school board have to show for inroads it has made since last July to make critically needed proficiency improvements at the HS? Citizens deserve answers to the question.

By ZOOMWV Data Dashboard on 01.07.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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A thorough accounting for where all the public money went could be easily achieved by a competent accountant.

Isn’t there a special account at the County’s school board office for expenditures related to all bills paid and who got the money?

Following the money trail always gets results along with verification of means, motives, and access.

By Let An Accountant Dig It Out on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If central office financial records for all public money paid out for everything from site planning, site studies and development, and everything else to get to completion of the GCES and the LES—- what is the reason?

It is known that money was spent on the Arbuckle site and Cedar Creek, and public money was paid out for the LES too.

Were County records for the spending purged and if that happened who ordered the action? The records are either in the County’s central office or they aren’t.

By End Financial Secrecy on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Hasn’t the time come to finally start naming names and making people accountable?

By Get It Done on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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How about the “BIG WV WINDFALL”....?

For 3 or 4 months now we keep hearing about the millions of dollars of tax revenue collected.

Millions and millions above ‘estimates’.  Were those ‘estimates’ honest, or fudged to begin with, so as to request higher tax rates?

Well, Justice and the Legislature now have our dollars, what will become of this windfall? Will we see tax rates lowered?  Doubt full, but we should.

Likely this windfall, created by “over-taxation”, will simply create a “party atmosphere” of legislative spending. Watch the Charleston ‘gangsters’ get their wish lists ready this coming session.

By taxpayers always lose on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Yes.  The blame Does seem to fall to ‘local’ people. In small places like Gilmer County, it’s just a poker game, boys, and the deep pockets win.  Money speaks volumes where ‘officials’ stay silent.  Go ask for the records, see what they’ve got.

By CheatersNeverWin on 11.20.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Teachers and staff knew from the beginning that the GCES was going to be too small. They were ordered by the State to keep quiet about the shortfall and other serious concerns too.

A sixth grader could understood how many rooms were needed by dividing total student numbers to attend the school by how many students should be in a classroom.

Under sizing was the State’s fault and it cannot be rationalized any other way including to assign the blame to local people. Same applies to the over sized LCES.

By Corrupt State Intervention on 11.19.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There will never be a full, public accounting of the gross mishandling of tax dollars during WVDOE intervention.
Too many local jobs and too many embarrassments of both elected and appointed bureaucrats.
These types cover dirt for each other.

Any local whistle blowers?  Doubtful.

One school built short 4 classrooms and another built with 5 too many.  Can it get more stupid than that?
Mr. Degree and Ms. Common Sense seldom travel together.

By Full accounting will never be revealed. Never. on 11.18.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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GCBOE when the two principals give reports at board meeting could the gist of what they said be summarized in minutes to keep the County informed?

It was a welcomed development by the Board to require principals to give reports particularly if there are required updates on progress designed to improve student learning for reading, math, and other subjects.

We still have not been informed about the status of science proficiency at the GCHS based on the latest testing. Why has the State failed to release the data? Were results too dismal?

By More Specifics For Principal's Reports on 11.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If it is going to cost extra money to eliminate over crowding at the GCES the financial information referenced by Do It Ourselves should be presented to Charleston and the press too.

That would help frame a solid case that crowding problems were not caused by Gilmer County because all decisions related to facilities were dictated by officials over whom the County had no oversight authority during the State’s intervention.

By Follow The Money on 11.16.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is assumed that all records for spending to include money paid out for the LCES, dropped Arbuckle site, dropped Cedar Creek site, and all bills for the GCES are in the Gilmer Schools central office.

The new GCBOE has authority to get to the truth by demanding a thorough accounting for all the spending.

Afterwards the financial officer in the central office could easily access existing computerized records and to use the information for a report to the GCBOE and the public.

By Do It Ourselves on 11.15.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Notice that most of the ‘officials’ in Gilmer County also hold regular day jobs - sometimes working on more than one paying ‘job’ at a time in the same office space. This common practice is concerning for many reasons, and it needs to be talked about when so many go without.

By QuestionablePractice on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There are two views in the County related to the under built GCES. Although the State built the school with inadequate classrooms one group believes that we should move on to let go of the past.

Isn’t this a form of advocacy for a coverup to prevent accountability for the State’s incompetence and mismanagement?

The other group believes that there should be a full accounting for all public money spent up to the time the GCES was completed to include disclosure of recipients of the public money. 

The accounting should be done for all public money spent at the LCES, the Arbuckle site, Cedar Creek, and finally the GCES.

Reasons for the under built GCES should be fully disclosed too. When the State was in control this information was kept secret from the public with loud claims that there was adequate space at the GCES.

Now it is known that there is inadequate space at the GCES and the problem is left to Gilmer County to fix. Only in WV!

By Citizens For Financial Disclosure on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Unprofessional issues,rude commentsand rolling eyes at the high school has become an issue. Being on cell phone talking to boyfriends,when parents etc.going into the office. Since the teachers were ask not to be on them while students in the classroom. The one in the office should not be allowed to talk personal to her boyfriend, or whoever. Also, I hope this is corrected, the personal days, etc that the board provides to staff shouldn’t be allowed to use to work or operate a second job. Let’s get the priorities straight.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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GULMER COUNTY BOE. It is time for me to let you know some issues that is going on at the High school.  I’m hoping this will be addressed at the next board meeting. 1. It should not matter if an employee has a second job or run a business. The priority job is for the board. One should not be allowed to use any time from the board to run your business. There is going on
If they want to run your business than go but not on the boards time. I would like for all employees be treated the equal. They should not be allowed to use the time the board gives them for other jobs.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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While at it there should be an investigation of why the LES was build with too many classrooms and the GCES was built with too few. At the very least what happened is a WV horror story example of the State’s waste and mismanagement.

By Where Is The Investigation? on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is obvious that the GCES has a major space problem.

What options for dealing with the State’s mismanagement to cause the serious blunder are being considered by the Board of Education?

Could the original architectural design for the dropped Cedar Creek site be compared to what resulted at the GCES to accurately determine the extent of classroom space alterations?

If the architectural design at the GCES is different than the original plan for Cedar Creek the next step should be to determine reasons for the changes and where the money originally planned for needed classrooms went.

By INFO REQUEST TO GCBOE on 11.09.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It’s long been known that Justice doesn’t happen in Gilmer County “because it all comes down to money”. And for those in charge of handling it and making decisions, it comes down to being competent to do the job,  keep accurate books and accounts and I’m sorry to say, that is seriously lacking in Gilmer County.

By Follow the Paycheck(s) on 11.06.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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What is GSC’s BOG’s plan for getting money for the next payment on the $38,000,000 bond loan the Gilmer County Commission approved?

Will the State pay or will the money come from private donations?

Money will have to come from somewhere to avoid a default.

By Where Is The Money? on 11.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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So sorry to hear of Kendall’s passing. I have fond memories of him at Uncle Paul’s store and the family reunions. I’m sure he will be missed greatly by those closest to him.
Please accept condolences from me and my family.

By Steve Lewis on 11.04.2018

From the entry: 'Kendall Goodwin'.

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GSC’s present plight is no secret and its future existence is in question.

Instead of expressing attitudes that GSC is being picked on could the Blue Ribbon Commission reveal why the College “tested out” as it did to fail to get more State money?

Was the “grading system” based on student enrollment trends, retention, time taken to get a degree, academic reputation, inept governance and administration, and other factors to block more funding? Informative specifics were not disclosed.

Teachers know that concerned students who want to do better always seek advice on what needs to be done to get better grades.

Similar to concerned students GSC’s supporters should be informed of what needs to be done to position the College for improved chances for survival to include eligibility for more State funding.

Saying that GSC is being picked on does nothing to help solve its nagging problems.

By What Was The Grading System? on 10.30.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Well thank you, Details Please,  for asking!  So many problems in Gilmer and education is just one.  Look at the town, take a good look around.  Remember who runs unopposed at election time.  Vote.  Make a difference.  Hold authority figures responsible.  Allow videos, minutes and more to be shared on GFP again, for transparency.  Know your neighbors, help a friend.  Be good to each other. Amen.

By Reader7 on 10.29.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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I will truly miss my Uncle Stephen.  Telling me so much information about from gardening to canning. Just to listening to him talk with such passion for everything that he does… he had a sense of humor that always warms my heart.. listening to him play the banjo sometimes even when he didn’t feel good. he is always willing to share his recipes and his ways of doing things… his solar information he was always studying something ... I’m remember one time we asked him where he got his blackberries when it wasn’t Blackberry season and he go there’s a store down the road it’s called Walmart they have everything… He was so funny.  I love you.. xoxo.

By Robin Nunez on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Sorry for your loss. He sure did look like his father.

By Buck Edwards on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Reader 7, please give details for your suggested solutions to the County’s concerns you addressed.

The information would be helpful for consideration by school system administrators and the general public.

By Details Please on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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