GilmerFreePress.net

Hunting & Trapping

Hunting & Trapping

Mountaineer Food Bank Receives $50,000 Donation from 2015 Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt

Mountaineer Food Bank receives $50,000 donation from 2015 Governor’s
One Shot Deer Hunt event for Hunters Helping the Hungry;
Total of more than half-a-million dollar raised over nine years

The Free Press WV

CHARLESTON, WV – Governor Earl Ray Tomblin, members of the Governor’s One Shot Committee and several state senators and delegates recently presented a check to the Mountaineer Food Bank, representing $50,000 raised during the ninth annual Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt, held Oct. 23-25, 2015, at Stonewall Resort State Park. Brig. Gen. Chuck Yeager, USAF, Ret., was the featured guest at the event.

The first event in 2007 raised $17,000, the second in 2008 raised $35,000, the third in 2009 raised $50,000, the fourth in 2010 raised $75,000, the fifth in 2011 raised $75,000; the sixth in 2012 raised $70,000, the seventh in 2013 raised $65,000, and the eighth in 2014 raised $65,000. Donations received at the 2015 event brought the total amount raised to more than half-a-million dollars over the life of the event.

The money will go toward expenses associated with the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program (HHH), administered by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, to distribute venison to needy families across the state through the Mountaineer Food Bank. The check was presented Jan. 21, 2016, during a ceremony at the State Capitol in Charleston.

The Governor’s One Shot event is sponsored by WVDNR and the Governor’s One Shot Committee, which organizes the event each year. Official with the Mountaineer Food Bank, accepted the check with thanks to everyone who contributed to the Governor’s One Shot.

Private individuals and businesses donate money for the opportunity to participate in guided antlerless deer hunts on private property near Stonewall Resort State Park. The event wraps up with an auction and an award banquet. All venison from the hunt, along with profits from the sponsorships, goes to the Mountaineer Food Bank.

The HHH program allows hunters to donate legally harvested deer to certified processors so the meat can be distributed to a network of more than 550 local soup kitchens, food pantries, shelters, senior centers, missions, churches and community centers around the state.

The HHH program has been highly successful since it began in 1992, providing more than a million family style meals to the neediest of West Virginians. However, the program also requires cash donations to pay for processing and distribution costs to benefit these needy individuals. More information about the HHH program is available at wvdnr.gov/Hunting/HHH.shtm.

West Virginia Buck Season Delivers Dollars To The State

The Free Press WV

The state estimates that the West Virginia economy gets a big boost from the annual buck firearms season.

The Division of Natural Resources estimates that more than 330,000 hunters will spend a total of $230 million in the state during the two-week season, which began Monday.

That spending means $34 million in tax revenue.

The DNR also estimates that 5,700 West Virginians are employed as a result of the hunting industry.

Motels throughout the north-central region of the state are already booked.

Hunters travel from neighboring states to stalk deer in West Virginia woods.

Passage of Sportsmen’s Act OF 2015

Legislation will increase public lands access for sportsmen and promote West Virginia’s outdoor recreation economy

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV), co-chair of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus and member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) Committee, applauded the bipartisan passage of the Sportsmen’s Act of 2015. The legislation will enhance hunting, fishing and recreational shooting opportunities by increasing access to federal lands. It also includes the permanent authorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The bill passed the ENR Committee by a voice vote.

“As a lifelong, avid sportsman, I know firsthand that our hunting, fishing and outdoor heritage is so important to who we are as West Virginians and as Americans,” Senator Manchin said. “In West Virginia, it’s a family affair and an opportunity to pass along, from one generation to another, a deep and lasting appreciation for all the outdoors have to offer. I believe that we should protect these traditions that help define who we are. This bipartisan bill will boost West Virginia’s economy while expanding hunting and fishing rights and allowing people a greater ability to enjoy the outdoors.”


Senator Manchin’s remarks, as prepared for delivery, are below:

As an avid sportsman, I believe that hunting and fishing are an integral part of the American culture and a powerful force of good protecting and preserving the natural world around us.

In West Virginia, it’s a family affair and an opportunity to pass along – from one generation to another – a deep and lasting appreciation for all the outdoors have to offer.

One of my top priorities is to make sure that the people I represent can carry on that tradition by ensuring they have access to hunting, fishing and recreational shooting on our nation’s public lands.

In my home state, we have more than 1.6 million acres of public land open to hunting with 28 shooting ranges on these lands.

We have a year-round fishing season, with more than 20,000 miles of streams and more than 100 public fishing lakes.

But this is about more than heritage and family tradition – hunting and fishing are big business in the Mountain State.

In 2011 alone, sportsmen and women spent $870 million on hunting and fishing in West Virginia and paid $81 million in state and local taxes.

Title II of this bill establishes an important precedent that seems pretty common sense to me – Federal land should be open to hunting and fishing, within existing laws, unless there is a reason for it not to be.

Nothing in the bill opens any sensitive areas that are already closed to these activities.

It merely establishes the precedent that our public lands should be open to the public so that people can enjoy them.

I think it’s a shame that we all too often get caught up in debates between environmentalists and sportsmen – both of whom want to preserve and protect the great outdoors.

Gale Norton, Secretary of the Department of the Interior under President George W. Bush, once said:

“Dating back to Teddy Roosevelt, hunters have been the pillar of conservation in America, doing more than anyone to conserve wildlife and its habitat.”

I’m a firm believer that introducing someone to the great outdoors through hunting and fishing is one of the easiest and most effective ways to show them why conservation matters.

I was also very pleased to see that the permanent authorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was included in this bill.

In West Virginia, LWCF has helped maintain and expand access to some of our State’s natural treasures for the benefit of all.

Access projects funded by LWCF, in places like the Monongahela National Forest, Canaan Valley, and the Gauley River, not only keep public lands public for sportsmen, but also promote West Virginia’s thriving and growing outdoor recreation economy.

A Section 6 habitat grant was the centerpiece of a project up in Cheat Canyon that leveraged state, local, and private funds to protect another incredible river that provides outdoor recreation in the northern part of the state.

A different type of grant protected key battlefield areas around Harper’s Ferry last year. 

The permanent reauthorization of the LWCF is another one of my top priorities, and I commend my colleagues for working together, across partisan lines, to include it in this bill.

For the past two Congresses, we have tried and failed to pass a Sportsmen’s package through the Senate despite strong bipartisan support.

I commend Senator Murkowski and Senator Heinrich for their leadership on the Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act this Congress, and I urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill.

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation presents $50,000 donation for West Virginia Elk Restoration Project

At the regular quarterly meeting of the Natural Resources Commission held Sunday February 22, 2015, in South Charleston, Bill Carman, Regional Director for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF) and its West Virginia State Chapter President Brian Satterfield presented a Seed Grant check in the amount of $50,000 to the West Virginia DNR for its active elk restoration program.

These funds can now be used by WVDNR to support its active elk restoration program.  RMEF has been instrumental with the restoration of elk in Kentucky and Virginia just astride of the Mountain State’s designated southwestern coalfields elk zone consisting of all or parts of Logan, Mingo, Wyoming, McDowell, Lincoln, Wayne and Boone counties.

The Gilmer Free Press


The commissioners and WVDNR Chief of Wildlife Resources Curtis Taylor thanked RMEF for this generous contribution, which is designated to kick-off the program. Revenues for such grants are generated by fundraising banquets held by local chapters here and elsewhere. West Virginia presently has four active chapters.

“The mission of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage,” Carman said.

Accepting the contribution on behalf of WVDNR were elk zone wildlife and law enforcement coordinators Randy Kelley and Sgt. Terry Ballard, respectively.

**DNR**

Photo courtesy of the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources

In photo, left to right: WVDNR Sgt. Terry Ballard, RMEF Regional Director Bill Carman, West Virginia State Chapter President Brian Satterfield, WVDNR District Biologist Randy Kelley.

Proposals for Doe Hunting

The drastic drop in the number of bucks hunters killed in 2014 is reflected in the proposed regulations for the 2015 antlerless deer hunting season in West Virginia. Whether the changes are enough to satisfy hunters remain to be seen.

“The season framework is very similar or the same as in years past,” said DNR Game Management Supervisor Gary Foster. “There will be a lot of counties that are the same, but a lot of counties will be a lot more restrictive. That’s primarily due to that decreased buck gun harvest.”

Under the proposed regulations for 2015 Boone, Tucker, Wayne, Webster and portions of Clay, Fayette, Greenbrier, Kanawha, Mineral, Pendleton and Raleigh counties would have no antlerless hunting season.

Hunters in Randolph, Mercer, Nicholas, Pocahontas and portions of Clay, Fayette Raleigh counties will need to apply for a limited number of tags in 2015 and the bag limit will be one antlerless deer.

The biggest change may be a reduction in the antlerless bag limit in selected counties. Hunters in Barbour, Braxton, Cabell, Grant, Hancock, Kanawha (north of Elk River and west of Corridor G), Lincoln, Marshall, Pleasants, Preston, Summers, Taylor, and Upshur Counties will see their bag limit for 2015 set at one antlerless deer.

The Gilmer Free Press


The other major change will be in the number of counties where hunters are required to kill an antlerless deer before they could kill their second buck.  Thirty-one counties carried the so called “earn a second buck” restriction in 2014. The number this year is down to nine counties or parts of counties.  Those are Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, part of Greenbrier, Hampshire, Part of Mineral, Morgan, Ritchie, and Wood Counties.  The bag limit in those counties for antlerless deer remained at three as proposed by game biologists.

The bag limit will also remain at three without the “earn a second buck” restriction in Berkeley, Brooke, Hardy, Harrison, Jackson, Jefferson, Lewis, Marion, Mason, Monongalia, Monroe, Ohio, Putnam, Roane, Tyler, Wetzel, and Wirt County.  The eastern portion of Pendleton County was also added to the three antlerless deer limit for 2015.

“The 2014 harvest was definitely low, but I don’t think it’s a reflection of a lower deer population,” said Foster. “There are a lot of other factors that came into play including the really strong mast crop and terrible weather in the first week of buck season, particularly on the first day.  The data looks very similar to what we had in 2010 after the bumper crop when mast was at an all time high.”

The proposals keep the season framework intact.  The season would be October 22-24, November 23-December 5 concurrent with the buck season. December 17-19 and December 29-31 on private land.  The season dates for public land include November 23-December 5 concurrent with buck season, December 17-19, December 29-31.

The agency indicated harvest objectives and population density is more inline with management plans on the state’s public hunting areas. The proposals include a limited antlerless hunt with a bag limit of one on the Elk River, Big Ugly, and Wallback WMA’s and Greenbreir State Forest and Kumbrabow State Forest.

Biologist suggest unlimited hunting with a one deer bag limit for does on Castleman’s Run, Stonecoal Lake, Camp Creek, McClintic, Stonewall Jackson Lake, Amherst/Plymouth, Cross Creek, Beury Mountain, Chief Cornstalk, Lewis-Wetzel, Bluestone, and Greenbottom Wildlife Management Areas as well as Cooper’s Rock State Forest.  Any public hunting area not specified in the proposal would follow the county’s proposed regulations for antlerless deer hunting.

The dates and bag limits are only proposals at this point. They will go out for public comment and the agency will accept comments on the ideas during the upcoming sectional meetings in March.  The state Natural Resources Commission will vote on the proposals at their next meeting.

~~  Chris Lawrence ~~

West Virginia Seasons End for Furbearer Trapping and Hunting February 28, 2015

The Gilmer Free Press

The West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (DNR) reminds sportsmen and women that the hunting and trapping seasons for red fox, gray fox, bobcat and raccoon ends February 28, 2015.

The trapping seasons for coyote, otter, mink, skunk, opossum, weasel and muskrat also will end February 28, 2015.

The trapping season for beaver ends March 31, 2015.

Beaver trappers are reminded that it is illegal to set traps during the month of March for beaver, unless those traps are in water.

Trappers should be aware that it is illegal to set traps or leave traps set after Noon on the last day of the respective season.

The trapping season for fisher ended January 31, 2015.

All beaver, bobcat, otter and fisher pelts are required to be checked at an official game checking station within 30 days of the close of their respective seasons.

Beaver trappers should be aware that starting April 01, 2015, they must check game by one of the following three ways:

•  Internet - www.wvhunt.com

•  Stopping at any license agent (you will not have to bring the animal with you)

•  Telephone - Call 1.844.WVCHECK (1.844.982.4325) - DNR ID number required.

Trappers, hunters and fur dealers are reminded that furs shipped out of West Virginia must have a fur shipping tag, which is available at DNR District Offices.

Anyone who plans to sell an otter or bobcat pelt outside of the state of West Virginia should obtain a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) seal for each pelt.

All otter and bobcat pelts, usually exported from the United States by licensed fur buyers, must have a CITES seal from the state where the animal was harvested.

The general public is reminded that now, before the trapping season ends, would be a good time to deal with nuisance furbearer problems.

Trappers may be more likely to assist landowners with nuisance problems while their gear is in working order and pelts are prime.

Senior Lifetime Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping License designation on driver’s licenses and ID Cards

West Virginia DMV and DNR working together to provide opportunity

Division of Natural Resources Director Bob Fala and Division of Motor Vehicles Commissioner Pat Reed announce the opportunity for seniors who have purchased the Class XS Senior Lifetime Hunting and Fishing License to obtain a Class XS designation on their West Virginia driver’s license or identification card.

The Gilmer Free Press


According to Commissioner Reed, “DMV is pleased to offer a new, convenient driver’s license and ID card designation for our customers, in addition to other designation opportunities already available, including veteran, hearing impaired and organ donor.”

Working together with other organizations to further enhance good customer service is important to both agencies.  “We are pleased to partner with the DMV to make it easier for our Senior Lifetime License holders to show proof of a license while in the field,” said Director Fala.  “The Class XS License endorsement printed on the West Virginia driver’s license means they only would be required to carry that one proof of identification with them.”

The Senior Lifetime Hunting, Fishing and Trapping license can only be purchased through the DNR South Charleston Office at 324 4th Avenue. To obtain the Senior Lifetime Hunting, Fishing and Trapping designation, customers may visit their nearest DMV regional office and apply for the designation to be added to their driver’s license or ID card.  Customers will need to present the bill of sale for the license, or their permanent Class XS license card as proof of licensure, as well as all applicable documentation for a driver’s license or ID card.

Documentation required includes one proof of physical residency for a Not For Federal driver’s license or ID card and two proofs of physical residency for a For Federal card.

No fees will be collected by the DMV for the designation if the applicant is already renewing their license or ID card.

A $5 duplicate fee will be charged for the Not For Federal driver’s license or ID card if the customer is wanting to just add the designation.

A $15 fee will be collected for the For Federal driver’s license or ID card.

Commissioner Reed encourages all applicants to call the DMV Call Center at 1-800-642-9066 or visit the DMV website at www.dmv.wv.gov with any questions before going to a regional office.  “Our focus is customer service, and we want our customers to have a pleasant and efficient visit to the DMV.  Our fully-staffed Call Center and website are both great information resources to ensure that all of the necessary documents are in place before going to the DMV.”

For additional information about the senior lifetime hunting, trapping and fishing license, please call 304.558.2771 and ask for the licensing office.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 1,016 Fall Turkeys in 2014

The Gilmer Free Press

Preliminary figures for the 2014 fall turkey hunting season reveal that 1,016 turkeys were checked in.

Statewide, the 2014 harvest was very similar to the 999 reported in 2013.

Three of the six administrative districts reported increases in harvest from 2013 levels ranging from a modest 4% increase in District 1 to a 69% increase in District 6, despite having two additional counties closed to hunting.

Districts 2, 4 and 5 reported declines in harvest.

The decline in District 5 was likely due to only one county being open to hunting in 2014, compared to five counties in 2013.

“Fall turkey harvests are highly influenced by hunter participation and interest, annual recruitment and hard mast conditions,“ said Curtis I. Taylor, chief of the Wildlife Resources Section of the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

“Turkey brood production was fairly good this year and it mimicked the 5-year average. Brood observations were 30% higher than last year and 15% better than 2012. These production improvements and better mast conditions led us to anticipate a similar fall harvest, which happened even with six fewer counties open to hunting.“

Top counties for 2014 were Nicholas (90), Greenbrier (84), Randolph (83), Pocahontas (54) and Preston (53).

WEST VIRGINIA FALL WILD TURKEY
  HARVEST, 2010-2014

County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Barbour C C 30 C 18
Brooke 6 6 7 9 2
Hancock 24 8 11 8 5
Harrison 0 20 26 20 20
Marion 12 C 15 4 6
Marshall 15 11 28 10 22
Monongalia 24 13 18 24 15
Ohio 16 12 12 9 3
Preston 80 76 63 77 53
Taylor 7 C 11 8 5
Tucker 28 17 25 14 25
Wetzel 9 C 14 2 18
District 1 Subtotal 221 163 260 185 192
Berkeley 18 35 18 36 19
Grant 42 31 31 41 31
Hampshire 30 22 22 41 25
Hardy 33 27 30 34 27
Jefferson C C C C C
Mineral 17 32 22 28 21
Morgan 14 18 5 13 15
Pendleton 38 38 46 26 31
District 2 Subtotal 192 203 174 219 169
Braxton C C C C C
Clay C C C C C
Lewis 12 22 C 8 C
Nicholas 46 61 98 39 90
Pocahontas 47 68 79 57 54
Randolph 58 142 77 59 83
Upshur 40 42 43 24 C
Webster 37 44 58 35 52
District 3 Subtotal 240 379 355 222 279
Fayette C C C C C
Greenbrier 92 90 138 58 84
McDowell 16 C C 33 C
Mercer C 52 C C C
Monroe 59 63 89 71 52
Raleigh C C C C C
Summers 36 31 71 42 41
Wyoming 31 C C 37 34
District 4 Subtotal 234 236 298 241 211
Boone C C C C C
Cabell 6 5 10 1 C
Kanawha C C C C C
Lincoln 41 C C 14 C
Logan C C C 17 C
Mason 46 57 37 20 33
Mingo C C C C C
Putnam 38 21 21 2 C
Wayne C C C C C
District 5 Subtotal 131 83 68 54 33
Calhoun C C 14 8 C
Doddridge C C C C C
Gilmer C C C 6 C
Jackson 19 33 35 18 36
Pleasants 2 2 5 4 3
Ritchie 12 C C 2 31
Roane C C C C C
Tyler 17 9 6 1 8
Wirt 21 34 22 19 23
Wood 37 43 35 20 31
District 6 Subtotal 108 121 117 78 132
Unknown 0 0 1 0 0
State Total 1126 1185 1186 999 1016

2015 Hunting and Fishing Show in Charleston

The Gilmer Free Press

The annual West Virginia Hunting and Fishing Show is this weekend at the Charleston Civic Center.

The largest outdoor theme gathering in the state is now in its 29th year.

The show features more than 200 exhibitors, including approximately 30 new vendors for 2015.

The exhibitors include product vendors and hunting and fishing outfitters from around the world.

All will be set up in the Civic Center’s Grand Hall from Friday thorough Sunday.

Hours are 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM Saturday, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday.

Admission is $8 for adults, children 6-12 $1, and under 6 admitted free.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 104,223 Deer in 2014

The Gilmer Free Press

Preliminary counts of game checking tags indicate West Virginia hunters harvested 104,223 white-tailed deer during the recently completed bucks-only, antlerless, muzzleloader, archery and youth/Class Q/Class XS deer seasons.

This year’s total harvest was 31 percent less than the 2013 deer harvest of 150,877 and 23 percent below the five-year average of 136,168.

The 2014 harvest is very similar to the 2010 harvest of 106,499, the last time acorns were exceptionally abundant. Successful buck hunters this year had an excellent chance to harvest an older-age buck as the preliminary analysis of deer age data indicates that 25 percent of the antlered bucks brought to the game checking stations during the first three days of traditional buck firearm season were 3.5 years of age or older. A breakdown of the combined 2014 deer seasons reveals hunters harvested 37,766 bucks during the traditional buck firearm season, 39,514 antlerless deer during all antlerless firearm hunting opportunities, 21,653 deer during archery season, and 5,290 deer during muzzleloader season.


Antlerless Deer Season

The 2014 antlerless deer season harvest, which includes the youth/Class Q/Class XS deer season, was 30 percent less than in 2013 and 14 percent below the five-year average of 46,204.

“It is important to note that the antlerless harvest is the key component to any deer management strategy, as it controls the future deer population,” said Director Fala.

In 2014, all or portions of 50 of the 55 counties were open to antlerless firearms season for hunters to harvest one to three antlerless deer, depending on the county. Next year’s antlerless deer hunting opportunity will depend on the need to increase, decrease or stabilize deer populations in each of the 51 counties where firearms deer hunting is permitted.

The top 10 counties are: Preston (1,859), Mason (1,446), Lewis (1,421), Upshur (1,365), Jackson (1,296), Ritchie (1,291), Randolph (1,285), Braxton (1,254), Harrison (1,253) and Monroe (1,214).


Muzzleloader Deer Season

The 2014 muzzleloader harvest of 5,290 was 32 percent less than the 2013 harvest of 7,739, and 28 percent below the five-year average of 7,341. However, this year’s harvest was within 95 deer of the 2012 recorded harvest of 5,385.

The top 10 counties are: Randolph (295), Preston (265), Nicholas (251), Braxton (195), Lewis (193), Harrison (182), Fayette (164), Barbour (156), Mason (149) and Jackson (143).


Archery Deer Season

The bowhunter take of 21,653 deer was 28 percent less than the 2013 harvest of 29,979, 19 percent below the five-year average harvest of 26,721 and is very similar to the 2010 harvest of 21,962. Archery harvests are correlated to hard mast crops, and the above average acorn crop in 2014, like that of 2010, was a significant factor for the lower harvest in 2014.

The top 10 counties are: Preston (968), Randolph (759), Kanawha (757), Mason (710), Wyoming (683), Nicholas (673) Fayette (647), Raleigh (635), Wood (602) and Logan (601).

2014   WEST VIRGINIA DEER HARVEST

County Buck   Gun Antlerless Muzzleloader Archery Total
Barbour 892 1076 156 407 2531
Brooke 255 407 30 302 994
Hancock 201 359 36 374 970
Harrison 946 1253 182 488 2869
Marion 706 949 107 427 2189
Marshall 709 940 108 305 2062
Monongalia 688 879 87 574 2228
Ohio 235 368 37 155 795
Preston 1533 1859 265 968 4625
Taylor 457 529 79 254 1319
Tucker 497 395 87 304 1283
Wetzel 893 938 91 241 2163
District I   Subtotal 8012 9952 1265 4799 24028
Berkeley 528 764 68 378 1738
Grant 800 615 71 269 1755
Hampshire 1111 1048 122 251 2532
Hardy 926 844 106 218 2094
Jefferson 385 474 54 354 1267
Mineral 839 1101 75 428 2443
Morgan 414 544 47 152 1157
Pendleton 891 606 94 245 1836
District   II Subtotal 5894 5996 637 2295 14822
Braxton 936 1254 195 371 2756
Clay 361 99 25 188 673
Lewis 1167 1421 193 366 3147
Nicholas 827 460 251 673 2211
Pocahontas 831 348 121 170 1470
Randolph 1301 1285 295 759 3640
Upshur 1016 1365 142 436 2959
Webster 642 128 33 418 1221
District   III Subtotal 7081 6360 1255 3381 18077
Fayette 746 292 164 647 1849
Greenbrier 1399 887 110 506 2902
McDowell       446 446
Mercer 409 255 33 411 1108
Monroe 1015 1214 125 430 2784
Raleigh 514 222 78 635 1449
Summers 660 903 107 329 1999
Wyoming       683 683
District   IV Subtotal 4743 3773 617 4087 13220
Boone 527 199 131 427 1284
Cabell 424 498 58 280 1260
Kanawha 731 490 57 757 2035
Lincoln 724 739 102 414 1979
Logan       601 601
Mason 1005 1446 149 710 3310
Mingo       284 284
Putnam 571 803 87 431 1892
Wayne 530 284 57 271 1142
District V   Subtotal 4512 4459 641 4175 13787
Calhoun 519 591 75 203 1388
Doddridge 624 748 72 192 1636
Gilmer 673 781 108 159 1721
Jackson 999 1296 143 472 2910
Pleasants 275 276 22 78 651
Ritchie 1164 1291 82 412 2949
Roane 964 1175 97 333 2569
Tyler 579 748 91 229 1647
Wirt 694 917 85 236 1932
Wood 1033 1151 100 602 2886
District   VI Subtotal 7524 8974 875 2916 20289
State   Total

37766

39514

5290

21653

104223

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 2,385 Black Bears in 2014

West Virginia hunters harvested 2,385 black bears during the combined 2014 archery and firearms seasons, according to Colin Carpenter, Black Bear Project Leader for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources. The preliminary harvest data for the combined 2014 seasons were 11 percent lower than the 2013 harvest of 2,692 bears. The black bear harvest of 2014 marks the fifth time in five years that the harvest has topped 2,000 and is tied for the third highest harvest on record.

“Mast conditions in 2014 helped some hunters and hurt others,” said Carpenter. “The 2014 Mast Survey and Hunting Outlook documented vastly improved oak mast conditions over 2013. Historically, abundant oak mast has led to a decreased archery harvest and an increased December firearms harvest, and that scenario held true in 2014. Abundant oak mast statewide prevented archers from patterning bears effectively and led to a decreased archery harvest. However, abundant mast kept bruins out of their winter dens and available to be harvested in the December firearms season.”

Carpenter attributed the decrease in harvest during the September/October firearms seasons to a decrease in hunting days from six in 2013 to three in 2014 in the 16 counties that were open. There was a slight increase in harvest during the concurrent buck-gun/bear season over 2013. Overall, the decrease in archery and September/October firearms harvest was not offset by the increases in the buck-gun and December firearms harvest.

Hunters took 516 bears during the 2014 archery season. The top five counties were Webster (53), Preston (45), Fayette (42), Nicholas (39), and Randolph (39).

Firearms hunters harvested 1,869 bears during 2014. Hunters took 457 bears in September and October, 397 during the concurrent buck-gun/bear season, and 1,015 during the traditional December season. The top five counties were Pocahontas (182), Randolph (172), Greenbrier (167), Pendleton (167) and Webster (160).

The Gilmer Free Press



2014 WEST VIRGINIA BLACK BEAR HARVEST

County

Archery

September/October

Buck Gun

December

Total

Barbour

15

3

13

9

40

Brooke

0

0

0

0

0

Hancock

0

0

0

0

0

Harrison

1

0

0

0

1

Marion

0

0

0

0

0

Marshall

0

0

0

0

0

Monongalia

4

0

3

0

7

Ohio

0

0

0

0

0

Preston

45

16

30

22

113

Taylor

3

0

1

2

6

Tucker

17

23

7

55

102

Wetzel

2

0

0

0

2

District I Subtotal

87

42

54

88

271

Berkeley

0

0

0

0

0

Grant

5

5

9

57

76

Hampshire

3

0

12

7

22

Hardy

5

24

16

76

121

Jefferson

0

0

0

0

0

Mineral

1

2

0

7

10

Morgan

3

0

6

2

11

Pendleton

25

50

14

103

192

District II Subtotal

42

81

57

252

432

Braxton

9

7

13

11

40

Clay

9

5

2

17

33

Lewis

2

0

5

4

11

Nicholas

39

44

35

46

164

Pocahontas

19

48

14

120

201

Randolph

39

52

11

109

211

Upshur

10

6

7

10

33

Webster

53

36

29

95

213

District III Subtotal

180

198

116

412

906

Fayette

42

13

39

17

111

Greenbrier

23

37

20

110

190

McDowell

18

14

0

17

49

Mercer

8

0

4

1

13

Monroe

8

9

11

23

51

Raleigh

18

10

24

11

63

Summers

7

0

5

3

15

Wyoming

20

3

0

8

31

District IV Subtotal

144

86

103

190

523

Boone

16

25

24

35

100

Cabell

0

0

0

0

0

Kanawha

13

18

43

21

95

Lincoln

1

0

0

0

1

Logan

17

5

0

11

33

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

Mingo

8

2

0

2

12

Putnam

0

0

0

0

0

Wayne

0

0

0

0

0

District V Subtotal

55

50

67

69

241

Calhoun

3

0

0

4

7

Doddridge

0

0

0

0

0

Gilmer

1

0

0

0

1

Jackson

0

0

0

0

0

Pleasants

1

0

0

0

1

Ritchie

1

0

0

0

1

Roane

0

0

0

0

0

Tyler

0

0

0

0

0

Wirt

2

0

0

0

2

Wood

0

0

0

0

0

District VI Subtotal

8

0

0

4

12

State Total

516

457

397

1015

2385

MANCHIN ANNOUNCES HIRING OF FRANK JEZIORO AS LIAISON TO SPORTSMEN AND NATURAL RESOURCES GROUPS

The Gilmer Free Press

Jezioro will coordinate state and federal wildlife, sportsmen, and conservation groups

“I am thrilled to announce that a truly dedicated West Virginia public servant, Frank Jezioro, has agreed to join our Senate office as the new Liaison to Sportsmen and Natural Resources. Frank’s vision and foresight coupled with his invaluable support and insight, have always served as an asset to help me better serve the people of West Virginia, whether as Governor or as a United States Senator. As the new Co-Chair of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus and as a member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, Frank’s experience will undoubtedly benefit hunters, fishers and outdoorsmen across the Mountain State and this country.

“It was a privilege to appoint Frank as Director of the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources when I was Governor, where he played a vital role in preserving significant amounts of public land to expand access for hunting and fishing, along with protecting some of our state’s most beautiful landmarks. His intuition and leadership capabilities also helped launch the annual Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt at Stonewall Resort State Park, which since 2007, has raised and donated $455,000 to the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program.”

Deer Hunters in West Virginia Harvest 37,277 Bucks During the Buck Firearms Season

The Gilmer Free Press

Preliminary data collected from game checking stations across the state indicate deer hunters in West Virginia harvested 37,277 bucks during the two-week buck firearms season, which ran from Nov.ember24 through December 06, 2014.

The 2014 buck harvest is down 34% from the 2013 harvest of 56,523.

The top 10 counties for buck harvest were as follows:  Preston (1,531), Greenbrier (1,384), Randolph (1,254), Lewis (1,159), Ritchie (1,157), Hampshire (1,069), Wood (1,019), Upshur (1,015), Monroe (1,001), and Mason (998).

This year’s overall buck harvest is lower than last year’s with decreases occurring in all DNR districts.

The largest percentage decreases occurred in the western counties of the state, while the buck harvest in the mountain and southeastern counties had smaller decreases.

Warm and very windy weather across the state on opening day; heavy snowfall Wednesday, the third day of the season, in the eastern panhandle of the state; and a rainy second week impacted hunter participation and contributed to the decreased harvest across the state.

The excellent acorn crop this fall also contributed to lower hunter success, just as a similar abundant acorn crop in 2010 led to a 31% decline in buck harvest followed by a 38% rebound in 2011.

This year’s preliminary buck harvest remains 33% below the previous five-year average of 55,902.

Wildlife biologists and wildlife managers collected age-specific biological information at checking stations in 19 counties this year.

They will analyze data from the combined 2014 deer seasons (buck, antlerless, archery and muzzleloader) before making appropriate recommendations for next year’s deer seasons.

These recommendations will be available for public review at 12 regulations meetings scheduled for March 16 and 17, 2015 (see current 2014 - 2015 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Summary page 6).

Director Jezioro reminds hunters that several days of deer hunting opportunity still remain for 2014.

The traditional antlerless deer season in selected counties on both public and private land opens Thursday, December 18 and runs through Saturday, December 20.

The Youth, Class Q/QQ and Class XS deer season for antlerless deer will be open Friday and Saturday, December 26 and 27 in any county with a firearms deer season.

West Virginia Antlered Deer Gun Harvest, 2010-2014

County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Barbour 875 1372 1177 1109 888
Brooke 337 413 407 389 255
Hancock 299 324 320 273 200
Harrison 1053 1494 1385 1301 945
Marion 764 1249 1089 1130 661
Marshall 1087 1407 1309 1051 709
Monongalia 1116 1508 1297 1107 667
Ohio 412 467 466 399 230
Preston 2034 2224 2158 1741 1531
Taylor 494 768 684 635 456
Tucker 743 738 649 527 486
Wetzel 958 1615 1471 1537 893
District I Subtotal 10,172 13,579 12,412 11,199 7,921
County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Berkeley 661 835 767 871 528
Grant 959 1266 1250 1135 796
Hampshire 1271 1676 1588 1846 1069
Hardy 1315 1589 1429 1447 926
Jefferson 482 447 526 445 385
Mineral 947 1286 1181 1345 825
Morgan 457 601 602 743 414
Pendleton 893 1391 1373 1163 890
District II Subtotal 6,985 9,091 8,716 8,995 5,833
County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Braxton 986 1468 1401 1626 896
Clay 353 519 528 475 347
Lewis 1130 1586 1365 1692 1159
Nicholas 846 1279 1212 824 814
Pocahontas 1100 1106 1152 961 825
Randolph 1858 2032 1804 1329 1254
Upshur 1088 1612 1283 1396 1015
Webster 807 1063 817 717 640
District III Subtotal 8,168 10,665 9,562 9,020 6,950
County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Fayette 742 1005 996 835 736
Greenbrier 1367 1783 1875 1509 1384
McDowell 0 0 0 0
Mercer 362 647 682 536 396
Monroe 1002 1364 1569 1466 1001
Raleigh 446 739 749 579 512
Summers 536 865 1077 973 617
Wyoming 0 0 0 0
District IV Subtotal 4,455 6,403 6,948 5,898 4,646
County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Boone 471 653 898 725 524
Cabell 464 705 750 763 424
Kanawha 896 1275 1164 1380 724
Lincoln 747 1146 1319 1124 707
Logan 0 0 0 0
Mason 1298 1944 1676 1495 998
Mingo 0 0 0 0
Putnam 794 1170 1191 1210 568
Wayne 570 894 1041 870 525
District V Subtotal 5,240 7,787 8,039 7,567 4,470
County 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Calhoun 570 962 770 1164 501
Doddridge 767 1000 950 1243 620
Gilmer 701 1029 911 1427 668
Jackson 1225 1962 1630 1917 987
Pleasants 332 512 371 438 272
Ritchie 1195 1701 1512 2091 1157
Roane 1049 1694 1391 1893 962
Tyler 833 1189 922 1000 579
Wirt 659 944 846 1091 692
Wood 1110 1639 1403 1580 1019
District VI Subtotal 8,441 12,632 10,706 13,844 7,457

State Total

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
43,461 60,157 56,383 56,523 37,277

Mountaineer Food Bank in Gassaway Receives $65,000 Donation…

Mountaineer Food Bank receives $65,000 Donation from
2014 Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt event for Hunters Helping the Hungry

Governor’s One Shot Committee members have presented a check to the Mountaineer Food Bank, representing $65,000 raised during the eighth annual Governor’s One Shot Deer Hunt held October 24-26, 2014.

The money will go toward expenses associated with the Hunters Helping the Hungry Program (HHH), administered by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, to distribute venison to needy families across the state through the Mountaineer Food Bank.

The Gilmer Free Press
(FR, L-R) Richard Hardin, Governor’s One Shot Committee; Dot Underwood, Governor’s Regional Representative;
Marcel Malfregeot, Governor’s One Shot Committee; Carla Nardella, Director of Mountaineer Food Bank;
Frank Jezioro, Director of Division of Natural Resources;
Emily Fleming, Assistant to the Director, Division of Natural Resources;
(BR, L-R) David Truban, Governor’s One Shot Committee; Wendy Greene, Division of Natural Resources


The check was presented December 10, 2014 at the Food Bank’s headquarters in Gassaway, Braxton County.

The Governor’s One Shot event is sponsored by WVDNR and the Governor’s One Shot Committee, which organizes the event each year. Committee members also were in attendance at the ceremony.

Carla Nardella, director of the Mountaineer Food Bank, accepted the check with thanks to everyone who contributed to the Governor’s One Shot.

Private individuals and businesses donate money for the opportunity to participate in guided antlerless deer hunts on private property near Stonewall Resort State Park.

The event wraps up with an auction and an award banquet.

All venison from the hunt, along with profits from the sponsorships, goes to the Mountaineer Food Bank.

The first event in 2007 raised $17,000, the second in 2008 raised $35,000, the third in 2009 raised $50,000, the fourth in 2010 raised $75,000, the fifth in 2011 raised $75,000; the sixth in 2012 raised $70,000, and the seventh in 2013 raised $65,000.

The HHH program allows hunters to donate legally harvested deer to certified processors so the meat can be distributed to a network of more than 550 local soup kitchens, food pantries, shelters, senior centers, missions, churches and community centers around the state.

The HHH program has been highly successful since it began in 1992, providing more than a million family style meals to the neediest of West Virginians.

However, the program also requires cash donations to pay for processing and distribution costs to benefit these needy individuals.

More information about the HHH program is available at wvdnr.gov/Hunting/HHH.shtm.

Click Below for additional Articles...

Page 1 of 37 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »








The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVI The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved