GilmerFreePress.net

Books

Books

GSC History Book Authors to be on hand for Signing

The Free Press WV

On Tuesday, October 17 the authors of Glenville State College’s recent history book, titled Preserving and Responding, will hold a signing event with the text. The authors, Jason Gum and Dustin Crutchfield, will be on hand at the signing event which will take place concurrently from 4:00-6:00 p.m. during the opening reception of the art exhibit in GSC’s Fine Arts Center Gallery.

Later in the week on Saturday, October 21, the authors will again have the books available from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the alumni tailgate before GSC’s Homecoming football game.

The book is a companion to Nelson Wells’ and Charles Holt’s Lighthouse on the Hill, which chronicled the College’s history from 1872 through 1997. Throughout the over 100 pages of the book, the tenures of five different college presidents are detailed including major projects, initiatives, challenges, and more. The text contains several noteworthy listings including inductees into the College’s Curtis Elam Athletic Hall of Fame, former Board of Governors members, past Pioneer mascots, emeriti faculty, and more. The book begins with a timeline which provides readers with a ‘quick history’ of the institution from its founding in 1872 through the subsequent 125 years.

The authors worked over several months to complete the history book project. Gum, the Staff Librarian and Archivist in the Robert F. Kidd Library, and Crutchfield, a Public Relations Specialist in GSC’s Marketing Department, are both Glenville State College graduates. Gum also holds a Master of Information Science degree from the University of North Texas. Crutchfield is currently in the process of completing a master’s degree from the West Virginia University Reed College of Media.

Copies of Preserving and Responding will be available for purchase at both signings for $20.


10.05.2017
Arts & EntertainmentMediaBooksEducationNewsWest VirginiaRegionGilmer CountyGlenville

(1) Comments


Permalink - Link to This Article

~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

Positive press out of GSC is always good for the community and the College.

What is not good for the community and GSC is the ongoing telephone scam GSC has nothing to do with.

The phone will ring, there is a GSC entry on caller ID, and a 304-462 number is given. If you answer thinking that it is a legitimate GSC call you get surprised.

The caller, usually with a strange accent, will make a pitch for money and it is obviously a scam.

It is common for the caller to try to convince a person that a grand child or another relative is in bad trouble and thousands of dollars are needed quickly for a lawyer or some other expense.

When the 304 number is called back there is nothing there. It would help if GSC officials would alert the public to the cruel scam and to involve high level law enforcement to stop the nuisance calls.

By Fed Up Glenville Resident  on  10.05.2017

Leave a Comment


Print This Article



Tumblr StumbleUpon Reddit Print Email LinkedIn Pinterest Google+ Facebook Twitter Addthis

West Virginia Library Commission Launches New Website

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Library Commission is proud to announce the launch of its newly redesigned website. 

The website features streamlined menus, simplified navigation, and a fresh, new look.

The new homepage features specific gateways for patrons who want to visit the state reference library, for librarians and trustees who need to access WVLC training and information material, and for the blind and physically handicapped. 

It also includes a direct link for visitors to find any public, academic, or special library in the state.

Other home page links include:

          • Who We Are
          • What We Do
          • Latest News and Videos
          • Helpful Resources
          • FAQs
          • Contact Us

“Our primary goal is to offer library visitors a quicker, easier way to find the information they need,” says WVLC Executive Secretary Karen Goff. “We are proud of the redesign and look forward to comments and suggestions as our online guests visit the new site.”

State residents can explore the redesigned WVLC website at www.librarycommission.wv.gov.

West Virginia Library Commission encourages lifelong learning, individual empowerment, civic engagement and an enriched quality of life by enhancing library and information services for all West Virginians. WVLC is an independent agency of the Office of the Secretary of Education and the Arts.

To learn more about the WVLC, please visit www.librarycommission.wv.gov or call us at 304.558.2041.

I’m Jealous….

Awesome Teen Reading Selection for Today’s Young Readers
The Free Press WV

As a young teen, my daughter read these books that I dubbed as her “death” books.

Lurlene McDaniel wrote books about dying teens and family members. I thought they were a bit depressing to read constantly and attempted to steer my daughter occasionally toward other books, but true to my own beliefs, I never censored what she read. I figured if it was in the children’s/young adult section of a major bookstore or in the library, I wasn’t going to be one of those hovering parents who read a book and approved it before allowing my child’s fingers to turn the same pages.

I trusted my daughter’s choices in books, so consequently, after she grew out of the Babysitter Club books, those “death” books took a place of prominence on her bookshelves. Thankfully, and I will admit I heaved a sigh of relief, she eventually moved on to a mix of other topics.

I think that was a time when that young adult genre was emerging from a cocoon it had been wrapped in for, well, forever. The advent of Harry Potter jump-started the move into a much broader range of fiction books for teens. There wasn’t much when I was that age – I remember moving straight from Nancy Drew and the likes of “Freckled and Fourteen” by Viola Rowe into adult books such as the 1960s “Coffee, Tea or Me?“ A rather racy book to be read by a 15-year-old. I’m not sure I even remember what the book is about but the experience of buying it is indelible. I did read way above my age group as a teen but truth be told, not much held my interest in the scant “young adult” category which, back then, didn’t even have a name.

Note: Ironically, Donald Bain is the ghost writer for “Coffee, Tea or Me?“ He’s also the writer for one of my favorite book series – Murder, She Wrote – created in line with the old television series and “written” by fictional character Jessica Fletcher, impossible, we know, and Donald Bain.

Today, there really is no need for young adults to read books not befitting their age group – there is such a wide selection with well-scripted plots and phenomenal writing that even adults read the genre. Thought is put into the characters, the plot and the message, whether it’s set in current times or in an embattled dystopian environment. One of the best series around is the “Divergent” series by the young Veronica Roth. It starts with the same named book and goes into “Insurgent,“ “Allegiant” and then “Four.“ Her new book, “Carve the Mark,“ is sitting on my shelf waiting patiently to be read. The Divergent series is thought-provoking: Teens learning to find themselves within a crooked, bureaucratic one-size-fits-all culture until they rebel.

And I will cop to liking the “Twilight” series, too. I read all the books as soon as they came out and watched all the movies as soon as they came out. One holiday year, I was the only adult with a passel full of teens heading off to the movies after Thanksgiving dinner.

I do agree with some oft-heard statements that much of the teen reading today is futuristic, dystopian or paranormal. Not every parent’s cup of tea, but in my mind it’s harmless. I do know parents who won’t allow those books to be read by their kids, magic and darkness and such, and that’s up to them.

But, I do think that mindset feeds into the way life was dictated for kids back in the ’60s and early ’70s. Fiction books written in my era were designed to shelter and protect, not let in the grit, controversy and dirt – or if so, maybe just a peek, such as “Summer of My German Soldier,“ by Bette Greene. Gasp, at the far-flung likes of “Go Ask Alice” and that gave just a hint of the turmoil behind drug addiction. Thought provoking, be damned.

I think shutting teens out of the darkness in life, even in fictional settings with paranormal/fantasy as a back drop, does a disservice to that age group – and sends them running to the likes of “Coffee, Tea or Me?“ a tad bit too early in life.

My picks for best teen reading today (these authors also have additional series’ worth checking out):

  • Bloodlines series by Richelle Mead
  • A Court of Thorns and Roses series by Sarah J. Maas
  • Divergent series by Veronica Roth
  • The Iron Fey series by Julie Kagawa
  • Selection series by Kiera Cass
  • The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer
  • Hex Hall series by Rachel Hawkins

My top books as a young teen (many not geared for teens):

  • “Summer of My German Soldier” by Bette Greene
  • “A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’Engle
  • “Carrie” by Stephen King
  • “The Hiding Place” by Corrie ten Boom
  • “Love Story” by Erich Segal
  • “Rich Man, Poor Man” by Irwin Shaw
  • “The Winds of War” by Herman Wouk

~~  Susan Winlow ~~

Glenville State College History Book Now Available

A full-color photo and history book about the last twenty years at Glenville State College has recently been completed. The book, Preserving and Responding, can be purchased from the Glenville State College Foundation or at the campus Bookstore for $24.99 (shipping included). The book is a companion to Nelson Wells’ and Charles Holt’s Lighthouse on the Hill, which chronicled the College’s history from 1872 through 1997.

Throughout the over 100 pages of the book, the tenures of five different college presidents are detailed including major projects, initiatives, challenges, and more. The text contains several noteworthy listings including inductees into the College’s Curtis Elam Athletic Hall of Fame, former Board of Governors members, past Pioneer mascots, emeriti faculty, and more. The book begins with a timeline which provides readers with a ‘quick history’ of the institution from its founding in 1872 through the subsequent 125 years and ends with an afterword from outgoing President Dr. Peter Barr.

The Free Press WV


Working over several months, two Glenville State College staff members completed the project. Authoring the work was Jason Gum, the Staff Librarian and Archivist in the Robert F. Kidd Library. Assisting him was Dustin Crutchfield, a Public Relations Specialist in GSC’s Marketing Department.

“As a new incoming president, I can’t think of a better resource to understand the recent past of the institution. While we continue to face new and unprecedented trials and challenges, it is clear that we stand on the shoulders of giants. It is also heartening to know that the DNA of the institution and the individuals who have worked here and continue to do so have created a solid foundation for a bright future,” stated incoming President, Dr. Tracy Pellett.

“I could not be happier regarding the end-product that Dustin and I were able to develop and owe many other campus personnel my gratitude for their guidance. GSC alumni, employees, students, and friends will enjoy this review of the past 20 years. I especially want to thank outgoing First Lady Betsy Barr for recognizing the need for such a history book to further document campus happenings since Wells’ and Holt’s Lighthouse on the Hill was published in 1997. Betsy has been a devout supporter of the campus archives and my subsequent efforts throughout her tenure,” said Gum.

“If you are a Glenville State College history maven like I am, you will be very impressed with the efforts these two young men have made to encapsulate the last twenty years of our great institution. This surely deserves a prominent spot on your coffee table so that your family, friends, and neighbors can share in our story of service to central West Virginia, our state as a whole, and the many states and nations where our alumni work and live,” said Dennis Pounds, Vice President for College Advancement.

An on-campus book signing is being planned for the fall.

To purchase a book by phone, call 304.462.6380.

24th Letters About Literature Writing Contest to Announce Winners

Read. Be Inspired. Write Back.
The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Center for the Book at the West Virginia Library Commission will hold the 2017 Letters About Literature awards ceremony at the state Culture Center on Thursday, May 18th, 2017, from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. Letters About Literature is a national reading and writing program, supported locally by the WV Center for the Book, an affiliate of the National Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. Local author Belinda Anderson will speak at the event, where participating state students will be honored.

The theme for this year’s writing competition was How Did an Author’s Work Change Your View of the World or Yourself? Students in grades 4-12 (divided by Levels 1-3) wrote letters to authors (living or dead) telling them how a book, poem, or play by that author affected them personally. “It is amazing how students of all ages are impacted by the “written word” in very personal and meaningful ways; their letters leave their own lasting impression,” explained Gayle Manchin, Cabinet Secretary of Education and the Arts.

This year, 723 students from West Virginia were among the more than 47,000 students nationwide who wrote Letters About Literature. National screeners selected 117 of the West Virginia entries for state level judging. Judges, chosen by the West Virginia Center for the Book, determined the top letters in each competition level for the state. Entries for state level judging were selected on how well they met the required criteria of: audience, purpose, grammatical conventions, and originality.

Those receiving “Top Honors” advance to national level judging. The Center for the Book in the Library of Congress selects a panel of judges to award national winners and national honor winners. Karen Goff, WVLC Executive Secretary, says, “The Letters About Literature competition allows the most gifted students in the state to showcase their skills. The WVLC is proud to support this program, which creates a forum for students to excel in both reading and writing.”

The Library of Congress will announce all National and National Honor Winners and awards and will list all state-level winners on its website: www.read.gov/letters/.

West Virginia Library Commission encourages lifelong learning, individual empowerment, civic engagement and an enriched quality of life by enhancing library and information services for all West Virginians. WVLC is an independent agency of the Office of the Secretary of Education and the Arts. To learn more about WVLC, please visit www.librarycommission.wv.gov or call us at 304.558.2041.

West Virginia Library Commission Announces Partnership with Hoopla

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Library Commission, provider of state library information and services, is pleased to announce its partnership with Hoopla, a digital service providing access to entertainment media products and services.  Hoopla allows library patrons to borrow thousands of movies, television shows, music albums, eBooks, audiobooks and comics for free through a mobile device or online access.

Library Commission card holders can download the free Hoopla digital mobile app on their Android or IOS device or visit hoopladigital.com to begin enjoying thousands of titles – from major Hollywood studios, record companies and publishers – available to borrow 24/7, for instant streaming or temporary downloading to their smartphones, tablets and computers.

Heather Campbell-Schock, State Library Services Director, says, “The Library Commission is proud to offer this great digital service to state residents.  Hoopla helps the WVLC expand its reach and allows patrons much more access to books and entertainment.”

A WVLC library card is needed to access Hoopla services.  To request a library card, residents may visit the West Virginia State Library in the Culture Center in Charleston, WV, or send their name, address, phone number and email address to State Library Services at .

West Virginia Library Commission encourages lifelong learning, individual empowerment, civic engagement and an enriched quality of life by enhancing library and information services for all West Virginians. WVLC is an agency of the Office of the Secretary of Education and the Arts.

To learn more about the WVLC, please visit www.librarycommission.wv.gov or call us at 304.558.2041.

Submission Deadline Extended for GSC Literary Journal

The Free Press WV

The submission deadline for the 2017 issue of Glenville State College’s literary and arts journal, The Trillium, has been extended. All GSC students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community members are invited to submit visual art, poetry, fiction, song lyrics, and other forms of creative expression.

Written submissions should be submitted electronically, as an attachment, to with contact information and a brief biographical statement about the author. Written works should be sent as Microsoft Word document attachments or as a RTF file. Visual work can be sent in JPG, PNG, BMP, or GIF formats and should also include contact information, a brief description of the artwork, and a biographical statement about the artist. The deadline for submissions has been extended to Tuesday, February 14, 2017.

For more information, contact , , or 304.462.6322.

Click Below for additional Articles...

Page 1 of 1 pages








The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVI The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved