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State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education

The Free Press WV

State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Steven Paine presented the 2018 State of Education during the West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) meeting today. The report provided an overview of the educational activities, progress, achievements and challenges of the past school year as well as an outlook of the year to come.

The purpose of the report is to give an accurate and constructive review of public education and depict how the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) and WVBE are addressing the needs of students as they prepare to enter college or the workforce.

“Many great things are happening within West Virginia’s public schools that may go unnoticed, and it is important to take time to share that information because there are so many teachers, students and communities working hard for educational success,” Paine said. “We also realize that there are significant challenges that require our continued dedicated attention and effort. For example, we’ve fought against unsatisfactory math achievement for far too long, and we have developed a comprehensive plan to address this,” Paine explained. “This and other areas of critical need are addressed within the report,” he said.

The report highlights successes achieved during the 2017-18 school year through the combined effort of many people, partnerships, agencies and communities. West Virginia has the third highest graduation rate in the country at 89.4 percent; it ranks sixth in the nation for quality and access to early education programs due to its support of Universal Pre-K; and the state’s commitment to Career and Technical Education (CTE) is resulting in more students earning industry-recognized credentials while still in high school.

The WVBE and WVDE have worked closely with Governor Jim Justice to support his vision and passion for education. This includes providing a fair and accurate accountability system for public schools, restoring control to the local level and reducing redundancies in services. These are among the measures taken to create a climate that is more conducive to school and student growth.

The WVDE has also implemented intensive programs to support students at-risk of dropping out, developed partnerships to reduce remediation at the college level and launched CTE initiatives that provide options and real-work experiences for students who prefer a career pathway.

“We continue to explore ways to meet the state’s economic demands through high-quality learning systems,” Paine said. “Working together, we are creating a culture of career readiness, skill development and proven practices that allow our education system to fuel the state’s economy and develop the emerging workforce,” he said.

The State of Education report also highlights educator preparation and leadership development and outlines public funding for education. The complete report can be found by visiting, https://wvde.us/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/2018stateofed-report.pdf.


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~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

Praises go to Governor Justice, Dr. Paine, and the entire State Board for producing this outstanding report.

For the first time in memory comprehensive information is included in one source for the public and it is written in an understandable
style.

A request is made to the Gilmer County Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther to produce a similar report by this fall for the specific status of our school system.

We could celebrate achievements for which we excel and we could profit from our weak points as opportunities for corrective measures to take.

Forget about what other counties are doing—we are competing against ourselves.

The often cited excuse that we are just as good as other counties with WV ranking near bottom should no longer be tolerated.

By fall results of recent SAT testing would be available to Superintendent Lowther and the County Board to include in the report.

One advantage of the suggested County report and ones in successive years would be a basis for the public to use to judge effectiveness of Gilmer’s Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther.

The GFP is applauded for its role in being a leader in WV for making education news accessible on the Internet.

By Frank Wiseman  on  07.14.2018

Wiseman’s suggestion is an opportunity for the new School Board officers, Mr. Cottril and Mr. Shakleford.

Both members campaigned on improvements they would make if elected. The most important improvement would be outstanding results with student learning outcomes in the County.

Quarterly progress reports from Mr. Cottril and Mr. Shackleford are requested.

By Voters For Accountability  on  07.16.2018

What a glowing report.

Just because you say or print something, doesn’t make it true.

With a report like this, you would think WV had moved up the list from 47th in outcomes.

A few people don’t have the wool down over their eyes.

By wasted lipstick on the pig.  on  07.17.2018

The lipstick comment deserves special attention. The State’s testing results verifies that too many students are not proficient in science, reading, and math. WV remains in the lower 10th among the 50 states for those areas.

Google WVZOOM Dashboard and look at State assessment scores for the GCHS. According to reports a decision was made to hire one more math teacher over there to help improve future results.

Nothing is known about what is being done to help Gilmer’s HS students with reading and science. The new Board president must get detailed information out to the public.

Assurances that everything is OK won’t work anymore. There has been too much of that type of hokum. The public knows how to access achievement information from the Internet to impose increasing accountability for our school system.

By R. J. Myers  on  07.17.2018

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Carmichael Claims Credit for Teacher Pay Raises He Tried to Kill

West Virginia Senate President Mitch Carmichael now appears to be taking credit for the teacher pay raises he failed to stop earlier this year.

When school employees went on statewide strike, the Republican-led Senate was blocking the higher pay they were demanding. But last week on Hoppy Kercheval’s Talkline program, Carmichael took credit for the money now showing up in public employee checks. Carmichael said he wasn’t trying to pat himself on the back, but in his words, “if we had opposed that pay raise, it wouldn’t have happened.“

Senaor Corey Palumbo, D-Charleston, called that statement laughable, given what happened after the strike began.

“The House fairly quickly passed the 4 percent increase. And then the Senate sat on it for days, not doing anything with it,” Palumbo said. “It is laughable for them to now take credit as if they were leading the charge.“

The Free Press WV
During the teachers’ strike, the West Virginia State Senate was widely
viewed as the main obstacle to meeting strikers’ demands.


When host Kercheval pushed back, Carmichael said it was “not true at all” that GOP Senate leaders opposed the raise, and the strike “made no difference.“ The record of roll call votes on the bill that finally resulted in the pay raise shows Carmichael and the committee chairs he appointed repeatedly trying to stop, slow or reduce the pay increase.

Carmichael told Kercheval the GOP was “100 percent on board with as much pay raise” as the state could afford. He said the only thing holding them back was a tight budget.

But Palumbo pointed out that it’s the first public employee pay raise to get though the legislature since Republicans took over.

“It’s been a four-year period,” he said. “And if you look back over the last 25, 30 years, there’s been no three-year period, if I remember right, where teachers or public employees had not received a raise.“

Teachers and school service personnel shut the schools down for 11 days, ending March 07, when the 5 percent pay increase passed. During regular demonstrations at the Capitol, strikers singled Carmichael out. One sign said, “Mitch better have my money.“ Others chanted - parodying a rap song - “Yo, Mitch - Get Out The Way.“

~~  Dan Heyman ~~

Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV 

Citing declining enrollment, and increasing reliance on that enrollment rather than the state Legislature for funding, plus competition for students from West Virginia and Marshall universities, a report recommends merging the governing boards of Bluefield State College, Concord University, Glenville State College and West Virginia State University.

The document, from the Colorado-based nonprofit National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, labels those four schools “Medium Risk to High Risk” in sustainability, saying they’re “sustainable in the short-term, but their futures are uncertain.”

The REPORT recommends this move, in the short-term for Bluefield and Concord and in the long-term for Glenville and WVSU, and suggests “initially” retaining the separate boards of governors for Fairmont State, Shepherd and West Liberty universities, “but with additional powers regarding governance of institutions explicitly delegated” to the state Higher Education Policy Commission.

The recommendations include “leaving open” that Concord and Bluefield “could become a single accredited institution” and “the potential of including New River Community and Technical College within the new structure while retaining its unique mission as a community college.”

The report, which includes several other recommendations, also lists negative effects of the state government’s decisions to separate community colleges from public 4-year schools, weaken the power of the HEPC, decentralize governance and cut higher education funding.

And at a time when the presidents of WVU, Marshall and Concord are to co-chair Gov. Jim Justice’s newly formed group to study the funding and sustainability of higher education (the HEPC was already studying a possible funding formula), the report notes that a “major obstacle to collaboration with West Virginia University or Marshall University is a fear that the larger institutions will collaborate only out of their self-interest to stifle competition or ultimately take over the smaller institutions.”

“With West Virginia University admitting more than 35 percent of high school graduates in 22 counties, it seems improbable that all these students would have been the top-performing students in their counties,” the report states. “The more selective institutions are dipping deeper into their applicant pools to the detriment of the regional institutions. ... In the absence of some external forces, this predation will continue.”

“We have not previously seen the report, so we can’t react in detail,” WVU Communications Office Senior Executive Director John Bolt said after being sent the report late Tuesday afternoon. “Nevertheless, I can say without equivocation that West Virginia University is not predatory.”

“It is not appropriate to comment until I have had an opportunity to read and thoroughly review the report,” said Bluefield President Marsha Krotseng, to whom the Gazette-Mail also sent the report late Tuesday.

In a statement, Concord President Kendra Boggess suggested that the data in the report are accurate, but said a Bluefield/Concord consolidation is “only one potential option that should be considered.”

The report says that, “in the longer-term, as suggested by the Consolidated Financial Index, all the regional institutions are at risk of failure. However, that risk varies significantly.”

The report defines “regional institutions” as all public four-year schools but WVU, Marshall, their branch campuses and the School of Osteopathic Medicine, in Lewisburg.

“NCHEMS’ observation is that for the institutions at highest risk, Bluefield State College and Concord University, the challenges are so serious that only a major restructuring will preserve postsecondary education opportunity for students in Southern West Virginia,” the report states. “Implementing this restructuring will require external pressure, leadership, and on-going facilitation to mandate and implement a consolidation of academic, student and administrative capacity of the two institutions.

“Nevertheless, forces at both institutions continue to resist needed changes,” the report states. “Bluefield State College continues to pursue construction of a residence hall, with partial support from a local foundation, with hopes that this will enable the institution to recruit and retain more students. This while Concord has empty dormitory space.”

The report goes on to state that, “Without immediate action to mandate that these two institutions pursue an integrated approach to their future, each institution will continue on its downward trajectory.”

The report, dated April 3, is labeled draft and was obtained from the HEPC by the Gazette-Mail through an open records request.

Neither NCHEMS Vice President Brian Prescott nor HEPC Communications Director Shelli Dronsfield said they’re anticipating any changes to the report. Dronsfield said it hasn’t been released because the HEPC staff is still developing an executive summary and response to the report, planned to be presented alongside the report to the HEPC board in August.

~~  Ryan Quinn ~~


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This information including details in the referenced full Report helps put GSC’s precarious standing in perspective. More information can be accessed at http://www.collegesimply.com.

That web site provides SAT student information for WV institutions of higher learning and GSC has the lowest scores.

Inferences from the scores and material in the report are that because GSC gets a large percentage of students from poor counties including Gilmer County, school systems there need improving.

Also, with employers becoming more sophisticated in hiring the best qualified graduates they access information of the type published on the web site given above.

The reason is that institutions with the best prepared students have more rigorous academic programs and they do not have to expend valuable time on remediation.

Provision of this comment is not intended to be a slam at GSC. The purpose is to encourage Dr. Pellett and the Board of Governors to devise a viable strategy for making the College a center of excellence to improve its standing in WV. It is that simple for guaranteed survival in the future.

By GSC GRAD  on  07.05.2018

Bigger is better? Rarely.

Everyone knows that school consolidation has resulted in failed outcomes.

This is laying the ground work, for an ego driven power grab.  The big institutions have no limit to their desire for money.

Stay small, and if failure occurs, fewer people are impacted.  Too large, and management of that soon turns into a problem.

By Its just planned failure.  on  07.05.2018

Advice for GSC’s president is to read Janis’book entitled Victims of Group Think.

The theme for the book is that alike thinkers of a group of elites in control can have colossal failures because they believe that their decision-making processes are unworthy of outside scrutiny.

Think about it. Did the airport to accommodate jet traffic at the mouth of Cedar Creek work out and did the federal prison result in economic prosperity with a hefty upsurge with GSC’s
enrollment?

What about the millions of dollars of new construction at GSC? Did it result in healthy enrollments as promised.

Some elites associated with GSC were strong advocates for the ill fated ventures.

GSC has been controlled too long by members of the same families. With the undeniable track record of declining conditions a few resignations would be a positive step.

The nagging governance problem affecting GSC has been shielding elite individuals from personal accountability without penalties for bad decisions.

By Governance Changes Needed At GSC  on  07.06.2018

“Governance Changes Needed at GSC” is 100% correct.

Basically GSC Board of Governors and other leadership positions, have been a result of nepotism and crony friend choices.

Those two ‘tools’ rarely, if ever, give the best persons available to whatever the position requires.

Incest often produces less than desired outcomes as well.

By PAST Time for change @ GSC  on  07.08.2018

There are two examples in Janis’ book regarding the Kennedy presidency. The first one deals with the group think Bay Of Figs disaster.

Those in Washington associated with invasion decisions considered themselves to be infallible world class thinkers. That mistake prevented critical and constructive review from anyone outside that tight group of political operatives.

The other example covers the Cuban Missile Crisis as an example of masterful diplomacy and planning to prevent a nuclear holocaust. President Kennedy deserved credit because he avoided group think traps from Bay Of Pigs lessons learned.

Higher education decisions in WV are made by individual tight knit Boards of Governors with excessive autonomy and no meaningful oversight.

Also, board members are there through political appointments at local levels. Governors traditionally rubber stamp the recommended appointments.

When serious group think mistakes occur at colleges and universities Boards are conditioned to assume that State bail outs will cover damages.

If private businesses are group think practitioners they never last unless they change strategies to avoid brutal market place penalties.

By WVU Political Scientist  on  07.08.2018

Oops! Bay of Pigs not Figs. Shows that college profs are not immune to embarrassing gaffs.

By WVU Prof.  on  07.09.2018

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Butler named New River CTC interim president

The Free Press WV

The New River Community and Technical College Board of Governors has selected Dr. Kathy Butler to serve as interim president of New River Community and Technical College until the search is completed to fill the position vacated by the resignation of Dr. L. Marshall Washington.

Butler has over 35 years of experience in West Virginia education, including 26 years in higher education (both public and private) and 10 years in public K-12 education.

She has served as WV Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, working with both the Higher Education Policy Commission and the Community and Technical College System and later served as Special Assistant to the HEPC Chancellor.

At the college level, Butler has held nearly every academic position at Glenville State College: faculty, Dean, Academic Vice President and Provost. Additionally, she also served as a Special Assistant/Counselor to the President at Ohio Valley University.

She holds an Ed.D. in Education, Curriculum and Instruction from West Virginia University.

GSC Awards Scholarships to Gilmer County Student

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College student Samantha Lamb of Sand Fork has been awarded the Fred H. and Lucy Francis Killingsworth Scholarship and the John C. Shaw Scholarship from the GSC Foundation for the 2018-2019 academic school year. She will be majoring in English and is the daughter of Tracy Rexroad.

The Fred H. and Lucy Francis Killingsworth scholarship fund was established to be used for educational purposes and granted to worthy students chosen by the Glenville State College Scholarship Committee. Preference is given to students who reside in Gilmer County, West Virginia.

The John C. Shaw Scholarship was established in 1985 by John C. Shaw, who was the President of Glenville State College from 1901-1908. This scholarship is awarded to academically talented freshmen from West Virginia.

“The Glenville State College Foundation is excited to be able to award scholarships to these very deserving students,” said Vice President for Advancement and Executive Director of the GSC Foundation David Hutchison. “Our extended Glenville State family has been very generous which makes our impact that much more meaningful. From our Day of Giving to our new crowdfunding campaigns - I am truly impressed and grateful to our donors, their families, and all who have stepped up to make more opportunities for current students.”

For more information about Glenville State College Scholarships, contact the GSC Foundation at 304.462.6380.

School Clothing Allowance Applications Accepted through July 31, 2018

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Division of Family Assistance will begin accepting school clothing allowance applications on Monday, July 2, 2018, for eligible children enrolled in West Virginia schools. 

“Through raising our own children, Cathy and I know the importance of back to school preparations for West Virginia families,” said Governor Jim Justice. “Growing kids need new clothes and shoes. The school clothing allowance program literally helps West Virginia students begin the school year on the right foot.”

Families with school-aged children currently receiving WV WORKS cash assistance, as well as those in foster care, will automatically receive school clothing allowance vouchers for each school-age child in the home by mid-July 2018. 

Families who received school clothing allowance vouchers in 2017 and currently receive Medicaid or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits from DHHR should have received an application by mail in June 2018.  Mailing address updates can be made online at wvinroads.org or by calling DHHR’s Customer Services Center at 1.877.716.1212 to ensure prompt delivery of vouchers.

Others may be eligible for school clothing allowance vouchers, but the monthly income for a family of four may not exceed $2,092. 

Each eligible child will receive a $200 voucher that may be used toward the purchase of appropriate school clothing or piece goods for families who sew clothing for their children.  Vouchers must be used by October 31, 2018.  For a list of participating stores, visit dhhr.wv.gov/bcf/Services/familyassistance/Documents/SCA%20Vendors%20_2018.pdf.

“Last year the school clothing allowance program helped more than 90,000 West Virginia children enter the new school year with confidence,” said Linda Watts, Acting Commissioner of DHHR’s Bureau for Children and Families. “The support this program provides to West Virginia’s families allows for better educational outcomes and brighter futures.”

To learn more about eligibility guidelines or to apply, contact your local DHHR office, apply online at wvinroads.org or call 1.877.716.1212.  Verification of income for the month of July must be submitted with the application.

Applications must be received in the local DHHR office by July 31, 2018.

Longtime Glenville State College Alumni Director to Retire

After over 45 years as an employee at Glenville State College, Debra (Reed) Nagy is retiring. Throughout her decades of service to Glenville State, she has worked with eight different college presidents, two of GSC’s Community & Technical College provosts, helped hundreds of staff, faculty, and administrators, and interacted with countless students, alumni, and friends of the college.

In 1973 she came to GSC as secretary and bookkeeper for the campus Bookstore which, at the time, was operated by the College. She was promoted to store manager in 1975 following the retirement of one of her mentors, Nellie Engelke, and while assuming the role which included being the store’s sole buyer, she also continued her secretary/bookkeeper duties. Nagy’s efforts in the store over the years saw revenue increase to $1 million, due in part to former GSC President William K. Simmons’ approval of a mid-1990s expansion of the Bookstore that brought increased square footage and expanded inventory. She also ran Central Supply, located just off the Bookstore from 1987 until 2000, this being a centralized location that college staff frequented for their office supplies.

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After the College opted to outsource Bookstore operations in 2000, Nagy served as Special Assistant to the President/Coordinator of Alumni Affairs for a year before being tapped to serve as Business Manager of GSC’s Community and Technical College which was headquartered, at the time, in Summersville although classes were offered in Braxton and Lewis Counties as well. She commuted to the Summersville campus during the 2001-2002 fiscal year and, although back on campus and serving in the Business Manager for Special Projects capacity, when the state legislature mandated that community and technical components be severed from GSC’s main operations by 2003, Nagy worked with the College’s Business Manager and with the CTC Provost in what would become a two-year process to close out operations and divide enrollment between Glenville State and the newly formed New River Community and Technical College.

In the fall of 2003 and while still retaining her Business Manager for Special Project duties, she was again appointed Coordinator of Alumni Affairs and the following spring also took on the additional duties of Facilities Manager/Scheduling including Facilities Rental.

She was able to relinquish her Business Manager for Special Projects duties in 2007 after having been named Director of Alumni Affairs in addition to being named Special Assistant to the President again in 2006, this while still retaining her facilities scheduling and rental duties.

With the exception of the time that she was heavily involved with GSC’s Community & Technical College component, Nagy has coordinated the college’s special events including Homecoming, the Curtis Elam Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Banquet, Commencement Exercises, and other major events since 2000. Many on and off campus also consider her to be GSC’s unofficial historian because of her wealth of institutional memory and her passion for the institution, her motto being that, “you can’t get to where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve been.”

“I’ve truly enjoyed my years at Glenville State College,” she said. “My first 27 years in the Bookstore put me in touch with so many of our students and alumni. As I’ve changed jobs, many of them have kept in touch, and as Alumni Director, I’ve not only been able to use the Alumni House as their information center on campus and the bridge between their new life as graduates and their alma mater but to reminisce with so many of them about their time at GSC and to keep up with where they are and what they are doing.”

Nagy completed her College Business Management Institute Certification from the University of Kentucky in 1978 after having attended these classes in the summers of 1976, 1977, and 1978. She also received her College Business Management Institute Refresher Certification in the summer of 1988.

She is lifelong a resident of Gilmer County and was married to her husband Paul for 35 years until his passing in May 2017. They have a son, Paul III, who resides in Charleston, West Virginia.

“Frankly I have a hard time imagining Glenville State College without Deb Nagy,” said GSC President Dr. Tracy Pellett. “Debbie is someone who dedicates her time to make sure that things run smoothly for the rest of us; I think that says a lot about her. More importantly, I don’t know that you could find a bigger advocate for Glenville State, our alumni, and the preservation of our college’s rich history. My hope is that she’ll remain an active participant in our alumni and college events even if she isn’t holding office hours anymore.”

Her last day will be June 30, 2018 although she hasn’t ruled out possibly working as a consultant for the college from time to time.

Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education

The Free Press WV

Governor Jim Justice today announced the creation of a Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education to study and evaluate ways that West Virginia can create a more efficient and meaningful Higher Education system. The Commission will be officially created by executive order and is expected to be signed by Monday, July 02, 2018.

The commission will be tasked with finding bold and unique solutions to a problem that West Virginia has faced for several decades. The Governor has asked the commission to give regular updates and reports and has mandated the work be completed by the December 2018 interim meetings of the West Virginia Legislature.

Governor Justice said, “Our West Virginia colleges and universities are so critical to our communities, and the continued erosion of their stability deeply concerns me. My hope is that every possible solution will be considered and evaluated, all colleges and universities will be consulted, and that the Commission will find the right solution for our higher education system in West Virginia.

“Just as my philosophy has been in opposition to K-12 school consolidation, our colleges and universities need an advocate to stand up for their continued stability and to recognize their critical importance to West Virginia communities. These colleges and universities are a lifeline for the students they serve and represent the future of West Virginia. We must find a more efficient means of ensuring that these colleges and universities stay in the communities they serve today.”


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This news has great implications for GSC and Gilmer County. The College could form a partnership with the County’s school system to close the K-12 achievement gap.

For years while under State intervention it was denied that a gap existed, and the mantra was that the County was doing as well as the State as a whole.

That was like saying that we are OK with the State being ranked near the bottom for the quality of its K-12 education system and we should be content to wallow at the bottom too.

Ms. Patty Lowther, the new superintendent of schools, states that we must close the K-12 achievement gap and it is within the County’s capabilities.

She and her staff including Shelly Mason the new curriculum expert, principals, and the County’s teachers are actively involved with devising solutions to eliminate problems.

Regarding GSC, Dr. Pellett is on record with definite innovations to improve the College’s standing.

He has an unique opportunity to guide the College to contribute to Gilmer County having the best school system in WV as a model to emulate throughout the State and Appalachia.

In the past the typical Charleston trap has been to collect achievement data without expending successful efforts to interpret its meaning for use in solving under-achievement.

Dr. Pellett, Ms. Lowther, and Shelly Mason, with the help of other professionals in our schools can jettison that long standing road block to make Gilmer County a K-12 education standout.

Dr. Pellett in particular has an unparalleled opportunity to make his mark on guiding the College to improve K-12 education in the County and to let successes spread as examples throughout Appalachia.

There would not be a better way to justify the necessity of the College’s continuing existence for Gilmer County, central WV, and the entire State.

By Good News For WV  on  06.29.2018

Word is that officers on the County’s school board have changed with Doug Cottrill becoming the new president and Shackleford the VP.

Voters request to know what the new board’s plans are for improving the County’s standing with the quality of K-12 education for math, reading, science, and other subjects, and correcting remaining problems at the new grade school contractors have not fixed.

Why not publishing monthly progress reports to cover the new board’s accomplishments? That job would be a good assignment for the new president.

By Voters Watching  on  07.03.2018

We must be wary of how County K-12 achievement information is presented.

From the outset the new school board should focus on exactly how well our students are performing with mastering subjects, and not to fall victim to news unrelated to demonstrated student learning.

For one example the GCHS was awarded for its high graduation rate, but it ranked in the bottom 10% among WV high schools for college and career readiness of seniors.

This is not to say that graduation rates are unimportant, but they cannot be interpreted as fact of a direct relationship with how well students are prepared for college and careers.

For some schools an unusually high graduation rate could be a function of enforced “everyone passes” policy.

The point is that there is need for vigilance when student performance information is disclosed to the public so school board get all of it out so voters can decide where the County’s school system really stands.

By Give All Facts  on  07.03.2018

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West Virginia Board of Education Approves Five Policies Following Public Comment Period

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) met today for its monthly routine business meeting. During the meeting, five policies were discussed and approved. A brief description of each policy can be found below.

 

  • 2444.4 – Insurance of the State of West Virginia High School Equivalency Diploma and Option Pathway: This policy, formerly titled West Virginia High School Equivalency Diploma, was repealed and replaced to expand scope and clarify procedures for acquiring a high school equivalency diploma, the implementation of an Option Pathway in the high school/Mountaineer ChalleNGe Academy and the use of high school equivalency assessment for credit recovery. The policy will be effective July 16, 2018.
  • 2322 – West Virginia Accountability System: Policy 2322, formerly titled Standards for High Quality Schools was repealed and replaced to include the accountability system outlined in West Virginia’s Consolidated Plan for Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (2015). The new accountability system was approved by the U.S. Department of Education on January 10, 2018, and will be applied to all public schools in the state beginning with performance data from the 2017-18 school year. A total of nine comments were received; all related to section 4.1.b. Academic Progress, resulting in the reduction of student testing time with added language to compare the benchmark from the beginning of the year with the General Summative Assessment. The policy will be effective July 16, 2018.
  • 2340 – West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress: This policy was repealed and replaced to reflect changes in state code that no longer requires the state to administer statewide assessments to students in grades 9 and 10. Students in grade 11 will be administered a college- and career-readiness exam and will also receive their science score, which was previously administered in grade 10. Additionally, the WVDE will no longer administer a retake of the grade 11 college- and career-readiness test to seniors who did not meet the acceptable benchmark scores. Comments received during the 30-day comment period resulted in the addition of a fixed form test. This policy will go into effect July 16, 2018.
  • 2520.5 – West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Standards for Wellness Education: This policy, formerly titled Next Generation Health Education 5-12 Content Standards and Objectives for West Virginia Schools, was repealed and replaced to incorporate Policy 2520.6: 21st Century Physical Education 5-12 Content Standards and Objectives for WV Schools and Policy 2520.55: 21st Century Wellness Pre-K -4 Content Standards and Objectives for WV Schools, making the policy more comprehensive. Comments received resulted in the addition of clarification regarding emotional changes that occur during puberty and adolescence. Policy 2520.6 and Policy 2520.55 will be repealed, and the more comprehensive Policy 2520.5 will go into effect July 16, 2018.
  • 2520.9 – West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Standards for the Arts: Policy 2530.9, formerly titled 21st Century Dance Content Standards and Objectives for West Virginia Schools, was repealed and replaced to incorporate and replace Policy 2520.10: 21st Century Music Education Content Standards and Objectives for WV Schools, Policy 2520.11: 21st Century Theatre Content Standards and Objectives for WV Schools, Policy 2520.12: 21st Century Visual Arts Content Standards and Objectives for WV Schools, creating a more comprehensive policy and reducing duplicative language. This policy will go into effect July 16, 2018.

 

The Board also voted to place the West Virginia Secondary School Activities Commission (WVSSAC) proposals on a 30-day public comment period. Twenty-eight proposals were submitted for consideration: 20 proposals removed the 9th grade from middle school; proposal 4 prevents acquiring temporary residence in another school zone for athletic eligibility; proposal 5 allows students coming from another sport to practice two less days; proposal 6 adds a new Emergency Action Plan to the Rules and Regulations handbook, proposal 7 allows physical exam to be completed earlier; proposal 9 allows schools to choose to play up to challenge their student-athletes and compete on a more competitive playing field; proposal 14 ensures that younger/inexperience student-athletes get game experience, and, proposal 25 allows eligibility participation limits to be counted by weigh-ins not matches. The Board chose to remove proposal 8, which would have created an all-private “AP” classification of schools.

To review WVBE policies, visit: http://wvde.state.wv.us/policies/.

Director of International Programs at GSC Visits China

Glenville State College Associate Professor of Spanish and Director of International Programs Dr. Megan Gibbons recently spent time in China as part of the Confucius Institute of West Virginia University which hosted a delegation of education administrators from the Mountain State. The group consisted of four representatives from primary schools, three from middle and high schools, and three from colleges and universities who were invited to participate in the twelve-day visit. The trip was designed to explore possible collaborations between educational institutions in West Virginia and in China and to allow the representatives to learn firsthand about Chinese culture through language, art, history, food, geography, and more.

The Free Press WV
Dr. Megan Gibbons with students from Huidi 1st Primary School

Gibbons had the opportunity to visit five educational institutions including two universities, Tianjin University of Finance and Economics and Tianjin University of Science and Technology. While visiting these universities, she was able to discuss the possibility of arranging faculty/student exchanges, as well as developing virtual exchange opportunities through GSC’s Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) Program with university officials.

The group was also able to take part in cultural sightseeing at The Great Wall, The Forbidden City, Tian’anmen Square, Tianjin Museum, Tianjin Art Museum, Jin Mai Tower in Shanghai, and a night cruise on the Huangpujiang River in Shanghai.

“Everything about this trip was memorable from Shanghai’s magnificent illuminated nighttime skyline to the Confucius Institute Headquarters’ interactive displays about Chinese paper cutting and the Peking Opera. Tianjin surprised us with its understated beauty and with its parks full of choral groups, ballroom dancers, and practitioners of tai chi. The food was plentiful and delicious even if our chopstick skills never quite mastered those never-ending noodles. The people we met – professors, administrators, teachers, students, tour guides, even strangers in the streets – were welcoming and kind,” said Gibbons.

The Free Press WV
Members of the West Virginia delegation enjoying a night cruise on the Huangpujiang River in Shanghai


A highlight of the trip came when musicians in the National Band of Tianjin University of Finance and Economics performed a special arrangement of Take me Home, Country Roads (one of West Virginia’s official state songs) for the group on traditional Chinese instruments. Elementary student also sang songs, performed dances, and offered the delegation hand-made gifts of paper fans and sculptures.

GSC students who are interested in studying abroad in China should contact Gibbons in the Office of International Programs at or 304.462.6321.

Gilmer County Energy Express is almost here!

The Free Press WV

Students will attend this program, geared for students entering grades first through sixth, beginning June 18th at Gilmer County Elementary School.

Mentors are busy planning drama, art and reading activities to engage with their students, while the Community Coordinator is beginning to receive and make phone calls for volunteers to assist with Read Aloud and One-on-One reading in the classrooms.

If you have questions, please contact the Gilmer County Energy Express Site Coordinator, Cherri West at 304.462.7338.

West Virginia University Researcher to Study Fracking Effect

The Free Press WV

A West Virginia University assistant professor has received a $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to look at how airborne particles that result from hydraulic fracturing affect human health.

In hydraulic fracturing, oil and gas are extracted from rock by injecting mixtures of water, sand and chemicals underground.

The university said in a news release that public health assistant professor Travis Knuckles will spend three years studying how the particles can make it harder to control how much blood enters the capillaries. He will also explore at how the particles can make it harder to turn oxygen into a chemical that is a primary energy source for cells.

Knuckles and his research team will look at whether fine particles released by fracking are more toxic than particles normally found in urban air.

More than 3,200 PROMISE-eligible scholars planning to begin college this fall

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (Commission) today announced that 3,202 students who are graduating from high school this year have been awarded PROMISE Scholarships. These annual awards of up to $4,750 can be used beginning this fall toward tuition and fees at eligible colleges and universities in West Virginia. Additional PROMISE Scholarships will be awarded as eligible students are identified through July 2018 ACT and June 2018 SAT testing scores.

“The PROMISE Scholarship continues to make a significant impact on our state by making college more accessible and affordable for thousands of West Virginia students,” said Dr. Paul L. Hill, the Commission’s Chancellor. “Through this merit-based program, along with need-based state grants that can be combined with PROMISE, West Virginia is one of the top financial aid-providing states in the nation. These investments showcase our state’s commitment to advancing higher education opportunities for our students.”

During the 2017-18 academic year, 10,332 students received $47.2 million in PROMISE Scholarships. And since its inception in 2002, the PROMISE Scholarship Program has awarded in excess of $600 million to more than 55,000 West Virginia students from all 55 counties. Of the 2015-16 academic year PROMISE recipients, 88 percent attended public four-year institutions in West Virginia. Since 2010, eligible students have received the block award amount of up to $4,750 or full tuition and fees, whichever is less. The academic criteria for PROMISE have remained the same since 2007.

Research shows that receiving PROMISE increases a student’s likelihood of completing college. In addition, PROMISE graduates stay in the state for their careers at higher rates than overall graduates – with one study finding 66.7 percent of PROMISE scholars who graduated in 2013-14 working in the state in 2015.  Studies also show that between 75 and 80 percent of PROMISE graduates are in the state’s workforce within seven years of graduation.

The PROMISE application for the Class of 2019 will become available October 01, 2018 on www.cfwv.com.

For more information on the PROMISE Scholarship Program, visit the state’s free college-planning resource, the College Foundation of West Virginia, at www.cfwv.com/PROMISE

Annual WVMATYC Conference held at GSC

Earlier this spring, Glenville State College hosted members of the West Virginia chapter of the American Mathematical Association of Two Year Colleges (WVMATYC) for their annual conference. WVMATYC is made up of people who are interested in teaching mathematics, especially the courses usually taken in the first two years of college which typically include developmental courses through calculus. The West Virginia Chapter was founded in May 1996 by college faculty throughout the state and follows the mission, ‘to be a leading voice and resource for excellence in mathematics education in the first two years of college.’

The conference opened with a welcome by GSC Department of Science and Mathematics Chair Dr. Sara Sawyer followed by an icebreaker activity conducted by GSC Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education Joseph Wood. WVMATYC Secretary Michael Anderson (West Virginia State University) conducted the group’s annual business meeting and new officers were elected. The morning session concluded with a panel discussion by the West Virginia Higher Education Math Task Force.

The Free Press WV
Panel discussion lead by members of the
West Virginia Higher Education Math Task Force


Marshall University Mathematics Professor Karen Mitchell began the afternoon session with the keynote address ‘Our Student; Their Issues; Our Solutions.’ Following the address, Dr. Keri Ferro (West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission) presented on a system-wide perspective on changes in mathematics courses for the transition from high school to college. Dr. Fred Walborn (Glenville State College) shared the work of the GSC Collaborative Project and their findings that show taking and passing developmental math (or its equivalent) is a critical variable for passing future classes in other academic disciplines. Vicki Sealey (West Virginia University) lead the final presentation entitled ‘The use of Active Learning in First-Semester Calculus;’ she shared the importance of using active learning strategies in the classroom and how they can be incredibly effective in promoting student learning and retention of mathematics.

The Free Press WV
2018-19 WVMATYC Officers


“The idea for Glenville State to host this year’s conference grew out of a comment by our former department chair at a Complete College America meeting on Co-requisite Mathematics in Charleston, West Virginia in 2017. He suggested that GSC might host the WVMATYC Conference in order to gain perspective on what the community and technical colleges were doing with co-requisite mathematics classes. I think that the Conference did bring together many mathematics teachers from the first two years of college who may not have interacted with each other before and was successful in widening perspectives. I wish to thank the presenters who responded to my requests for presentations and I wish to acknowledge the advice, support, and contributions of my faculty colleagues Larry Baker, Wenwen Du, Avan McHenry, Sara Sawyer, Fred Walborn, and Joseph Wood, of the following GSC staff members Debra Nagy, Kay Peters, and Debbie Starcher-Johnson, and of the Alpha Iota Chapter of Chi Beta Phi and especially Ryan Mizia, Mark Sanson, Hilari Sprouse, and Marquis Walker. Without them, the Conference would not have been possible,” said conference organizer and GSC Associate Professor of Mathematics Paul Peck.

To view a complete overview of the conference, visit the WVMATYC website by clicking here or contact Peck at or 304.462.6309.

Students Named to Spring 2018 Honor Lists at GSC

The Free Press WV

The names of students who attained the Glenville State College President’s and Vice President’s Honor Lists for the Spring 2018 semester have been announced.

To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Barbour County: Shania Pennington, Jacob Price

Berkeley County: Alexander Miller

Boone County: Andrew Boktor, Ally Brown

Braxton County: Lucas Bonnett, Kendra Houghton, Ashlee James, Taylor Johnson, Brittany White, McKenze Yanero

Calhoun County: MacKenzie Ammerman, Jerry Basnett, Jacob Petry, Emily Snyder

Clay County: Jessica Beckett, Caitlyn Rogers

Doddridge County: Ryan Mizia

Fayette County: Trevor Wood

Gilmer County: Preston Allison, Katelyn Benson, Heather Coleman, Dravin Gibson, Janeeva Jenkins, Dalton Law, Brian Moore, Brianna Ratliff, Wesley Self, Hilari Sprouse

Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty

Harrison County: Hannah Mick

Jackson County: Larissa Hayman

Jefferson County: Taylor Corey

Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Bethany Spelock

Lewis County: Haley Biller, Hannah Blankenship, Destiny Grimes, Kelly Weaver

Logan County: Matthew Zachary

Marshall County: Logen LeMasters

Mercer County: Anna Lusk

Nicholas County: Marlyn Donelson, William Lyons, Elizabeth Messer, Mark Sanson

Putnam County: Joshua Brennan, Madison Null

Raleigh County: Michael Layne

Roane County: Savannah Harper

Webster County: Bryce McCourt

Wirt County: Mary Strong

Wyoming County: Brittany Koutsunis

Out-Of-State: Victoria Peterson (CA), Jacqueline Deary (CT), Brian Williams (MD), Allison Parski (MI), John Routzahn (OH)




To be named to the GSC Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Quincy Band

Braxton County: Jordan Batton, Leslee Coffman, Kathryn Dean, Jessica Ellis, Bryan Foster, Brittany Louk, Madison Oney, Christian Pritt, Jonathon Shreve, Jacob Stout, Forrest Taylor

Calhoun County: Hannah Allen, Christopher Cunningham, Johnathan Taylor, Laura Webb, Lindsey Webb

Clay County: Andrea Litton, Gracen Samples, Seth Stover, Braylee Woods

Doddridge County: Alexis Shonk

Fayette County: Derek Bloomfield, Matthew Hackworth, Travis Myers, Kelsey Norris, Destiny Rader, Clayton Swisher

Gilmer County: Jacob Arden, Chandler Ferguson, Madisyn Furr, Thomas Gilco, Lauren Hardman, Wyatt Helmick, Emilie Jedamski, Jaylin Johnson, Amanda Lamb, Matthew Montgomery, Adam Moore, Hannah Moore, Kitric Moore, Analysse Petty, Hayley Summers, Katelyn Weese, Halee Wildman, Carrissa Wood, Trevor Wright

Grant County: Larissa Henry

Greenbrier County: Kerri Arbuckle, Justice Bowyer

Hardy County: Faith Smith

Harrison County: Lia Runyan

Jackson County: Josie Hayman, Evan Merical, Sapphire Parsons

Jefferson County: Michael Dodson, Jasmine Tarman

Kanawha County: Jacob Lutsy, Jeri Potter

Lewis County: Daniel Conrad, Hannah Curfman, Emily Kemper, Michael Marion, Taylor McClain, Heather Montgomery, April Moran, Brooklyn Queen, Sara Sellers, Arikka Smith, Damien White

Logan County: Alec Maynard

Marion County: Morgan Hardesty

Mineral County: Abigail Johnson

Monroe County: Cody Newhouse

Nicholas County: Danielle Bartlett, Charles Baughman, Tabitha Cochrum, Austin Hill, Anthony Mayes, William Womack, J. Cameron Woods

Pleasants County: Jessy Moore

Pocahontas County: Matthew Rao, Nancy Turner

Preston County: Brittany Louk

Putnam County: Sarah Lines, Jacob Stover, Tori Ward

Raleigh County: Jacob Coots, William Harper, Matthew Welch

Randolph County: Daniel Crawford, Kayla Palmer, Kathlyne Simmons

Roane County: Brianna Deel, Sabrina Gonzalez, Kimberly Lee, Chad Leport, Cassidy Taylor, James Williams

Tucker County: Angela Myers, Wiley Raines

Tyler County: Miranda Taylor

Upshur County: Belinda Lewis, Casey Orsburn

Webster County: Jared Romano

Wetzel County: James Goddard

Wirt County: Kristina Lowe, Kia Sleesman

Wood County: Taylor Broadwater, Hannah Dennis

Wyoming County: Ethan Gillespie, Kaci Mullins, Hunter Simmons

Out-Of-State: Giles Guy-Williams (CA), Andre Henderson (CA), Julia Lindberg (CT), Grant Williams (DC), Alyssa Banks (DE), Ryan Nimely (GA), Ai Miyazaki (Japan), Ethan Carr (KY), Haley Wolff (MD), Jacob Ngangum (MD), Julia Lesko (MD), Paranda Uber (MD), Madison Gargus (MI), Jessica Digennaro (NY), Brianna D’Angelo (NY), Isaiah Sattelmaier (OH), Catherine Pelfrey (OH), Chere Davis (VA), Cory Goodhope (VA), John Jeans (VA)

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Education

Dr. Martha J. Kanter to Speak at Commencement

The Free Press WVDr. Martha J. Kanter, executive director of the College Promise Campaign and Senior Fellow at the Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy, will deliver the keynote address [ .... ]  Read More

WV Teacher Received the Remaing Donations accepted through a GoFundMe Page

The Free Press WVOrganizers with WV Teacher Strike Fund distribute more than $330,000 to school employees [ .... ]  Read More

Imagination Library Successfully Transitions to West Virginia Department of Education

The Free Press WV West Virginia’s Imagination Library program successfully transitioned to the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) this week, making it the first of several programs to shift as a result of HB 4006, which dissolved the Department of Education and the Arts [ .... ]  Read More

Emrick Awarded Top Honors by NATA ICSM

The Free Press WVRae Emrick ’95, assistant professor of athletic training at West Virginia Wesleyan College, was recently awarded District III Head D2 Athletic Trainer by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Intercollegiate Council for Sports Medicine (NATA ICSM)  [ .... ]  Read More

Parkersburg’s Sarah Sisson Named WVWC Newman Civic Fellow 2018

The Free Press WVCampus Compact, a Boston-based non-profit organization working to advance the public purposes of higher education, has announced the students who comprises the organization’s 2018 cohort of Newman Civic Fellows, including West Virginia Wesleyan College’s own Sarah Sisson [ .... ]  Read More

WVWC to hold Two-Day Lincoln Conversations Event

The Free Press WV West Virginia Wesleyan College’s Department of History, the Phi Alpha Theta history honor society, and the Annie Merner Pfeiffer Library are proud to co-sponsor the first “Conversations on Lincoln” to be held over two days [ .... ]  Read More

Jean-Baptiste Receives International Travel Scholarship from WVWC Emeritus Club

The Free Press WVMichael Jean-Baptiste of West Palm Beach, FL received the Dr. Harold T. Elmore, Hon. ’82 Emeritus Club Endowed Scholarship for International Travel. This summer, Jean-Baptiste will travel to Ecuador and spend four weeks studying global health and Spanish [ .... ]  Read More

State Superintendent Paine wants to meet with students about school safety

The Free Press WVWest Virginia Superintendent of Schools Steve Paine said at a state Board of Education meeting last week he wants to meet with students regarding ways to make schools safer [ .... ]  Read More

Rebuilding Nicholas County Schools

The Free Press WV West Virginia Board of Education and Nicholas County Board of Education Approve Mediation Process for Rebuilding Nicholas County Schools [ .... ]  Read More

Wesleyan Concert Band to Present Peter and the Wolf

The Free Press WVThe West Virginia Wesleyan Concert Band will perform a family concert featuring Peter and the Wolf on Wednesday, February 28 at 7 p.m.  [ .... ]  Read More

Governor Justice Signs Pay Raise Bill

The Free Press WV Governor Jim Justice has signed legislation today that will provide teachers, school service personnel and state police with a 2 percent pay increase starting in July and has taken the steps in the budget to include a 2 percent pay raise for all other state employees effective July 01 as well [ .... ]  Read More

West Virginia teachers strike over pay, benefits

The Free Press WV West Virginia teachers have gone on strike over pay and benefits one day after the governor signed raises for them [ .... ]  Read More

Office of Admissions to Hold Annual Orange & Black Scholarship Recognition Day on February 24

The Free Press WV The Office of Admissions at West Virginia Wesleyan College will hold the 27th annual Orange & Black Scholarship Recognition Day on Saturday, February 24 on the Buckhannon campus [ .... ]  Read More

Teachers and service workers say they’ve had enough

The Free Press WVThere will be no public school next Thursday or Friday anywhere in West Virginia. Whether classes resume on Monday remained up in the air [ .... ]  Read More

Fizer Selected to Attend Sarajevo Symposium on Post-Conflict Transitions

The Free Press WVSarah Fizer, senior music education major from Martinsburg, WV, has been selected to attend the International Peace & Security Institute’s (IPSI) Sarajevo Symposium on Post-Conflict Transitions July 07-22 in Sarajevo, Bosnia. In partnership with the Sarajevo School of Science and Technology, the 2018 Sarajevo Symposium will engage participants in contemporary theory and practice of post-conflict political transitions in the Former Yugoslavia and other countries [ .... ]  Read More

Education

Amid review, West Virginia higher ed system taps new chief

The Free Press WV An interim chancellor has been appointed for West Virginia’s higher education system as it undergoes a review.  [ .... ]  Read More

West Virginia State President’s Contract Extended by Five Years

The Free Press WVThe contract was approved Friday by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission [ .... ]  Read More

Teacher of the Year finalists named

The Free Press WV The West Virginia Department of Education announced Friday the five finalists for the 2019 State Teacher of the Year award [ .... ]  Read More

Finalists named for WV Scholar program

The Free Press WV ShaiAnne Williams Webster County High School [ .... ]  Read More

Flanagan Resigns from State Board of Education

The Free Press WV Jeffrey D. Flanagan of Kanawha County has tendered his resignation as a member of the West Virginia State Board of Education effective immediately [ .... ]  Read More

Nicholas County mediation team calls for 2 new high schools

The Free Press WV The mediation team said Nicholas County families would be able to select the high school or middle school that “best meet their educational needs [ .... ]  Read More

Justice appoints David L. Roach as executive director of School Building Authority

The Free Press WV Governor Jim Justice announced today that he has appointed David L. Roach as executive director of the School Building Authority [ .... ]  Read More

West Virginia school district given $440K tech award

The Free Press WVA rural West Virginia school board has been chosen to receive more than $440,000 for video conference technology to provide distance learning [ .... ]  Read More

Application deadline for merit-based scholarship extended

The Free Press WV The PROMISE scholarship pays up to $4,750 for tuition and mandatory fees for any in-state student who meets grade and college entrance exam requirements [ .... ]  Read More

WV Senate adjourns without voting on teachers’ pay

The Free Press WVThe West Virginia Senate has adjourned for the day without taking up the 5 percent pay raise Governor Jim Justice negotiated with union leaders to end teachers’ weeklong walkout [ .... ]  Read More

West Virginia teachers to keep striking Tuesday

The Free Press WV The Latest on a statewide teachers walkout in West Virginia over pay and benefits [ .... ]  Read More

Attorney General: Teacher strike is illegal

The Free Press WV West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey says the teacher strike is illegal and he will take action, if requested, to enforce the law [ .... ]  Read More

Authorities: At least 2 juveniles accused of school threats

The Free Press WVAuthorities say at least two juveniles have been identified for allegedly posting social media threats aimed at a West Virginia high school [ .... ]  Read More

Teachers taking a statewide work action

The Free Press WV There were apparently no major breakthroughs in a meeting at the state capitol between leading lawmakers, representatives of the governor’s office and the leaders of the two teacher groups [ .... ]  Read More

Walk-ins held across Eastern Panhandle

The Free Press WVTeachers across the Eastern Panhandle held walk-ins at area schools Friday morning in a show of solidarity amidst concerns about teacher pay increases and changes to the Public Employees Insurance Agency [ .... ]  Read More

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Education

Readers' Recent Comments

The lipstick comment deserves special attention. The State’s testing results verifies that too many students are not proficient in science, reading, and math. WV remains in the lower 10th among the 50 states for those areas.

Google WVZOOM Dashboard and look at State assessment scores for the GCHS. According to reports a decision was made to hire one more math teacher over there to help improve future results.

Nothing is known about what is being done to help Gilmer’s HS students with reading and science. The new Board president must get detailed information out to the public.

Assurances that everything is OK won’t work anymore. There has been too much of that type of hokum. The public knows how to access achievement information from the Internet to impose increasing accountability for our school system.

By R. J. Myers on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

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Maybe it is a case of not seeing the forest for the trees. GSC is designated responsibility for serving seven counties in central WV.

SAT scores for students entering GSC are the lowest in the State with large numbers of students coming from the seven counties. This suggests that education needs to be upgraded in the counties.

Why not focus on using the College to train teachers for central WV and to do what is necessary to improve pre-K-12 education in the seven counties?

Looks to be a natural winner for GSC. What about it Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors?

By Watching Alumni on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Thanks you for honest comments, Mr. Boggs.

Its a sad state when volunteers can be credited with a better job than paid WV employees.

No wonder we have financial, legislative, highway, issues at every turn in the road. 

And to think, that the governor has to burden the National Guard with administration of a flood recovery program? 

Obvious we have incompetent individuals in many positions throughout the state bureaucracy. Are there ever, ever any state employees actually fired, for unacceptable job performance or plain incompetence?

Look at route 5 west of I-79 for a wonderful example of DOH failure.  The DOH county office is a mile from the ‘rollercoaster’ ride. All those state employees have to ride it 10, maybe 20 times a week just doing their jobs.  How can they not see it?

This rollercoaster is the ‘welcome center’ to Braxton and Gilmer county.
Its been a mess for over 20 years.  The rough, bumpy railroad tracks too.

Yes, that’s what the Gilmer Federal Prison employees who commute deal with.  It’s a great welcome, great first look, for prospective Glenville State College students and staff as well.

By A failed state of the state report. on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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What a glowing report.

Just because you say or print something, doesn’t make it true.

With a report like this, you would think WV had moved up the list from 47th in outcomes.

A few people don’t have the wool down over their eyes.

By wasted lipstick on the pig. on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

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Wiseman’s suggestion is an opportunity for the new School Board officers, Mr. Cottril and Mr. Shakleford.

Both members campaigned on improvements they would make if elected. The most important improvement would be outstanding results with student learning outcomes in the County.

Quarterly progress reports from Mr. Cottril and Mr. Shackleford are requested.

By Voters For Accountability on 07.16.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

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Excellent meeting minutes I wish we could see more local news like this..  Where can I find information on the recent lawsuit between the Gilmer County Commission and Prosecutor Hough?  I understand Judge Alsop issued a decision?

By Reader on 07.14.2018

From the entry: 'GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES'.

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Praises go to Governor Justice, Dr. Paine, and the entire State Board for producing this outstanding report.

For the first time in memory comprehensive information is included in one source for the public and it is written in an understandable
style.

A request is made to the Gilmer County Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther to produce a similar report by this fall for the specific status of our school system.

We could celebrate achievements for which we excel and we could profit from our weak points as opportunities for corrective measures to take.

Forget about what other counties are doing—we are competing against ourselves.

The often cited excuse that we are just as good as other counties with WV ranking near bottom should no longer be tolerated.

By fall results of recent SAT testing would be available to Superintendent Lowther and the County Board to include in the report.

One advantage of the suggested County report and ones in successive years would be a basis for the public to use to judge effectiveness of Gilmer’s Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther.

The GFP is applauded for its role in being a leader in WV for making education news accessible on the Internet.

By Frank Wiseman on 07.14.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

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Dr. Pellett, you attacked accuracy of the NCHEMS report in your Gazette article today.

It would be informative for you to give an Internet link to the report to permit it to be read and for you to publish a detailed critique of errors in it with backup evidence as proof.

By GSC EMPLOYEE on 07.13.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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A basic truism for a highly successful start up business is to offer a new top quality product in high demand at a price consumers can afford.

Why do Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors reject the concept? Specifically, as printed in the Democrat there is a proposal to establish a premiere five year teacher education program at the College with grads to receive a masters degree in teaching. A program of that type is desperately needed in WV and it is not offered elsewhere.

Word circulating is that Dr. Pellet, the Board of Governors, and dominant members of the County’s elite have summarily rejected the idea.

One excuse heard is that local power brokers do not want WVU involved with the College. Yet, in the Democrat Dr. Pellett is quoted saying that he is working on a new nursing program with WVU’s involvement.

Is the true reason of veto of the innovative teacher education program because Dr. Pellet and the Board of Governors were not originators of the idea to automatically cause its rejection?

Dr. Pellett is invited to explain to the public and concerned alumni why the program would not be in GSC’s long term best interests.

By Why Dr. Pellet and GSC BOG? on 07.13.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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The Glenville mayor is doing an excellent job and the town is lucky to have him on the job. Getting old houses torn down was a kept promise and the town looks much better at those places. Let’s have more of it.

By Citizen on 07.11.2018

From the entry: 'GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES'.

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Why is it that when tax dollars were spent on the higher education reorganization study by the Colorado NCHEMS group it is being keep secret from the public? Mr. Boggs how about helping out by informing voters how to get a copy of the report to read and decide for themselves?

By Voters Watching on 07.10.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Oops! Bay of Pigs not Figs. Shows that college profs are not immune to embarrassing gaffs.

By WVU Prof. on 07.09.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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There are two examples in Janis’ book regarding the Kennedy presidency. The first one deals with the group think Bay Of Figs disaster.

Those in Washington associated with invasion decisions considered themselves to be infallible world class thinkers. That mistake prevented critical and constructive review from anyone outside that tight group of political operatives.

The other example covers the Cuban Missile Crisis as an example of masterful diplomacy and planning to prevent a nuclear holocaust. President Kennedy deserved credit because he avoided group think traps from Bay Of Pigs lessons learned.

Higher education decisions in WV are made by individual tight knit Boards of Governors with excessive autonomy and no meaningful oversight.

Also, board members are there through political appointments at local levels. Governors traditionally rubber stamp the recommended appointments.

When serious group think mistakes occur at colleges and universities Boards are conditioned to assume that State bail outs will cover damages.

If private businesses are group think practitioners they never last unless they change strategies to avoid brutal market place penalties.

By WVU Political Scientist on 07.08.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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“Governance Changes Needed at GSC” is 100% correct.

Basically GSC Board of Governors and other leadership positions, have been a result of nepotism and crony friend choices.

Those two ‘tools’ rarely, if ever, give the best persons available to whatever the position requires.

Incest often produces less than desired outcomes as well.

By PAST Time for change @ GSC on 07.08.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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Advice for GSC’s president is to read Janis’book entitled Victims of Group Think.

The theme for the book is that alike thinkers of a group of elites in control can have colossal failures because they believe that their decision-making processes are unworthy of outside scrutiny.

Think about it. Did the airport to accommodate jet traffic at the mouth of Cedar Creek work out and did the federal prison result in economic prosperity with a hefty upsurge with GSC’s
enrollment?

What about the millions of dollars of new construction at GSC? Did it result in healthy enrollments as promised.

Some elites associated with GSC were strong advocates for the ill fated ventures.

GSC has been controlled too long by members of the same families. With the undeniable track record of declining conditions a few resignations would be a positive step.

The nagging governance problem affecting GSC has been shielding elite individuals from personal accountability without penalties for bad decisions.

By Governance Changes Needed At GSC on 07.06.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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Bigger is better? Rarely.

Everyone knows that school consolidation has resulted in failed outcomes.

This is laying the ground work, for an ego driven power grab.  The big institutions have no limit to their desire for money.

Stay small, and if failure occurs, fewer people are impacted.  Too large, and management of that soon turns into a problem.

By Its just planned failure. on 07.05.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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This information including details in the referenced full Report helps put GSC’s precarious standing in perspective. More information can be accessed at http://www.collegesimply.com.

That web site provides SAT student information for WV institutions of higher learning and GSC has the lowest scores.

Inferences from the scores and material in the report are that because GSC gets a large percentage of students from poor counties including Gilmer County, school systems there need improving.

Also, with employers becoming more sophisticated in hiring the best qualified graduates they access information of the type published on the web site given above.

The reason is that institutions with the best prepared students have more rigorous academic programs and they do not have to expend valuable time on remediation.

Provision of this comment is not intended to be a slam at GSC. The purpose is to encourage Dr. Pellett and the Board of Governors to devise a viable strategy for making the College a center of excellence to improve its standing in WV. It is that simple for guaranteed survival in the future.

By GSC GRAD on 07.05.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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We must be wary of how County K-12 achievement information is presented.

From the outset the new school board should focus on exactly how well our students are performing with mastering subjects, and not to fall victim to news unrelated to demonstrated student learning.

For one example the GCHS was awarded for its high graduation rate, but it ranked in the bottom 10% among WV high schools for college and career readiness of seniors.

This is not to say that graduation rates are unimportant, but they cannot be interpreted as fact of a direct relationship with how well students are prepared for college and careers.

For some schools an unusually high graduation rate could be a function of enforced “everyone passes” policy.

The point is that there is need for vigilance when student performance information is disclosed to the public so school board get all of it out so voters can decide where the County’s school system really stands.

By Give All Facts on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

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Word is that officers on the County’s school board have changed with Doug Cottrill becoming the new president and Shackleford the VP.

Voters request to know what the new board’s plans are for improving the County’s standing with the quality of K-12 education for math, reading, science, and other subjects, and correcting remaining problems at the new grade school contractors have not fixed.

Why not publishing monthly progress reports to cover the new board’s accomplishments? That job would be a good assignment for the new president.

By Voters Watching on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

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There is no mention of the facts Jumpin Jim defaulted on a 9 million dollar loan, poor record of paying taxes, nor the mess of the RISE flood funds handling. 

No wonder the poor score.  Anyone think it was ‘earned’?

By Jumpin Jim Nose Dives on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Low favorable marks for Manchin, Morrisey, Justice in latest PPP poll'.

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This news has great implications for GSC and Gilmer County. The College could form a partnership with the County’s school system to close the K-12 achievement gap.

For years while under State intervention it was denied that a gap existed, and the mantra was that the County was doing as well as the State as a whole.

That was like saying that we are OK with the State being ranked near the bottom for the quality of its K-12 education system and we should be content to wallow at the bottom too.

Ms. Patty Lowther, the new superintendent of schools, states that we must close the K-12 achievement gap and it is within the County’s capabilities.

She and her staff including Shelly Mason the new curriculum expert, principals, and the County’s teachers are actively involved with devising solutions to eliminate problems.

Regarding GSC, Dr. Pellett is on record with definite innovations to improve the College’s standing.

He has an unique opportunity to guide the College to contribute to Gilmer County having the best school system in WV as a model to emulate throughout the State and Appalachia.

In the past the typical Charleston trap has been to collect achievement data without expending successful efforts to interpret its meaning for use in solving under-achievement.

Dr. Pellett, Ms. Lowther, and Shelly Mason, with the help of other professionals in our schools can jettison that long standing road block to make Gilmer County a K-12 education standout.

Dr. Pellett in particular has an unparalleled opportunity to make his mark on guiding the College to improve K-12 education in the County and to let successes spread as examples throughout Appalachia.

There would not be a better way to justify the necessity of the College’s continuing existence for Gilmer County, central WV, and the entire State.

By Good News For WV on 06.29.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

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If you can’t trust judges to do the right thing…. is there any reason to trust our whole system of government?  One has to wonder.

Now we are reading a judge likely to be impeached as well as the legislature is considering impeaching the governor?

Are the any honest people running for offices?

By crooks everywhere? on 06.27.2018

From the entry: 'Auditors Seek Answers on State Supreme Court Spending'.

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This does not rise to the level of impeachment. “Slick Willy” got a head job in the peoples oval office, and dripped semen on the peoples carpet then lied about it, and according to the democrats back then, that did not rise to the level of impeachment.

By The Silent Majority on 06.21.2018

From the entry: 'Senate and House Democratic Leaders Renew Call for Immediate Legislative Action on Justice Loughry'.

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Something happening is good.
That building has been empty far too long.

Now we shall see if it workable.
Hope for all involved, that their efforts work out for GC and GSC.

By Good on 06.21.2018

From the entry: 'GSC Bluegrass Music Education Center to hold Ribbon Cutting Ceremony'.

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Numbers of new businesses is not the important factor. It is how many new jobs were created for local employees. Politicians like to cite meaningless numbers to crow about and they get by with it too often. Empty store fronts on Main Street have not diminished in numbers. Where are the jobs and what do they pay?

By New Jobs? on 06.20.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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Similar to EDA if Gilmer’s SAT results were rosy the news would be out in banner headlines. Elites see to it to keep peasants at bay.

By SAT Checker on 06.19.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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Straddlin Joe had a chance to embrace conservatism and convert to Republican, as Governor Justice and much of the state has done. Politics in the state are no longer ruled by mine union bosses. It’s time we send him back to Marion County, as we did with Natalie Tennant.

By The Silent Majority on 06.18.2018

From the entry: 'Joe Manchin: Political games would cost West Virginians with pre-existing conditions'.

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If the so called business creation were true?
Wouldn’t the EDA be having all sorts of news releases?
You would think so.

EDA used to have monthly public meetings.
Now only four times a year?

Business things that slim nothing to discuss?
Or maybe secret meetings by the insiders?

By Gilmer EDA...private club ? on 06.15.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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If we can ask Jeff Campbell questions as a Gilmer County official why can’t we get timely information from other officials too?

For an example how did the County do with recent SAT testing?

Superintendents have the information so when is it going to be made public?

Hopefully the newly elected school board will take it on as a priority to get accurate student achievement information to the public with specific plans to make improvements where needed.

By End Public Information Embargo on 06.13.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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If true, this would be great news!

The Gilmer County Economic Development Association should be telling us in press releases who/what/where those new businesses are?

How about it GCEDA President Jeff Campbell?

Lets hear from you.

By reader6 on 06.11.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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Interesting chart.

But….it shows 4 new businesses in Gilmer…..in each of the past 3 months.
That…..is TWELVE new businesses!

BUT, BUT, where are they?

By Where are they? on 06.08.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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You will find most ticks down low on grass blades along well traveled trails, where the unfed adults and even larvae and eggs are brushed off by a passing varmint. Another myth is that ticks will jump on you, of the thousands of ticks I have picked off grass blades and dropped in a cup of gasoline, I have never had one jump at me.

By Trespasser Will on 06.08.2018

From the entry: 'Insect-related illnesses are trending up'.

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Ticks don’t go, they are carried there by host animals. They are best controlled by controlling the host varmints in your back yard. As bad as Lyme disease is, from personal experience, believe me you don’t want Rocky Mountain spotted fever either.

By Trespasser Will on 06.07.2018

From the entry: 'Insect-related illnesses are trending up'.

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NEWS FLASH !
Rural West Virginia is STILL WAITING for that high speed internet that these two have been promising for 20 years!

By Rural WV still waiting.... on 06.06.2018

From the entry: 'U.S. Senators Manchin, Capito announce funding for rural communities'.

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Dilapidated buildings seem to make the news on a regular basis.

Dilapidated buildings are nothing more than an great indicator of a ‘dilapidated’ economy.

By WV's dilapidated economy on 06.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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I don’t know how the state can say that, male bears have been known to attack for unknown reasons, and of course females will attack if they perceive their cub is in danger. The best thing to do is shut the #### up and don’t be posting on Facebook what you have done.

By Tresspasser Will on 06.03.2018

From the entry: 'West Virginia man accused of wrongfully shooting bear'.

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Steve and John,
My deepest heartfelt sympathy to you at this most difficult time.
I will miss your mother, my best friend, immensely! We laughed hard together and we cried together, only as two close cousins could do! We spent many hours on the phone chatting either catching up or talking about cooking, any hour day or night,it never mattered to us.

Our words to each other every time we spoke, “I love you sweet cousin of mine”

God’s Speed until we meet again!💞💓
Rest In Peace for eternity💓

Love you dearly,

Cousin, Jo Ann xoxoxo

By Jo Ann Emrick on 06.01.2018

From the entry: 'Catherine Ann Umanetz'.

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The loss of money at Cedar Creek was only part of it. Money spent on Leading Creek, more money to fill the huge hole at GCES, money to fix land slide at GCES because of poor site design work, money spent to fix various other botches that should have been done right to begin with, uncalled for huge pay raises to select central office staff to buy them off, money for playground equipment when existing equipment could have been used, money for an unneeded payroll clerk at the central office, money for a principal at Troy when the individual did not do the work, and more to include building GCES too small and Leading Creek too large with public funds. Will anything be done about it? Of course not except to continue the cover-up. Money trail too hot to handle.

By Etched Memory on 05.31.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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Many kudos to both the PACF people as well as their supporters!

Hard to believe how much good they are doing for so many, in just a few short years!

Keep up the good works!

By many kudos ! on 05.31.2018

From the entry: 'Grants Support Area Charities (Little Kanawha Area)'.

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Minney was just another ‘enabler’ for the blatant, bold faced, incompetent, corruption during the West Virginia State Board of Education overthrow of the Gilmer County School System.

Thousands of dollars wasted.  Do not forget the Cedar Creek property chosen by State Appointed Superintendent Blankenship in coercion with the former, ousted, GSC President Simmons.  The money spent clearing forest, the money spent bulldozing a road, until it finally became clear, they were on a ‘fools errand’.

Then to get out of that mess, Blankenship and Simmons,  trade that property, so a school could be built in a flood plain?

‘Education’ and common sense do not always go hand in hand.

If only people were as smart as they think they are.

By Another black eye for state intervention ! on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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All this Minney stuff brings up at least 2 questions:

WHY did state appointed super Devano hire Minney?

Why did the Doddridge folks hire Minney when he doesn’t have the required financial ‘credentials’ to be a district treasurer?

Either poor hiring practices or someone pulling strings.

By questions but no answers ? on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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And to think that OUR own little Gilmer County Library ranks in the top ten of libraries in the whole state!

By WOW--WOW--WOW ! ! ! on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'West Virginia Libraries Rock Out with Summer Reading Programs'.

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Didn’t Mr. Minney approve paying select employees on payroll, for the days they did not work without board or superintendent’s knowledge or approval? Fortunately, he got caught by the board.

By Ridiculous on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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If you follow the money, you can easily see where all the money went in construction of Gilmer Elementary, why the school has so many physical issues and why there have been problems to get them fixed. Thanks the board for choosing a different auditor.

By FTM on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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There were a lot of corruptions under state control and superintendent Devano. They mismanaged funds and paid off several employees to keep their mouth shut. When the local controlled board chose a different auditor from the norm, they got caught. I think the remaining paid off employees need to talk the facts, quit, or get prosecuted.

By They were bad on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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That was far from the first time Mr. DM had gotten into trouble with the auditors. In previous years, findings for mismanagement of funds were issued against him in connection with other work places leading to dismissal.
The audit which is available on state DOE site couldn’t find any justification of board approval for payments, and mismanagement of funds.

By Don LK on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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He got caught of mismanagement of public funds.

By Jeremy D on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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I hear Gilmer schools treasurer Dan Minney is leaving. Why?

By Just Curious on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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Good to see this program return after having it gone missing under the state appointed superintendent.

It was reported there was no place for it to take place.

Thank you Gilmer County Board of Education for making it happen.

By Some remember on 05.21.2018

From the entry: 'FREE breakfast and lunch this summer for Gilmer County Kids'.

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Pam,
Sorry to read of your mom’s passing. I remember may times spent in your home with your parents and brothers. Sending love and prayers to you and your brothers.
Sherry Broggi

By Sherry Straley Broggi and Rita Straley on 05.17.2018

From the entry: 'Lora Faye Tomblin'.

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Really cool project to all who volunteered and those helping financially as well!

Where’s DR? He never misses these events?

By Very nice project - great volunteers! on 05.17.2018

From the entry: 'CommunityImprovement™: Pavilion'.

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The GSC retention post must relate to those beginning in 2014 who planned for 4 year degrees and they dropped out. There probably were students who began in 2014 and they earned 2 year degrees before 2018 so they were not drop outs.

By GSC RETENTION? on 05.15.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Congratulations kids!  Setting up a scholarship fund is a GREAT idea! Where can we get information on who to contact and what local needs are?

By Reader on 05.14.2018

From the entry: 'Calhoun-Gilmer Career Center Celebrates Seniors'.

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How large was GSC’s graduating class of 2018 last week and what was its original size the fall of 2014?

Accurate information should be available to indicate retention. One news source reported that 100 graduated in the class of 2018.

By Alumni on 05.13.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Some interesting results.  Should shake the trees a little.

By Spring cleaning! on 05.09.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Local Election Results - May 2018'.

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So sorry for your loss.  Prayers.

By Betty Woofter on 05.07.2018

From the entry: 'Ina Mae (Foster) Clem'.

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Anyone interested in facts for graduation rates after four years of college can access information on WV’s Education Policy Commission web site.

The last time information was reported WV State was listed at 13.6% compared to WVU’s at 35.9%. GSC was at 25.1%.

Comments submitted so far flag a serious problem in WV. Student achievement information is scattered all over with it being reported by the State, the federal government, and testing organizations including ACT.

Because WV lacks an effective State clearing house to sort through the information and to interpret it for practical application in improving our pubic school systems, too much important quality control material is neglected.

When citizens take initiative to obtain the information and they cite it they are often berated to be a form of “attack the messenger”.

Then too there are the perennial apologists who say that everything is “just fine” to help confuse the issue even more to detract from school improvements.

By WVDE Career Employees on 05.06.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Too often students have to go an extra year or longer to graduate from college with under graduate degrees because they were not prepared when they got there to enable them to complete on time.

The 35% graduation rate includes incoming freshmen who do not finish in four years, and it is factual that some of our public colleges have worse records than others.

WVU does above average, but it has large numbers of-out-of state better prepared students.

By R. Page on 05.06.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Rex Page claims we have a college graduation rate of approximately 35%.

In essence that is a FAILURE rate of 65% !

Think of how many dollars are wasted, and how many students are burdened with student loans, that basically will do them little good in life.

Oh yes.  It does pump money into the flawed system.

By Wv Has a FLAWED educational system ! on 05.05.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Even with enrolling in colleges where acceptance is noncompetitive, meaning that all applicants with at least C averages are accepted, the graduation rate to get a degree is around 35%.

This fact is more evidence for WV’s failed public education system and solid proof that a major top to bottom over haul is needed.

If we accept the often cited excuse that there is a problem with kids and their families to cause under achievement in school that line of reasoning suggests that West Virginians are inherently flawed. This is untrue and the problem lies with WV’s under performing education system.

By Rex Page on 05.03.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Disgraceful that WV lacks a top quality education system to prepare more high school graduates to be eligible for acceptance into the best colleges where there is competition for acceptance.

The deficiency forces students to attend lower tier places where everyone is accepted.

Why does WV fail to make improvements? It is because education delivery in our State is designed to be void of meaningful accountability for administrators.

By WVDE Watcher on 05.03.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Little doubt the block schedule system at the high school gives GC lower scores.

This has been proven over and over in other school systems.

Its an out dated and antiquated system.  Our board of education needs to get rid of it.

Gilmer County Board of Education….are you up to the job?

By Block Schedule Supported By Blockheads on 05.02.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Hopefully this is the beginning of doing better with getting out school news to Gilmer. It is far better to read timely news than to have to go to the Cornerstone to get it.

We wish Mr. Shuff the best in improving learning results at the HS. If he tackles problems like he engaged in athletics the HS will be put on the map for academic excellence.

When he gets his school improvement plan together everyone in the County will pitch in to help him succeed. Thank you GCBOE.

By Pleased Parents on 05.02.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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Mr. Williams has it nailed down.  Solid.

America’s entire education system is a farce.
Education administrators worry about their job than worry about the children.

Youth is our future.
By creating dummies, do not expect much of a future.

The children are being short changed, robbed.
America is being short changed, robbed.

But the failed administrators keep their jobs.

By Time To Clean the Education House! on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Is this article some sort of a joke ?
Certainly would seem so!

We are almost daily bombarded with chemical spraying from above.
We rarely actually have that clear, deep blue sky that God gave us.

If it happens we do get a clear(?) day, we will have the light blue, almost whispy white cloud sky.

Set a white bowl out in the rains.  Check to see what color the water is after a rain.  You will be
surprised.  Color will vary depending what is being sprayed on a given day.

If it were winter, I’d tell you to look at the snowflakes.  No more are all snowflakes different.  Watch what falls on your clothing, you will see 1,000’s of flakes all the same shape.  Again, depends what toxic material we are being blasted with.

Asthma attacks, ER visits are on the rise.
Do some web searching, plenty of websites report this travesty.  You tax dollars at ‘work’.

By WHERE ARE THE ENVIRONMENTALISTS ? ? on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Air Quality Awareness Week is April 30 – May 04'.

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Fraud is not only rampant in education, it consumes Gilmer County..  Those who Have want to keep it any and all costs, and those that don’t, want.  Gilmer needs a good house cleaning of court and legal ‘authorities’ as well if anything is Ever going to change.

By Spring cleaning! on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Fraud is committed in Gilmer County when citizens are told that our high school grads are prepared to be highly competitive for entry into the modern world.

The misinformation conflicts with verification that our grads lag when it comes to being college and career ready.

By being disadvantaged academically too many students drop out of college when they cannot compete and they often must go an extra year at a greater expense to catch-up.

There is another type of fraud not pointed out in the posting. It relates to bragging about the “fine” ACT test scores made by students at the GCHS.

For the ACT the average GCHS score as touted by school officials is close to 20. This may be slightly higher than average State scores, but here is the rub.

Our kids could not get accepted into top quality colleges and universities with stringent academic requirements to include those for ACT scores higher than most made at the GCHS.

What do they do? They attend institutions with relaxed acceptance criteria with some not having any basic requirements for ACT or SAT scores.

As a parent with a son at the Career Center I know that there must be remedial instruction in math and English for success in chosen career fields. It is called embedded instruction.

Because teachers must be hired at the Center for the catch-up it means that tax payers are paying twice (more fraud) for instruction that should have been done at the GCHS!

What can we do? Gilmer County must determine what must be done in our schools to make necessary improvements for the better to enable our kids to be the best they can be after HS. Simple isn’t it?

By We Want Better Schools on 04.30.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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It is easy to see through the motive for avoiding application of the same assessment approach in all of WV’s school systems.

The powerful in control do not want to make achievement results available for voters to compare academic results among districts!

That way opportunities for more accountability in ways school systems are administered will be nipped in the bud.

Interesting isn’t it that for sports minute attention is paid to comparing performances of all kinds of teams throughout WV.

Unfortunately the strategy will be to keep voters keenly focused on sports so they will not ask questions about education spending and how children are doing in mastering subjects in our school systems.

By WVDOE Disgusted on 04.20.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: State might let counties switch standardized test from SAT to ACT'.

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The West Virginia State Board of Education has operated as a “pin the tail on the donkey” bureaucratic nightmare for over a generation.

Currently, it is hard to envision any positive change in their SOP?

Try this, try that.  Change this, change that.
Continual evidence that all is being run as an experiment?
The WVBOE has no real clue what to actually do, in order to fix anything.

Money wasted. Children cheated of a good education.
Parents and taxpayers cheated.  Opportunities missed.

This is the WVBOE legacy.

By State BOE - dysfunctional is an understatement? on 04.16.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: State might let counties switch standardized test from SAT to ACT'.

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Maybe Jimmy can pay some of his tax bills now?

By Justice, pay your tax bills! on 04.15.2018

From the entry: 'City to purchase club owned by the governor’s company'.

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Reread the article and see what a wonderful set of excuses have been set forward.

Taxpayers give the state the funds for education.  It is then properly squandered leaving students with substandard educations.

These people have the audacity to blame the teachers on top of it.

State BOE, suck it up, fix the problem you and your previous board members have created. 

Make President Truman’s desk saying your motto:  “The buck stops here.“

That is, if you are up to it.

By Kanawha Reader on 04.15.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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West Virginia made national news again with its spending per student to be in the top third among the 55 states.

We spend more than $11,000 on average per pupil in our public schools. For comparison Utah spends about $6,500 per pupil and it ranks in the top third for the quality of its education system.

It would be interesting to know how much Gilmer County spends per pupil counting total funding from all sources.

WV is certainly no way near the top third with getting students college, career, and jobs ready right out of high school. Where is all our money going? What could we learn from rural states similar to Utah?

The worst culprit seems to be too many high paid people on WV payrolls who are non-contributers to making better lives for our kids.

By Economist on 04.14.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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Those of us who keep close tabs on student achievement want to know reasons for unacceptable reading, science, and math scores in Gilmer County and what is being done to correct them. For something this important the problems and solutions surely have been looked into.

By R. A. Beasley on 04.14.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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HaHaHaHaHaHaHa!

By Don't bring them to Gilmer! on 04.13.2018

From the entry: 'NEW “ALMOST HEAVEN” CAMPAIGN'.

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No matter what is going on in the State our concern is Gilmer County. The State reports on Zoom that 10th graders at the GCHS perform at the 35.9% proficiency rate for science.

Proficiency for 11th graders is 37% in math and it is commendable that the rate for them for reading is 64%.

What is being done to make improvements for science and math when students are about ready to graduate from HS? We hope that scores for reading hold up and even improve.

Why do we fail to receive updates for plans for proficiency improvements in the County’s schools?

In other WV counties superintendents provide that type of information on a routine basis.

By GCHS Parents on 04.12.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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