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Education

Gilmer County Residents Graduate from GSC

The Free Press WV

Three students from Gilmer County were awarded degrees during the Glenville State College December Commencement Ceremony held on Saturday, December 08, 2018.

  • Amanda Lamb of Normantown, WV graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Early Education (PreK-K), Elementary Education (K-6), and Multi-Categorical Special Education (K-6).

  • Samantha McCune of Linn, WV received a Bachelor of Science degree in Behavioral Science with a minor in Social Work.

  • Carissa Wood of Shock, WV graduated Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Behavioral Science with a minor in Music.

Founded in 1872, Glenville State College is a public liberal arts college located in Glenville, West Virginia.

The college offers a variety of four-year degree programs and several NCAA Division II athletic teams.

 

The Free Press WV

These High-Poverty Schools Figured Out How to Help Kids Succeed

The Free Press WV

In 2005, the Prichard Committee sponsored a study of a small number of high-poverty Kentucky public schools that were successfully educating their students at high levels. Their success was unexpected because schools with many poor students have historically struggled to help them succeed.

Research on “break-the-mold” schools that defy this trend has consistently identified the same set of characteristics: high expectations for students, strong and stable leadership, effective teachers, safe and orderly environment, focus on academics, and frequent monitoring of each student’s progress.

Our study was unique in using the state audit process to systematically compare eight Kentucky break-the-mold schools that had once been low-performing with eight chronically low-performing schools. We wanted to understand how schools serving the same kinds of students could have such different results.

Our findings confirmed what other researchers had found but underscored that the schools’ primary stakeholders — principals, teachers, parents and students themselves — drove improvement. We were captivated by three findings in particular:


► No one was “brought in” to turn the schools around. The schools’ turnaround did not come through replacing the principal or “re-staffing” the school. Instead, the principal and staff had painful discussions about their low-performing status and engaged in collaborative, intensive self-study — often with district or other external support — to figure out how to improve.


► Schools were led by collaborative principals. Principals in the successful schools were not authoritarian or top-down but engaged with their school communities to collaboratively address the problems.


► School climate was the single most distinguishing feature. High-performing schools differed most strongly from low-performing schools on measures of school climate, particularly high expectations for everyone (not just students); a commitment to equity and appreciation of diversity; and caring, respectful relationships among all stakeholders.  

Sadly, not all of the schools in our study have maintained their high performance. In 2017, only two of the six schools had achievement results in the top third of Kentucky elementary schools. One more was slightly above state average, and three were in the bottom third, based on all subjects tested (two schools have closed). Why are we not able to sustain high performance and learn from schools that have seemingly solved public education’s most chronic problem?

Based on what we learned in 2005 and our work since then, we suggest four promising strategies for eliminating chronically low-performing public schools:


► Learn from and build upon success: The two schools that have maintained high performance are in districts with several high-performing schools, suggesting a district role in improvement that includes ensuring that success does not walk out the door with effective principals and staff when they move on to other opportunities.


► Support school-led improvement efforts: Do we really need to make the case that for schools to improve, the faculty, staff and students inside the school must understand what is going on, figure out how to address the problem, and lead the improvement effort? External expertise will likely be needed, but improvement should be done by the schools, not to them.


► Engage the students: School improvement efforts for far too long have been led and implemented almost exclusively by adults. As recent youth mobilization efforts around school safety in Kentucky and across the country have shown, students sometimes have the best-informed voices about what is going wrong in their schools, and how to fix it. Improvement efforts going forward must involve students in meaningful and ongoing ways.


► Focus on climate: Our findings about the importance of a respectful, caring school climate focused on every student’s learning has been validated by a growing body of research showing a direct correlation between positive school climate and improved learning for all young people. Improvement efforts, then, must focus on creating a safe, engaging, and inclusive culture where high performance by everyone in the building is expected and supported. School-led climate audits are a promising first step to building this culture. The Prichard Committee’s Student Voice Team has been piloting a student-led climate and culture analysis and sharing results to spur rich, solutions-oriented conversations about how to improve schools from the inside out.

Our research and practice suggest that we don’t have to look outside our public schools to break the cycle of chronic low performance. Kentucky’s own success stories teach us that improvement can — and probably must — begin with our schools’ primary stakeholders. That includes administrators, teachers, parents, and yes, what is arguably the most overlooked resource in chronically low-performing schools: students.

The Free Press WV      The Free Press WV


Patricia Kannapel is an education researcher based in Louisville who led the Prichard Committee study “Inside the Black Box of High-Performing, High-Poverty Schools.“ Rachel Belin is the director of the Prichard Committee Student Voice Team, a statewide group of self-selected youth who work as research, policy and advocacy partners in the Prichard Committee’s efforts to improve Kentucky schools.



Rachel’s and Patricia’s solutions

Based on our research and practice in Kentucky, we suggest four promising strategies for eliminating chronically low-performing public schools:


► Learn from and build upon success. Schools that have maintained high performance are in districts with several high-performing schools, suggesting a district role in improvement that includes ensuring that success does not walk out the door with effective principals and staff when they move on to other opportunities.


► Support school-led improvement efforts.  For schools to improve, the faculty, staff and students inside the school must understand what is going on, figure out how to address the problem, and lead the improvement effort.  External expertise will likely be needed, but improvement should be done by the schools, not to them.


► Engage the students.  As recent youth mobilization efforts around school safety in Kentucky and across the country have shown, students sometimes have the best-informed voices about what is going wrong in their schools and how to fix it. Improvement efforts must involve students in meaningful and ongoing ways.


► Focus on climate. Given that there is a direct connection between positive school climate and improved learning for all young people, improvement efforts must focus on creating a safe, engaging, and inclusive culture where high performance by everyone in the building is expected and supported.  School-led climate audits are a promising first step to building this culture. 

WV Board of Education Approves Three Policies, Places Five on Public Comment Period

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) met today for its monthly routine business meeting. During the meeting, five policies were discussed and placed on a 30-day public comment period. A brief description of each policy can be found below.

Policy 2322, West Virginia System of Support and Accountability: The policy is recommended for repeal and replacement to better align with current research related to effective schools. It will also provide a clarified definition of the support and accountability system for schools and counties. The policy will also define school and county recognition programs for academic success and school quality.

Policy 4373, Expected Behavior in Safe and Supportive Schools: Policy 4373 is placed on public comment to gather feedback for the following proposed changes: behavior and consequences charts are moved to an Appendix to reinforce flexibility to schools when applying the four different levels of consequences and interventions depending on the severity of inappropriate student behaviors. The updated policy includes new requirements such as the reduction in time required by mandated reporters to report suspected abuse, and sexual abuse prevention education requirements for public school employees and students as required by West Virginia House Bill 4402. In addition, the policy will provide clarification for guns in vehicles on school property as outlined in W. Va. Code §61-7-11a.

Policy 5100, Approval of Educational Personnel Preparation Programs: Policy 5100 outlines the preparation of educators eligible for licensure to work in West Virginia public schools. The policy guides the institutions of higher education (IHEs) in the creation and revision of preparation programs and national accreditation. The revisions reflect the most updated assessments available and incorporate the following: adding and clarifying language regarding accreditation definitions, partnerships, program content requirements, and pilot program proposals.

Policy 5202, Minimum Requirements for the Licensure of Professional/ Paraprofessional Personnel and Advanced Salary Classification: This policy outlines the minimum requirements for the various licenses approved by the WVBE, and issued by the State Superintendent of Schools to educators, paraprofessionals and other school personnel who wish to work in West Virginia’s public schools. The policy also outlines the requirements for educators who wish to qualify for an advanced salary classification. In the revised version going out for public comment, important terminology is defined, governing principles are identified, and the criteria for issuance of each license and salary classification are established.

Policy 6200, Handbook on Planning School Facilities: Policy 6200 has been revised to expand and clarify the flexibility provided to counties in designing school facilities. The primary changes emphasize that the Handbook on Planning School Facilities is not intended to be so prescriptive that it preempts the judgement of curriculum specialists and design professionals. Proposed changes also clarify that economies of scale and program utilization shall not be the single determining factors in evaluating existing buildings or funding new building projects. 

The Board voted to approve Policy 2420, Adult Education Programs, which incorporates Policy 2420 (Adult Vocational Technical Programs and Funding Source) into Policy 2520.13 better aligns the Advance Career Education programs of study, formally known as Adult CTE programs, to the national accreditation requirements. The policy will be effective 30 days from the date of filing.

The Board also voted to approve two additional policies. Policy 2520.13, West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Programs of Study/Standards for Career Technical Education, which was amended to include the repeal of Policy 2530.02 and Policy 4310; and Policy 2520.14, West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Standards for Technology and Computer Science, amended to separate and clarify standards for technology and computer science. Both policies will go into effect July 1, 2019.

To review and comment on WVBE policies, visit: wvde.state.wv.us/policies/.

State Fair of West Virginia taking scholarship applications

The Free Press WV

The State Fair of West Virginia is accepting applications for scholarships to be awarded to young people who have participated in the fair.

The scholarships are funded through the State Fair Endowment.

Five four-year scholarships of up to $1,000 are awarded to young people who have participated in the fair within the past five years.

Those people must plan to pursue a vocational trade or associate’s or bachelor’s degree, have excelled academically and demonstrated a financial need.

The scholarships will go to people who have participated in state fair livestock shows, equine programs or 4-H and FFA youth exhibit.

The fair said in a news release the deadline is Monday.

Applications are available at http://www.gvfoundation.org/scholarships or at the fair’s website at http://www.statefairofwv.com/fair.

For more information, call 304.645.1090.

GCHS: Honor Roll - 2nd Nine Weeks - 2018-19

The Gilmer Free Press
GILMER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
HONOR ROLL
2nd Nine Weeks
2018-2019
7th Grade 8th Grade
Anderson, Kara Amos, Riley
Ball, Dakota Arden, Lucas
Blake, Micca Ball, Brianna
Bourn, Elijah Bill, Vanessa
Brenwald, Jozlyn Bourn, Ashlyn
Butler, Grant Brannon, David
Cain, Logan Cogar, Cole
Casto, Dyson Drennen, Cassandra
Foster, Keven Freeman, Jacob
Frame, Madison Hale, Lilith
Frashure, Bayley Harubin, Ryleigh
Frymier, Destiny Jenkins, Taylor
Gibson, Kaley Kumpis, Mykolas
Gray, Alena McCord, Seanna
Hess, Samantha McHenry, Harlee
Hough, Mya Miller, Samuel
Hulse, Skylar Mims, Jailyn
Junkins, Christopher Naimark, Lena
Nolan, Destiney Patterson, Dakota
Norman, Jackson Pendergrass, Justin
Phares, Kathrine Peters, Haylea
Pinckney, Tyler Simmons, Tessa
Puchalski, Madison Smith, Morgan
Putnam, Morgan Snyder, Daisy
Ratliff, Jessica Thompson, Elexis
Richards, Kiley Wine, Christian
Snider, Casey Wood, Allison
Sprouse, Sydney   
Starsick, Stevie
Taylor, Mikayla
Thompson, Courtni
Yeager, Olivya
  
9th Grade 10th Grade
Anderson, Kaitlyn Bourn, Shayla
Bancroft, Trinity Canfield, Logan
Barger, Layna Cawthon, Caliegh
Beron, Ryan Clark, Athena
Carpenter, Ryan Clevenger, Misty
Carr, Christopher Collins, Zackery
Chapman, Avery Dobbins, Damon
Chapman, Jacob Drake, Trevor
Conrad, Alex Eberly, Arista
Facemire, Elijah Fox, Emma
Ferguson, Carrah Frame, Christopher
Gonzalez, Sean Frymier, Allyson
Hamric, Ean Gibson, Autumn
Landis, Jesse Gray, Jada
Liu, Justin Grove, Corbin
McHenry, Taylor Hale, Wyllow
McWhirter, Keely Lang, Rachel
Minigh, Lilly Law, Tierra
Mohr, James Mathess, Taylor
Morgan, Malaysia McCumbers, Sara
Moyers, Autumn Mohr, Eve
Price, Scott Moss, Kyle
Self, Levi Phares, Rachel
Stewart, Adam Poole, Jacob
Stewart, Amiah Ratliff, Landen
Taylor, Emma Stanley, Kenya
Thorne, Carissa Taylor, Dakota
White, McKinzie Wellings, Thomas
Young, Lucas White, Gabriel
   Williams, Tori
  
11th Grade 12th Grade
Clegg, Kelsey Barger, Emily
Cogar, Zane Barnhouse, Ezekiel
Dobbins, Michaela Boggs, Maysen
Finley, Rhea Bossert, Logan
Fitzwater, Brady Bossert, Morgan
Frederick, Jared Chapman, Lindsay
Furr, Jagger Cole, Tiffany
Garcia, Savanna Facemire, Lucas
Hale, Natalie Frymier, Autumn
Haley, Ty Grove, Hannah
Harper, Jonathan Hardman, Faith
Hinter, Hannah Lipscomb, Johntae
Johnson, Jaycie Miller, Colten
Jones, Indica Mohr, Madison
Langford, Alyssa Moore, Cheyenne
Lemon, Hunter Page, Daydra
Liu, Andrew Phares, Hailey
McCord, MacKenzie Phares, Logan
McHenry, Cameron Powell, Brianna
Miller, Clifford Pritt, Richard
Minney, Hannah Pyles, Brandon
Morris, Maria Raulston, Cassandra
Phares, Ethan Roy, Michael
Roberts, Jon Smith, Donald
Skeens, Makayla Snyder, Kaylene
Starsick, Macee Steele, Kollin
Stewart, Christopher Watts, Garrett
Sumpter, Kandus Wood, Sierra
Waddell, Harley Yoak, Morga
Watkins, Kerry   
Wellings, Grace
Wine, Katelyn
Yoho, Anna
The Gilmer Free Press

First Lady Cathy Justice Seeks Entries in Valentines to West Virginia Contest

The Free Press WV

First Lady Cathy Justice and her Student Artist Series announced the new “Valentines to West Virginia” contest Friday. All students in the 6th grade are invited to submit a Valentine to West Virginia that shows or tells what they love most about the Mountain State.

“I look forward to seeing all the creative entries and learning more about what makes our state so special to the students,” First Lady Cathy Justice said.

Students may use writing, photography, painting, drawing, and other art mediums to describe a favorite place, memory, or moment in West Virginia. Valentines must be at least two-dimensional and no larger than 5x7 inches.

They can be created using a variety of materials. Students are encouraged to take their time and be creative!

This contest is the third installment of the First Lady’s Student Artist Series initiative.

On special holidays, she will host different art competitions or projects for students to participate in, encouraging creativity and promoting the importance of the arts within schools throughout West Virginia.  

Students may mail their Valentines to West Virginia to:
The Governor’s Mansion
1716 Kanawha Boulevard East, Charleston, WV 25305.

With each submission, students MUST include their name, phone, email, county, school name, teacher name, and teacher email. Valentines will not be returned. Valentines must be received by February 1, 2019. Winners will be announced by Valentine’s Day, February 14, 2019.

Prizes will be awarded to winning valentines.

For questions, please contact the First Lady’s Special Assistant Katie Speece at 304.558.3588 or ‘kate.e.speece@wv.gov’.

IOGAWV Scholarship Program

The Free Press WV

In 1997, the Independent Oil and Gas Association of West Virginia, Inc. (IOGAWV) established its Scholarship Program in an effort to become more involved in higher education in West Virginia. The Scholarship Program was specifically created to reward the outstanding scholastic achievements of high school seniors whose parents work in the oil and natural gas industry for IOGAWV membership companies. The Association now also awards deserving high school “student employees” who have completed a required number of working hours at an IOGAWV member company. Since the Scholarship Program’s inception, IOGAWV has awarded a total of $155,000 in scholarships to these very deserving students.


Eligibility Rules:

  1. Applicant must be a West Virginia high school senior.

  2. Applicant must be a dependent of an employee/retiree of an IOGAWV Company in good standing OR be employed by an IOGAWV Company in good standing (Student employee must have worked a minimum of 400 hours. Validation of hours worked and a letter of recommendation from the employer must be provided).

  3. Applicant must enroll in a four year West Virginia college or university.

  4. Applicant must compose a 300-500 word essay answering the question: “Describe your community’s perception of the Oil and Gas Industry and explain how you would improve it.”

  5. Application must be signed by the high school counselor.

  6. The completed application (including the AP and Honors Courses, Extracurricular Activities Including Employment, and Community Service and Other Activities forms) along with the student’s essay, transcript and ACT scores must be postmarked no later than Friday, March 22, 2019 IOGAWV will accept applications and accompanying essays postmarked between January 02, 2019 and March 22, 2019. From all the applications received, an IOGAWV Scholarship Review Committee will review the qualifying applications and award $10,000 in scholarships in the early part of April 2019. The winners will be announced at their respective high school awards assemblies or commencement programs. Should you have any questions or require additional information, please contact Dee Beane at 304.344.9867 or via e-mail at .


APPLICATION DOCUMENTS

All forms below must be filled out in their entirety and signed by the school counselor. Please do not staple. 


2019 Scholarship Letter of Explanation


2019 Scholarship Application Requirements


2019 Scholarship Application Form


EducationNewsWest Virginia

(9) Comments

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~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

Scholarship must be the most important focus in Gilmer County’s schools.

Brought up the ZOOMWV Data Dashboard site to review the most recent State achievement test results for GCHS’s 11th grade.

Folks, Gilmer is in serious trouble. Proficiency for math=24%, reading=41%, and science=24%.

On an A through F grading scales the GCHS gets an F for all three subject areas.

What does the new school board have to show for inroads it has made since last July to make critically needed proficiency improvements at the HS? Citizens deserve answers to the question.

By ZOOMWV Data Dashboard  on  01.07.2019

Conversation at local eatery.
Shortly after election.
Individuals were educators.

‘You think we have school problems now, wait until these new folks take the steering wheel’.

‘Students, parents, staff are all going to be in the soup’.

Sounds as if Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving vacation-deer season times have all taken a big hit.  If that is true, the union teachers need to come together, stand their ground, along with parents, and hold this new board accountable.

Have a local strike if need be.
Request resignations.
Vote of no confidence.

Schools employees can win.
You have done it before.
Just stick together.

By overheard conversation  on  01.08.2019

It is unclear after reading school board meeting minutes what progress if any is being made by GCHS and GCES principals in improving student proficiency in reading, math and science.

Why not allocate a few sentences in the minutes to summarize what the two principals reported to the school board?

All it would take to get the critical information out to citizens would be for the new school board to act on this.

Does anyone have a problem with the suggested change to keep Gilmer’s bill paying public informed?

By Need Specifics For Principal's Reports  on  01.09.2019

Gilmer County is not the only place in the USA that has been faced with its students failing to meet proficiency standards for science, reading, and math.

The difference here is that evidence is lacking to conclusively demonstrate that Gilmer County’s officials in control have exerted proper efforts to profit form powerful lessons learned elsewhere to use that knowledge to help solve learning deficiencies in our schools.

In fact, a convincing argument could be made that the approach in the County has been the one professional planners designate as muddling through.

Classic symptoms of muddling through include failure to thoroughly analyze categories of causes contributing to problems followed up by using the information to develop a comprehensive plan to do the most good in getting better results by treating key causes instead of symptoms.

Muddling typically involves officials assigning blame for lack of progress to outside forces e.g., the “culture”, the State did it to us, and poverty. Haven’t we heard plenty of that?

Muddling must be eliminated if we want progress in solving non-performance problems within the County’s school system. Does anyone disagree?

By End School System Muddling  on  01.09.2019

Muddling infects federal, state, and local government entities where personal accountability for top officials to get measurable results rarely exists.

Muddling practitioners are famous for passing off information unrelated to measurable proof that effective problem-solving has occurred. A common example is emphasizing how much public money is being spent to attempt to convince tax payers that magnitudes of expenditures are always directly correlated to levels of problem-solving successes.

Muddling by an organization is characterized by the existence of thick planning documents replete with vagueness and lack of clarity, undefined technical terms, and mysterious acronyms.

Muddling thrives on intentional ambiguity and confusion designed to protect muddlers and their organizations.

By Muddling 101  on  01.11.2019

Suggestion after reading strategic plans for the GCHS and the GCES.

How about the school board requiring that for each school an informative executive summary be written to include——where each school stands on reading, math, and science proficiency, what the term proficiency means to eliminate the confusion, student proficiency goals for the two school, target time to expect goals to be achieved, and a statement to commit to keeping the public informed of progress in achieving the goals at designated intervals (e.g. quarterly) during a school year.

Omit confusing abbreviations and technical terms understood only by a select few in the education field, and written for comprehension by reasonable persons.

Leave it up to the County’s professional educators to determine how to get the job done with continual laser-like focus on getting results.

By Student Learning at GCHS and GCES  on  01.13.2019

West Virginia is number one!
Our politicians are the best that can be had.
They are also the lobbyers dream come true.
No one—-can out-muddle our elected reps !

By we know it  on  01.13.2019

Muddling has another distinct symptom. It is the tendency for administrators in control to emphasize processes and procedures while avoiding disclosure of progress, or the lack thereof, in achieving learning results.

The purpose is another way to avoid personal accountability for school system failures.

By Muddling Epidemic In WV School Systems  on  01.14.2019

During intervention the State had dictatorial control of our school system to include all decisions related to the GCES.

One result is that the GCES was built too small.

An investigation is needed to determine who was responsible for the bad decision, and what role the no-bid architectural firm had in designing and constructing the school.

Something major happened to cause the GCES to be built too small. Was something dropped at the expense of adequate class room space as a result of having to spend extra money because a poor site was selected?

Minimally, gross incompetency on the State’s part is the explanation for the disaster foisted onto the County.

A question pertains to the new gym. Lots of effort was taken by the State to try to convince the public that a competition gym instead of a regular gym was needed.

Did the competition gym cost extra money at the expense of needed classroom space? If the answer is affirmative who was responsible for deciding on the more expensive gym?

What about the enormous pit at the GCES? Was money spent on it at the expense of classrooms because something was wrong with the school’s site that was selected by the State?

Nothing similar to the pit has been seen at other sites where new WV schools were built.

Why has there been a failure for a thorough investigation to have occurred to expose the facts?

The obvious explanation is that powerful elitists in control do not want tracks leading to them, and they have veto power over a meaningful investigation including one done by a leading newspaper.

By GCES Built Too Small Scandal  on  01.15.2019

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Registration Open for Two-Week Winter Term at GSC

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College will be offering a variety of courses during the upcoming winter term to accommodate students who might wish to repeat a course or who just want to speed up their degree progression. The courses are delivered both online and in person. All of the classes, which are part of the accelerated two-week winter term, will begin on Thursday, January 3 and run through Wednesday, January 16.

Class offerings include: Computer Skills for Education (online), Introduction to Fine Arts (online), Physical Geography (Monday-Friday 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.), Lifetime Fitness/Wellness (online), ST&P: Practice CORE Math Prep (Monday-Friday 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.), Music Theory I (Monday-Friday 8:00 - 12:00 p.m.), Music Theory I Lab (Monday-Friday 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.), Survey of Music (Monday-Friday 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.), First Aid and Safety (Monday-Friday 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.), American National Government (online), and ST&P: Introduction to Behavior Modification (online).

“This is the first time in recent College history that Glenville State College has offered a winter term, which was implemented because we believe it can benefit our students by helping them reduce their time to graduation. It can also help reduce the course load in a given semester for students that need this relief. Students should also be aware that financial aid can be applied toward courses taken during the winter term. Moving forward we would like to see more courses offered during the winter term, that other opportunities be made available to our students such as offering courses abroad for credit, and that opportunities for professional development to be made available to the community at large. The Office of Academic Affairs will be monitoring what does and doesn’t work this term and making changes accordingly moving forward,” read a statement from the Office of Academic Affairs.

Tuition for GSC’s winter term is a $300 flat rate per credit hour with no extra fees. On campus students will be able to reside in the residence halls during winter term for free with arrangements for food at a discounted price through meal tickets from local restaurants.

The last day to sign up is Friday, January 04, 2019.

Current students who wish to enroll in these courses should contact the Academic Success Center or their academic advisor. New students who are interested should contact the Office of Admissions at or 304.462.4128.

EQT Students of Excellence Scholarship 2018 Recipients

The Free Press WV

EQT Foundation, the philanthropic arm of EQT Corporation, is proud to announce the 2018 EQT Students of Excellence Scholarship recipients.

The accomplished students come from both large and small schools across West Virginia.

As an integrated energy company with an emphasis on Appalachian-area natural gas production, EQT has awarded $1,000 scholarships for one student from West Virginia counties, four at-large $1,000 scholarships scattered throughout the state, as well as six “full-ride” four-year scholarships, each up to $18,000 per year, to students interested in studying engineering, geology, computer science/information technology, energy or land management and environmental or safety science.


The “full-ride” scholarship winners are:

  • Tylee Oldham - Hurricane High School in Putnam County
  • Brooke Burns - Scott High School in Boone County
  • Catherine Stodola - Herbert Hoover High School in Kanawha County
  • Lian Dunlevy - Morgantown High School in Monongalia County
  • Justin Lovell - Shady Spring High School in Raleigh County
  • Safa Afnan - George Washington High School in Kanawha County


The $1000 scholarship winner’s are:

  • Zoe Payne - Barbour County
  • Victoria Parello - Berkeley County
  • Kayla Hartsell - Boone County
  • Michael Lemon - Braxton County
  • Abigail Nickerson - Brooke County
  • John Swanson - Cabell County
  • Megan Meadows - Calhoun County
  • Michael Willis - Clay County
  • Emily Spadafore - Doddridge County
  • Mason Harp - Fayette County
  • Kaylene Snyder - Gilmer County
  • Megan Kite - Grant County
  • Kara Vaughan - Greenbrier County
  • Della Moreland - Hampshire County
  • Chloe Molish - Hancock County
  • Aden Funkhouser - Hardy County
  • Hayley Woods - Harrison County
  • Brandon Cochran - Jackson County
  • Haya Moushmoush - Kanawha County
  • Kenton Linger - Lewis County
  • Lillian Lucas - Lincoln County
  • Elijah McComas - Logan County
  • Kristine Waddell - Marion County
  • Lydia Knutsen - Marshall County
  • Allison Henderson - Mason County
  • Hailey Mitchem - McDowell County
  • Trey Lennox-Kowalewski - Mercer County
  • Kyle Breedlove - Mineral County
  • Hannah Vorndran - Monongalia County
  • Chandler Mills - Monroe County
  • Logan Riffey - Morgan County
  • Anna Hamilton - Nicholas County
  • Norman Lee - Ohio County
  • Claire Heavner - Pendleton County
  • Laci Hashman - Pleasants County
  • Mathias Solliday - Pocahontas County
  • Henry Cerbone - Preston County
  • Olivia Hart - Putnam County
  • Victoria Mackowiak - Raleigh County
  • Susan Riggleman - Randolph County
  • Nikita Collins - Ritchie County
  • Dylan Hammack - Roane County
  • Marcella Aguilar - Summers County
  • Amy Frosch - Taylor County
  • Matthew Dellinger - Tucker County
  • JoLee Walton - Tyler County
  • Logan Whithair - Upshur County
  • Nicholas Bowen - Wayne County
  • Erin Kidd - Webster County
  • Hannah Loy - Wetzel County
  • Sara Almashy - Wirt County
  • Josie Brothers - Wood County
  • Myleigh Stewart - Wyoming County


The “At Large” $1000 recipients are:

  • Noah Sampson - Monongalia County
  • Davis Warmuth - Ohio County
  • Eric Hamilton - Kanawha County
  • Jay Wessels - Kanawha County.

A total of 345 high school students from across West Virginia was nominated by teachers, principals, guidance counselors, family members and the students themselves. A team of volunteer judges were then tasked with the difficult responsibility of choosing the “best of the best.” The judges looked for students who demonstrated strong academic performance and who participated in community service and extracurricular activities.

The scholarship program which is presented in cooperation with NCWV Media and The State Journal, has grown each year since EQT became the title sponsor in 2009.

An awards event where all the recipients will be recognized will take place in March at the State Capitol in Charleston. The date and time of the event will be announced in January

Foundation’s Civic Leaders Fellowship Program Accepting Applications

Attention college students seeking meaningful paid work experience and leadership opportunities! 

Applications are now available for the Parkersburg Area Community Foundation & Regional Affiliates’ (PACF) Civic Leaders Fellowship Program. 

This employment program operates for seven weeks beginning on May 31, 2019 and ending on July 19, 2019. 

The Civic Leaders Fellowship Program offers local students the chance to return to their home communities to work in a career-related field while learning about their hometowns. 

The Free Press WV
Civic Leaders from the Foundation’s 2018 program gather in front of the PACF’s office in Parkersburg, WV.


Students are able to develop connections and leadership skills that may later assist them in finding meaningful employment upon graduation.

To be eligible for participation, students must have successfully completed at least one year of post-secondary education (college, trade/technical school, etc.), be currently enrolled in a post-secondary education program, and have a permanent home address in the PACF’s service region of Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Jackson, Mason, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Wirt, and Wood counties in West Virginia, or Washington County, Ohio. 

The student application is available on the Foundation’s website and must be submitted by February 08, 2019.

During their time in the Program, Civic Leaders are placed at a work site, in a position related to their career interests, where they work four days a week.

On Mondays of each week of the Program, the Civic Leaders participate in leadership activities and programs with other Civic Leaders designed to increase their knowledge of the region and prepare them to engage fully in service to their communities.

Wood County resident Megan Hardway participated in the Foundation’s Civic Leaders Fellowship Program 2014 - 2016. 

Through the Civic Leaders Fellowship Program, she was introduced and placed at the Chamber of Commerce of the Mid-Ohio Valley, where she was actively engaged in the day-to-day operations of the Chamber preparing releases, planning events, and serving as liaison for Chamber members. 

A 2016 graduate of West Virginia University, Hardway returned to the area to join the Chamber as a full-time staff member!

“The Civic Leaders Fellowship Program was a wonderful way to gain knowledge and experience in my field, as well as explore volunteer opportunities available close to home,” said Hardway.

The PACF is also seeking organizations that wish to serve as host employers for summer 2019. 

Businesses, nonprofit organizations, and units of government may apply to serve as a host employer for the Civic Leaders Fellowship Program. 

The Civic Leader is provided to the host employer at no cost. 

In exchange, the host employer must be willing to provide supervision and a meaningful work assignment. 

Organizations throughout the PACF’s service region are encouraged to apply online to provide an employment opportunity for one of our region’s college-aged students. 

The host application is also available on the Foundation’s website and must be submitted by March 15, 2019.

To learn more about the Civic Leaders Fellowship Program and to apply to participate as a student or host employer, visit:  www.pacfwv.com/CLFP

Questions regarding this opportunity may be directed to the PACF’s Civic Leaders Fellowship Program Manager, Mindi Line, at ‘Mindi.Line@pacfwv.com’. 

Scholarships Available for Area Students

The Free Press WV

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation & Regional Affiliates (PACF) has launched its 2019 Consolidated Scholarship Application! 

The Foundation administers more than 160 scholarship funds for the benefit of students in its 11-county service area (Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Jackson, Mason, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Wirt, and Wood counties in West Virginia, and Washington County, Ohio).

Through the Foundation’s online scholarship application, students are given the opportunity to apply for multiple scholarships through one easy application. 

To apply, students must visit the Foundation’s website, www.pacfwv.com/scholarships

This application must be completed and submitted online by midnight on March 01, 2019.

During the PACF’s 2018 scholarship application process, the Foundation awarded more than $331,000 to our region’s students. 

These awards were made possible by many generous donors who established scholarship funds with the Foundation to help our local students fulfill their educational goals. 

Each year, more than 200 community volunteers residing throughout the PACF’s service area assist the Foundation in reviewing the submitted scholarship applications.

To learn more about the 2019 scholarship application process, please contact the Foundation office by calling 304.428.4438 or by emailing ‘info@pacfwv.com’.

The Free Press WV

U.S. Veteran, AB Nursing Professor Published in International Journals

Alderson Broaddus University Professor of Nursing Dr. Gina Maiocco, APRN, CNS-BC, served as lead researcher on a recent internationally published article in the Journal of Clinical Nursing titled “Care of veterans in a non-veteran health administration hospital: What is the status of nursing practice after continuing education?” Dr. Maiocco has a track record of funded research on the care of veterans in non-VHA health care facilities.

The purpose of the research for this article was to identify how civilian nurses care for military veterans and to describe challenges nurses face in the provision of that care. The article summarizes the uncertainty nurses face in delivering care to veterans and documents current practices, to include frequency of documentation of veteran status in the electronic medical record system.

The Free Press WV
U.S. Veteran, AB Nursing Professor Published in International Journals


As a veteran herself, Dr. Maiocco understands the unique health care issues veterans face on a day-to-day basis, and her research serves as a “bridge” between veterans and nurses in civilian hospitals.

“Being an officer in the U.S. Air Force, I have a direct connection to fellow veterans who become hospital patients,” said Maiocco. “We are a family, and I understand how to treat a veteran simply because I lived that life. Veterans take care of veterans.”

“Many nurses are unsure of the methods they should use to treat veterans properly. The point of this research was to see what we can do to improve the overall care of our veteran patients, and the knowledge and safety of our nurses,” said Maiocco.

She explains that by documenting a patient’s service history, relevant patient outcomes are monitored so that educational programs, clinical processes, and work safety initiatives can be considered and implemented to support both the veteran and the caring nurse.

To further assist nurses in non-VA facilities, Dr. Maiocco founded and continues to volunteer for the Veteran-to-Veteran program. It is a program that supports veterans and their families during admission to a civilian hospital and helps to educate nurses on veterans’ physical and mental health needs.

“My passion is helping others, and helping fellow veterans is close to my heart,” says Maiocco. “Their care is so specific, and if we can help tend to the needs of veterans of all ages as well as keep our nurses safe, then we are taking a step in the right direction.”

Maiocco’s Veteran-to-Veteran program is gaining national attention. Since publishing an additional article about the program in The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, other hospitals across the country have expressed interest in starting a Veteran-to-Veteran program as well.

Dr. Maiocco is a Weston, WV native and a 1981 graduate of Alderson Broaddus University, where she received her bachelor’s in nursing. During military service in the U.S. Air Force, she earned a master’s degree in critical care/trauma at the University of Maryland, and a Ph.D. in nursing at the University of Utah. While in the Air Force, Dr. Maiocco performed many duties to include flight nurse, hyperbaric nursing, flight clinical coordinator, critical care clinical nurse specialist and chief of emergency services. In West Virginia, Dr. Maiocco holds an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) licensure as a clinical nurse specialist, only one of 26 in the state.

For more information about the Veteran-to-Veteran Program, or assistance with veteran care, contact Dr. Gina Maiocco at: ‘maioccogm@ab.edu’.

“Dark Skies” Park Project by Calhoun-Gilmer Career Center simulated workplace awarded $50,000

Calhoun Gilmer Construction, a Calhoun Gilmer Career Center Simulated Workplace, has been awarded $50,000 dollars by the Governor’s Economic Initiative in conjunction with the West Virginia State Department of Education.

The EPIC (Economic Projects Impacting Communities) Competition “…magnifies the Simulated Workplace Company’s collaborative and creative abilities into a showcase of technical skills through developing, designing and constructing an innovative community impact project for public, private, commercial, or residential use.”

The Free Press WV
L-R - Dr. Kathy D’Antoni, Jesse Kargol, Thomas DeVres, Benjamin Knotts
Logan Greenleaf, Donnie Pitts, Bryan Sterns, Paul Parsons and Clinton Burch


Building Construction instructor, Paul Parsons and his students submitted a proposal titled, “The Star Gazing Cabin” to the competition. Their proposal outlined a cabin to be located at the Calhoun County Park. The cabin will feature a stargazing room with a retractable roof to allow those staying a clear view of the night sky.

The cabin will be equipped with a full functioning kitchen, bedroom and bathroom. There will also be a loft that will sleep four people. At the cabin site, there will be three camper/RV connections. This cabin will help meet the needs of the park, while also creating revenue for the community.

Five simulated workplace team finalists were chosen and traveled to Charleston to present their concepts to the State Board of Education and individuals from the EPIC committee. After the presentations were complete, an announcement was made that all five finalists were chosen to receive $50,000 to fund their projects.

“The EPIC Competition will be completed over the next two school years and will require partnering with local businesses and other community organizations. The goal of the competition is to enhance students’ technical skills and creativity while making an impact within their local community.”

The Free Press WV

Simulated Workplace Students Present Ideas for Innovative Community Projects

The Free Press WV

Five Simulated Workplace companies from across the state presented their winning ideas for developing, designing and constructing innovative community projects to the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) this week. These five projects, which represent plans for public, private, commercial, or residential use, were chosen out of dozens submitted for the inaugural Economic Projects Impacting Communities (EPIC) competition.

The WVDE Division of Technical Education and Governor’s Economic Initiatives challenged Simulated Workplace companies to participate in an innovative community impact project competition that will positively affect local economies. The EPIC projects will be completed throughout the next two school years and will require partnering with local businesses and other community organizations. The goal of the competition is to enhance students’ technical skills and creativity while making an impact within their local communities.

“West Virginia’s greatest resource is her students,” said West Virginia Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Steven Paine. “The selected EPIC projects showcase the creativity and technical abilities of the participating students while serving local communities. Our students should be very proud of the work they are doing in their Simulated Workplace companies to benefit our state.”

The selected Simulated Workplace projects were from Calhoun-Gilmer Career Center, Hundred High School, Moorfield High School, Putnam Career & Technical Center and Roane-Jackson Technical Center.

The projects include a Star Gazing Cabin for Calhoun County Parks, community partnerships for post-flood beautification in Hundred, a micro-business complex in Moorefield, energy efficient cabins in Eleanor Park and park upgrades throughout Roane and Jackson counties.

“We are so proud of the five schools’ Simulated Workplace companies for their hard work and dedication in developing innovative EPIC projects that enhance technical skills while impacting local communities,” said Associate Superintendent, Dr. Kathy D’Antoni. “We look forward to seeing the students’ work over the next two years as they partner with local businesses to turn their EPIC ideas into viable, successful projects that positively impact the economy of their communities.”

To learn more about the EPIC competition, visit: HERE.

To view the chosen projects and read a brief description of each, visit: HERE.

WV Board of Education Approves Recommendations for Increased Education Funding

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) unanimously approved six recommendations for increased education funding at its meeting this week. The recommendations, which will be presented to state lawmakers, were outlined through the WVBE’s committee on school finance and funding.

“The committee discussed nearly 30 areas to consider for increased funding,” board member and chair of the committee on school finance and funding Tom Campbell said. “We ultimately agreed on six areas that will have the greatest impact on students and schools over time.”

Equity in funding has been a major focus for West Virginia for many years. However, student needs cannot be fairly met based on enrollment numbers alone. The recommendations ensure the state’s funding formula equitably and adequately address the needs of students today.

The WVBE approved the following six recommendations

  1. Increase compensation/funding for Step 1 and Step 2. This should include an increase in the number of funded positions and increased compensation for professional educators and service personnel to meet the needs of West Virginia students.

  2. Provide adequate funding for Step 6a to adequately maintain school facilities.

  3. Reestablish leave incentives for employees to reduce the need for substitutes and improve retention and recruitment rates. Increased funding for Steps 6b and Step 6c would alleviate some funding issues. This problem has progressively worsened as more employees enter the workforce without the ability to bank leave days and convert them for benefits such as pension credit or health care costs at retirement. Receiving some pension credit for unused sick leave was successful previously and should be reauthorized.

  4. Increase the supply reimbursements above the current amount of $200 per professional educator. This funding has not changed for many years. The funding has not kept up with rising cost of materials and is inadequate for today’s classroom needs.

  5. Increase county funding and flexibility to address the growing severity of our students’ physical and mental health needs. Increased funding would support response personnel and include but not be limited to additional mental health counselors, guidance counselors, social workers, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists and psychologists. Additional funding for alternative education (as defined in §18-2-6) is needed for those students who have limitations that make it difficult for them to attend school during the traditional public-school day.  

  6. Increase funding for career technical education (CTE). There is great demand in today’s economy for students that possess expertise in technical skills such as construction, plumbing, electrical and computer-related technology.

“I commend the work of our committee on school finance and funding,” WVBE President David Perry said. “As a Board, we stand behind these recommendations and plan to share them with our state’s lawmakers ahead of the upcoming legislative session in hopes of action being taken to increase funding to benefit our education system.”

“Our goal is to prioritize the needs we have heard from our districts and provide that input to the Legislature,” he said.

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Readers' Recent Comments

During intervention the State had dictatorial control of our school system to include all decisions related to the GCES.

One result is that the GCES was built too small.

An investigation is needed to determine who was responsible for the bad decision, and what role the no-bid architectural firm had in designing and constructing the school.

Something major happened to cause the GCES to be built too small. Was something dropped at the expense of adequate class room space as a result of having to spend extra money because a poor site was selected?

Minimally, gross incompetency on the State’s part is the explanation for the disaster foisted onto the County.

A question pertains to the new gym. Lots of effort was taken by the State to try to convince the public that a competition gym instead of a regular gym was needed.

Did the competition gym cost extra money at the expense of needed classroom space? If the answer is affirmative who was responsible for deciding on the more expensive gym?

What about the enormous pit at the GCES? Was money spent on it at the expense of classrooms because something was wrong with the school’s site that was selected by the State?

Nothing similar to the pit has been seen at other sites where new WV schools were built.

Why has there been a failure for a thorough investigation to have occurred to expose the facts?

The obvious explanation is that powerful elitists in control do not want tracks leading to them, and they have veto power over a meaningful investigation including one done by a leading newspaper.

By GCES Built Too Small Scandal on 01.15.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Pat McGroyne is spot on.
High speed internet is simply another failure of WV state government.

If the elected in our state, were doing the job expected by voters….we should have very few problems or issues?

By Gilmer resident on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Muddling has another distinct symptom. It is the tendency for administrators in control to emphasize processes and procedures while avoiding disclosure of progress, or the lack thereof, in achieving learning results.

The purpose is another way to avoid personal accountability for school system failures.

By Muddling Epidemic In WV School Systems on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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West Virginia is number one!
Our politicians are the best that can be had.
They are also the lobbyers dream come true.
No one—-can out-muddle our elected reps !

By we know it on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Suggestion after reading strategic plans for the GCHS and the GCES.

How about the school board requiring that for each school an informative executive summary be written to include——where each school stands on reading, math, and science proficiency, what the term proficiency means to eliminate the confusion, student proficiency goals for the two school, target time to expect goals to be achieved, and a statement to commit to keeping the public informed of progress in achieving the goals at designated intervals (e.g. quarterly) during a school year.

Omit confusing abbreviations and technical terms understood only by a select few in the education field, and written for comprehension by reasonable persons.

Leave it up to the County’s professional educators to determine how to get the job done with continual laser-like focus on getting results.

By Student Learning at GCHS and GCES on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Muddling infects federal, state, and local government entities where personal accountability for top officials to get measurable results rarely exists.

Muddling practitioners are famous for passing off information unrelated to measurable proof that effective problem-solving has occurred. A common example is emphasizing how much public money is being spent to attempt to convince tax payers that magnitudes of expenditures are always directly correlated to levels of problem-solving successes.

Muddling by an organization is characterized by the existence of thick planning documents replete with vagueness and lack of clarity, undefined technical terms, and mysterious acronyms.

Muddling thrives on intentional ambiguity and confusion designed to protect muddlers and their organizations.

By Muddling 101 on 01.11.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Gilmer County is not the only place in the USA that has been faced with its students failing to meet proficiency standards for science, reading, and math.

The difference here is that evidence is lacking to conclusively demonstrate that Gilmer County’s officials in control have exerted proper efforts to profit form powerful lessons learned elsewhere to use that knowledge to help solve learning deficiencies in our schools.

In fact, a convincing argument could be made that the approach in the County has been the one professional planners designate as muddling through.

Classic symptoms of muddling through include failure to thoroughly analyze categories of causes contributing to problems followed up by using the information to develop a comprehensive plan to do the most good in getting better results by treating key causes instead of symptoms.

Muddling typically involves officials assigning blame for lack of progress to outside forces e.g., the “culture”, the State did it to us, and poverty. Haven’t we heard plenty of that?

Muddling must be eliminated if we want progress in solving non-performance problems within the County’s school system. Does anyone disagree?

By End School System Muddling on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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It is unclear after reading school board meeting minutes what progress if any is being made by GCHS and GCES principals in improving student proficiency in reading, math and science.

Why not allocate a few sentences in the minutes to summarize what the two principals reported to the school board?

All it would take to get the critical information out to citizens would be for the new school board to act on this.

Does anyone have a problem with the suggested change to keep Gilmer’s bill paying public informed?

By Need Specifics For Principal's Reports on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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“High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).“

I disagree with much of what Mr.Boggs believes.  That said, high-speed broadband is the single most important step the State of WV could take to improve the business climate and provide more opportunities for its citizens.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Conversation at local eatery.
Shortly after election.
Individuals were educators.

‘You think we have school problems now, wait until these new folks take the steering wheel’.

‘Students, parents, staff are all going to be in the soup’.

Sounds as if Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving vacation-deer season times have all taken a big hit.  If that is true, the union teachers need to come together, stand their ground, along with parents, and hold this new board accountable.

Have a local strike if need be.
Request resignations.
Vote of no confidence.

Schools employees can win.
You have done it before.
Just stick together.

By overheard conversation on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Scholarship must be the most important focus in Gilmer County’s schools.

Brought up the ZOOMWV Data Dashboard site to review the most recent State achievement test results for GCHS’s 11th grade.

Folks, Gilmer is in serious trouble. Proficiency for math=24%, reading=41%, and science=24%.

On an A through F grading scales the GCHS gets an F for all three subject areas.

What does the new school board have to show for inroads it has made since last July to make critically needed proficiency improvements at the HS? Citizens deserve answers to the question.

By ZOOMWV Data Dashboard on 01.07.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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A thorough accounting for where all the public money went could be easily achieved by a competent accountant.

Isn’t there a special account at the County’s school board office for expenditures related to all bills paid and who got the money?

Following the money trail always gets results along with verification of means, motives, and access.

By Let An Accountant Dig It Out on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If central office financial records for all public money paid out for everything from site planning, site studies and development, and everything else to get to completion of the GCES and the LES—- what is the reason?

It is known that money was spent on the Arbuckle site and Cedar Creek, and public money was paid out for the LES too.

Were County records for the spending purged and if that happened who ordered the action? The records are either in the County’s central office or they aren’t.

By End Financial Secrecy on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Hasn’t the time come to finally start naming names and making people accountable?

By Get It Done on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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How about the “BIG WV WINDFALL”....?

For 3 or 4 months now we keep hearing about the millions of dollars of tax revenue collected.

Millions and millions above ‘estimates’.  Were those ‘estimates’ honest, or fudged to begin with, so as to request higher tax rates?

Well, Justice and the Legislature now have our dollars, what will become of this windfall? Will we see tax rates lowered?  Doubt full, but we should.

Likely this windfall, created by “over-taxation”, will simply create a “party atmosphere” of legislative spending. Watch the Charleston ‘gangsters’ get their wish lists ready this coming session.

By taxpayers always lose on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Yes.  The blame Does seem to fall to ‘local’ people. In small places like Gilmer County, it’s just a poker game, boys, and the deep pockets win.  Money speaks volumes where ‘officials’ stay silent.  Go ask for the records, see what they’ve got.

By CheatersNeverWin on 11.20.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Teachers and staff knew from the beginning that the GCES was going to be too small. They were ordered by the State to keep quiet about the shortfall and other serious concerns too.

A sixth grader could understood how many rooms were needed by dividing total student numbers to attend the school by how many students should be in a classroom.

Under sizing was the State’s fault and it cannot be rationalized any other way including to assign the blame to local people. Same applies to the over sized LCES.

By Corrupt State Intervention on 11.19.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There will never be a full, public accounting of the gross mishandling of tax dollars during WVDOE intervention.
Too many local jobs and too many embarrassments of both elected and appointed bureaucrats.
These types cover dirt for each other.

Any local whistle blowers?  Doubtful.

One school built short 4 classrooms and another built with 5 too many.  Can it get more stupid than that?
Mr. Degree and Ms. Common Sense seldom travel together.

By Full accounting will never be revealed. Never. on 11.18.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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GCBOE when the two principals give reports at board meeting could the gist of what they said be summarized in minutes to keep the County informed?

It was a welcomed development by the Board to require principals to give reports particularly if there are required updates on progress designed to improve student learning for reading, math, and other subjects.

We still have not been informed about the status of science proficiency at the GCHS based on the latest testing. Why has the State failed to release the data? Were results too dismal?

By More Specifics For Principal's Reports on 11.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If it is going to cost extra money to eliminate over crowding at the GCES the financial information referenced by Do It Ourselves should be presented to Charleston and the press too.

That would help frame a solid case that crowding problems were not caused by Gilmer County because all decisions related to facilities were dictated by officials over whom the County had no oversight authority during the State’s intervention.

By Follow The Money on 11.16.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is assumed that all records for spending to include money paid out for the LCES, dropped Arbuckle site, dropped Cedar Creek site, and all bills for the GCES are in the Gilmer Schools central office.

The new GCBOE has authority to get to the truth by demanding a thorough accounting for all the spending.

Afterwards the financial officer in the central office could easily access existing computerized records and to use the information for a report to the GCBOE and the public.

By Do It Ourselves on 11.15.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Notice that most of the ‘officials’ in Gilmer County also hold regular day jobs - sometimes working on more than one paying ‘job’ at a time in the same office space. This common practice is concerning for many reasons, and it needs to be talked about when so many go without.

By QuestionablePractice on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There are two views in the County related to the under built GCES. Although the State built the school with inadequate classrooms one group believes that we should move on to let go of the past.

Isn’t this a form of advocacy for a coverup to prevent accountability for the State’s incompetence and mismanagement?

The other group believes that there should be a full accounting for all public money spent up to the time the GCES was completed to include disclosure of recipients of the public money. 

The accounting should be done for all public money spent at the LCES, the Arbuckle site, Cedar Creek, and finally the GCES.

Reasons for the under built GCES should be fully disclosed too. When the State was in control this information was kept secret from the public with loud claims that there was adequate space at the GCES.

Now it is known that there is inadequate space at the GCES and the problem is left to Gilmer County to fix. Only in WV!

By Citizens For Financial Disclosure on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Unprofessional issues,rude commentsand rolling eyes at the high school has become an issue. Being on cell phone talking to boyfriends,when parents etc.going into the office. Since the teachers were ask not to be on them while students in the classroom. The one in the office should not be allowed to talk personal to her boyfriend, or whoever. Also, I hope this is corrected, the personal days, etc that the board provides to staff shouldn’t be allowed to use to work or operate a second job. Let’s get the priorities straight.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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GULMER COUNTY BOE. It is time for me to let you know some issues that is going on at the High school.  I’m hoping this will be addressed at the next board meeting. 1. It should not matter if an employee has a second job or run a business. The priority job is for the board. One should not be allowed to use any time from the board to run your business. There is going on
If they want to run your business than go but not on the boards time. I would like for all employees be treated the equal. They should not be allowed to use the time the board gives them for other jobs.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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While at it there should be an investigation of why the LES was build with too many classrooms and the GCES was built with too few. At the very least what happened is a WV horror story example of the State’s waste and mismanagement.

By Where Is The Investigation? on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is obvious that the GCES has a major space problem.

What options for dealing with the State’s mismanagement to cause the serious blunder are being considered by the Board of Education?

Could the original architectural design for the dropped Cedar Creek site be compared to what resulted at the GCES to accurately determine the extent of classroom space alterations?

If the architectural design at the GCES is different than the original plan for Cedar Creek the next step should be to determine reasons for the changes and where the money originally planned for needed classrooms went.

By INFO REQUEST TO GCBOE on 11.09.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It’s long been known that Justice doesn’t happen in Gilmer County “because it all comes down to money”. And for those in charge of handling it and making decisions, it comes down to being competent to do the job,  keep accurate books and accounts and I’m sorry to say, that is seriously lacking in Gilmer County.

By Follow the Paycheck(s) on 11.06.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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What is GSC’s BOG’s plan for getting money for the next payment on the $38,000,000 bond loan the Gilmer County Commission approved?

Will the State pay or will the money come from private donations?

Money will have to come from somewhere to avoid a default.

By Where Is The Money? on 11.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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So sorry to hear of Kendall’s passing. I have fond memories of him at Uncle Paul’s store and the family reunions. I’m sure he will be missed greatly by those closest to him.
Please accept condolences from me and my family.

By Steve Lewis on 11.04.2018

From the entry: 'Kendall Goodwin'.

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GSC’s present plight is no secret and its future existence is in question.

Instead of expressing attitudes that GSC is being picked on could the Blue Ribbon Commission reveal why the College “tested out” as it did to fail to get more State money?

Was the “grading system” based on student enrollment trends, retention, time taken to get a degree, academic reputation, inept governance and administration, and other factors to block more funding? Informative specifics were not disclosed.

Teachers know that concerned students who want to do better always seek advice on what needs to be done to get better grades.

Similar to concerned students GSC’s supporters should be informed of what needs to be done to position the College for improved chances for survival to include eligibility for more State funding.

Saying that GSC is being picked on does nothing to help solve its nagging problems.

By What Was The Grading System? on 10.30.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Well thank you, Details Please,  for asking!  So many problems in Gilmer and education is just one.  Look at the town, take a good look around.  Remember who runs unopposed at election time.  Vote.  Make a difference.  Hold authority figures responsible.  Allow videos, minutes and more to be shared on GFP again, for transparency.  Know your neighbors, help a friend.  Be good to each other. Amen.

By Reader7 on 10.29.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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I will truly miss my Uncle Stephen.  Telling me so much information about from gardening to canning. Just to listening to him talk with such passion for everything that he does… he had a sense of humor that always warms my heart.. listening to him play the banjo sometimes even when he didn’t feel good. he is always willing to share his recipes and his ways of doing things… his solar information he was always studying something ... I’m remember one time we asked him where he got his blackberries when it wasn’t Blackberry season and he go there’s a store down the road it’s called Walmart they have everything… He was so funny.  I love you.. xoxo.

By Robin Nunez on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Sorry for your loss. He sure did look like his father.

By Buck Edwards on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Reader 7, please give details for your suggested solutions to the County’s concerns you addressed.

The information would be helpful for consideration by school system administrators and the general public.

By Details Please on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is speculation that the plan is for GSC to convert to an education center for low risk federal inmates. Is this something the County and central WV needs?

By GSC's New Mission? on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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Dr. Pellett’s commentary in the 10/26/2018 issue of the Gazette includes a statement that GSC is responsible for injecting $28,000,000 into the local economy.

If GSC were to close loss of the money would cause the County to have more severe poverty than it has now.

The pressing challenge is for GSC’s administrators including its Board of Governors to exercise effective leadership to prevent closure.

Why can’t GSC take action on the long standing suggestion for it to be an innovator by establishing a five year teacher education program to enable students to earn a masters degree by graduation time?

Something must be done in WV to deal with the 700 positions for which certified teachers including those for math, science and special education are not in the classrooms.

Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors why is a new teacher education program at the College not a viable option? Nothing else seems to be working.

The need exists, a similar program of excellence does not exist anywhere in the State, and GSC’s status would be elevated by having a masters degree program.

By GSC Alumni on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Paine: Plan to improve math scores to focus on algebra where a third of teachers aren’t certified'.

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GSC could make a valuable contribution to WV by doing a study to report on how grade and elementary schools with excellent results in math and reading did it.

Then, other schools could use the information as guidance instead of going it alone to reinvent the wheel.

With the Ed.D. expertise at GSC it would be a natural to take on the assignment. Dr. Pellett, would you back the initiative?

By Opportunity for GSC on 10.23.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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There is reference to signing an agreement with the State for math4life for all WV school districts. What has Gilmer County agreed to do to fix our problems?

By Agreements Matter on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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This important news has potential for making significant progress in improving math and reading outcomes in WV.

It hinges on how quickly advantage can be taken from lessons learned in schools that excelled.

The WVBE could do an analysis of reasons for excelling and to quickly provide guidance information to other schools.

That is the way the private sector approaches problem-solving because chronic failures have consequences and the unfit are weeded out.

Dr. O’Cull could help if the WVBE is not responsive. There could be panels of individuals from excelling schools to make presentations at WV School Board Association meetings to explain what their schools did to make the achievements.

By Why Reinvent The Wheel? on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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A characteristic of a good strategic plan is to simplify language to enable a clear understanding of all its details.

Regarding the comment about abbreviations, a simple fix for them and terms (e.g. lexile) would be to insert an asterisk or a footnote symbol the first time one of them is used to refer readers to a section at the end of the documents where the entries are defined.

This comment is not intended to be a criticism. All specialty fields have a language of their own including the teaching profession.

Suggested clarity improvements in the plans would not be time consuming for principals at the County’s two schools.

By Clarity Is Always Good on 10.18.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Looked at the strategic plan for the GCES. It is a major achievement for the new GCBE to provide the information to the public.

Suggestion. Could the GCBOE post a meaning of all abbreviations in the plan? Doing that would make it far easier for readers to understand details in the plan.

By Help Understanding on 10.17.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Thanks Mrs. Lowther and the BOE for providing meeting minutes for the public to read.

Those of us who voted for the levy would appreciate receiving specific information for what is being done at the grade school and the high school to make needed improvements for college and career readiness.

Could a current overview and updates throughout the school year be provided to the public?

Why not put the details on websites of the two schools to give the principals a chance to shine?

By Levy Supporter on 10.16.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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“engage in pedantic colloquy?“

No Bill.

By WEKNOWYOU on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Correct.  I do not wish to engage in back and forth useless ‘banter’ with big words and no results.  What I AM interested in is Gilmer County, in all it’s ways.  Education, Food, Law and Transparency.  Fancy words are often used to hide, divide, and distract..  Plain words speaking truth for the safety and well being of the people is what I’m looking for..  Gilmer is suffering… I want it to stop. I want to see the citizens healthy, educated and strong. I want to see more jobs instead of food banks.  I want Committee meetings for all to see. I want the law to do what it should, when it should.  Plain english would work fine.  Thanks for asking.

By Reader7 on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Lol 7, you do not wish to engage in a pedantic colloquy?

By Smart Feller on 10.13.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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All nice but a small request? Can we simplify some of the language?  Don’t mean to be rude, but fancy works aren’t needed for the Truth.

By Reader7 on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Stop living the delusion the state will fix education.
They have caused the problem.
Remember, for them, job one IS job protection.

Rare in history, that the cause of a problem, has come forth with a solution to what they have caused. They keep resetting testing standards so as not have any ‘yardstick’ they can be measured against.  Apparently people just don’t get it?  And the WVBOE is so happy about that.

By it-ain't-a-gonna-happen. period. on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is a continuum for sophistication regarding what is done with data.

Collecting and compiling it is at the low end of sophistication.

Synthesis is at the high end.

This means using results and other information to make specific recommendations for making improvements.

The State took its typical easy way out by failing to go beyond the data compilation stage.

By Easy Way Out on 10.10.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The comment about need to find out what was done at high performance schools to determine what we could do in Gilmer County to get the same results merits a comment.

The comment flags what is wrong with the State BOE in failing to provide effective leadership.

Does anyone recall a single instance, after tens of millions of dollars were spent on amassing data, when the State BOE did anything to effectively address lessons learned at high performance schools for application at other schools?

Of course not! It is the easy way out for those in high income brackets in Charleston to collect data instead of using it to the maximum to take full advantage of lessons learned.

Could the WV School Board Association help fill the gap?

By Lost Opportunity on 10.07.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Harry, So sorry to hear of the passing of your wife.  I’m also sorry that I never got to know her because if she was anything like you, I’m sure she was pretty special.  Please know that you and your family will be in my thoughts and prayers.  May God’s love be with you my friend.

By Greg Garvin on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Judith “Judy” Carolyn Buckley Rich'.

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What is the BOE’s proficiency goal for English and mathematics and what is the time frame for achieving the goal? That is news citizens want.

Then too, how can citizens at large get involved to honor and to encourage students who improve, and what of a similar nature could be done to give special recognition to outstanding teachers who contribute to improved learning for English and math?

By Positive Changes Made By New BOE on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The BOE and Mrs Lowther deserve high praise for disclosing proficiency information to the public.

It is the first time since 2011 anything like this has happened.

We still do not know about results for science, and it is understood that Charleston is still “working” on it.

Now we know our serious shortcomings in math and English and there is new hope for burrowing out of the mess with everyone in Gilmer working together.

By Thanks Gilmer BOE on 10.03.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Well, dear citizen… sometimes the local ‘law’ gets it wrong.  #truth #JusticeForGilmer

By Transparency matters on 09.30.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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Soooo…...why do we never see a big drug bust in Gilmer?
With the college and others, there are plenty sources.
Seems strange?

By citizen 3 on 09.23.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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If you access http://www.mywvschool.com it is evident that some schools outpace others for math and English.

For examples look at data for Lizemore Elementary in Clay County, Alum Creek Elementary in Kanawha County, Rock Branch Elementary in Putnam county, and Greenmont Elementary in Wood County.

Gilmer BOE why not assign someone to evaluate what is being done at those school and others to make them State standouts and to apply lessons learned to our elementary schools?

The same applies to learning from others regarding how to get high marks at GCHS.

By Learn What Works From Others on 09.23.2018

From the entry: 'WV and Area Counties Balanced Scorecard for School Year 2017-2018'.

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I have not read anyone blaming our teachers.  Quite the contrary.
There have been some well thought out comments submitted too.
I am old enough to remember when we had few issues about quality education.

Forget Charleston? Better not.
Believe we are still in their “probation” period.
You better check out just what that means.

By GC--still on state probation? on 09.22.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Why not go for it on our own and use the tried and widely accepted Iowa Test of Basic Skills to evaluate learning proficiency of our children?

It is the longest running test in America and it goes back to 1936.

One outcome of using the test is that each grade would be evaluated and compared to performances to schools in other parts of America.

We would probably have to go through hoop jumps of the State’s everchanging testing too.

By Iowa Test For Gilmer on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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To compound complexity of the issue, Gilmer is different from McDowell and both are different than Monongahela.

The implication is that getting out of the crisis must be county-specific and there is no one size that will fit all of WV’s 55 school systems.

Each county is on its own and ones with the best planning, local boards of education, and administrators will shine. Forget about Charleston!

By County-Specific on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Similar to most complex problems there are several categories contributing to WV’s dismal failure in improving education results in our grade and high schools.

Information in referred journal is beginning to show up. Some of the categories include curriculum issues in high schools, block scheduling failures in high schools, inordinate emphasis on sports at the expense of academics, inadequate prep of grade schoolers to ensure that they get firm foundations in math and English Language Arts, failure to instill need for life long learning at early ages, failure for school systems to fund continuing education of teachers to prepare them for newly emerged practices for enhanced student learning, cultural impediments including failure of some families to encourage children and to give them extra learning help at home, dysfunctional families for children to grow up in caused by drug and alcohol abuse and chronic unemployment, grade inflation characterized by too many As and Bs and attitudes that nobody fails so pass them along, failure of school boards to hire the best qualified superintendents and teachers because of local emphasis on favoring “home grow” individuals, failure of school boards to define performance expectations for superintendents to make effective accountability impossible, constantly changing types of State mandated testing to cause chaos and morale problems, poor compensation of teachers necessary to attract and keep the best and the brightest, etc.

To blame all problems on teachers is a cruel travesty.

One of the weakest links contributing to a lack of progress in improving WV schools is that instead of analyzing the full spectrum of contributing problems and focusing on ones with the biggest payoff potential, the trend in Charleston is to constantly apply band aid approaches with hopes that “cures” will be stumbled on accidentally.

By Do Not Blame It All On Our Teachers on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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The problem with preK-12 education in WV is that a holistic and and technically defensible evaluation of contributing factors to cause WV’s problems and how to deal with them has not occurred.

Instead, under direction of clueless politicians ineffective muddling prevails while selling what is done at a particular time as the definitive solution.

How many times have we witnessed muddling over the past 20-30 Years? It still goes on in Charleston.

Why not obtain a grant to have qualified experts analyze success stories around the Nation and use findings to craft a demonstration project in Gilmer County to improve our school system?

Regardless of what we do there must be open minds in seeking out what to do in homes, schools,  teacher education programs in our institutions of higher learning, continuing education for classroom teachers, and to involve various factions in our community to achieve acceptable results. Everyone must band together as a unified team to make it work.

One trap is over emphasis of sports. If the same magnitude of attention and importance were to be focused on solving preK-12 education problems in WV, great strides could be made to benefit deserving children.

By Muddling on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Our heartfelt condolences on the passing of Mr. Ron. I too know this pain of losing a beloved father. Both of these men were taken way too soon. Praying maybe Mr.Ron, my Dad, and all the former Westinghouse employees in heaven are getting together. Love and prayers from, Adrienne and family.

By Adrienne (Trimper) Johnson on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'Ronald J. Vanskiver'.

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West Virginia’s educational failures is NOT because of classroom teachers.

It IS because of the WV Board of Education’s failures of the past 20-30 years.

That 9 member, lopsided governor board is a crime against children and education in WV as a whole.

It needs 3 teachers, 3 general public parent members, and 3 governor appointees.

Until that governors click gang is broken up, you simply see repeats of the past.  NO progress in education.

It will take the legislature to fix it, but they are too busy with the legislature created court system failure, while trying to line pockets with gas and oil money.

By Tell It Like It Is ! on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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What is the plausible rationale for Gilmer not disclosing detailed facts similar to what Superintendent Hosaflook did?

Wood County reported 11,176 students in its 27 schools for the full FY 2018 school year.

In comparison Gilmer had 734 reported students in our two schools for the full FY 2018 school year.

Wood County had 15 times more students than Gilmer and it is reasonable to assume that it was 15 times more demanding to administer with its 27 schools.

If Wood County could get detailed facts out to the public with its significantly higher work load what keeps tiny Gilmer from doing the same?

By Why Gilmer BOE? on 09.18.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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We have not had a responsible, functioning, WVBE for 20 years.
Not one that would accept any responsibility.

They just keep changing ‘score keeping’ so there can be no accurate tracking of student progress.

State ranks 48th or 49th on educational outcomes. Still.
Colleges still have to give remedial classes.

The ONLY thing that changes are the names of the governor appointed players.
And just look at the ‘cost-per-pupil’ spending!
We are about the highest in the nation.

West Virginia State Board of Education = complete failure.  Nothing less.

By just more smoke and mirrors on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released for Public Schools in West Virginia'.

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Never could figure out why working people, retirees, volunteers are picking up trash left by adults?

Not when we have the numbers of bored prisoners we have locked up doing nothing??

By No solution here- on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Adopt-A-Highway Fall Statewide Cleanup Set for September 29'.

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Go to http://www.mywvschool.org to access more official State information about Gilmer’s schools. There are serious red flags in need of immediate corrective attention.

If you access Lewis County schools on the same web site you can review info for LES. Look at the red flags there. Worse than GES.

Instead of using the info to criticize it can be useful in seeking out opportunities for making immediate improvements.

For those who take apologetic stands that Gilmer is doing as well as some other WV counties and everything is fine, it does not mean that inferior educations for our children are acceptable.

By Look At Red Flags on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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Who is responsible for Gilmer’s oversight of the LES?

If you access the State’s website you will learn that math and reading is red flagged for the LCES to be as bad as it can get.

Why is it that nothing is reported in Gilmer County about how that school is doing when we know that our sixth grade finishers from over there will go to the GCHS to finish their educations? 

It is like our students who attend LCES are forgotten about. Someone needs to be watching out for them.

By Who Minds The Store on 09.15.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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The really sad stories are left out.
The students who accrue debt and for whatever reasons, drop out of school after a year or two.

They have little hope of improving incomes, but still have debt.
More of them than you think.

By More sad ones to be told. on 09.14.2018

From the entry: 'Student-Loan Debts a "Loss of Freedom" for Some in WV'.

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Information made ‘public’ forces accountability.
Do not hold your breath lest you turn blue.

‘They’ want elected. Get their place at the trough.
Then discover ‘exposure’ makes their work more difficult.

Informed citizens make informed decisions.
Why do we see the same names being elected over and over and over?

By WHEN we're allowed to see it......? on 09.14.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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Lots of work to be done with schools in Gilmer County. 2017-2018 Summative Assessments out today for student achievement.

Gilmer County High School.

For Math
*Exceed or Meet Standards=40% of Students.
*Fail to Meet Standards=60% of Students

For Reading
*Exceed or Meet Standards=36% of Students
*Fail to Meet Standards=64%

The scores speak volumes. What was done to accurately determine causes of failures and what will be done about it? BOE, the public has a right to know answers.

By Public Demands Answers on 09.13.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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The Founding Fathers screwed up, we should not have to work and pay our bills. Let that man behind the tree work and pay for it all.
Free education should be a right.
Free food should be a right.
Free healthcare should be a right. 
Free transportation should be a right.
Free entertainment should be a right.

By Smart Feller on 09.13.2018

From the entry: 'Student-Loan Debts a "Loss of Freedom" for Some in WV'.

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Thank you BOE members and Mrs. Lowther. Let’s work together at all community levels to make Gilmer County an educational power house in West Virginia. We can do it as an effective team and provision of information will be the key to success.

By Better Times On The Way on 09.12.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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Accountability - good point - and across Gilmer County.  We’ve seen glimpses and pieces of news WHEN we’re allowed to see it, mere mortals that we are. But never any follow up.  And the information come in bits and pieces (remember when we actually got to SEE what the Gilmer County Commission was up to?)  My question is, why do we never see the accountability or repercussion for actions of current Gilmer ‘elite’??

By Transparency matters on 09.12.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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Encouraging news that the superintendent will present her goals for Gilmer Schools on 9/10.

We assume that there will be a commitment for specific goals to achieve, measurable outcomes, completion dates for different steps and final goal achievement, and a meaningful monitoring program to determine if we are on track or there is need for mid-course fine tuning.

If any of this is missing there will not be meaningful accountability. Excellent business plans have all the components addressed above.

By Waiting To See on 09.09.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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