GilmerFreePress.net

Arts & Entertainment

Art, Photography, Books, Magazine, Newspaper, Movie, Theater, Music, Radio and TV

Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV 

Citing declining enrollment, and increasing reliance on that enrollment rather than the state Legislature for funding, plus competition for students from West Virginia and Marshall universities, a report recommends merging the governing boards of Bluefield State College, Concord University, Glenville State College and West Virginia State University.

The document, from the Colorado-based nonprofit National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, labels those four schools “Medium Risk to High Risk” in sustainability, saying they’re “sustainable in the short-term, but their futures are uncertain.”

The REPORT recommends this move, in the short-term for Bluefield and Concord and in the long-term for Glenville and WVSU, and suggests “initially” retaining the separate boards of governors for Fairmont State, Shepherd and West Liberty universities, “but with additional powers regarding governance of institutions explicitly delegated” to the state Higher Education Policy Commission.

The recommendations include “leaving open” that Concord and Bluefield “could become a single accredited institution” and “the potential of including New River Community and Technical College within the new structure while retaining its unique mission as a community college.”

The report, which includes several other recommendations, also lists negative effects of the state government’s decisions to separate community colleges from public 4-year schools, weaken the power of the HEPC, decentralize governance and cut higher education funding.

And at a time when the presidents of WVU, Marshall and Concord are to co-chair Gov. Jim Justice’s newly formed group to study the funding and sustainability of higher education (the HEPC was already studying a possible funding formula), the report notes that a “major obstacle to collaboration with West Virginia University or Marshall University is a fear that the larger institutions will collaborate only out of their self-interest to stifle competition or ultimately take over the smaller institutions.”

“With West Virginia University admitting more than 35 percent of high school graduates in 22 counties, it seems improbable that all these students would have been the top-performing students in their counties,” the report states. “The more selective institutions are dipping deeper into their applicant pools to the detriment of the regional institutions. ... In the absence of some external forces, this predation will continue.”

“We have not previously seen the report, so we can’t react in detail,” WVU Communications Office Senior Executive Director John Bolt said after being sent the report late Tuesday afternoon. “Nevertheless, I can say without equivocation that West Virginia University is not predatory.”

“It is not appropriate to comment until I have had an opportunity to read and thoroughly review the report,” said Bluefield President Marsha Krotseng, to whom the Gazette-Mail also sent the report late Tuesday.

In a statement, Concord President Kendra Boggess suggested that the data in the report are accurate, but said a Bluefield/Concord consolidation is “only one potential option that should be considered.”

The report says that, “in the longer-term, as suggested by the Consolidated Financial Index, all the regional institutions are at risk of failure. However, that risk varies significantly.”

The report defines “regional institutions” as all public four-year schools but WVU, Marshall, their branch campuses and the School of Osteopathic Medicine, in Lewisburg.

“NCHEMS’ observation is that for the institutions at highest risk, Bluefield State College and Concord University, the challenges are so serious that only a major restructuring will preserve postsecondary education opportunity for students in Southern West Virginia,” the report states. “Implementing this restructuring will require external pressure, leadership, and on-going facilitation to mandate and implement a consolidation of academic, student and administrative capacity of the two institutions.

“Nevertheless, forces at both institutions continue to resist needed changes,” the report states. “Bluefield State College continues to pursue construction of a residence hall, with partial support from a local foundation, with hopes that this will enable the institution to recruit and retain more students. This while Concord has empty dormitory space.”

The report goes on to state that, “Without immediate action to mandate that these two institutions pursue an integrated approach to their future, each institution will continue on its downward trajectory.”

The report, dated April 3, is labeled draft and was obtained from the HEPC by the Gazette-Mail through an open records request.

Neither NCHEMS Vice President Brian Prescott nor HEPC Communications Director Shelli Dronsfield said they’re anticipating any changes to the report. Dronsfield said it hasn’t been released because the HEPC staff is still developing an executive summary and response to the report, planned to be presented alongside the report to the HEPC board in August.

~~  Ryan Quinn ~~


Arts & EntertainmentMediaNewspaperEducationFeaturesStudy | Report | Audit | Survey | ResearchNewsWest VirginiaRegionGilmer CountyGlenville

(6) Comments

Permalink - Link to This Article

~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

This information including details in the referenced full Report helps put GSC’s precarious standing in perspective. More information can be accessed at http://www.collegesimply.com.

That web site provides SAT student information for WV institutions of higher learning and GSC has the lowest scores.

Inferences from the scores and material in the report are that because GSC gets a large percentage of students from poor counties including Gilmer County, school systems there need improving.

Also, with employers becoming more sophisticated in hiring the best qualified graduates they access information of the type published on the web site given above.

The reason is that institutions with the best prepared students have more rigorous academic programs and they do not have to expend valuable time on remediation.

Provision of this comment is not intended to be a slam at GSC. The purpose is to encourage Dr. Pellett and the Board of Governors to devise a viable strategy for making the College a center of excellence to improve its standing in WV. It is that simple for guaranteed survival in the future.

By GSC GRAD  on  07.05.2018

Bigger is better? Rarely.

Everyone knows that school consolidation has resulted in failed outcomes.

This is laying the ground work, for an ego driven power grab.  The big institutions have no limit to their desire for money.

Stay small, and if failure occurs, fewer people are impacted.  Too large, and management of that soon turns into a problem.

By Its just planned failure.  on  07.05.2018

Advice for GSC’s president is to read Janis’book entitled Victims of Group Think.

The theme for the book is that alike thinkers of a group of elites in control can have colossal failures because they believe that their decision-making processes are unworthy of outside scrutiny.

Think about it. Did the airport to accommodate jet traffic at the mouth of Cedar Creek work out and did the federal prison result in economic prosperity with a hefty upsurge with GSC’s
enrollment?

What about the millions of dollars of new construction at GSC? Did it result in healthy enrollments as promised.

Some elites associated with GSC were strong advocates for the ill fated ventures.

GSC has been controlled too long by members of the same families. With the undeniable track record of declining conditions a few resignations would be a positive step.

The nagging governance problem affecting GSC has been shielding elite individuals from personal accountability without penalties for bad decisions.

By Governance Changes Needed At GSC  on  07.06.2018

“Governance Changes Needed at GSC” is 100% correct.

Basically GSC Board of Governors and other leadership positions, have been a result of nepotism and crony friend choices.

Those two ‘tools’ rarely, if ever, give the best persons available to whatever the position requires.

Incest often produces less than desired outcomes as well.

By PAST Time for change @ GSC  on  07.08.2018

There are two examples in Janis’ book regarding the Kennedy presidency. The first one deals with the group think Bay Of Figs disaster.

Those in Washington associated with invasion decisions considered themselves to be infallible world class thinkers. That mistake prevented critical and constructive review from anyone outside that tight group of political operatives.

The other example covers the Cuban Missile Crisis as an example of masterful diplomacy and planning to prevent a nuclear holocaust. President Kennedy deserved credit because he avoided group think traps from Bay Of Pigs lessons learned.

Higher education decisions in WV are made by individual tight knit Boards of Governors with excessive autonomy and no meaningful oversight.

Also, board members are there through political appointments at local levels. Governors traditionally rubber stamp the recommended appointments.

When serious group think mistakes occur at colleges and universities Boards are conditioned to assume that State bail outs will cover damages.

If private businesses are group think practitioners they never last unless they change strategies to avoid brutal market place penalties.

By WVU Political Scientist  on  07.08.2018

Oops! Bay of Pigs not Figs. Shows that college profs are not immune to embarrassing gaffs.

By WVU Prof.  on  07.09.2018

Leave a Comment

Print This Article



Tumblr StumbleUpon Reddit Print Email LinkedIn Pinterest Google+ Facebook Twitter Addthis

GSC Bluegrass Music Education Center to hold Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

The Glenville State College Bluegrass Program has recently relocated to The Pioneer Stage at 10 East Main Street in downtown Glenville. The Pioneer Stage will serve as GSC’s Bluegrass Music Education Center.

A ribbon cutting ceremony will take place on Thursday, June 21 at 6:00 p.m. at the center to mark its opening and to help kick-off the West Virginia State Folk Festival. During Folk Festival weekend, the Pioneer Stage will be the site of a Youth Bluegrass Camp (Saturday, June, 23 and Sunday, June 24), the second series of youth camps sponsored by the GSC Bluegrass Program this summer.

Additionally, visitors can enjoy the first ‘We, too, are Appalachia’ events at The Pioneer Stage during the West Virginia State Folk Festival; the Festival takes place Thursday, June 21 through Sunday, June 24. A photography exhibit, including items from the GSC Robert F. Kidd Library Archives Fern Rollyson Collection, will be on display Thursday, June 21 beginning at 4:00 p.m. at the Pioneer Stage. Buddy Griffin’s presentation on the influence of Appalachian music will take place at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 23, also at the Pioneer Stage. Complementary bottled water will be available throughout the festival while supplies last.

The Free Press WV
Bluegrass Students during an informal jam session at The Pioneer Stage


“I can’t express my gratitude to the students and parents from Normantown Christian Academy who have volunteered countless hours helping us prepare the center for this opening. I would also like to thank Glenville Foodland and everyone in the community who donated bottled water for us to distribute during the Folk Festival. In bluegrass music, we share many of the Folk Festival values such as preserving old time and cultural traditions,” said GSC Director of Bluegrass Music Dr. Megan Darby.

For more information about the ribbon cutting ceremony or any of the events taking place at The Pioneer Stage during the West Virginia State Folk Festival weekend, contact Darby at or 304.462.6347.

The ‘We, too, are Appalachia’ project is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Youth Bluegrass Camps Sponsored by GSC Bluegrass Program

This summer, the Glenville State College Bluegrass Program will be sponsoring several Youth Bluegrass Camps throughout the United States. The Bluegrass Day Camps are open to all skill levels (beginner, intermediate, and advanced) and are intended to enrich the lives of children who have a passion for traditional bluegrass music. Those with a strong desire to learn not only how to play the music, but also the history of the music, vocals and harmonies, instrument care, stage presence, jamming etiquette, and more are encouraged to attend. The camps are designed for students 6-18 years old who are interested in learning the great American tradition of bluegrass music.

This year the camps will be held in five locations across the country: Saturday, June 09 at Bill Monroe’s Bean Blossom Festival in Bean Blossom, Indiana; Saturday, June 24-Sunday, June 24 at the West Virginia State Folk Festival in Glenville, West Virginia; Friday, July 20 at the Big Horn Music Festival in Buffalo, Wyoming; Saturday, September 1 at the Sam Jam Bluegrass Festival in Piketon, Ohio; and Saturday, September 8 at the Furnace Town Living Heritage Museum Bluegrass Festival in Snow Hill, Maryland.

The Free Press WV


The camp instructors are highly skilled and will be made up mostly of Glenville State bluegrass students and will feature GSC Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Bluegrass Music Dr. Megan Darby and members of her family, founder of GSC’s Bluegrass Program Buddy Griffin, and select GSC bluegrass alumni.

“As a parent of two toddlers, I know that young children love sound. Music activities and experiences help children practice important skills including: thinking, motor coordination, and understanding emotions. Our bluegrass program and the West Virginia community recognizes that it is our duty to encourage children to be proud of their heritage, culture, and music – it’s more than mastering an instrument,” said Darby.

Admission to all of the camps other than the WV State Folk Festival is $30.00 per student which includes the admission of one adult. WV State Folk Festival camp admission is $60.00. That camp has a community concert on the second day that campers are invited to participate in. The camp fee includes six to eight hours of instructional time, small and whole group sessions, lunch, snacks, a guided tour of the festival, and a Youth Bluegrass Day Camp t-shirt. For a guaranteed spot in the camps and an event t-shirt students should register one month prior to the event.

Click the following links to view more information and to download a registration form.

For more information about the Youth Bluegrass Day Camps, contact Darby at ‘Megan.Darby@glenville.edu’ or 304.462.6347.

GSC Concert Band Wraps up Successful Semester

For students, faculty, and staff who perform with, direct, and organize Glenville State College’s Concert Band, the spring 2018 semester has been a busy one. For the first time since the 1970’s, the Concert Band went on tour, traveling to southern West Virginia. While visiting Logan County, the band performed two shows, a day concert for Chapmanville High School students and another in the evening for members of the community.

The Free Press WV
Daniel While ’97 conducting the 10th Anniversary GSC Honor Band


As part of the tour, band members served as guest clinicians for Chapmanville High School, Logan High School, and Lincoln County High School band members. GSC students held workshops and mentored the high school students on their concert band state ratings music.

Derrick Lowe, a senior instrumental music major at GSC and a 2013 graduate of Chapmanville High School, was one of the GSC students who served as a clinician and had a featured solo in each of the concerts. “Returning to my hometown and performing with possibly one of the top concert bands in the state was a great time and simply amazing. Now performing a solo – that was nerve-racking because two music teachers that I highly respect were right in front of me. Getting to work with the different high school bands was a day filled with good music and, for me, nothing beats that,” said Lowe.

Recently, the Concert Band hosted the 10th Anniversary Honor Band at GSC which featured 100 middle and high school students from fifteen schools throughout West Virginia. Most of the bands that participated in the event were directed by Glenville State alumni. This year’s honor band was conducted by Daniel White, a December 1997 GSC graduate, and Director of Bands at Parkersburg High School in Parkersburg, West Virginia.

The Free Press WV
GSC Concert Band during a performance at Chapmanville High School


“Conducting the Glenville State College Honor Band was an honor and a privilege. GSC is an excellent place to hone one’s musicality and, as an alumnus, I hope each student who participated will seriously consider Glenville to further their education,” said White.

“Our annual Honor Band is not only an educational experience for those who participate, but it also serves as a major recruiting event for GSC. It has become very popular and is a wonderful way for us to introduce GSC to students from around West Virginia. The many Glenville alumni that come back to campus with their students is truly remarkable and it creates a sense of pride for them,” said Department of Fine Arts Chair and Associate Professor of Music Dr. Lloyd Bone.

For more information about the GSC Concert Band or Honor Band, contact the Department of Fine Arts at 304.462.6340.

Popular Television Series Explores Bluegrass Music with GSC Alumni, Students

Several current students, graduates, and mentors with Glenville State College’s Bluegrass Music Program were recently featured in an article and accompanying video produced by CNN for Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown series.

Earlier this month the video crew trailed several musicians in order to see a glimpse into Appalachian culture through the lens of bluegrass music. Throughout the interviews featured in the article, readers are introduced to the various ways someone traveling through the West Virginia hills might come into contact with bluegrass music; from local radio station programming and informal jam sessions to full-scale concerts with an admission fee.

The Free Press WV
In a screen capture from the video, GSC’s Dr. Megan Darby speaks about bluegrass music during an interview filmed for the Parts Unknown series


GSC’s Director of Bluegrass Music Dr. Megan Darby serves as the narrator for the feature video that accompanies the piece.

“I’m very pleased with how the story and video turned out. We were honored to be a part of it and hope that people who read the article or watch the video learn a little something about traditional and bluegrass music,” Darby said. “We would love to see someone be motivated to take a road trip of their own because of seeing this video and want to join us at one of the various performances. Nothing makes me happier than seeing the joy and history of bluegrass music spread to new ears.”

GSC’s Bluegrass Program Founding Director Buddy Griffin and renowned regional musician and square dance caller Mack Samples are featured in the video along with GSC bluegrass alumni Laiken Boyd, Luke Shamblin, and Trisha Anderson. Additionally, current student Josh Pitcock was highlighted during a portion of the video that was filmed at the Alpine Theatre in Ripley, West Virginia.

 

The Free Press WV
his still shot from the Parts Unknown video shows current GSC student Josh Pitcock on stage at the Alpine Theatre

Click here to read the article and view the video.

In the video Darby mentions GSC’s traditional on-campus degree that it has offered for many years. Glenville State College also recently announced that it will begin offering a four-year bluegrass music degree online.

“We’re trying to preserve bluegrass music but at the same time we know that you have to be innovative to better serve students. We can utilize technology in ways that wouldn’t have been possible even a few years ago and, to me, that’s truly exciting. I invite anyone who wants to know more about bluegrass to consider signing up for our in-person or online courses for the fall,” Darby said. “Our program teaches students about bluegrass music directly from the masters. That is so unique for a program like ours and, in my opinion, is the only way to learn.”

For more information about the Bluegrass Music Program at GSC, contact Darby by e-mail at ‘Megan.Darby@glenville.edu’ or call 304.462.6347.

One Book One West Virginia Returns for 2018

The Free Press WV

For the 13th consecutive year, the West Virginia Library Commission and West Virginia Center for the Book will sponsor the state’s most important statewide discussion group:  One Book One West Virginia. 

Each year, one book by an Appalachian author is selected for this prestigious honor, and the 2018 selection is the debut novel by Karen Spears Zacharias, Mother of Rain.

In Mother of Rain, Zacharias writes about a small, close-knit, East Tennessee community as the Depression yields to World War II.  The story follows the struggles of Maizee Hurd as she suffers through a series of setbacks from childhood on: the gruesome early death of her mother; her father’s rejection; the birth, illness, and resulting deafness of her infant son, Rain; and the disappearance of her husband during the war. Mother of Rain is an exploration of the nature of community in a rural setting and is the 2013 Weatherford Award winner for best novel in southern Appalachian fiction.

The Free Press WV


The One Book One West Virginia reading campaign helps support the Appalachian Heritage Writer-In-Residence Project developed by Shepherd University.  This literacy project invites everyone across the state to read the same book and take part in detailed group conversations about the book’s unfolding storyline.  West Virginia readers are urged to join book discussion groups and attend related events, such as meeting the author, character portrayals, movies, and workshops. 

To join a book group discussion, readers may contact their local library, or they can connect with others through the WVLC statewide Facebook page

West Virginians share a proud literary history, and it is the goal of the One Book One West Virginia project to share not only a story, but a story that promotes our rich Appalachian heritage.


The Appalachian Heritage Writer-in-Residence Project is made possible with financial support from the West Virginia Humanities Council, in partnership with the Shepherd University Foundation, the West Virginia Center for the Book, the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the Shepherdstown Public Library, the Scarborough Society, the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, the West Virginia Commission on the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

West Virginia Library Commission encourages lifelong learning, individual empowerment, civic engagement and an enriched quality of life by enhancing library and information services for all West Virginians. WVLC is an agency of the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts.

To learn more about the WVLC, please visit www.librarycommission.wv.gov or call us at 304.558.2041.

Music Education Students Hold Senior Recital at GSC

Glenville State College music education students Morgan Dolly and Faith Smith, both from Petersburg, West Virginia, held their joint senior recital on Saturday, April 07 in the Fine Arts Center Auditorium. Dolly performed on the trumpet and Smith on the baritone saxophone.

Outside of the classroom Dolly serves as the President of the GSC’s chapter of the National Association for Music Education and is a member of the GSC marching band and the jazz combo. After graduation from GSC, she plans to pursue a career in teaching and obtain a master’s degree in conducting. She is the daughter of Dale and Marlene Dolly.

The Free Press WV
(l-r) Morgan Dolly and Faith Smith


“I can’t thank the outstanding faculty at Glenville State College enough - especially Mr. [Harry] Rich and Dr. [Lloyd] Bone for helping me excel in my studies, become a better musician, and making Glenville feel like home my first day on campus. I will cherish my time at GSC forever and the many memories that I’ve made here,” said Dolly.

“Morgan Dolly was, and is, a very focused musician, she grew tremendously as a performer, as a musician, and as a professional. Her work ethic is to be admired. Her recital went very well and I am very proud of her. I have every reason to believe that she will be an excellent music teacher—dedicated, smart, and with a curiousness to continually improve professionally,” said GSC Professor Emeritus Harry Rich.

Smith is also a member of the GSC marching band and after graduation she plans to begin work on her master’s degree and become an elementary school principal. She is the daughter of Jamie Cook and Tammy Eckard.

“I began playing the baritone saxophone only a year ago, and with taking off a year I essentially started playing the baritone saxophone with minimal saxophone knowledge. My recital showcased the many hours and all of the hard work that I put into learning a new instrument,” said Smith.

“Faith is one of the hardest working and most dedicated students I have ever had the pleasure of teaching.  She worked incredibly hard for this recital and played as well as she did because she does not accept mediocrity.  She sets a very high bar for herself and does not give up easily,” said GSC Assistant Professor of Music Jason Barr.

For more information about these recitals or the Department of Fine Arts at Glenville State College, visit www.glenville.edu or call 304.462.6340.

Annual Glenville State College Student Art Show Winners Announced

Winners of the annual Glenville State College Juried Student Art Show have been announced.

The show was open to any full time GSC student who wished to submit a pieces of original art created during their college career.

The show was judged by GSC Associate Professor of English Melissa Gish.

“We are very proud of our art majors and all of the works in the show. This show wonderfully showcases the growth of our art students as well as the department,” said Department of Fine Arts Chair Dr. Lloyd Bone.

Heather Chambers of Parsons, West Virginia won first place for her ‘Howling Wolf’ digital painting and took third place for her ceramic piece ‘Demon Wolf.’ She is the daughter of Margaret and Matthew Chambers and is a senior studio art major with a minor in music.

The Free Press WV
Heather Chambers – First and Third Place Recipient


“My love for art comes from my twin sister. When we were little we would have competitions to see who the better artist was, but as I got older it became less about competition and more of a passion. I enjoy working with a wide variety of mediums, and I’m always excited to learn more,” said Chambers.

Gavin McCord of Walkersville, West Virginia won second place for his oil painting ‘Oni.’ He is the son of Shelia Watson and Andy McCord and is a sophomore graphic design and digital media major.

The Free Press WV
Gavin McCord – Second Place Recipient


“This is the first step in my career which I’m looking to expand. I’d like to thank Professor [Chris] Cosner for seeing my potential and drive and for inspiring me to put in the hard work to create this piece,” said McCord.

Four students - Taylor Brumfield, Joshua Smith, Sarah Lines, and Heather Coleman - were recognized with honorable mention certificates for their entries.

Gish, who judged the show, is the author of more than 90 juvenile nonfiction natural history and science books. Her writing and artwork has been published in a variety of small press journals. Her collections of found object art has been featured in the GSC Fine Arts Center Gallery, and she is currently working with GSC’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Guild student organization on their first chapbook of creative writing and art.

For more information about the GSC gallery, contact Assistant Professor of Art Chris Cosner at or 304.462.6349.

Small Town Monsters working on new film about Flatwoods Monster

The Free Press WV

A new film aims to tell the true story behind what happened in a rural, West Virginia town when a group of terrified locals encountered a monstrous being just moments after seeing strange objects in the sky.

“The Flatwoods Monster: A Legacy of Fear” is a new documentary from director, Seth Breedlove, which will unlock a decades-old mystery that included a government-ordered military examination of a purported alien crash-site, and multiple UFOs seen by countless residents of Braxton County, West Virginia. In the years since their brush with the “Flatwoods Monster”, witnesses have seen their story evolve from a terrifying, true-life event to little more than a fable. Two of the remaining witnesses will set the record straight when the film is released on April 6th.

The “Flatwoods Monster incident” has become one of the most famous legends in modern memory. However, with the Pentagon now opening up about UFO investigations dating back to the 1940’s, the incident can be seen in a new light. In September of 1952 hundreds of people across the United States witnessed glowing objects streak across the skies over much of the Eastern Seaboard. One of the objects in question was seen to land on a hill near the small community of Flatwoods by a group of children. The children and two adults made a journey to the top of the hill to search for the object but instead found themselves face to face with a thirteen foot tall mechanical monster. Later that same evening a branch of the local National Guard unit would be dispatched by Air Force officials to investigate the site of the encounter.

The film, which was shot over the course of eight months between July of 2017 and January, 2018, will also be part of a crowd-funding campaign that has launched.


The film is being released by the award-winning, Small Town Monsters production company, who are responsible for last Spring’s, “The Mothman of Point Pleasant” another documentary centered around a well-known West Virginia legend. The film features an original score composed by Brandon Dalo and cinematography by Zachary Palmisano with special FX by Santino Vitale and fully animated sequences by Chris Scalf.

The Flatwoods Monster will be released on DVD and Amazon next April with a wider digital release planned thereafter. Plans are in place to screen the movie prior to it’s release at HorrorHound Cincinnati, being held March 23-25 . The official premiere will be held at the Elk Theater in Sutton, on April 07 with members of the Small Town Monsters crew taking part in a Q&A following the showing.

To learn more about the movie click HERE.

GSC’s Megan Darby Successfully Defends Dissertation

The Free Press WV

Megan Darby, Glenville State College Assistant Professor and Director of the Bluegrass Music Degree Program, has successfully defended her dissertation at Walden University. This achievement caps her four year journey in pursuit of a Doctor of Education degree, which will officially be conferred upon her in late April.

The title of her dissertation, ‘Challenges to Student Success in an Introductory Music Theory I Course,’ hints at her primary interest in completing the study, which was to find ways to help music degree students be more successful in their programs.

“Music Theory I is tough for a lot of students, and it’s one of the first courses they take for their programs. If we can help them do better in that course, we can help them be more successful overall,” Darby said.

As part of her research, Darby generated a plan for helping students based on the data she collected and analyzed. “The plan is to activate a Music Theory I lab course to give students extra support for the concepts they’re learning in the class. It is quite likely that we can have the lab in place for the fall 2018 semester at GSC,” Darby added.

Since Darby began directing the Bluegrass Music Degree Program in 2010, she has revised the curriculum and implemented new courses and student opportunities. Under her guidance, students have been accepted into recording, engineering, and International Bluegrass Music Association internships, provided opportunities to join Hospice Bedside Singing, asked to play for RFD TV and showcases, and invited to tour. The program has been recognized at the Grand Ole Opry, the World Famous Station Inn, and WSM Radio. Her students also have recorded at Tom T. Hall and Miss Dixie’s and Rickey Wasson’s state of the art studios.

Darby has already begun working on her next project. “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to revise and help grow the Bluegrass Music Program here at GSC and to provide students with unique opportunities, certainly, but I am especially excited to be developing the world’s first online Bluegrass Music Degree Program. My parents took me to my first bluegrass festival at Renfro Valley, Kentucky when I was only four months old. By the time I was five, I was playing the fiddle. To say that bluegrass music is my life is an understatement, and to have this opportunity is a dream come true. GSC is going to make history, and I’m proud to be a part of that,” said Darby.

“I extend my most sincere congratulations to Megan for reaching this tremendous milestone. Glenville State College is lucky in that we get to benefit from the passion and enthusiasm that she shows for preserving and teaching bluegrass and traditional music and we have no doubt that she will continue to make the College proud. I, along with the rest of our faculty, congratulate Dr. Darby on this special moment,” said Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gary Morris.

Darby received a Bluegrass Certification from GSC in 2006 and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Education degree in 2011. She completed a Master’s in Education and Instructional Technology from Marshall University in 2013. In addition to three other previous CDs, Darby also recorded a fundraising album with Buddy Griffin, GSC’s Bluegrass Program founding director in 2017. In 2018, she was selected as a featured artist by GHS Strings. She and her husband Bryan have two daughters, Presley and Piper.

GSC Brass Ensemble to Perform at State Music Conference

The Free Press WV

On Friday, March 09 Glenville State College’s Brass Ensemble will perform at the West Virginia Music Educators Association State Conference at the Civic Center in Charleston, West Virginia. The group is directed by Dr. Lloyd E. Bone, Jr. and will feature the full Brass Ensemble as well as the Trumpet and Tuba and Euphonium Ensembles. Professor Emeritus Harry Rich directs the Trumpet Ensemble, Bone directs the Tuba and Euphonium Ensemble.

The conference is an annual event and is the largest of its kind in West Virginia. The performance is by invitation only.

“This is an honor as this marks the fourth time in the past five years that a music ensemble at GSC has been invited to perform at our annual state conference. The Tuba and Euphonium Ensemble, Jazz Combo, and the Brass Ensemble have all been invited previously,” said Bone, who also serves as chair of the Department of Fine Arts.

For more information regarding the state music conference performance, call 304.462.6340.

West Virginia Scholar Application Now Available

The Free Press WV

West Virginia Wesleyan College, in conjunction with MetroNews, announces the beginning of the 11th annual West Virginia Scholar Program for high school juniors in West Virginia. 

The top student will win a four-year scholarship to Wesleyan, valued at more than $160,000.

A second place prize of $5,000 and third place prize of $2,500 will also be awarded. 

All awards begin with the 2019 fall semester.

“We are thrilled to enter our eleventh year of partnership on the West Virginia Scholar program,” said John Waltz ’01, vice president for enrollment management. “Every year we are privileged to read each application and meet the absolute best and brightest students in West Virginia. These scholars not only excel in the classroom but also in athletics, creative arts, and service and leadership.  Applicants and finalists enrolling at Wesleyan have been among our 21 international scholarship winners in the last 7 years.  We cannot wait to see how these students change our state and the world.”

Students can apply at wvmetronews.com

An essay detailing how the applicant plans, through their studies and continuing education, to make West Virginia a better place to live.

The application deadline is April 15. 

Online voting at wvmetronews.com will be held directly after, and the winner will be announced at the 2018 WV Scholar Award Luncheon at Wesleyan in June.

In addition to MetroNews and Wesleyan, sponsors include the West Virginia Hospital Association, ZMM Architects and Engineers, the West Virginia Forestry Association, the West Virginia Farm Bureau, RBC Wealth Management, Komax Business Systems, and Friends of Coal.

Please contact the Office of Admissions at 800.722.9933 for more information.

GSC Theater Performing ‘Secondary Cause of Death’ February 22-23

The Free Press WV

Students in Glenville State College’s theater program will be performing ‘Secondary Cause of Death’ as their first full show of the spring 2018 semester.

The performance will run for two evenings, Thursday, February 22 and Friday, February 23, and begins at 7:00 p.m.

‘Secondary Cause of Death,’ is a murder mystery parody where the audience can imagine the game of Clue brought to life with cases of mistaken identity, accidental murders, explosions, a Nazi invasion, and more. Featured in the play is Colonel Charles Craddock who, despite his large house and assumed wealth, is in need of extra income. For additional cash the Colonel operates a bed and breakfast that also hosts murder mysteries out of his home. Craddock hires the sister of a famed amateur sleuth to entertain his diverse group of guests. Laughter and puzzling twists await audiences of this performance.

The cast includes Joshua Smith as Count Puchlik, Chase Rakes as Colonel Charles Craddock, Shiann Smith as Nurse Ann Parsley, Catherine Chambers as Lady Isadora Pollock, Heather Salsbury as Inspector Pratt, Angie Burgess as Martha Armstrong, Victoria Guillory as Lily Tuthill, Brittany Benson as Captain Henrietta, and Katie Miller as Cynthia Maple.

The play will be presented in the President’s Auditorium in the Heflin Administration Building. Admission is free for GSC students with a valid ID and $3.00 for general admission. The play is rated PG-13 for some suggestive dialog.

For more information about the performance, contact GSC Professor of Communications Dennis Wemm at or 304.462.6323.

Renowned Flautist Lindsey Goodman to Hold Master Class

The Free Press WV

On Monday, February 19, Lindsey Goodman will present a flute master class from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Glenville State College Fine Arts Center Recital Hall. Goodman will be on campus to work with GSC flute majors. Additionally, the Department of Fine Arts is opening the class up to high school flute players for no cost.

Goodman, a renowned flautist and a 12 season principal flute player for the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra, is in high demand as a soloist, chamber collaborator, orchestral musician, recording artist, teacher, and clinician. She is also an adjunct faculty member for West Virginia State University and Marietta College.

She first got her start as an adjunct instructor of flute for Ashland University through the 2013-2014 school year as well as doing private teaching lessons in Goodman Flute Studios. She teaches a variety of levels starting with beginners through professionals that are in the central Ohio region. Goodman is a sought-after clinician for master classes and presentations on music careers, entrepreneurship, electroacoustics, chamber collaboration, and commissioning. Throughout her last eight seasons she has been able to reach students in thirty-three universities across two different countries.

For more information or to RSVP for the master class, call 304.462.6340.

Andrews to Present Faculty Lecture on Jazz

The Free Press WV

Kyle Andrews ’13, instructor of music at West Virginia Wesleyan College, will present “Jazz is Dead: Long Live BAM” as part of the spring Faculty Lecture Series on Monday, February 12 at 7 p.m. in the Culpepper Auditorium of the Virginia Thomas Law Center for the Performing Arts (PAC).

The event is free and open to the public.

The lecture will be a discussion about the word “jazz” and its reception among jazz musicians throughout the past century. Andrews will play a portion of an important 1958-film titled The Cry of Jazz and discuss the BAM movement led by trumpet player Nicholas Payton.

“This lecture is important for anyone who listens to American music,” Andrews said. “Though jazz music is the focus of this discussion, these themes cut through virtually every moment of American musical history. Name a style or genre of music has a lot of repercussions, and many of them are not always obvious. This discussion will focus on jazz, but it is a conversation that is readily applicable to any genre/style/era of American music.”

Jazz musician, drummer and educator Andrews began playing in his hometown of Shepherdstown, WV and has since performed in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, New York City, and the greater North-Central West Virginia area. He holds a bachelor of music education from West Virginia Wesleyan College and a master of music in jazz studies from the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. He has served as a clinician and adjudicator in and around the state of West Virginia, and his articles and reviews have been published in Modern Drummer Magazine. With interests and pursuits in both performance and scholarship, Andrews hopes to help students to not only perform at their highest possible level but also to think critically about their relationship with music and the world around them.

Join the Wesleyan community for additional lectures this semester on the second Monday of each month at 7 p.m. in the PAC. Additional lectures will be given on March 12 by Jessica Scott, assistant professor of gender studies, and on April 9 by Dr. Joanna Webb, assistant professor of chemistry. For more information on additional cultural events at Wesleyan, please visit www.wvwc.edu.

Free Press Classified Ads

For YOU...By YOU

West Virginia

Arts & Entertainment

National

Politics

Arts & Entertainment

International

Arts & Entertainment

Arts & Entertainment

Arts & Entertainment

Review: ‘Blindspotting’

In ‘Blindspotting,’ simmering tensions with a beat [ .... ]  Read More

Movie Review: ‘The Equalizer 2’

Denzel Washington kills in ‘The Equalizer 2’  [ .... ]  Read More

Obama, Biden Ride Again

The Free Press WVThey’re reunited as fictional crime fighters in a new mystery novel   [ .... ]  Read More

Who’s the Greatest Man Booker Winner of Them All?

The Free Press WVPoll gives the nod to Michael Ondaatje’s ‘The English Patient’  [ .... ]  Read More

Amid a Trio of Rare Books, a Toxic Find

The Free Press WVTomes in Denmark university library were coated in arsenic-laced paint   [ .... ]  Read More

Future Trips to Hollywood Sign Could Take Just 6 Minutes

The Free Press WVWarner Bros. reveals $100M plan for tram to ease traffic   [ .... ]  Read More

Movie Review: ‘Skyscraper’

In ‘Skyscraper,‘ the Rock towers over action tropes [ .... ]  Read More

Partial list of nominees for annual Primetime Emmy Awards

The Free Press WV Partial list of nominees for the annual Primetime Emmy Awards, announced Thursday by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences [ .... ]  Read More

Movie Review: ‘Eighth Grade’

Click ‘like’ for Bo Burnham’s ‘Eighth Grade’  [ .... ]  Read More

Box office top 20: ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ stings with $75.8M

The Free Press WV Marvel Studios landed its 20th straight no. 1 box-office debut with an uncharacteristically small superhero for the swaggering comic-book juggernaut. “Ant-Man and the Wasp” opened with $75.8 million [ .... ]  Read More

Review: Anne Tyler’s new novel is about second chances

The Free Press WVIf you had to identify a single theme in Anne Tyler’s latest novel, it would be the importance of creating a surrogate family if your biological one is irretrievably broken [ .... ]  Read More

Anthony Bourdain Was Worth Millions Less Than Thought

The Free Press WVEstimates had pegged his fortune at $16M, but it was actually $1.21M   [ .... ]  Read More

Movie Review: ‘Ant-Man and The Wasp’

‘Ant-Man and The Wasp’ punches above its weight [ .... ]  Read More

Rocker Shares Letter Bourdain Sent His Upset Daughter

Josh Homme writes of his friend, ‘I miss you bad’  [ .... ]  Read More

‘Jurassic World 2’ takes No. 1 again

The Free Press WV The “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” dinosaurs ruled the box office for a second weekend in a row, but also left a little room for more modest newcomers like “Sicario: Day of the Soldado” and the basketball comedy “Uncle Drew” to over-perform in the crowded marketplac [ .... ]  Read More

Financial|Business

Sports

Living

Opinions

Outdoors

Technology & Science

Events & Announcements

Arts & Entertainment

Arts & Entertainment

Obituaries

Reader's Comments

Readers' Recent Comments

The lipstick comment deserves special attention. The State’s testing results verifies that too many students are not proficient in science, reading, and math. WV remains in the lower 10th among the 50 states for those areas.

Google WVZOOM Dashboard and look at State assessment scores for the GCHS. According to reports a decision was made to hire one more math teacher over there to help improve future results.

Nothing is known about what is being done to help Gilmer’s HS students with reading and science. The new Board president must get detailed information out to the public.

Assurances that everything is OK won’t work anymore. There has been too much of that type of hokum. The public knows how to access achievement information from the Internet to impose increasing accountability for our school system.

By R. J. Myers on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Maybe it is a case of not seeing the forest for the trees. GSC is designated responsibility for serving seven counties in central WV.

SAT scores for students entering GSC are the lowest in the State with large numbers of students coming from the seven counties. This suggests that education needs to be upgraded in the counties.

Why not focus on using the College to train teachers for central WV and to do what is necessary to improve pre-K-12 education in the seven counties?

Looks to be a natural winner for GSC. What about it Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors?

By Watching Alumni on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Thanks you for honest comments, Mr. Boggs.

Its a sad state when volunteers can be credited with a better job than paid WV employees.

No wonder we have financial, legislative, highway, issues at every turn in the road. 

And to think, that the governor has to burden the National Guard with administration of a flood recovery program? 

Obvious we have incompetent individuals in many positions throughout the state bureaucracy. Are there ever, ever any state employees actually fired, for unacceptable job performance or plain incompetence?

Look at route 5 west of I-79 for a wonderful example of DOH failure.  The DOH county office is a mile from the ‘rollercoaster’ ride. All those state employees have to ride it 10, maybe 20 times a week just doing their jobs.  How can they not see it?

This rollercoaster is the ‘welcome center’ to Braxton and Gilmer county.
Its been a mess for over 20 years.  The rough, bumpy railroad tracks too.

Yes, that’s what the Gilmer Federal Prison employees who commute deal with.  It’s a great welcome, great first look, for prospective Glenville State College students and staff as well.

By A failed state of the state report. on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

What a glowing report.

Just because you say or print something, doesn’t make it true.

With a report like this, you would think WV had moved up the list from 47th in outcomes.

A few people don’t have the wool down over their eyes.

By wasted lipstick on the pig. on 07.17.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Wiseman’s suggestion is an opportunity for the new School Board officers, Mr. Cottril and Mr. Shakleford.

Both members campaigned on improvements they would make if elected. The most important improvement would be outstanding results with student learning outcomes in the County.

Quarterly progress reports from Mr. Cottril and Mr. Shackleford are requested.

By Voters For Accountability on 07.16.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Excellent meeting minutes I wish we could see more local news like this..  Where can I find information on the recent lawsuit between the Gilmer County Commission and Prosecutor Hough?  I understand Judge Alsop issued a decision?

By Reader on 07.14.2018

From the entry: 'GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Praises go to Governor Justice, Dr. Paine, and the entire State Board for producing this outstanding report.

For the first time in memory comprehensive information is included in one source for the public and it is written in an understandable
style.

A request is made to the Gilmer County Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther to produce a similar report by this fall for the specific status of our school system.

We could celebrate achievements for which we excel and we could profit from our weak points as opportunities for corrective measures to take.

Forget about what other counties are doing—we are competing against ourselves.

The often cited excuse that we are just as good as other counties with WV ranking near bottom should no longer be tolerated.

By fall results of recent SAT testing would be available to Superintendent Lowther and the County Board to include in the report.

One advantage of the suggested County report and ones in successive years would be a basis for the public to use to judge effectiveness of Gilmer’s Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther.

The GFP is applauded for its role in being a leader in WV for making education news accessible on the Internet.

By Frank Wiseman on 07.14.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Dr. Pellett, you attacked accuracy of the NCHEMS report in your Gazette article today.

It would be informative for you to give an Internet link to the report to permit it to be read and for you to publish a detailed critique of errors in it with backup evidence as proof.

By GSC EMPLOYEE on 07.13.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

A basic truism for a highly successful start up business is to offer a new top quality product in high demand at a price consumers can afford.

Why do Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors reject the concept? Specifically, as printed in the Democrat there is a proposal to establish a premiere five year teacher education program at the College with grads to receive a masters degree in teaching. A program of that type is desperately needed in WV and it is not offered elsewhere.

Word circulating is that Dr. Pellet, the Board of Governors, and dominant members of the County’s elite have summarily rejected the idea.

One excuse heard is that local power brokers do not want WVU involved with the College. Yet, in the Democrat Dr. Pellett is quoted saying that he is working on a new nursing program with WVU’s involvement.

Is the true reason of veto of the innovative teacher education program because Dr. Pellet and the Board of Governors were not originators of the idea to automatically cause its rejection?

Dr. Pellett is invited to explain to the public and concerned alumni why the program would not be in GSC’s long term best interests.

By Why Dr. Pellet and GSC BOG? on 07.13.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Glenville mayor is doing an excellent job and the town is lucky to have him on the job. Getting old houses torn down was a kept promise and the town looks much better at those places. Let’s have more of it.

By Citizen on 07.11.2018

From the entry: 'GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Why is it that when tax dollars were spent on the higher education reorganization study by the Colorado NCHEMS group it is being keep secret from the public? Mr. Boggs how about helping out by informing voters how to get a copy of the report to read and decide for themselves?

By Voters Watching on 07.10.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Oops! Bay of Pigs not Figs. Shows that college profs are not immune to embarrassing gaffs.

By WVU Prof. on 07.09.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

There are two examples in Janis’ book regarding the Kennedy presidency. The first one deals with the group think Bay Of Figs disaster.

Those in Washington associated with invasion decisions considered themselves to be infallible world class thinkers. That mistake prevented critical and constructive review from anyone outside that tight group of political operatives.

The other example covers the Cuban Missile Crisis as an example of masterful diplomacy and planning to prevent a nuclear holocaust. President Kennedy deserved credit because he avoided group think traps from Bay Of Pigs lessons learned.

Higher education decisions in WV are made by individual tight knit Boards of Governors with excessive autonomy and no meaningful oversight.

Also, board members are there through political appointments at local levels. Governors traditionally rubber stamp the recommended appointments.

When serious group think mistakes occur at colleges and universities Boards are conditioned to assume that State bail outs will cover damages.

If private businesses are group think practitioners they never last unless they change strategies to avoid brutal market place penalties.

By WVU Political Scientist on 07.08.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

“Governance Changes Needed at GSC” is 100% correct.

Basically GSC Board of Governors and other leadership positions, have been a result of nepotism and crony friend choices.

Those two ‘tools’ rarely, if ever, give the best persons available to whatever the position requires.

Incest often produces less than desired outcomes as well.

By PAST Time for change @ GSC on 07.08.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Advice for GSC’s president is to read Janis’book entitled Victims of Group Think.

The theme for the book is that alike thinkers of a group of elites in control can have colossal failures because they believe that their decision-making processes are unworthy of outside scrutiny.

Think about it. Did the airport to accommodate jet traffic at the mouth of Cedar Creek work out and did the federal prison result in economic prosperity with a hefty upsurge with GSC’s
enrollment?

What about the millions of dollars of new construction at GSC? Did it result in healthy enrollments as promised.

Some elites associated with GSC were strong advocates for the ill fated ventures.

GSC has been controlled too long by members of the same families. With the undeniable track record of declining conditions a few resignations would be a positive step.

The nagging governance problem affecting GSC has been shielding elite individuals from personal accountability without penalties for bad decisions.

By Governance Changes Needed At GSC on 07.06.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Bigger is better? Rarely.

Everyone knows that school consolidation has resulted in failed outcomes.

This is laying the ground work, for an ego driven power grab.  The big institutions have no limit to their desire for money.

Stay small, and if failure occurs, fewer people are impacted.  Too large, and management of that soon turns into a problem.

By Its just planned failure. on 07.05.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

This information including details in the referenced full Report helps put GSC’s precarious standing in perspective. More information can be accessed at http://www.collegesimply.com.

That web site provides SAT student information for WV institutions of higher learning and GSC has the lowest scores.

Inferences from the scores and material in the report are that because GSC gets a large percentage of students from poor counties including Gilmer County, school systems there need improving.

Also, with employers becoming more sophisticated in hiring the best qualified graduates they access information of the type published on the web site given above.

The reason is that institutions with the best prepared students have more rigorous academic programs and they do not have to expend valuable time on remediation.

Provision of this comment is not intended to be a slam at GSC. The purpose is to encourage Dr. Pellett and the Board of Governors to devise a viable strategy for making the College a center of excellence to improve its standing in WV. It is that simple for guaranteed survival in the future.

By GSC GRAD on 07.05.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

We must be wary of how County K-12 achievement information is presented.

From the outset the new school board should focus on exactly how well our students are performing with mastering subjects, and not to fall victim to news unrelated to demonstrated student learning.

For one example the GCHS was awarded for its high graduation rate, but it ranked in the bottom 10% among WV high schools for college and career readiness of seniors.

This is not to say that graduation rates are unimportant, but they cannot be interpreted as fact of a direct relationship with how well students are prepared for college and careers.

For some schools an unusually high graduation rate could be a function of enforced “everyone passes” policy.

The point is that there is need for vigilance when student performance information is disclosed to the public so school board get all of it out so voters can decide where the County’s school system really stands.

By Give All Facts on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Word is that officers on the County’s school board have changed with Doug Cottrill becoming the new president and Shackleford the VP.

Voters request to know what the new board’s plans are for improving the County’s standing with the quality of K-12 education for math, reading, science, and other subjects, and correcting remaining problems at the new grade school contractors have not fixed.

Why not publishing monthly progress reports to cover the new board’s accomplishments? That job would be a good assignment for the new president.

By Voters Watching on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

There is no mention of the facts Jumpin Jim defaulted on a 9 million dollar loan, poor record of paying taxes, nor the mess of the RISE flood funds handling. 

No wonder the poor score.  Anyone think it was ‘earned’?

By Jumpin Jim Nose Dives on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Low favorable marks for Manchin, Morrisey, Justice in latest PPP poll'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

This news has great implications for GSC and Gilmer County. The College could form a partnership with the County’s school system to close the K-12 achievement gap.

For years while under State intervention it was denied that a gap existed, and the mantra was that the County was doing as well as the State as a whole.

That was like saying that we are OK with the State being ranked near the bottom for the quality of its K-12 education system and we should be content to wallow at the bottom too.

Ms. Patty Lowther, the new superintendent of schools, states that we must close the K-12 achievement gap and it is within the County’s capabilities.

She and her staff including Shelly Mason the new curriculum expert, principals, and the County’s teachers are actively involved with devising solutions to eliminate problems.

Regarding GSC, Dr. Pellett is on record with definite innovations to improve the College’s standing.

He has an unique opportunity to guide the College to contribute to Gilmer County having the best school system in WV as a model to emulate throughout the State and Appalachia.

In the past the typical Charleston trap has been to collect achievement data without expending successful efforts to interpret its meaning for use in solving under-achievement.

Dr. Pellett, Ms. Lowther, and Shelly Mason, with the help of other professionals in our schools can jettison that long standing road block to make Gilmer County a K-12 education standout.

Dr. Pellett in particular has an unparalleled opportunity to make his mark on guiding the College to improve K-12 education in the County and to let successes spread as examples throughout Appalachia.

There would not be a better way to justify the necessity of the College’s continuing existence for Gilmer County, central WV, and the entire State.

By Good News For WV on 06.29.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

If you can’t trust judges to do the right thing…. is there any reason to trust our whole system of government?  One has to wonder.

Now we are reading a judge likely to be impeached as well as the legislature is considering impeaching the governor?

Are the any honest people running for offices?

By crooks everywhere? on 06.27.2018

From the entry: 'Auditors Seek Answers on State Supreme Court Spending'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

This does not rise to the level of impeachment. “Slick Willy” got a head job in the peoples oval office, and dripped semen on the peoples carpet then lied about it, and according to the democrats back then, that did not rise to the level of impeachment.

By The Silent Majority on 06.21.2018

From the entry: 'Senate and House Democratic Leaders Renew Call for Immediate Legislative Action on Justice Loughry'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Something happening is good.
That building has been empty far too long.

Now we shall see if it workable.
Hope for all involved, that their efforts work out for GC and GSC.

By Good on 06.21.2018

From the entry: 'GSC Bluegrass Music Education Center to hold Ribbon Cutting Ceremony'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Numbers of new businesses is not the important factor. It is how many new jobs were created for local employees. Politicians like to cite meaningless numbers to crow about and they get by with it too often. Empty store fronts on Main Street have not diminished in numbers. Where are the jobs and what do they pay?

By New Jobs? on 06.20.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Similar to EDA if Gilmer’s SAT results were rosy the news would be out in banner headlines. Elites see to it to keep peasants at bay.

By SAT Checker on 06.19.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Straddlin Joe had a chance to embrace conservatism and convert to Republican, as Governor Justice and much of the state has done. Politics in the state are no longer ruled by mine union bosses. It’s time we send him back to Marion County, as we did with Natalie Tennant.

By The Silent Majority on 06.18.2018

From the entry: 'Joe Manchin: Political games would cost West Virginians with pre-existing conditions'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

If the so called business creation were true?
Wouldn’t the EDA be having all sorts of news releases?
You would think so.

EDA used to have monthly public meetings.
Now only four times a year?

Business things that slim nothing to discuss?
Or maybe secret meetings by the insiders?

By Gilmer EDA...private club ? on 06.15.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

If we can ask Jeff Campbell questions as a Gilmer County official why can’t we get timely information from other officials too?

For an example how did the County do with recent SAT testing?

Superintendents have the information so when is it going to be made public?

Hopefully the newly elected school board will take it on as a priority to get accurate student achievement information to the public with specific plans to make improvements where needed.

By End Public Information Embargo on 06.13.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

If true, this would be great news!

The Gilmer County Economic Development Association should be telling us in press releases who/what/where those new businesses are?

How about it GCEDA President Jeff Campbell?

Lets hear from you.

By reader6 on 06.11.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Interesting chart.

But….it shows 4 new businesses in Gilmer…..in each of the past 3 months.
That…..is TWELVE new businesses!

BUT, BUT, where are they?

By Where are they? on 06.08.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

You will find most ticks down low on grass blades along well traveled trails, where the unfed adults and even larvae and eggs are brushed off by a passing varmint. Another myth is that ticks will jump on you, of the thousands of ticks I have picked off grass blades and dropped in a cup of gasoline, I have never had one jump at me.

By Trespasser Will on 06.08.2018

From the entry: 'Insect-related illnesses are trending up'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Ticks don’t go, they are carried there by host animals. They are best controlled by controlling the host varmints in your back yard. As bad as Lyme disease is, from personal experience, believe me you don’t want Rocky Mountain spotted fever either.

By Trespasser Will on 06.07.2018

From the entry: 'Insect-related illnesses are trending up'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

NEWS FLASH !
Rural West Virginia is STILL WAITING for that high speed internet that these two have been promising for 20 years!

By Rural WV still waiting.... on 06.06.2018

From the entry: 'U.S. Senators Manchin, Capito announce funding for rural communities'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Dilapidated buildings seem to make the news on a regular basis.

Dilapidated buildings are nothing more than an great indicator of a ‘dilapidated’ economy.

By WV's dilapidated economy on 06.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

I don’t know how the state can say that, male bears have been known to attack for unknown reasons, and of course females will attack if they perceive their cub is in danger. The best thing to do is shut the #### up and don’t be posting on Facebook what you have done.

By Tresspasser Will on 06.03.2018

From the entry: 'West Virginia man accused of wrongfully shooting bear'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Steve and John,
My deepest heartfelt sympathy to you at this most difficult time.
I will miss your mother, my best friend, immensely! We laughed hard together and we cried together, only as two close cousins could do! We spent many hours on the phone chatting either catching up or talking about cooking, any hour day or night,it never mattered to us.

Our words to each other every time we spoke, “I love you sweet cousin of mine”

God’s Speed until we meet again!💞💓
Rest In Peace for eternity💓

Love you dearly,

Cousin, Jo Ann xoxoxo

By Jo Ann Emrick on 06.01.2018

From the entry: 'Catherine Ann Umanetz'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The loss of money at Cedar Creek was only part of it. Money spent on Leading Creek, more money to fill the huge hole at GCES, money to fix land slide at GCES because of poor site design work, money spent to fix various other botches that should have been done right to begin with, uncalled for huge pay raises to select central office staff to buy them off, money for playground equipment when existing equipment could have been used, money for an unneeded payroll clerk at the central office, money for a principal at Troy when the individual did not do the work, and more to include building GCES too small and Leading Creek too large with public funds. Will anything be done about it? Of course not except to continue the cover-up. Money trail too hot to handle.

By Etched Memory on 05.31.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Many kudos to both the PACF people as well as their supporters!

Hard to believe how much good they are doing for so many, in just a few short years!

Keep up the good works!

By many kudos ! on 05.31.2018

From the entry: 'Grants Support Area Charities (Little Kanawha Area)'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Minney was just another ‘enabler’ for the blatant, bold faced, incompetent, corruption during the West Virginia State Board of Education overthrow of the Gilmer County School System.

Thousands of dollars wasted.  Do not forget the Cedar Creek property chosen by State Appointed Superintendent Blankenship in coercion with the former, ousted, GSC President Simmons.  The money spent clearing forest, the money spent bulldozing a road, until it finally became clear, they were on a ‘fools errand’.

Then to get out of that mess, Blankenship and Simmons,  trade that property, so a school could be built in a flood plain?

‘Education’ and common sense do not always go hand in hand.

If only people were as smart as they think they are.

By Another black eye for state intervention ! on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

All this Minney stuff brings up at least 2 questions:

WHY did state appointed super Devano hire Minney?

Why did the Doddridge folks hire Minney when he doesn’t have the required financial ‘credentials’ to be a district treasurer?

Either poor hiring practices or someone pulling strings.

By questions but no answers ? on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

And to think that OUR own little Gilmer County Library ranks in the top ten of libraries in the whole state!

By WOW--WOW--WOW ! ! ! on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'West Virginia Libraries Rock Out with Summer Reading Programs'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Didn’t Mr. Minney approve paying select employees on payroll, for the days they did not work without board or superintendent’s knowledge or approval? Fortunately, he got caught by the board.

By Ridiculous on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

If you follow the money, you can easily see where all the money went in construction of Gilmer Elementary, why the school has so many physical issues and why there have been problems to get them fixed. Thanks the board for choosing a different auditor.

By FTM on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

There were a lot of corruptions under state control and superintendent Devano. They mismanaged funds and paid off several employees to keep their mouth shut. When the local controlled board chose a different auditor from the norm, they got caught. I think the remaining paid off employees need to talk the facts, quit, or get prosecuted.

By They were bad on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

That was far from the first time Mr. DM had gotten into trouble with the auditors. In previous years, findings for mismanagement of funds were issued against him in connection with other work places leading to dismissal.
The audit which is available on state DOE site couldn’t find any justification of board approval for payments, and mismanagement of funds.

By Don LK on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

He got caught of mismanagement of public funds.

By Jeremy D on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

I hear Gilmer schools treasurer Dan Minney is leaving. Why?

By Just Curious on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Good to see this program return after having it gone missing under the state appointed superintendent.

It was reported there was no place for it to take place.

Thank you Gilmer County Board of Education for making it happen.

By Some remember on 05.21.2018

From the entry: 'FREE breakfast and lunch this summer for Gilmer County Kids'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Pam,
Sorry to read of your mom’s passing. I remember may times spent in your home with your parents and brothers. Sending love and prayers to you and your brothers.
Sherry Broggi

By Sherry Straley Broggi and Rita Straley on 05.17.2018

From the entry: 'Lora Faye Tomblin'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Really cool project to all who volunteered and those helping financially as well!

Where’s DR? He never misses these events?

By Very nice project - great volunteers! on 05.17.2018

From the entry: 'CommunityImprovement™: Pavilion'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The GSC retention post must relate to those beginning in 2014 who planned for 4 year degrees and they dropped out. There probably were students who began in 2014 and they earned 2 year degrees before 2018 so they were not drop outs.

By GSC RETENTION? on 05.15.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Congratulations kids!  Setting up a scholarship fund is a GREAT idea! Where can we get information on who to contact and what local needs are?

By Reader on 05.14.2018

From the entry: 'Calhoun-Gilmer Career Center Celebrates Seniors'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

How large was GSC’s graduating class of 2018 last week and what was its original size the fall of 2014?

Accurate information should be available to indicate retention. One news source reported that 100 graduated in the class of 2018.

By Alumni on 05.13.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Some interesting results.  Should shake the trees a little.

By Spring cleaning! on 05.09.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Local Election Results - May 2018'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

So sorry for your loss.  Prayers.

By Betty Woofter on 05.07.2018

From the entry: 'Ina Mae (Foster) Clem'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Anyone interested in facts for graduation rates after four years of college can access information on WV’s Education Policy Commission web site.

The last time information was reported WV State was listed at 13.6% compared to WVU’s at 35.9%. GSC was at 25.1%.

Comments submitted so far flag a serious problem in WV. Student achievement information is scattered all over with it being reported by the State, the federal government, and testing organizations including ACT.

Because WV lacks an effective State clearing house to sort through the information and to interpret it for practical application in improving our pubic school systems, too much important quality control material is neglected.

When citizens take initiative to obtain the information and they cite it they are often berated to be a form of “attack the messenger”.

Then too there are the perennial apologists who say that everything is “just fine” to help confuse the issue even more to detract from school improvements.

By WVDE Career Employees on 05.06.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Too often students have to go an extra year or longer to graduate from college with under graduate degrees because they were not prepared when they got there to enable them to complete on time.

The 35% graduation rate includes incoming freshmen who do not finish in four years, and it is factual that some of our public colleges have worse records than others.

WVU does above average, but it has large numbers of-out-of state better prepared students.

By R. Page on 05.06.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Rex Page claims we have a college graduation rate of approximately 35%.

In essence that is a FAILURE rate of 65% !

Think of how many dollars are wasted, and how many students are burdened with student loans, that basically will do them little good in life.

Oh yes.  It does pump money into the flawed system.

By Wv Has a FLAWED educational system ! on 05.05.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Even with enrolling in colleges where acceptance is noncompetitive, meaning that all applicants with at least C averages are accepted, the graduation rate to get a degree is around 35%.

This fact is more evidence for WV’s failed public education system and solid proof that a major top to bottom over haul is needed.

If we accept the often cited excuse that there is a problem with kids and their families to cause under achievement in school that line of reasoning suggests that West Virginians are inherently flawed. This is untrue and the problem lies with WV’s under performing education system.

By Rex Page on 05.03.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Disgraceful that WV lacks a top quality education system to prepare more high school graduates to be eligible for acceptance into the best colleges where there is competition for acceptance.

The deficiency forces students to attend lower tier places where everyone is accepted.

Why does WV fail to make improvements? It is because education delivery in our State is designed to be void of meaningful accountability for administrators.

By WVDE Watcher on 05.03.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Little doubt the block schedule system at the high school gives GC lower scores.

This has been proven over and over in other school systems.

Its an out dated and antiquated system.  Our board of education needs to get rid of it.

Gilmer County Board of Education….are you up to the job?

By Block Schedule Supported By Blockheads on 05.02.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Hopefully this is the beginning of doing better with getting out school news to Gilmer. It is far better to read timely news than to have to go to the Cornerstone to get it.

We wish Mr. Shuff the best in improving learning results at the HS. If he tackles problems like he engaged in athletics the HS will be put on the map for academic excellence.

When he gets his school improvement plan together everyone in the County will pitch in to help him succeed. Thank you GCBOE.

By Pleased Parents on 05.02.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Mr. Williams has it nailed down.  Solid.

America’s entire education system is a farce.
Education administrators worry about their job than worry about the children.

Youth is our future.
By creating dummies, do not expect much of a future.

The children are being short changed, robbed.
America is being short changed, robbed.

But the failed administrators keep their jobs.

By Time To Clean the Education House! on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Is this article some sort of a joke ?
Certainly would seem so!

We are almost daily bombarded with chemical spraying from above.
We rarely actually have that clear, deep blue sky that God gave us.

If it happens we do get a clear(?) day, we will have the light blue, almost whispy white cloud sky.

Set a white bowl out in the rains.  Check to see what color the water is after a rain.  You will be
surprised.  Color will vary depending what is being sprayed on a given day.

If it were winter, I’d tell you to look at the snowflakes.  No more are all snowflakes different.  Watch what falls on your clothing, you will see 1,000’s of flakes all the same shape.  Again, depends what toxic material we are being blasted with.

Asthma attacks, ER visits are on the rise.
Do some web searching, plenty of websites report this travesty.  You tax dollars at ‘work’.

By WHERE ARE THE ENVIRONMENTALISTS ? ? on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Air Quality Awareness Week is April 30 – May 04'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Fraud is not only rampant in education, it consumes Gilmer County..  Those who Have want to keep it any and all costs, and those that don’t, want.  Gilmer needs a good house cleaning of court and legal ‘authorities’ as well if anything is Ever going to change.

By Spring cleaning! on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Fraud is committed in Gilmer County when citizens are told that our high school grads are prepared to be highly competitive for entry into the modern world.

The misinformation conflicts with verification that our grads lag when it comes to being college and career ready.

By being disadvantaged academically too many students drop out of college when they cannot compete and they often must go an extra year at a greater expense to catch-up.

There is another type of fraud not pointed out in the posting. It relates to bragging about the “fine” ACT test scores made by students at the GCHS.

For the ACT the average GCHS score as touted by school officials is close to 20. This may be slightly higher than average State scores, but here is the rub.

Our kids could not get accepted into top quality colleges and universities with stringent academic requirements to include those for ACT scores higher than most made at the GCHS.

What do they do? They attend institutions with relaxed acceptance criteria with some not having any basic requirements for ACT or SAT scores.

As a parent with a son at the Career Center I know that there must be remedial instruction in math and English for success in chosen career fields. It is called embedded instruction.

Because teachers must be hired at the Center for the catch-up it means that tax payers are paying twice (more fraud) for instruction that should have been done at the GCHS!

What can we do? Gilmer County must determine what must be done in our schools to make necessary improvements for the better to enable our kids to be the best they can be after HS. Simple isn’t it?

By We Want Better Schools on 04.30.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

It is easy to see through the motive for avoiding application of the same assessment approach in all of WV’s school systems.

The powerful in control do not want to make achievement results available for voters to compare academic results among districts!

That way opportunities for more accountability in ways school systems are administered will be nipped in the bud.

Interesting isn’t it that for sports minute attention is paid to comparing performances of all kinds of teams throughout WV.

Unfortunately the strategy will be to keep voters keenly focused on sports so they will not ask questions about education spending and how children are doing in mastering subjects in our school systems.

By WVDOE Disgusted on 04.20.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: State might let counties switch standardized test from SAT to ACT'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The West Virginia State Board of Education has operated as a “pin the tail on the donkey” bureaucratic nightmare for over a generation.

Currently, it is hard to envision any positive change in their SOP?

Try this, try that.  Change this, change that.
Continual evidence that all is being run as an experiment?
The WVBOE has no real clue what to actually do, in order to fix anything.

Money wasted. Children cheated of a good education.
Parents and taxpayers cheated.  Opportunities missed.

This is the WVBOE legacy.

By State BOE - dysfunctional is an understatement? on 04.16.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: State might let counties switch standardized test from SAT to ACT'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Maybe Jimmy can pay some of his tax bills now?

By Justice, pay your tax bills! on 04.15.2018

From the entry: 'City to purchase club owned by the governor’s company'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Reread the article and see what a wonderful set of excuses have been set forward.

Taxpayers give the state the funds for education.  It is then properly squandered leaving students with substandard educations.

These people have the audacity to blame the teachers on top of it.

State BOE, suck it up, fix the problem you and your previous board members have created. 

Make President Truman’s desk saying your motto:  “The buck stops here.“

That is, if you are up to it.

By Kanawha Reader on 04.15.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

West Virginia made national news again with its spending per student to be in the top third among the 55 states.

We spend more than $11,000 on average per pupil in our public schools. For comparison Utah spends about $6,500 per pupil and it ranks in the top third for the quality of its education system.

It would be interesting to know how much Gilmer County spends per pupil counting total funding from all sources.

WV is certainly no way near the top third with getting students college, career, and jobs ready right out of high school. Where is all our money going? What could we learn from rural states similar to Utah?

The worst culprit seems to be too many high paid people on WV payrolls who are non-contributers to making better lives for our kids.

By Economist on 04.14.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Those of us who keep close tabs on student achievement want to know reasons for unacceptable reading, science, and math scores in Gilmer County and what is being done to correct them. For something this important the problems and solutions surely have been looked into.

By R. A. Beasley on 04.14.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

HaHaHaHaHaHaHa!

By Don't bring them to Gilmer! on 04.13.2018

From the entry: 'NEW “ALMOST HEAVEN” CAMPAIGN'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

No matter what is going on in the State our concern is Gilmer County. The State reports on Zoom that 10th graders at the GCHS perform at the 35.9% proficiency rate for science.

Proficiency for 11th graders is 37% in math and it is commendable that the rate for them for reading is 64%.

What is being done to make improvements for science and math when students are about ready to graduate from HS? We hope that scores for reading hold up and even improve.

Why do we fail to receive updates for plans for proficiency improvements in the County’s schools?

In other WV counties superintendents provide that type of information on a routine basis.

By GCHS Parents on 04.12.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Click on the map below to see the information on Free Press Readers
The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVIII The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved