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Most WV Counties Show higher unemployment in November 2018

The Free Press WV

A majority of the state’s 55 counties showed an increase in unemployment in November.

According to to county jobless numbers released Friday by WorkForce West Virginia, 26 counties had an increase in joblessness last month, 21 counties showed a decrease while eight counties remained the same.

The counties with the highest unemployment last month were McDowell (9.2), Calhoun (8.8) and Wyoming (8.0) counties.

The county with the lowest unemployment rate was Jefferson County (2.9).

WorkForce West Virginia released the overall state unemployment rate for November, 4.6 percent, last week.

That was unchanged from October.

EQT Students of Excellence Scholarship 2018 Recipients

The Free Press WV

EQT Foundation, the philanthropic arm of EQT Corporation, is proud to announce the 2018 EQT Students of Excellence Scholarship recipients.

The accomplished students come from both large and small schools across West Virginia.

As an integrated energy company with an emphasis on Appalachian-area natural gas production, EQT has awarded $1,000 scholarships for one student from West Virginia counties, four at-large $1,000 scholarships scattered throughout the state, as well as six “full-ride” four-year scholarships, each up to $18,000 per year, to students interested in studying engineering, geology, computer science/information technology, energy or land management and environmental or safety science.


The “full-ride” scholarship winners are:

  • Tylee Oldham - Hurricane High School in Putnam County
  • Brooke Burns - Scott High School in Boone County
  • Catherine Stodola - Herbert Hoover High School in Kanawha County
  • Lian Dunlevy - Morgantown High School in Monongalia County
  • Justin Lovell - Shady Spring High School in Raleigh County
  • Safa Afnan - George Washington High School in Kanawha County


The $1000 scholarship winner’s are:

  • Zoe Payne - Barbour County
  • Victoria Parello - Berkeley County
  • Kayla Hartsell - Boone County
  • Michael Lemon - Braxton County
  • Abigail Nickerson - Brooke County
  • John Swanson - Cabell County
  • Megan Meadows - Calhoun County
  • Michael Willis - Clay County
  • Emily Spadafore - Doddridge County
  • Mason Harp - Fayette County
  • Kaylene Snyder - Gilmer County
  • Megan Kite - Grant County
  • Kara Vaughan - Greenbrier County
  • Della Moreland - Hampshire County
  • Chloe Molish - Hancock County
  • Aden Funkhouser - Hardy County
  • Hayley Woods - Harrison County
  • Brandon Cochran - Jackson County
  • Haya Moushmoush - Kanawha County
  • Kenton Linger - Lewis County
  • Lillian Lucas - Lincoln County
  • Elijah McComas - Logan County
  • Kristine Waddell - Marion County
  • Lydia Knutsen - Marshall County
  • Allison Henderson - Mason County
  • Hailey Mitchem - McDowell County
  • Trey Lennox-Kowalewski - Mercer County
  • Kyle Breedlove - Mineral County
  • Hannah Vorndran - Monongalia County
  • Chandler Mills - Monroe County
  • Logan Riffey - Morgan County
  • Anna Hamilton - Nicholas County
  • Norman Lee - Ohio County
  • Claire Heavner - Pendleton County
  • Laci Hashman - Pleasants County
  • Mathias Solliday - Pocahontas County
  • Henry Cerbone - Preston County
  • Olivia Hart - Putnam County
  • Victoria Mackowiak - Raleigh County
  • Susan Riggleman - Randolph County
  • Nikita Collins - Ritchie County
  • Dylan Hammack - Roane County
  • Marcella Aguilar - Summers County
  • Amy Frosch - Taylor County
  • Matthew Dellinger - Tucker County
  • JoLee Walton - Tyler County
  • Logan Whithair - Upshur County
  • Nicholas Bowen - Wayne County
  • Erin Kidd - Webster County
  • Hannah Loy - Wetzel County
  • Sara Almashy - Wirt County
  • Josie Brothers - Wood County
  • Myleigh Stewart - Wyoming County


The “At Large” $1000 recipients are:

  • Noah Sampson - Monongalia County
  • Davis Warmuth - Ohio County
  • Eric Hamilton - Kanawha County
  • Jay Wessels - Kanawha County.

A total of 345 high school students from across West Virginia was nominated by teachers, principals, guidance counselors, family members and the students themselves. A team of volunteer judges were then tasked with the difficult responsibility of choosing the “best of the best.” The judges looked for students who demonstrated strong academic performance and who participated in community service and extracurricular activities.

The scholarship program which is presented in cooperation with NCWV Media and The State Journal, has grown each year since EQT became the title sponsor in 2009.

An awards event where all the recipients will be recognized will take place in March at the State Capitol in Charleston. The date and time of the event will be announced in January

Hunters in West Virginia harvested 44,572 bucks during the traditional buck firearms season

The Free Press WV

Preliminary data collected from the electronic game checking system indicates that deer hunters in West Virginia harvested 44,572 antlered deer during the two-week buck firearms season which ran from November 19 through December 01, 2018, according to Gary Foster, assistant chief of Game Management with the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Section.

The 2018 harvest was 1 percent higher than the 2017 harvest.

The top 10 counties for buck harvest in 2018 were: Randolph (1,685), Preston (1,607), Greenbrier (1,479), Hampshire (1,471), Jackson (1,379), Pendleton (1,274), Grant (1,217), Hardy (1,212), Kanawha (1,212) and Mason (1,206).

The buck harvest increased in the eastern panhandle (DNR District 2) and in southwestern West Virginia (DNR District 5) and was similar to or slightly down in the remainder of the state.

Deer hunters have several days of opportunity left this year, including the remainder of the archery and crossbow seasons, which run through December 31.

Muzzleloader deer season will open December 10 and remain open through December 16.

The Youth, Class Q/QQ and Class XS deer season for antlerless deer will be open December 26-27 in any county with a firearms deer season.

This will be followed by the reopening of Class N/NN antlerless deer season on December 28-31 in specified counties or portions of counties.

In addition, the new primitive weapons “Mountaineer Heritage Season” will be open during the period from January 10-13, 2019.

Refer to the 2018–2019 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Summary or visit the DNR website at www.wvdnr.gov for additional details as well as county and area listings.


West Virginia Buck Firearms Season Harvest, 2014-2018

County

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Barbour

886

1,281

1,098

984

958

Brooke

251

286

268

175

188

Hancock

200

208

209

157

139

Harrison

930

1,418

1,138

1,017

887

Marion

702

1,190

765

735

677

Marshall

707

818

727

624

637

Monongalia

689

1,023

827

825

750

Ohio

232

290

270

180

197

Preston

1,526

2,046

1,774

1,947

1,607

Taylor

453

732

581

485

491

Tucker

494

783

730

817

754

Wetzel

891

1,144

899

823

676

District 1 Subtotal

7,961

11,219

9,286

8,769

7,961

Berkeley

522

908

737

753

757

Grant

783

1,304

954

1,194

1,217

Hampshire

1,094

1,947

1,197

1,386

1,471

Hardy

920

1,709

1,076

1,198

1,212

Jefferson

385

499

422

419

463

Mineral

835

1,335

922

1,011

1,051

Morgan

412

678

437

503

621

Pendleton

861

1,297

1,088

1,018

1,274

District 2 Subtotal

5,812

9,677

6,833

7,482

8,066

Braxton

921

1,660

1,102

1,233

1,017

Clay

329

618

390

481

438

Lewis

1,166

1,875

1,246

1,216

999

Nicholas

871

1,274

1,044

987

1,060

Pocahontas

831

1,008

921

1,040

988

Randolph

1,291

1,659

1,617

1,633

1,685

Upshur

1,009

1,704

1,399

1,025

1,155

Webster

632

1,080

941

777

937

District 3 Subtotal

7,050

10,878

8,660

8,392

8,279

Fayette

725

1,214

889

927

997

Greenbrier

1,372

1,816

1,447

1,628

1,479

McDowell

0

0

0

 

0

Mercer

402

843

636

593

617

Monroe

1,004

1,462

1,099

1,295

1,189

Raleigh

506

895

648

592

623

Summers

657

999

657

809

701

Wyoming

0

0

0

 

0

District 4 Subtotal

4,666

7,229

5,376

5,844

5,606

Boone

519

868

573

658

672

Cabell

421

641

677

404

642

Kanawha

730

1,547

1,058

1,046

1,212

Lincoln

720

1,312

846

569

957

Logan

0

0

0

 

0

Mason

1,002

1,488

1,267

867

1,206

Mingo

0

0

0

 

0

Putnam

565

1,114

992

624

942

Wayne

528

963

815

448

736

District 5 Subtotal

4,485

7,933

6,228

4,616

6,367

Calhoun

504

1,063

705

740

698

Doddridge

615

1,376

946

947

659

Gilmer

669

1,435

791

875

800

Jackson

1,107

1,870

1,487

1,096

1,379

Pleasants

273

492

334

317

280

Ritchie

1,123

2,024

1,422

1,338

1,065

Roane

927

1,846

1,178

1,186

1,177

Tyler

566

1,064

855

817

566

Wirt

681

1,152

777

734

668

Wood

1,011

1,556

1,193

974

1,001

District 6 Subtotal

7,476

13,878

9,688

9,024

8,293

State Total

37,450

60,814

46,071

44,127

44,572

2019 REAP Recycling Assistance Grants

The Free Press WV

Governor Jim Justice and West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s (WVDEP) Cabinet Secretary Austin Caperton today announced grants totaling over $2 million to 37 recipients through the WVDEP’s Rehabilitation Environmental Action Plan (REAP) Recycling Assistance Grants program.

Grants were awarded to state solid waste authorities, county commissions, municipalities, private industries, nonprofit organizations, and educational institutions.

Funding for the Recycling Assistance Grant Program is generated through the $1 assessment fee per ton of solid waste disposed at in-state landfills and is pursuant to WV Code 22-15A-19(h) (1).

“Congratulations to all of this year’s recipients,” said Gov. Jim Justice. “There’s no doubt in my mind that West Virginia is by far the most beautiful state and these folks are working hard to keep it that way.”

“People are eager to recycle what they can and we are all working together to make it easier for them to do that,” said WVDEP Cabinet Secretary Austin Caperton. “WVDEP is always happy to work with organizations like these recipients who share in our environmental mission.”

Grant recipients include:


BERKELEY COUNTY

Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority $99,000.00
To assist with improvements of brush containment area, yard waste, concrete pad, purchase of tractor trailers, tires, maintenance, and gravel for the county-wide recycling program.

BOONE COUNTY

D & D Recycling $27,505.50 To assist with the purchase of a can densifier, box truck maintenance, concrete for the lot, and a fork truck engine for the recycling operation.


CABELL COUNTY

Cabell County Solid Waste Authority $30,280.00
To assist with personnel, fuel for recycling truck, and equipment insurance for the county-wide program.

Goodwill Industries of KYOWVA $63,202.99
To assist with personnel, recycling conference, vertical baler, utilities, truck wrap, fuel, and operational supplies and equipment for the recycling operation.

Marshall University Sustainability Department $74,800.80
To assist with personnel, compost shredder, outdoor recycling containers, indoor compost containers and composting bags for the campus-wide recycling program.


CLAY COUNTY

Clay Recycling $74,992.08
To assist with the purchase of a forklift, mobile yard ramp, horizontal baler, utilities and operational supplies for the recycling operation.

Salisbury Auto Salvage $7,572.00
To assist with the purchase of a cardboard shredder perforator and dust collection system with bags, sorting table, and a used electric forklift for the recycling operation.


GRANT COUNTY

Region VIII Solid Waste Authority $55,000.00
To assist with the purchase of a skid steer loader with fork attachment and construction of a loading dock for the regional recycling program.


GREENBRIER COUNTY

Greenbrier County Solid Waste Authority $150,000.00
To assist with the purchase of a metal building for the county-wide program.

Greenworks Recycling $68,906.35
To assist with the purchase of a work truck, tilt trailers, utility trailers, truck bed liner, truck rack and educational brochure for the recycling operation.


HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

Hampshire County Commission $38,000.00
To assist with personnel and recycling cardboard containers for the county-wide program.


JACKSON COUNTY

Jackson County Solid Waste Authority $75,016.00
To assist with personnel, fuel for the vehicles, tires, building utilities, forklift truck modification, maintenance and repairs to equipment and vehicles, operating supplies, and insurance for vehicle and equipment for the county-wide program.


KANAWHA COUNTY

Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha and Putnam $62,066.00
To assist with the purchase of a truck, truck wrap, and insurance for the recycling operation.

Kanawha County Solid Waste Authority $122,565.00
To assist with personnel, domed roll-offs, operational supplies, equipment maintenance, pole building, fuel for recycling truck, and equipment insurance for the county-wide program.

Recycling Coalition of West Virginia $49,500.00
To assist with printing, website costs, delivery and insertion of West Virginia Recycles Day
Educational newspaper inserts, and advertising of Recycling Coalition activities statewide.


LINCOLN COUNTY

Lincoln County Solid Waste Authority $60,787.50
To assist with compartmentalized recycling bins, transportation costs for recyclables, personnel, insurance for containers, newspaper advertising, recycling bin lettering, brochure printing and educational conference expenses for the county-wide program.


MERCER COUNTY

Mercer County Commission $24,511.00
To assist with personnel, fuel and maintenance for recycling truck and trailers, recycling stations, and recycling liners for the county-wide program.

Mercer County Solid Waste Authority $150,000.00
To assist with personnel and a public sorting facility for the county-wide program.


MONROE COUNTY

Monroe County Solid Waste Authority $25,360.00
To assist with public water to the facility, installation of an approved septic system and personnel for the county-wide program.


MONONGALIA COUNTY

Mon County Habitat for Humanity $8,676.72
To assist with a new paint recycling program including equipment, supplies and training for the recycling operation.

PACE Enterprises of West Virginia $59,400.00
To assist with personnel, operational supplies and vehicle expenses for the recycling operation.


MORGAN COUNTY

Morgan County Solid Waste Authority $18,274.00
To assist with personnel, operational supplies, education trifolds and advertising for the county-wide program.


PENDLETON COUNTY

North Fork Disposal $16,560.00
To assist with the purchase of a recycling baler for the recycling operation.


PUTNAM COUNTY

West Virginia Cashin Recyclables $55,300.00
To assist with purchase of a destoner separation system for the recycling operation.


RALEIGH COUNTY

City of Beckley $50,000.00
To assist with the purchase of a recycling packer truck for the city-wide program.

Beckley Waste Paper $50,000.00
To assist with the purchase of a used recycling truck for the recycling operation.

Raleigh County Solid Waste Authority $95,018.91
To assist with a continuous ridge ventilator, skid steer loader, recycling closed top boxes, fork lift, skid steer tires and recycling tilt trucks/carts for the county-wide program.


RANDOLOPH COUNTY

Ambassador Ministries $52,284.00
To assist with the purchase of a walk behind stacker fork lift, floor pallet jack, advertising, covered cargo trailer, personnel costs, vehicle fuel and vehicle insurance and operational supplies for the recycling operation.

Randolph County Recycling Center $55,100.00
To assist with fuel for vehicles, bailing wire, trailer, insurance for equipment, skid steer and attachments for the recycling operation.


RITCHIE COUNTY

Ritchie County Solid Waste Authority $30,150.00
To assist with loading dock safety railing installation and repairs, gravel, equipment maintenance, fuel, used baler, safety equipment, office supplies, building and fence maintenance, signage and utilities for the county-wide program.


SUMMERS COUNTY

Summers County Commission $18,280.00
To assist with personnel, annual recycling conference, vehicle fuel and maintenance, and deskside bins for the county-wide program.


UPSHUR COUNTY

City of Buckhannon $50,000.00
To assist with the purchase of a hook-lift recycling truck for the city-wide program.


WAYNE COUNTY

Wayne County Commission $17,860.00
To assist with installation of new fencing and a concrete pad for the county-wide program.

Wayne County Solid Waste Authority $20,268.00
To fund personnel, fuel, utilities, maintenance, repairs, and office supplies for the county-wide program.


WETZEL COUNTY

Zanesville Welfare Organization and Goodwill Industries $20,000.00
To assist with the purchase of a used forklift for the recycling operation.


WOOD COUNTY

City of Parkersburg $119,000.00
To assist with the purchase of a recycling truck, bailing wire, asphalt for the recycling center, shelter for tire storage, personnel, 14-gallon recycling bins, conveyor repair, splicing tools, and forklift tires for the ongoing program.


WYOMING COUNTY

Wyoming County Board of Education $26,637.00
To assist with the purchase of a hydraulic dumping trailer, recycling bags, student environmental steward scholarships, personnel, travel to conference, fuel for recycling vehicles, educational outreach exhibit supplies, and printing costs for the county schools recycling program.

WV: New Business Growth for October 2018

The Free Press WV

Summers County led in new business growth for October 2018 with a total of 10 new businesses, according to the West Virginia Secretary of State’s Office.

That equates to a 2.36 percent growth.

The Secretary of State’s Business & Licensing Division reported Upshur, Barbour, Wetzel and Calhoun counties also had notable growth in October.

The number of business entities in Upshur County grew from 1,198 to 1,220, with Barbour County business entities increasing from 540 to 549.

Wetzel County experienced an increase in business entities from 512 to 520 and Calhoun County went from 183 to 186 business entities.

Statewide, West Virginia saw a 10.65 percent growth in business registrations in the previous 12-month period.

That growth was led by Summers County with 17.75 percent growth.

Wirt, Jackson, Berkeley and Braxton counties followed. Wirt County saw a 14.57 percent growth,

Jackson County saw a 13.99 percent growth,

Berkeley County saw a 12.41 percent growth and Braxton County saw a 11.94 percent growth in the previous 12-month period.

To review the county-by-county business growth click HERE.

September was National Voter Registration Month: In WV 5,002 New Registrations in Just One Month

The Free Press WV

Since 2002, September has been recognized as National Voter Registration Month throughout the United States.  National Voter Registration Month is a program sponsored in part by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS).

West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner is very pleased to announce that during the month of September county clerks registered 5,002 citizens to vote.  All 55 counties registered new voters in September.  A county-by-county breakdown is attached.

“I am very pleased regarding the partnership with our county clerks to register eligible citizens to vote,” Secretary Warner said. “Not only is it important to maintain updated voter registration files, but we must be equally diligent in our efforts to encourage eligible citizens to register to vote.”

National Voter Registration Month for 2018 was an active one for Warner and his office.  More than 30 organized voter registration drives took place in communities throughout the state.  Voter registration drives were hosted by numerous high schools during September.

During National Voter Registration Day on September 25th, Warner attended high school voter registration drives in Cabell, Putnam and Kanawha Counties.  Miss Teen International 2018 Georgia Clark and West Virginia Curator Randall Reid-Smith joined Warner.  Clark is a resident of Alabama and attends college at Troy University. Her platform as Miss Teen International is civic engagement of young people throughout the country.

For more information on how to register to vote or to check your current voter registration go to www.GoVoteWV.com.

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

Welcome Back to School and College - Students, Teacher, and Staff - 2018-2019

The Gilmer Free Press
The Gilmer Free Press
The Gilmer Free Press



The Gilmer Free Press
The Gilmer Free Press
The Gilmer Free Press

Attendance Maaters

The Free Press WV

WVDEP’s REAP Program Announces More Than $85,000 in Litter Control Grants

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) has announced the recipients of the fiscal year 2019 Rehabilitation Environmental Action Plan (REAP) Litter Control Matching Grants.

The 31 recipients were approved for $85,117.72 in grant funding. Funding for the litter control program is generated through civil penalties imposed on litter violations, as well as state agency facility recycling revenue as described in West Virginia Code §22-15A-4 and §22-15A-5.

Town of Anmoore: $2,500.00
The funding will be used for litter and recycling triple unit receptacles for the town parks.

Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority: $3,000.00
The funding will be used for “No Littering” signage for the county-wide litter program.

City of Bluefield: $4,125.00
The funding will be used for razing dilapidated structures around the city.

City of Buckhannon: $3,500.00
The funding will be used for the city-wide property cleanup program and anti-litter educational materials.

Town of Buffalo: $3,157.00
The funding will be used for dumpster rental fees, landfill fees, personnel wages and mass mailings for a town cleanup event.

Clay County Commission: $2,569.80
The funding will be used for litter receptacles and promotional items for the county cleanup program.

Town of Clendenin: $2,000.00
The funding will be used for anti-littering signage, litter and cigarette receptacles.

Town of Delbarton: $2,500.00
The funding will be used for litter and cigarette receptacles throughout the town.

City of Dunbar: $5,000.00
The funding will be used for razing dilapidated structures throughout the city.

City of Grafton: $2,000.00
The funding will be used for landfill fees for a town cleanup.

Hancock County Solid Waste Authority: $1,296.00
The funding will be used for personnel wages for the county-wide open dump and roadside litter cleanup program.

Jackson County Solid Waste Authority: $3,000.00
The funding will be used for educational materials and a county-wide cleanup event.

Kanawha County Commission: $3,500.00
The funding will be used for landfill fees, advertising and wages for deputies to issue citations and work county cleanup events.

City of Kenova: $2,947.62
The funding will be used for razing dilapidated structures throughout the city.

City of Kingwood: $5,000.00
The funding will be used for razing dilapidated structures throughout the city.

McDowell County Commission: $5,000.00
The funding will be used for razing dilapidated structures throughout the county.

McDowell County Solid Waste Authority: $2,500.00
The funding will be used for Litter Control Officer wages.

Mercer County Solid Waste Authority: $3,000.00
The funding will be used for landfill fees for cleanup events.

New Martinsville Parks and Recreation: $1,197.00
The funding will be used for litter receptacles and liners for the city parks.

City of Parkersburg: $3,000.00
The funding will be used for fencing to contain litter and protect wetlands at the city recycling center.

Pleasants County Commission: $2,500.00
The funding will be used for personnel wages for the county-wide illegal dump remediation program.

Preston County Solid Waste Authority: $2,088.00
The funding will be used for fuel for the Litter Control Officer vehicle for the county-wide program.

Putnam County Solid Waste Authority: $2,500.00
The funding will be used for Litter Control Officer wages for the county-wide litter control program.

Raleigh County Solid Waste Authority: $3,800.00
The funding will be used for a dump trailer for the county-wide litter control program.

Region VIII Solid Waste Authority: $1,900.00
The funding will be used for travel, conference space rental and meeting supplies for regional litter control workshop events.

Wayne County Commission: $2,000.00
The funding will be used for Litter Control Officer wages for the county-wide litter control program.

Webster County Commission: $2,000.00
The funding will be used for Litter Control Officer wages for the county-wide litter control program.

City of Weston: $1,393.00
The funding will be used for litter receptacles for the city-wide litter program.

Wetzel County Solid Waste Authority: $2,500.00
The funding will be used for Litter Control Officer wages and fuel for the Litter Control Officer’s vehicle for the county-wide litter program.

Wood County Solid Waste Authority: $1,143.80
The funding will be used for gloves and trash bags for cleanup events.

Wyoming County Solid Waste Authority: $2,500.00
The funding will be used for fuel, tires and maintenance for the Litter Control vehicle for the county-wide litter control program.

Students Named to Spring 2018 Honor Lists at GSC

The Free Press WV

The names of students who attained the Glenville State College President’s and Vice President’s Honor Lists for the Spring 2018 semester have been announced.

To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Barbour County: Shania Pennington, Jacob Price

Berkeley County: Alexander Miller

Boone County: Andrew Boktor, Ally Brown

Braxton County: Lucas Bonnett, Kendra Houghton, Ashlee James, Taylor Johnson, Brittany White, McKenze Yanero

Calhoun County: MacKenzie Ammerman, Jerry Basnett, Jacob Petry, Emily Snyder

Clay County: Jessica Beckett, Caitlyn Rogers

Doddridge County: Ryan Mizia

Fayette County: Trevor Wood

Gilmer County: Preston Allison, Katelyn Benson, Heather Coleman, Dravin Gibson, Janeeva Jenkins, Dalton Law, Brian Moore, Brianna Ratliff, Wesley Self, Hilari Sprouse

Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty

Harrison County: Hannah Mick

Jackson County: Larissa Hayman

Jefferson County: Taylor Corey

Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Bethany Spelock

Lewis County: Haley Biller, Hannah Blankenship, Destiny Grimes, Kelly Weaver

Logan County: Matthew Zachary

Marshall County: Logen LeMasters

Mercer County: Anna Lusk

Nicholas County: Marlyn Donelson, William Lyons, Elizabeth Messer, Mark Sanson

Putnam County: Joshua Brennan, Madison Null

Raleigh County: Michael Layne

Roane County: Savannah Harper

Webster County: Bryce McCourt

Wirt County: Mary Strong

Wyoming County: Brittany Koutsunis

Out-Of-State: Victoria Peterson (CA), Jacqueline Deary (CT), Brian Williams (MD), Allison Parski (MI), John Routzahn (OH)




To be named to the GSC Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Quincy Band

Braxton County: Jordan Batton, Leslee Coffman, Kathryn Dean, Jessica Ellis, Bryan Foster, Brittany Louk, Madison Oney, Christian Pritt, Jonathon Shreve, Jacob Stout, Forrest Taylor

Calhoun County: Hannah Allen, Christopher Cunningham, Johnathan Taylor, Laura Webb, Lindsey Webb

Clay County: Andrea Litton, Gracen Samples, Seth Stover, Braylee Woods

Doddridge County: Alexis Shonk

Fayette County: Derek Bloomfield, Matthew Hackworth, Travis Myers, Kelsey Norris, Destiny Rader, Clayton Swisher

Gilmer County: Jacob Arden, Chandler Ferguson, Madisyn Furr, Thomas Gilco, Lauren Hardman, Wyatt Helmick, Emilie Jedamski, Jaylin Johnson, Amanda Lamb, Matthew Montgomery, Adam Moore, Hannah Moore, Kitric Moore, Analysse Petty, Hayley Summers, Katelyn Weese, Halee Wildman, Carrissa Wood, Trevor Wright

Grant County: Larissa Henry

Greenbrier County: Kerri Arbuckle, Justice Bowyer

Hardy County: Faith Smith

Harrison County: Lia Runyan

Jackson County: Josie Hayman, Evan Merical, Sapphire Parsons

Jefferson County: Michael Dodson, Jasmine Tarman

Kanawha County: Jacob Lutsy, Jeri Potter

Lewis County: Daniel Conrad, Hannah Curfman, Emily Kemper, Michael Marion, Taylor McClain, Heather Montgomery, April Moran, Brooklyn Queen, Sara Sellers, Arikka Smith, Damien White

Logan County: Alec Maynard

Marion County: Morgan Hardesty

Mineral County: Abigail Johnson

Monroe County: Cody Newhouse

Nicholas County: Danielle Bartlett, Charles Baughman, Tabitha Cochrum, Austin Hill, Anthony Mayes, William Womack, J. Cameron Woods

Pleasants County: Jessy Moore

Pocahontas County: Matthew Rao, Nancy Turner

Preston County: Brittany Louk

Putnam County: Sarah Lines, Jacob Stover, Tori Ward

Raleigh County: Jacob Coots, William Harper, Matthew Welch

Randolph County: Daniel Crawford, Kayla Palmer, Kathlyne Simmons

Roane County: Brianna Deel, Sabrina Gonzalez, Kimberly Lee, Chad Leport, Cassidy Taylor, James Williams

Tucker County: Angela Myers, Wiley Raines

Tyler County: Miranda Taylor

Upshur County: Belinda Lewis, Casey Orsburn

Webster County: Jared Romano

Wetzel County: James Goddard

Wirt County: Kristina Lowe, Kia Sleesman

Wood County: Taylor Broadwater, Hannah Dennis

Wyoming County: Ethan Gillespie, Kaci Mullins, Hunter Simmons

Out-Of-State: Giles Guy-Williams (CA), Andre Henderson (CA), Julia Lindberg (CT), Grant Williams (DC), Alyssa Banks (DE), Ryan Nimely (GA), Ai Miyazaki (Japan), Ethan Carr (KY), Haley Wolff (MD), Jacob Ngangum (MD), Julia Lesko (MD), Paranda Uber (MD), Madison Gargus (MI), Jessica Digennaro (NY), Brianna D’Angelo (NY), Isaiah Sattelmaier (OH), Catherine Pelfrey (OH), Chere Davis (VA), Cory Goodhope (VA), John Jeans (VA)

The Free Press WV

West Virginia 2018 spring turkey harvest largest in 15 years

The Free Press WV

According to preliminary data gathered by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, turkey hunters in West Virginia harvested 12,274 gobblers this spring, which is a 15-year high and a 6 percent increase over 2017.

This year’s harvest also is more than 10 percent above the 10-year average, said Mike Peters, Game Bird and Small Game Project Leader for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

All but two DNR districts reported an increase over 2017 harvest figures. Districts 4 and 5 were the only two districts with fewer harvested birds this year. Counties in District 1 harvested the most birds again this year with 3,416, followed by District 6 (2,651), District 5 (1,811), District 4 (1,515), District 3 (1,805) and District 2 (1,076).

The five counties with the largest harvest were Preston (553), Mason (468), Jackson (460), Harrison (440) and Marshall (417).

Youth hunters harvested 431 turkeys during the one-day youth season on April 14. Those numbers, along with county totals, are included in the table below.

West Virginia Spring Gobbler Season Results

County

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Barbour

178

127

165

204

250

Brooke

84

67

78

100

174

Hancock

110

89

98

106

87

Harrison

264

247

286

327

440

Marion

149

170

192

256

330

Marshall

220

174

207

255

417

Monongalia

174

199

197

266

346

Ohio

91

109

111

113

145

Preston

344

333

371

475

553

Taylor

87

72

101

135

189

Tucker

88

82

90

97

89

Wetzel

203

168

196

244

396

District 1 Subtotal

 1,992

 1,837

     2,092

   2,578

    3,416

Berkeley

112

124

115

147

162

Grant

129

131

161

145

160

Hampshire

138

156

170

184

166

Hardy

135

116

132

132

150

Jefferson

57

82

79

114

115

Mineral

96

118

134

132

148

Morgan

62

64

54

64

64

Pendleton

95

94

88

112

111

District 2 Subtotal

     824

    885

         933

   1,030

    1,076

Braxton

175

194

197

209

307

Clay

68

83

101

120

142

Lewis

180

194

211

249

286

Nicholas

164

213

330

311

287

Pocahontas

130

145

144

143

113

Randolph

186

225

250

248

207

Upshur

229

231

228

303

334

Webster

113

114

156

150

129

District 3 Subtotal

 1,245

 1,399

     1,617

   1,733

    1,805

Fayette

244

239

292

278

247

Greenbrier

245

242

308

269

224

McDowell

215

218

200

177

132

Mercer

170

161

176

192

150

Monroe

212

181

184

192

182

Raleigh

214

231

283

279

213

Summers

209

199

219

209

170

Wyoming

255

257

320

262

197

District 4 Subtotal

 1,764

 1,728

     1,982

   1,858

    1,515

Boone

159

138

157

157

125

Cabell

80

110

114

176

125

Kanawha

231

227

285

319

308

Lincoln

178

169

215

228

158

Logan

181

172

181

165

157

Mason

293

314

378

448

468

Mingo

93

91

131

143

106

Putnam

150

181

210

268

235

Wayne

103

108

139

186

129

District 5 Subtotal

 1,468

 1,510

     1,810

   2,090

    1,811

Calhoun

135

128

145

164

190

Doddridge

126

118

137

160

216

Gilmer

147

124

132

143

170

Jackson

293

264

302

408

460

Pleasants

73

71

80

89

122

Ritchie

245

218

216

263

327

Roane

232

210

231

256

279

Tyler

136

144

182

181

250

Wirt

177

153

174

206

230

Wood

271

248

328

380

407

District 6 Subtotal

 1,835

 1,678

     1,927

   2,250

    2,651

State Total

 9,128

 9,037

   10,361

 11,539

  12,274

Final Early Voting Results - 05.06.18

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

2018 West Virginia Envirothon winners announced and scholarships awarded

The Free Press WV

The Ravenswood Future Farmers of America team won first place and a $5,000 scholarship Friday to share at the 2018 West Virginia Envirothon at WVU Jackson’s Mill in Lewis County.

Team members Katlyne Rollyson, Teresa Riffle, Tiffany Miihlbach, Gabriela Martinez and Fiona Lane took the prize in a tight competition with the second place Mineral County team, whose members will share a $3,750 scholarship.

Jefferson Agriscience (with a $2,500 scholarship) finished in third place, while the Eco Defenders team ($1,750) from Morgan County finished fourth, and the Moorefield High School team came in fifth ($1,250 scholarship).

The West Virginia Envirothon competition gives high school students an opportunity to learn about the state’s diverse ecosystem and how they can conserve and protect it. The event was held April 19-20.

Teams made up of five students each in grades 9 through 12 explored the environmental and earth sciences by focusing on five subject areas: aquatics, forestry, soils, wildlife and a current environmental topic, range land management.

Top teams at each station took home $500 station awards, shared among the team advisor and team members. Ravenswood and Mineral County split four of the five station awards. Ravenswood won the current environment topic and the wildlife station awards. Mineral

County’s team won the soils and the aquatics station awards. The Jefferson Agriscience team won the forestry station award.

The West Virginia Envirothon Committee awarded $15,000 in college scholarships during the event. Since 1997, $200,000 in college scholarships have been awarded to West Virginia high school students through the Envirothon.

Teams who participate are often created through school clubs, classes at school, 4-H groups, Scout troops or home school groups. Teams receive study materials and prepare for the competition ahead of time. Envirothon training opportunities are available to students in their area’s conservation district. During the competition, teams were tested on their skills, problem-solving abilities and knowledge about natural resources.

This is the second consecutive year the West Virginia Envirothon was held at Jackson’s Mill.

Teams participated from Braxton, Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge, Gilmer, Hardy, Jackson, Marshall, Mineral, Morgan, Pleasants, Preston, Webster and Wetzel counties.

Envirothon partners include the USDA Forest Service Northeast Area, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts, the West Virginia Conservation Agency, the West Virginia Department of Education, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, the West Virginia Department of Agriculture, the West Virginia Division of Forestry, the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources and the West Virginia Forestry Association.

This year’s scholarship sponsors and donors include the Weyerhaeuser Foundation, the Dominion Foundation, USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, the West Virginia Department of Education, Toyota, the West Virginia Conservation Agency, Mountain RC&D, Cornerstone Bank, the West Virginia Forestry Association and the West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts

2018 West Virginia Envirothon returning to Jackson’s Mill

Students to explore the environmental and earth sciences during competition

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Envirothon competition, which gives high school students an opportunity to learn about the state’s diverse ecosystem and how they can conserve and protect it, will return to Jackson’s Mill in Lewis County next week.

The event, which precedes Earth Day on April 22, is scheduled for Thursday, April 19, and Friday, April 20.

Through a unique hands-on experience, teams made up of five students each in grades 9 through 12 will explore the environmental and earth sciences by focusing on five subject areas: aquatics, forestry, soils, wildlife and a current environmental topic.

The best opportunity for photos, video, audio and interviews will be when review stations are open to teams on Thursday, April 19, from 1 p.m. until about 5 p.m. Interviews also can be arranged during this time. This is a great opportunity for a good feature story with appealing art.

The West Virginia Envirothon Committee expects to grant $15,000 in college scholarships during the event. Since 1997, $185,000 in college scholarships have been awarded to West Virginia high school students through the Envirothon.

Teams who participate are often created through school clubs, classes at school, 4-H groups, Scout troops or home school groups. Teams receive study materials and prepare for the competition ahead of time. Envirothon training opportunities are available to students in their

area’s conservation district. During the competition, teams are tested on their skills, problem-solving abilities and knowledge about natural resources.

This is the second consecutive year the West Virginia Envirothon is being held at Jackson’s Mill.

Teams signed up to participate this year are from Barbour, Braxton, Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge, Gilmer, Hardy, Harrison, Jackson, Marshall, Mineral, Morgan, Pleasants, Preston, Webster and Wetzel counties.

Envirothon partners include the USDA Forest Service Northeast Area, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts, the West Virginia Conservation Agency, the West Virginia Department of Education, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, the West Virginia Department of Agriculture, the West Virginia Division of Forestry, the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources and the West Virginia Forestry Association.

This year’s scholarship sponsors and donors include the Weyerhaeuser Foundation, the Dominion Foundation, USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, the West Virginia Department of Education, Toyota, the West Virginia Conservation Agency, Mountain RC&D, Cornerstone Bank, the West Virginia Forestry Association and the West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts. For more information, visit the Envirothon website at www.wvca.us/envirothon or contact Davin White at 304.767.5508 (cell) or ‘dwhite@wvca.us’.

Area Closings, Delays and Early Dismissal on Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The Free Press WV

Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Wednesday, March 21, 2018

 

Closings and Delays

Early Dismissal
Gilmer County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Braxton County Schools

 

 

Calhoun County Schools

3-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Doddridge County Schools

2-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Lewis County Schools

2-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Ritchie County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

 
Barbour County Schools

All Closed

 

Clay County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Harrison County Schools

2-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Nicholas County Schools

3-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Pleasants County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Roane County Schools

2-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Tyler County Schools

2-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Upshur County Schools

2-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Webster County Schools

3-Hour Delay >> All Closed

Wetzel County Schools

2-Hour Delay >> All Closed

 

Wirt County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Wood County Schools

2-Hour Delay

Glenville State College

 

Gilmer County Board of Education

 

Gilmer County Courthouse

 

Gilmer County Health Department

 

Gilmer County Senior Center

 

Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic

 

 

Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700

The Free Press WV

The Free Press WV
03.21.2018 @  09:00 AM

The Free Press WV
03.21.2018 @  05:30 AM

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Wetzel County

D. Max Dodd

The Free Press WV Age 83, of Pennsboro, WV (Beason Community) departed this life on Monday, December 10, 2018, at Pine View Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Harrisville, WV. Max was born August 04, 1935 in Pennsboro, WV (Beason Community) a son of the late Burl and Evelyn (Lamm) Dodd [....]  Read More

Jo Ann (Ware) Robinson

The Free Press WV Age 69 of Ireland, WV Went home to be with her Lord and Savior on the mourning of Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in the comfort of her home. She was born on August 28, 1948 in Green Hill, WV [....]  Read More

Mary Lou Weekley

The Free Press WVAge 75, of St. Marys, WV, went home to be with her Lord on Monday, April 16, 2018, at Marietta Memorial Hospital, surrounded by her loving family. Mary Lou was born April 05, 1943 in Ellenboro, WV, a daughter of the late Martin Luther and Beaulah Mae (Tucker) Corbin [ .... ]  Read More

James David Thompson

The Free Press WVAge 53, of Pennsboro, WV, departed this life on Friday, March 02, 2018 at his residence. He was born on February 28, 1965 a son of David and Karen Sue Cottrill Thompson [ .... ]  Read More

Shelvy Maxine (Cutright) Flanigan

The Free Press WVAge 89, of Salem WV, went to be with the Lord on Sunday, March 04, 2018 at her residence, surrounded by her family. She was born August 24, 1928 in Smithfield, WV; the daughter of the late Lee and Geneva Carroll Cutright [ .... ]  Read More

Ruth E. Hayhurst

David Eugene McDonald

Francis Junior Lough

Tressie R. (Adams) Phillips

Beulah Clara Byers

Donald Kenneth Bishop

Sonny Ceil

David B. Bonner

Doretta “Betty” R. Billeter

Readers' Recent Comments

During intervention the State had dictatorial control of our school system to include all decisions related to the GCES.

One result is that the GCES was built too small.

An investigation is needed to determine who was responsible for the bad decision, and what role the no-bid architectural firm had in designing and constructing the school.

Something major happened to cause the GCES to be built too small. Was something dropped at the expense of adequate class room space as a result of having to spend extra money because a poor site was selected?

Minimally, gross incompetency on the State’s part is the explanation for the disaster foisted onto the County.

A question pertains to the new gym. Lots of effort was taken by the State to try to convince the public that a competition gym instead of a regular gym was needed.

Did the competition gym cost extra money at the expense of needed classroom space? If the answer is affirmative who was responsible for deciding on the more expensive gym?

What about the enormous pit at the GCES? Was money spent on it at the expense of classrooms because something was wrong with the school’s site that was selected by the State?

Nothing similar to the pit has been seen at other sites where new WV schools were built.

Why has there been a failure for a thorough investigation to have occurred to expose the facts?

The obvious explanation is that powerful elitists in control do not want tracks leading to them, and they have veto power over a meaningful investigation including one done by a leading newspaper.

By GCES Built Too Small Scandal on 01.15.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Pat McGroyne is spot on.
High speed internet is simply another failure of WV state government.

If the elected in our state, were doing the job expected by voters….we should have very few problems or issues?

By Gilmer resident on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Muddling has another distinct symptom. It is the tendency for administrators in control to emphasize processes and procedures while avoiding disclosure of progress, or the lack thereof, in achieving learning results.

The purpose is another way to avoid personal accountability for school system failures.

By Muddling Epidemic In WV School Systems on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

West Virginia is number one!
Our politicians are the best that can be had.
They are also the lobbyers dream come true.
No one—-can out-muddle our elected reps !

By we know it on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Suggestion after reading strategic plans for the GCHS and the GCES.

How about the school board requiring that for each school an informative executive summary be written to include——where each school stands on reading, math, and science proficiency, what the term proficiency means to eliminate the confusion, student proficiency goals for the two school, target time to expect goals to be achieved, and a statement to commit to keeping the public informed of progress in achieving the goals at designated intervals (e.g. quarterly) during a school year.

Omit confusing abbreviations and technical terms understood only by a select few in the education field, and written for comprehension by reasonable persons.

Leave it up to the County’s professional educators to determine how to get the job done with continual laser-like focus on getting results.

By Student Learning at GCHS and GCES on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Muddling infects federal, state, and local government entities where personal accountability for top officials to get measurable results rarely exists.

Muddling practitioners are famous for passing off information unrelated to measurable proof that effective problem-solving has occurred. A common example is emphasizing how much public money is being spent to attempt to convince tax payers that magnitudes of expenditures are always directly correlated to levels of problem-solving successes.

Muddling by an organization is characterized by the existence of thick planning documents replete with vagueness and lack of clarity, undefined technical terms, and mysterious acronyms.

Muddling thrives on intentional ambiguity and confusion designed to protect muddlers and their organizations.

By Muddling 101 on 01.11.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Gilmer County is not the only place in the USA that has been faced with its students failing to meet proficiency standards for science, reading, and math.

The difference here is that evidence is lacking to conclusively demonstrate that Gilmer County’s officials in control have exerted proper efforts to profit form powerful lessons learned elsewhere to use that knowledge to help solve learning deficiencies in our schools.

In fact, a convincing argument could be made that the approach in the County has been the one professional planners designate as muddling through.

Classic symptoms of muddling through include failure to thoroughly analyze categories of causes contributing to problems followed up by using the information to develop a comprehensive plan to do the most good in getting better results by treating key causes instead of symptoms.

Muddling typically involves officials assigning blame for lack of progress to outside forces e.g., the “culture”, the State did it to us, and poverty. Haven’t we heard plenty of that?

Muddling must be eliminated if we want progress in solving non-performance problems within the County’s school system. Does anyone disagree?

By End School System Muddling on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

It is unclear after reading school board meeting minutes what progress if any is being made by GCHS and GCES principals in improving student proficiency in reading, math and science.

Why not allocate a few sentences in the minutes to summarize what the two principals reported to the school board?

All it would take to get the critical information out to citizens would be for the new school board to act on this.

Does anyone have a problem with the suggested change to keep Gilmer’s bill paying public informed?

By Need Specifics For Principal's Reports on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

“High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).“

I disagree with much of what Mr.Boggs believes.  That said, high-speed broadband is the single most important step the State of WV could take to improve the business climate and provide more opportunities for its citizens.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Conversation at local eatery.
Shortly after election.
Individuals were educators.

‘You think we have school problems now, wait until these new folks take the steering wheel’.

‘Students, parents, staff are all going to be in the soup’.

Sounds as if Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving vacation-deer season times have all taken a big hit.  If that is true, the union teachers need to come together, stand their ground, along with parents, and hold this new board accountable.

Have a local strike if need be.
Request resignations.
Vote of no confidence.

Schools employees can win.
You have done it before.
Just stick together.

By overheard conversation on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Scholarship must be the most important focus in Gilmer County’s schools.

Brought up the ZOOMWV Data Dashboard site to review the most recent State achievement test results for GCHS’s 11th grade.

Folks, Gilmer is in serious trouble. Proficiency for math=24%, reading=41%, and science=24%.

On an A through F grading scales the GCHS gets an F for all three subject areas.

What does the new school board have to show for inroads it has made since last July to make critically needed proficiency improvements at the HS? Citizens deserve answers to the question.

By ZOOMWV Data Dashboard on 01.07.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

A thorough accounting for where all the public money went could be easily achieved by a competent accountant.

Isn’t there a special account at the County’s school board office for expenditures related to all bills paid and who got the money?

Following the money trail always gets results along with verification of means, motives, and access.

By Let An Accountant Dig It Out on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

If central office financial records for all public money paid out for everything from site planning, site studies and development, and everything else to get to completion of the GCES and the LES—- what is the reason?

It is known that money was spent on the Arbuckle site and Cedar Creek, and public money was paid out for the LES too.

Were County records for the spending purged and if that happened who ordered the action? The records are either in the County’s central office or they aren’t.

By End Financial Secrecy on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Hasn’t the time come to finally start naming names and making people accountable?

By Get It Done on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

How about the “BIG WV WINDFALL”....?

For 3 or 4 months now we keep hearing about the millions of dollars of tax revenue collected.

Millions and millions above ‘estimates’.  Were those ‘estimates’ honest, or fudged to begin with, so as to request higher tax rates?

Well, Justice and the Legislature now have our dollars, what will become of this windfall? Will we see tax rates lowered?  Doubt full, but we should.

Likely this windfall, created by “over-taxation”, will simply create a “party atmosphere” of legislative spending. Watch the Charleston ‘gangsters’ get their wish lists ready this coming session.

By taxpayers always lose on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Yes.  The blame Does seem to fall to ‘local’ people. In small places like Gilmer County, it’s just a poker game, boys, and the deep pockets win.  Money speaks volumes where ‘officials’ stay silent.  Go ask for the records, see what they’ve got.

By CheatersNeverWin on 11.20.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Teachers and staff knew from the beginning that the GCES was going to be too small. They were ordered by the State to keep quiet about the shortfall and other serious concerns too.

A sixth grader could understood how many rooms were needed by dividing total student numbers to attend the school by how many students should be in a classroom.

Under sizing was the State’s fault and it cannot be rationalized any other way including to assign the blame to local people. Same applies to the over sized LCES.

By Corrupt State Intervention on 11.19.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

There will never be a full, public accounting of the gross mishandling of tax dollars during WVDOE intervention.
Too many local jobs and too many embarrassments of both elected and appointed bureaucrats.
These types cover dirt for each other.

Any local whistle blowers?  Doubtful.

One school built short 4 classrooms and another built with 5 too many.  Can it get more stupid than that?
Mr. Degree and Ms. Common Sense seldom travel together.

By Full accounting will never be revealed. Never. on 11.18.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

GCBOE when the two principals give reports at board meeting could the gist of what they said be summarized in minutes to keep the County informed?

It was a welcomed development by the Board to require principals to give reports particularly if there are required updates on progress designed to improve student learning for reading, math, and other subjects.

We still have not been informed about the status of science proficiency at the GCHS based on the latest testing. Why has the State failed to release the data? Were results too dismal?

By More Specifics For Principal's Reports on 11.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

If it is going to cost extra money to eliminate over crowding at the GCES the financial information referenced by Do It Ourselves should be presented to Charleston and the press too.

That would help frame a solid case that crowding problems were not caused by Gilmer County because all decisions related to facilities were dictated by officials over whom the County had no oversight authority during the State’s intervention.

By Follow The Money on 11.16.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

It is assumed that all records for spending to include money paid out for the LCES, dropped Arbuckle site, dropped Cedar Creek site, and all bills for the GCES are in the Gilmer Schools central office.

The new GCBOE has authority to get to the truth by demanding a thorough accounting for all the spending.

Afterwards the financial officer in the central office could easily access existing computerized records and to use the information for a report to the GCBOE and the public.

By Do It Ourselves on 11.15.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Notice that most of the ‘officials’ in Gilmer County also hold regular day jobs - sometimes working on more than one paying ‘job’ at a time in the same office space. This common practice is concerning for many reasons, and it needs to be talked about when so many go without.

By QuestionablePractice on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There are two views in the County related to the under built GCES. Although the State built the school with inadequate classrooms one group believes that we should move on to let go of the past.

Isn’t this a form of advocacy for a coverup to prevent accountability for the State’s incompetence and mismanagement?

The other group believes that there should be a full accounting for all public money spent up to the time the GCES was completed to include disclosure of recipients of the public money. 

The accounting should be done for all public money spent at the LCES, the Arbuckle site, Cedar Creek, and finally the GCES.

Reasons for the under built GCES should be fully disclosed too. When the State was in control this information was kept secret from the public with loud claims that there was adequate space at the GCES.

Now it is known that there is inadequate space at the GCES and the problem is left to Gilmer County to fix. Only in WV!

By Citizens For Financial Disclosure on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Unprofessional issues,rude commentsand rolling eyes at the high school has become an issue. Being on cell phone talking to boyfriends,when parents etc.going into the office. Since the teachers were ask not to be on them while students in the classroom. The one in the office should not be allowed to talk personal to her boyfriend, or whoever. Also, I hope this is corrected, the personal days, etc that the board provides to staff shouldn’t be allowed to use to work or operate a second job. Let’s get the priorities straight.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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GULMER COUNTY BOE. It is time for me to let you know some issues that is going on at the High school.  I’m hoping this will be addressed at the next board meeting. 1. It should not matter if an employee has a second job or run a business. The priority job is for the board. One should not be allowed to use any time from the board to run your business. There is going on
If they want to run your business than go but not on the boards time. I would like for all employees be treated the equal. They should not be allowed to use the time the board gives them for other jobs.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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While at it there should be an investigation of why the LES was build with too many classrooms and the GCES was built with too few. At the very least what happened is a WV horror story example of the State’s waste and mismanagement.

By Where Is The Investigation? on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is obvious that the GCES has a major space problem.

What options for dealing with the State’s mismanagement to cause the serious blunder are being considered by the Board of Education?

Could the original architectural design for the dropped Cedar Creek site be compared to what resulted at the GCES to accurately determine the extent of classroom space alterations?

If the architectural design at the GCES is different than the original plan for Cedar Creek the next step should be to determine reasons for the changes and where the money originally planned for needed classrooms went.

By INFO REQUEST TO GCBOE on 11.09.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It’s long been known that Justice doesn’t happen in Gilmer County “because it all comes down to money”. And for those in charge of handling it and making decisions, it comes down to being competent to do the job,  keep accurate books and accounts and I’m sorry to say, that is seriously lacking in Gilmer County.

By Follow the Paycheck(s) on 11.06.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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What is GSC’s BOG’s plan for getting money for the next payment on the $38,000,000 bond loan the Gilmer County Commission approved?

Will the State pay or will the money come from private donations?

Money will have to come from somewhere to avoid a default.

By Where Is The Money? on 11.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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So sorry to hear of Kendall’s passing. I have fond memories of him at Uncle Paul’s store and the family reunions. I’m sure he will be missed greatly by those closest to him.
Please accept condolences from me and my family.

By Steve Lewis on 11.04.2018

From the entry: 'Kendall Goodwin'.

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GSC’s present plight is no secret and its future existence is in question.

Instead of expressing attitudes that GSC is being picked on could the Blue Ribbon Commission reveal why the College “tested out” as it did to fail to get more State money?

Was the “grading system” based on student enrollment trends, retention, time taken to get a degree, academic reputation, inept governance and administration, and other factors to block more funding? Informative specifics were not disclosed.

Teachers know that concerned students who want to do better always seek advice on what needs to be done to get better grades.

Similar to concerned students GSC’s supporters should be informed of what needs to be done to position the College for improved chances for survival to include eligibility for more State funding.

Saying that GSC is being picked on does nothing to help solve its nagging problems.

By What Was The Grading System? on 10.30.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Well thank you, Details Please,  for asking!  So many problems in Gilmer and education is just one.  Look at the town, take a good look around.  Remember who runs unopposed at election time.  Vote.  Make a difference.  Hold authority figures responsible.  Allow videos, minutes and more to be shared on GFP again, for transparency.  Know your neighbors, help a friend.  Be good to each other. Amen.

By Reader7 on 10.29.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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I will truly miss my Uncle Stephen.  Telling me so much information about from gardening to canning. Just to listening to him talk with such passion for everything that he does… he had a sense of humor that always warms my heart.. listening to him play the banjo sometimes even when he didn’t feel good. he is always willing to share his recipes and his ways of doing things… his solar information he was always studying something ... I’m remember one time we asked him where he got his blackberries when it wasn’t Blackberry season and he go there’s a store down the road it’s called Walmart they have everything… He was so funny.  I love you.. xoxo.

By Robin Nunez on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Sorry for your loss. He sure did look like his father.

By Buck Edwards on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Reader 7, please give details for your suggested solutions to the County’s concerns you addressed.

The information would be helpful for consideration by school system administrators and the general public.

By Details Please on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is speculation that the plan is for GSC to convert to an education center for low risk federal inmates. Is this something the County and central WV needs?

By GSC's New Mission? on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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Dr. Pellett’s commentary in the 10/26/2018 issue of the Gazette includes a statement that GSC is responsible for injecting $28,000,000 into the local economy.

If GSC were to close loss of the money would cause the County to have more severe poverty than it has now.

The pressing challenge is for GSC’s administrators including its Board of Governors to exercise effective leadership to prevent closure.

Why can’t GSC take action on the long standing suggestion for it to be an innovator by establishing a five year teacher education program to enable students to earn a masters degree by graduation time?

Something must be done in WV to deal with the 700 positions for which certified teachers including those for math, science and special education are not in the classrooms.

Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors why is a new teacher education program at the College not a viable option? Nothing else seems to be working.

The need exists, a similar program of excellence does not exist anywhere in the State, and GSC’s status would be elevated by having a masters degree program.

By GSC Alumni on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Paine: Plan to improve math scores to focus on algebra where a third of teachers aren’t certified'.

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GSC could make a valuable contribution to WV by doing a study to report on how grade and elementary schools with excellent results in math and reading did it.

Then, other schools could use the information as guidance instead of going it alone to reinvent the wheel.

With the Ed.D. expertise at GSC it would be a natural to take on the assignment. Dr. Pellett, would you back the initiative?

By Opportunity for GSC on 10.23.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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There is reference to signing an agreement with the State for math4life for all WV school districts. What has Gilmer County agreed to do to fix our problems?

By Agreements Matter on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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This important news has potential for making significant progress in improving math and reading outcomes in WV.

It hinges on how quickly advantage can be taken from lessons learned in schools that excelled.

The WVBE could do an analysis of reasons for excelling and to quickly provide guidance information to other schools.

That is the way the private sector approaches problem-solving because chronic failures have consequences and the unfit are weeded out.

Dr. O’Cull could help if the WVBE is not responsive. There could be panels of individuals from excelling schools to make presentations at WV School Board Association meetings to explain what their schools did to make the achievements.

By Why Reinvent The Wheel? on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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A characteristic of a good strategic plan is to simplify language to enable a clear understanding of all its details.

Regarding the comment about abbreviations, a simple fix for them and terms (e.g. lexile) would be to insert an asterisk or a footnote symbol the first time one of them is used to refer readers to a section at the end of the documents where the entries are defined.

This comment is not intended to be a criticism. All specialty fields have a language of their own including the teaching profession.

Suggested clarity improvements in the plans would not be time consuming for principals at the County’s two schools.

By Clarity Is Always Good on 10.18.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Looked at the strategic plan for the GCES. It is a major achievement for the new GCBE to provide the information to the public.

Suggestion. Could the GCBOE post a meaning of all abbreviations in the plan? Doing that would make it far easier for readers to understand details in the plan.

By Help Understanding on 10.17.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Thanks Mrs. Lowther and the BOE for providing meeting minutes for the public to read.

Those of us who voted for the levy would appreciate receiving specific information for what is being done at the grade school and the high school to make needed improvements for college and career readiness.

Could a current overview and updates throughout the school year be provided to the public?

Why not put the details on websites of the two schools to give the principals a chance to shine?

By Levy Supporter on 10.16.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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“engage in pedantic colloquy?“

No Bill.

By WEKNOWYOU on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Correct.  I do not wish to engage in back and forth useless ‘banter’ with big words and no results.  What I AM interested in is Gilmer County, in all it’s ways.  Education, Food, Law and Transparency.  Fancy words are often used to hide, divide, and distract..  Plain words speaking truth for the safety and well being of the people is what I’m looking for..  Gilmer is suffering… I want it to stop. I want to see the citizens healthy, educated and strong. I want to see more jobs instead of food banks.  I want Committee meetings for all to see. I want the law to do what it should, when it should.  Plain english would work fine.  Thanks for asking.

By Reader7 on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Lol 7, you do not wish to engage in a pedantic colloquy?

By Smart Feller on 10.13.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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All nice but a small request? Can we simplify some of the language?  Don’t mean to be rude, but fancy works aren’t needed for the Truth.

By Reader7 on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Stop living the delusion the state will fix education.
They have caused the problem.
Remember, for them, job one IS job protection.

Rare in history, that the cause of a problem, has come forth with a solution to what they have caused. They keep resetting testing standards so as not have any ‘yardstick’ they can be measured against.  Apparently people just don’t get it?  And the WVBOE is so happy about that.

By it-ain't-a-gonna-happen. period. on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is a continuum for sophistication regarding what is done with data.

Collecting and compiling it is at the low end of sophistication.

Synthesis is at the high end.

This means using results and other information to make specific recommendations for making improvements.

The State took its typical easy way out by failing to go beyond the data compilation stage.

By Easy Way Out on 10.10.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The comment about need to find out what was done at high performance schools to determine what we could do in Gilmer County to get the same results merits a comment.

The comment flags what is wrong with the State BOE in failing to provide effective leadership.

Does anyone recall a single instance, after tens of millions of dollars were spent on amassing data, when the State BOE did anything to effectively address lessons learned at high performance schools for application at other schools?

Of course not! It is the easy way out for those in high income brackets in Charleston to collect data instead of using it to the maximum to take full advantage of lessons learned.

Could the WV School Board Association help fill the gap?

By Lost Opportunity on 10.07.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Harry, So sorry to hear of the passing of your wife.  I’m also sorry that I never got to know her because if she was anything like you, I’m sure she was pretty special.  Please know that you and your family will be in my thoughts and prayers.  May God’s love be with you my friend.

By Greg Garvin on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Judith “Judy” Carolyn Buckley Rich'.

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What is the BOE’s proficiency goal for English and mathematics and what is the time frame for achieving the goal? That is news citizens want.

Then too, how can citizens at large get involved to honor and to encourage students who improve, and what of a similar nature could be done to give special recognition to outstanding teachers who contribute to improved learning for English and math?

By Positive Changes Made By New BOE on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The BOE and Mrs Lowther deserve high praise for disclosing proficiency information to the public.

It is the first time since 2011 anything like this has happened.

We still do not know about results for science, and it is understood that Charleston is still “working” on it.

Now we know our serious shortcomings in math and English and there is new hope for burrowing out of the mess with everyone in Gilmer working together.

By Thanks Gilmer BOE on 10.03.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Well, dear citizen… sometimes the local ‘law’ gets it wrong.  #truth #JusticeForGilmer

By Transparency matters on 09.30.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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Soooo…...why do we never see a big drug bust in Gilmer?
With the college and others, there are plenty sources.
Seems strange?

By citizen 3 on 09.23.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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If you access http://www.mywvschool.com it is evident that some schools outpace others for math and English.

For examples look at data for Lizemore Elementary in Clay County, Alum Creek Elementary in Kanawha County, Rock Branch Elementary in Putnam county, and Greenmont Elementary in Wood County.

Gilmer BOE why not assign someone to evaluate what is being done at those school and others to make them State standouts and to apply lessons learned to our elementary schools?

The same applies to learning from others regarding how to get high marks at GCHS.

By Learn What Works From Others on 09.23.2018

From the entry: 'WV and Area Counties Balanced Scorecard for School Year 2017-2018'.

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I have not read anyone blaming our teachers.  Quite the contrary.
There have been some well thought out comments submitted too.
I am old enough to remember when we had few issues about quality education.

Forget Charleston? Better not.
Believe we are still in their “probation” period.
You better check out just what that means.

By GC--still on state probation? on 09.22.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Why not go for it on our own and use the tried and widely accepted Iowa Test of Basic Skills to evaluate learning proficiency of our children?

It is the longest running test in America and it goes back to 1936.

One outcome of using the test is that each grade would be evaluated and compared to performances to schools in other parts of America.

We would probably have to go through hoop jumps of the State’s everchanging testing too.

By Iowa Test For Gilmer on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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To compound complexity of the issue, Gilmer is different from McDowell and both are different than Monongahela.

The implication is that getting out of the crisis must be county-specific and there is no one size that will fit all of WV’s 55 school systems.

Each county is on its own and ones with the best planning, local boards of education, and administrators will shine. Forget about Charleston!

By County-Specific on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Similar to most complex problems there are several categories contributing to WV’s dismal failure in improving education results in our grade and high schools.

Information in referred journal is beginning to show up. Some of the categories include curriculum issues in high schools, block scheduling failures in high schools, inordinate emphasis on sports at the expense of academics, inadequate prep of grade schoolers to ensure that they get firm foundations in math and English Language Arts, failure to instill need for life long learning at early ages, failure for school systems to fund continuing education of teachers to prepare them for newly emerged practices for enhanced student learning, cultural impediments including failure of some families to encourage children and to give them extra learning help at home, dysfunctional families for children to grow up in caused by drug and alcohol abuse and chronic unemployment, grade inflation characterized by too many As and Bs and attitudes that nobody fails so pass them along, failure of school boards to hire the best qualified superintendents and teachers because of local emphasis on favoring “home grow” individuals, failure of school boards to define performance expectations for superintendents to make effective accountability impossible, constantly changing types of State mandated testing to cause chaos and morale problems, poor compensation of teachers necessary to attract and keep the best and the brightest, etc.

To blame all problems on teachers is a cruel travesty.

One of the weakest links contributing to a lack of progress in improving WV schools is that instead of analyzing the full spectrum of contributing problems and focusing on ones with the biggest payoff potential, the trend in Charleston is to constantly apply band aid approaches with hopes that “cures” will be stumbled on accidentally.

By Do Not Blame It All On Our Teachers on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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The problem with preK-12 education in WV is that a holistic and and technically defensible evaluation of contributing factors to cause WV’s problems and how to deal with them has not occurred.

Instead, under direction of clueless politicians ineffective muddling prevails while selling what is done at a particular time as the definitive solution.

How many times have we witnessed muddling over the past 20-30 Years? It still goes on in Charleston.

Why not obtain a grant to have qualified experts analyze success stories around the Nation and use findings to craft a demonstration project in Gilmer County to improve our school system?

Regardless of what we do there must be open minds in seeking out what to do in homes, schools,  teacher education programs in our institutions of higher learning, continuing education for classroom teachers, and to involve various factions in our community to achieve acceptable results. Everyone must band together as a unified team to make it work.

One trap is over emphasis of sports. If the same magnitude of attention and importance were to be focused on solving preK-12 education problems in WV, great strides could be made to benefit deserving children.

By Muddling on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Our heartfelt condolences on the passing of Mr. Ron. I too know this pain of losing a beloved father. Both of these men were taken way too soon. Praying maybe Mr.Ron, my Dad, and all the former Westinghouse employees in heaven are getting together. Love and prayers from, Adrienne and family.

By Adrienne (Trimper) Johnson on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'Ronald J. Vanskiver'.

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West Virginia’s educational failures is NOT because of classroom teachers.

It IS because of the WV Board of Education’s failures of the past 20-30 years.

That 9 member, lopsided governor board is a crime against children and education in WV as a whole.

It needs 3 teachers, 3 general public parent members, and 3 governor appointees.

Until that governors click gang is broken up, you simply see repeats of the past.  NO progress in education.

It will take the legislature to fix it, but they are too busy with the legislature created court system failure, while trying to line pockets with gas and oil money.

By Tell It Like It Is ! on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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What is the plausible rationale for Gilmer not disclosing detailed facts similar to what Superintendent Hosaflook did?

Wood County reported 11,176 students in its 27 schools for the full FY 2018 school year.

In comparison Gilmer had 734 reported students in our two schools for the full FY 2018 school year.

Wood County had 15 times more students than Gilmer and it is reasonable to assume that it was 15 times more demanding to administer with its 27 schools.

If Wood County could get detailed facts out to the public with its significantly higher work load what keeps tiny Gilmer from doing the same?

By Why Gilmer BOE? on 09.18.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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We have not had a responsible, functioning, WVBE for 20 years.
Not one that would accept any responsibility.

They just keep changing ‘score keeping’ so there can be no accurate tracking of student progress.

State ranks 48th or 49th on educational outcomes. Still.
Colleges still have to give remedial classes.

The ONLY thing that changes are the names of the governor appointed players.
And just look at the ‘cost-per-pupil’ spending!
We are about the highest in the nation.

West Virginia State Board of Education = complete failure.  Nothing less.

By just more smoke and mirrors on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released for Public Schools in West Virginia'.

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Never could figure out why working people, retirees, volunteers are picking up trash left by adults?

Not when we have the numbers of bored prisoners we have locked up doing nothing??

By No solution here- on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Adopt-A-Highway Fall Statewide Cleanup Set for September 29'.

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Go to http://www.mywvschool.org to access more official State information about Gilmer’s schools. There are serious red flags in need of immediate corrective attention.

If you access Lewis County schools on the same web site you can review info for LES. Look at the red flags there. Worse than GES.

Instead of using the info to criticize it can be useful in seeking out opportunities for making immediate improvements.

For those who take apologetic stands that Gilmer is doing as well as some other WV counties and everything is fine, it does not mean that inferior educations for our children are acceptable.

By Look At Red Flags on 09.16.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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Who is responsible for Gilmer’s oversight of the LES?

If you access the State’s website you will learn that math and reading is red flagged for the LCES to be as bad as it can get.

Why is it that nothing is reported in Gilmer County about how that school is doing when we know that our sixth grade finishers from over there will go to the GCHS to finish their educations? 

It is like our students who attend LCES are forgotten about. Someone needs to be watching out for them.

By Who Minds The Store on 09.15.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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The really sad stories are left out.
The students who accrue debt and for whatever reasons, drop out of school after a year or two.

They have little hope of improving incomes, but still have debt.
More of them than you think.

By More sad ones to be told. on 09.14.2018

From the entry: 'Student-Loan Debts a "Loss of Freedom" for Some in WV'.

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Information made ‘public’ forces accountability.
Do not hold your breath lest you turn blue.

‘They’ want elected. Get their place at the trough.
Then discover ‘exposure’ makes their work more difficult.

Informed citizens make informed decisions.
Why do we see the same names being elected over and over and over?

By WHEN we're allowed to see it......? on 09.14.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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Lots of work to be done with schools in Gilmer County. 2017-2018 Summative Assessments out today for student achievement.

Gilmer County High School.

For Math
*Exceed or Meet Standards=40% of Students.
*Fail to Meet Standards=60% of Students

For Reading
*Exceed or Meet Standards=36% of Students
*Fail to Meet Standards=64%

The scores speak volumes. What was done to accurately determine causes of failures and what will be done about it? BOE, the public has a right to know answers.

By Public Demands Answers on 09.13.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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The Founding Fathers screwed up, we should not have to work and pay our bills. Let that man behind the tree work and pay for it all.
Free education should be a right.
Free food should be a right.
Free healthcare should be a right. 
Free transportation should be a right.
Free entertainment should be a right.

By Smart Feller on 09.13.2018

From the entry: 'Student-Loan Debts a "Loss of Freedom" for Some in WV'.

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Thank you BOE members and Mrs. Lowther. Let’s work together at all community levels to make Gilmer County an educational power house in West Virginia. We can do it as an effective team and provision of information will be the key to success.

By Better Times On The Way on 09.12.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Superintendent Set Her Goals for School Year'.

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Accountability - good point - and across Gilmer County.  We’ve seen glimpses and pieces of news WHEN we’re allowed to see it, mere mortals that we are. But never any follow up.  And the information come in bits and pieces (remember when we actually got to SEE what the Gilmer County Commission was up to?)  My question is, why do we never see the accountability or repercussion for actions of current Gilmer ‘elite’??

By Transparency matters on 09.12.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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Encouraging news that the superintendent will present her goals for Gilmer Schools on 9/10.

We assume that there will be a commitment for specific goals to achieve, measurable outcomes, completion dates for different steps and final goal achievement, and a meaningful monitoring program to determine if we are on track or there is need for mid-course fine tuning.

If any of this is missing there will not be meaningful accountability. Excellent business plans have all the components addressed above.

By Waiting To See on 09.09.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Harrison BOE sets yearly superintendent goals'.

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