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Wetzel County

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2018 West Virginia Teacher of the Year Finalists Announced

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) today announced six finalists for the West Virginia Teacher of the Year award. Finalists represent the best of the best in education and were selected from among the county teacher of the year winners. This year’s six finalists are: Teresa Thorne, Slanesville Elementary School, Hampshire County, Tammy Ann Spangler, Ripley Middle School, Jackson County, Katlin Thorsell, Washington High School, Jefferson County, Tammy J. Bittorf, Berkeley Springs High School, Morgan County, Adriane L. Manning, Wheeling Middle School, Ohio County and Leslie Lively, Short Line School, Wetzel County.

“I congratulate this group of finalists who have confirmed that we have some of the most compassionate teachers in West Virginia influencing our students,” said West Virginia Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Steven Paine. “Each of these teachers embrace high expectations, strive for excellence and put students at the center of all they do.”

This years’ nominees include elementary, middle and high school educators from a variety of disciplines, and span the Mountain State.

Teresa Thorne is a first-grade teacher at Slanesville Elementary, and has been teaching for 14 years. She is active on a variety of leadership teams and advisory councils and is passionate about fostering character growth as a Watch D.O.G.S. (Dads of Great Students) sponsor, a program that allows dads, uncles and grandfathers to volunteer at schools.

Tammy Ann Spangler is a mathematics teacher at Ripley Middle School. She focuses on working together with her students to share ideas and strategies to complete project-based math lessons. Spangler works to develop Jackson County’s sixth grade mathematics curriculum and share her vision for “all students to be mathematical thinkers and persevere in solving problems.“

Katlin Thorsell makes sure her students understand the importance of community involvement. As an agriculture education teacher and FFA Advisor, Thorsell ensures that her agriculture students have the ability to complete Supervised Agriculture Experiences (SAE) allowing real-world training in a supervised environment. A volunteer firefighter and EMT, Thorsell also allows graduating seniors to receive hands-on CPR and First Aid training.

Tammy Bittorf began teaching English after her honorable discharge from the United States Airforce. That experience inspired her to launch the “Broadening Horizon’s in Morgan County Program” a non-profit, dedicated to providing students the opportunity to visit other countries. Bittorf focuses on teaching students respect and tolerance for other cultures while building their self-confidence to prepare them for college and the workforce.

Adriane Manning likes to combine literature, history, art and performance together as a middle school Reading and English Language Arts teacher. Manning brings her experience as a seasoned reporter for The Washington Post to teach life skills like discipline, teamwork and self-confidence in her classroom. Manning is also involved with the school’s spring musical and the student-led news broadcast, Wildcat 411.

Leslie Lively has been an educator for more than 20 years with a focus on STEM education. Lively has built the Engineer Energy Program in Wetzel County, which engages nearly 100 students in hands-on exploration of STEM subjects. The program allows students to coordinate with their local Board of Education, businesses and community at large to present their STEM based projects throughout the school year.

The West Virginia Teacher of the Year program identifies, recognizes and promotes representatives of excellent teaching in the elementary and secondary classrooms of the state. West Virginia’s program is recognized as one of the oldest and consistent state Teacher of the Year programs in the nation.

West Virginia’s Teacher of the Year will be announced during a ceremony on September 18th at the Clay Center in Charleston. The winner of the state recognition will go on to represent West Virginia at the national level.

Photos of each finalist can be accessed below:

Adriane Manning, Ohio County

Katlin Thorsell, Jefferson County

Leslie Lively, Wetzel County

Tammy Bittorf, Morgan County

Tammy Spangler, Jackson County

Teresa Thorne, Hampshire County

Welcome Back to School and College - Students, Teacher, and Staff - 2017-2018

The Gilmer Free Press
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West Virginia News

The Free Press WV

►  County board of education proposes e-cigarette ban

A West Virginia board of education is listening to public comments on a policy revision that would ban e-cigarettes and all substances containing nicotine from property that the school system owns or operates.

The Kanawha County Board of Education put the changes out for public comment Monday. School system General Counsel Jim Withrow says concerns were raised regarding e-cigarettes or vapes that don’t contain tobacco, but have nicotine.

The school system currently has a 1997 policy in place, banning tobacco. The proposed changes would add nicotine and e-cigarettes to the existing tobacco prohibition policy. It would also ban substances containing nicotine from all property that is owned, leased or operated by the school system.


►  Ex-West Virginia highway gets prison for fraud conspiracy

A former West Virginia Division of Highways employee has been sentenced to 21 months in prison after pleading guilty to wire and tax fraud, admitting he used his position to funnel work to a South Carolina business and received secret payments of almost $200,000.

Bruce Kenney III, of Norfolk, Virginia, has admitted to his role in a conspiracy from 2008 to 2014 to bypass normal state procedures and steer $1.5 million of inspection work to Dennis Corp. of Columbia.

The 61-year-old Kenney, who pleaded guilty in federal court to two charges, worked in the Traffic Engineering Division.

Kenney was ordered to pay $34,714 in restitution to the Internal Revenue Service to forfeit $162,536.

Three others have also been prosecuted in the case.


►  Postcards to 130,000 WV registered voters seek to confirm current address

More than 130,000 West Virginia voters will soon be getting a postcard from the Secretary of State’s office.

“These postcards are nothing more than a request for you to update your address,” said Donald Kersey, Director of the Elections Division and Deputy Legal Counsel for the Secretary of State.

The mailings are largely routine to bring voter registration information up to date in West Virginia.  West Virginia, as a member of a national network, receives notice from other states when it appears somebody may have moved and failed to transfer their registration information to their new home.  The mailing is an effort to help county clerks update the voter roles.

“If you have moved, confirm it and sign the card and we’ll take appropriate action,” Kersey said. “These post cards will NOT result in the immediate cancellation of any registration, with the one exception if the voter checks the box that requests cancellation of their registration since they moved out of state.”

The cards will be directed to voters who have relocated from the voting precinct where they originally registered.

“What we’re doing is making sure our voter roles are as accurate as possible,” Kersey explained. “So on Election Day when the poll clerk checks the poll books, they’ll know the person is eligible to vote and can feel confident that person should be eligible to vote.”


►  Governor says he has “no regrets” after changing registration back to Republican

Governor Jim Justice said Wednesday on MetroNews “Talkline” he is “perfectly comfortable with the staff” after his decision last week to switch his registration from Democrat to Republican.

Justice said he doesn’t expect wholesale turnover but there will likely be some casualties beginning with administration Press Secretary Grant Herring.

“Grant has done a great job and he’s a good young man but Grant’s personal feelings are entrenched in the Democratic Party through and through. I do not think Grant is going to survive with me,” Justice predicted.

Herring joined Justice during last year’s gubernatorial campaign as the campaign spokesman and then was hired to stay on with the administration.

Justice said Chief of Staff Nick Casey, a former West Virginia Democratic Party chairman, is not in the office this week but that was time off that was previously planned. Justice did not offer a guess Wednesday on what Casey’s ultimate decision would be.

Justice said he gave similar messages to his staff and cabinet in separate meetings after the party switch announcement.

“I said, ‘If you feel the least bit uncomfortable in the direction we are going–because I know exactly what direction we’re going here. If you feel the least bit uncomfortable in your loyalty to me then you’ve got to go,‘” Justice said.

Justice said state Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Austin Caperton stood up and pledged his support.

“Austin’s family has been Democrats forever and Austin stood up and said, ‘Listen governor, I truly believe the people of West Virginia elected you to get something done and I understand totally what you’re doing and I’m with you 100 percent. I’m not going anywhere,‘” Justice said.

Justice also said Wednesday there’s been very little “backlash” from his decision.

“I don’t have any regrets whatsoever. I’m excited about working with the Republicans and I’m hoping I can still work with some of the Dems. What I’m hearing from everybody is good stuff,” Justice said.

Justice announced his decision last week during a rally in Huntington featuring Donald Trump. He signed the papers Friday. Justice was a registered Republican until 2015 when he switched to Democrat. He ran the following year for governor.


►  Justice companies settling suit for flood cleanup

Three businesses owned by West Virginia Governor Jim Justice and his family have agreed to settle for $551,420 a lawsuit that claimed they had not paid for $771,268 of cleanup work after the Greenbrier resort was hit by severe flooding last year.

The consent judgment filed Monday in federal court says the Greenbrier Hotel Corp., James C. Justice Companies Inc. and Justice Family Group LLC will pay post-judgment interest of 7 percent until it’s paid in full.

The December lawsuit by Texas-based BMS CAT followed a mechanic’s lien against the Justice companies in October for the unpaid bills.

The flood remediation was done on the resort’s chapel, ballroom, PGA tournament office and other buildings following the June flooding.

Company officials said last year they were awaiting compensation from their insurance carrier.


►  West Virginia state fair opening Thursday

West Virginia’s State Fair opens Thursday and fair officials say they will offer various admission discounts during its 10-day run in Lewisburg.

On opening day, gates open at 2 p.m. with $5 admission tickets and $20 ride passes until 11 p.m.

Other specials include $1 admission from 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, August 16.

Children 12 and under can enter free every day. Daily adult tickets at the gate cost $11.

The fair’s concert series begins Thursday evening with Aaron Lewis. Other shows include Martina McBride and Josh Turner on Friday.


►  DOH Assessing Flood Damage in Twelve Counties

The West Virginia Division of Highways continues to make repairs and assess damages in twelve counties hit by heavy rains and flooding July 28-29.

July 28-29 Flooding

Update: 08.09.2017

District

County

Estimated Damage Costs

4

Doddridge

$60,200

4

Harrison

$585,700

4

Marion

$458,212

4

Monongalia

$776,500

4

Preston

$343,500

4

Taylor

$288,883

6

Marshall

$3,482,000

6

Ohio

$2,059,025

6

Tyler

$154,500

6

Wetzel

3,829,705

8

Randolph

$125,000

8

Tucker

$686,000

Total

$12,849,225

►  County Democratic Chairman Resigns Following Justice Switch

A Democratic Party executive committee chairman from Greenbrier County has resigned following Governor Jim Justice’s flip from Democrat to Republican.

Paul Moya has resigned, telling the Charleston Gazette-Mail that Justice’s change back to the Republican Party is indicative of weak party leadership at the state level.

Moya says he won’t give up, but he’s out and he’s tired of it.

He announced his resignation on Facebook, where he calls Justice’s claim that the party left him a “lame a—excuse.“

The party leadership backed Justice in the Democratic primary he won in 2016 against state Senator Jeff Kessler and former federal prosecutor Booth Goodwin.

Moya says he believes the party leadership should be neutral in primaries.

Public School Start/End Dates for 2017-18 Across the Area

The Free Press WV

Barbour County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 23


Braxton County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 10

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 16


Calhoun County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Clay County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 30


Doddridge County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Gilmer County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Harrison County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 24


Lewis County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Nicholas County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Pleasants County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Ritchie County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Roane County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Tyler County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Webster County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Wetzel County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, June 07


Wirt County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Wood County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01

Sunday Storms Could Cause Flash Flooding

The Free Press WV

More than two dozen counties in West Virginia are under a Flash Flood Watch through Sunday evening, the National Weather Service said.

Additional rounds of thunderstorms containing very heavy rain could cause flooding along small streams and poor drainage areas, meteorologists said.

The counties under the watch include: Mason, Jackson, Wood, Pleasants, Tyler, Putnam, Kanawha, Roane, Wirt, Calhoun, Ritchie, Doddridge, Clay, Braxton, Gilmer, Lewis, Harrison, Taylor, Upshur Barbour, Fayette, Nicholas, Webster, Pocahontas, and Randolph.

Limited Bear Firearms Season Permit Applications Available Online

The West Virginia Division of Natural Resources is now accepting applications for a limited number of permits for black bear hunting during the traditional deer gun season in eight counties. The application deadline is midnight August 13.
 
Hunters with these permits will be allowed to hunt bear without dogs on public and private land in Cabell, Doddridge, Harrison, Lincoln, Marion, Marshall, Mineral and Wetzel counties, from November 20 through December 02, 2017. Resident landowners, their resident children or resident tenants who live on the land are not required to apply for a limited bear firearms season permit or purchase a class DS bear hunting stamp to hunt on their own land.
 
“Counties open for bear hunting during the buck-gun season are above their management objective and need additional bears harvested to achieve their goal,” said Colin Carpenter, DNR black bear project leader. “Timing is critical when setting bear hunting seasons, and the limited bear firearms season will occur when the maximum number of hunters are in the woods. This is the fifth year with expanded bear hunting opportunities during the buck-gun season, and we hope hunters will continue to take advantage of them.”
 
Hunters must apply for a limited bear firearms permit by using the Electronic Licensing System at www.wvhunt.com. To apply, licensed hunters must log in to their account and click on “Enter Lottery” on the home screen, select “2017 Black Bear Hunt” and select the desired county. Hunters also may call their local DNR district office for help with the application process.
 
Successful applicants will be notified by mail by the first week of October. Applicants can see if they received a permit, starting September 01, by logging into their account. Neither the permit, nor the class DS stamp, is transferable, and the county of hunt cannot be changed.
 
Hunters are also reminded that 31 counties in West Virginia do not require permits to hunt black bears during the buck-gun season. Details concerning bear hunting seasons can be found in the 2017-2018 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Summary, available soon at license agents and online at www.wvdnr.gov.

#wvhunt
 

The Free Press WV



Permits Available

 

Cabell

100

 

 

Doddridge

100

 

 

Harrison

100

 

 

Lincoln

100

 

 

Marion

100

 

 

Marshall

100

 

 

Mineral

100

 

 

Wetzel

100

 

 

Total

800

 

Students Named to Spring 2017 Honor Lists at GSC

The Free Press WV

The names of students who attained the Glenville State College President’s and Vice President’s Honor Lists for the Spring 2017 semester have been announced.

To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison

Boone County: Tiffany D. Muller

Braxton County: Coleden R. Belknap, Bridget D. Carr, Amber N. Hyre

Calhoun County: Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont

Clay County:  Dalton M. Holcomb

Doddridge County:  Dennis M. Bowling, Jr., Joshua M. Pitcock

Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth

Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Jonathan E. Clark, Michaela L. Gumm, Christina L. Jenkins, Amanda R. Lamb, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Halee N. Wildman

Grant County: Larissa A. Henry

Jackson County: Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical, Clayton Swisher

Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Jasmine N. Tarman

Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Rebecca E. Wiseman

Lewis County: Jennifer M. Eiler, Justin P. Raines, Kelly L. Weaver

Logan County: Matthew A. Zachary

Marshall County: Logen M. LeMasters

Mason County: Anthony ‘AJ’ Howard

Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton

Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg, Michael I. Pracht

Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Mark H. Sanson

Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto

Preston County: Madison H. Null, Josiah D. Nuse

Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne

Randolph County: Chad E. Cook, Daniel T. Crawford, Christopher D. Varner

Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff

Roane County: Georgia B. Bing

Tucker County: Wiley T. Raines

Upshur County: Skylar A. Fulton, Belinda L. Lewis

Wayne County: James M. Egnor

Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule

Wirt County: Mary M. Strong

Wood County:  Taylor A. Broadwater

Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Raven P. Fatool, Raven C. Greer, Jake Hensell, Momi P. Lievan, Allison A. Parski, Victoria L. Peterson, Brian S. Williams

***

To be named to the GSC Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Logan M. Renner

Boone County: Andrew K. Boktor, Gregory I. Lail, Mackenzie R. Smith

Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Tyler K. Cunningham, Larissa E. DeLuca, Garrett E. Hacker, Sean R. Hawkins, Jacob D. Haymond, Tonya L. Lyons, Christian M. Pritt, Joshua L. Rexroad, Teddy J. Richardson, Randy A. Stiers, Andrew R. Tefft, Erica N. Toler, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Andrea B. Vidal, Elania N. White, Shanna S. Wine

Calhoun County: Moriah J. Creelfox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Amber N. Frymier, Chelsea R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Devon T. Toppings

Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Carrie G. Huffman, Caitlyn M. Rogers, Kristie D. Taylor

Doddridge County: Ryan M. Mizia, Megan J. Sheets, Lindsey G. Travis

Fayette County: Breanna N. Bennett, Anthony J. Murdock, II, Travis C. Myers, Trevor D. Wood

Gilmer County: Katelyn S. Benson, Madison L. Campbell, Janessia S. Cool, Teayria G. Cool, Sara B. Coombs, Tara S. Evans, Conner T. Ferguson, Samantha L. McCune, Matthew M. Montgomery, Cody M. Moore, Dawn R. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Hunter Moore, Zaon A. Starseed, Lexsey A. Wagner, Timothy G. Wine, Carrissa M. Wood, Trevor D. Wright

Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty

Hardy County: Faith V. Smith

Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Abby S. McCarty, Hannah M. Mick, Lia Runyan, Megan E. Ruppert, Amy A. Weiss, Bettie M. Wilfong

Kanawha County:  McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Jacob T. Lutsy, Jeri D. Potter, Bethany N. Spelock

Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, James Z. Browning, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Daniel M. Pascasio, Mitchell D. Queen, Torie A. Riffle

Logan County: Kristin A. DesRocher

Marion County:  Emily A. Stoller

Mason County:  Kaylee M. Howard

Monongalia County: Hunter A. Given

Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Brady A. Tritapoe

Nicholas County: Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Kimmy K. Little, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Eric W. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Joshua ‘Cameron’ Woods

Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Brittany L. Huffman, Chase M. Simmons, Raven D. Turner

Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote

Pocahontas County: Lucas W. Fuller, Isaac C. Hise, Brooke A. Riffe

Putnam County: Tori L. Ward

Raleigh County: Jordan B. Coalson, Jacob Coots, Michael A. Layne, Matthew Welch

Randolph County: Jerome W. Smith

Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Olivia D. Goff, Valerie E. Ogle

Roane County: Bonita J. Schreckengost, Cassidy M. Taylor, James D. Williams

Tucker County: Catherine Chambers

Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber

Upshur County: Heather A. Gregory

Webster County: Richard M. Burns, Tonya N. Sahl, Danielle Williams

Wetzel County: Colton L. Ring, Brandon M. Smith

Wood County: Brooke N. Radabaugh

Wyoming County: Kaci M. Mullins

Out of State: Ali P. Capobianco, Jr, Brianna T. D’Angelo, Jessica D. Digennaro, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Alex E. Gilmore, Tanner B. Helms, Cedric J. Johnson, Justin S. Koogler, Julia E. Lindberg, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Asiya B. Smith, Tayana L. Stewart, Johnni M. Tillman

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 11,539 Spring Turkeys In 2017

The Free Press WV

Spring turkey hunters harvested 11,539 gobblers this year, an increase of more than 11 percent from 2016, according to preliminary numbers provided by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The harvest is the largest since 2006 when 11,735 birds were harvested, and is more than 18 percent above the 10-year average.

“Weather conditions were variable across the state during this year’s spring gobbler season, so it’s nice to see hunters were able to get out and enjoy some successful hunting, which is reflected in the harvest numbers,” said Mike Peters, DNR game bird biologist.

Five of the six DNR districts reported increased harvests over last year.

District 4 was the only district in which fewer birds were harvested than in 2016.

District 1 again recorded the most birds harvested this year (2,578), followed by District 6 (2,250), District 5 (2,090), District 4 (1,858), District 3 (1,733) and District 2 (1,030).

The top five counties with the largest harvests were Preston (475), which was up more than 100 birds from last year, Mason (448), Jackson (408), Wood (380), and Harrison (327).

Youth hunters harvested 458 turkeys during the one-day youth season on April 15.

Those numbers are included on the accompanying table.

West Virginia Spring Gobbler Season Results

County

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Barbour

162

178

127

165

204

Brooke

104

84

67

78

100

Hancock

110

110

89

98

106

Harrison

355

264

247

286

327

Marion

218

149

170

192

256

Marshall

300

220

174

207

255

Monongalia

262

174

199

197

266

Ohio

131

91

109

111

113

Preston

403

344

333

371

475

Taylor

103

87

72

101

135

Tucker

57

88

82

90

97

Wetzel

256

203

168

196

244

District 1 Subtotal

2,461

1,992

1,837

2,092

2,578

Berkeley

98

112

124

115

147

Grant

129

129

131

161

145

Hampshire

124

138

156

170

184

Hardy

129

135

116

132

132

Jefferson

60

57

82

79

114

Mineral

87

96

118

134

132

Morgan

54

62

64

54

64

Pendleton

117

95

94

88

112

District 2 Subtotal

798

824

885

933

1,030

Braxton

238

175

194

197

209

Clay

147

68

83

101

120

Lewis

221

180

194

211

249

Nicholas

221

164

213

330

311

Pocahontas

160

130

145

144

143

Randolph

217

186

225

250

248

Upshur

262

229

231

228

303

Webster

118

113

114

156

150

District 3 Subtotal

1,584

1,245

1,399

1,617

1,733

Fayette

287

244

239

292

278

Greenbrier

299

245

242

308

269

McDowell

308

215

218

200

177

Mercer

177

170

161

176

192

Monroe

206

212

181

184

192

Raleigh

277

214

231

283

279

Summers

258

209

199

219

209

Wyoming

291

255

257

320

262

District 4 Subtotal

2,103

1,764

1,728

1,982

1,858

Boone

230

159

138

157

157

Cabell

138

80

110

114

176

Kanawha

332

231

227

285

319

Lincoln

213

178

169

215

228

Logan

246

181

172

181

165

Mason

370

293

314

378

448

Mingo

141

93

91

131

143

Putnam

225

150

181

210

268

Wayne

144

103

108

139

186

District 5 Subtotal

2,039

1,468

1,510

1,810

2,090

Calhoun

179

135

128

145

164

Doddridge

138

126

118

137

160

Gilmer

191

147

124

132

143

Jackson

326

293

264

302

408

Pleasants

83

73

71

80

89

Ritchie

326

245

218

216

263

Roane

236

232

210

231

256

Tyler

211

136

144

182

181

Wirt

193

177

153

174

206

Wood

294

271

248

328

380

District 6 Subtotal

2,177

1,835

1,678

1,927

2,250

State Total

11,162

9,128

9,037

10,361

11,539

8th Graders Honored For Golden Horseshoe Accomplishments

The Free Press WV

More than 200 eighth-graders from across West Virginia were honored at the state Culture Center in the annual Golden Horseshoe ceremony.

The students earned the honor of Knights of the Golden Horseshoe for their knowledge of West Virginia history.

“I am proud of each student who earned this elite honor today,” state School Superintendent Dr. Steve Paine said. “The Golden Horseshoe recognizes students’ appreciation and understanding of West Virginia and promotes pride in our state.”

The Golden Horseshoe test has been given each year since 1931 in West Virginia. This year marks the 301st anniversary of the Golden Horseshoe tradition that began in the 1700’s when West Virginia was part of Virginia.

A complete list of 2017 winners can be found by visiting HERE.

Report: More Mountain State Students Pursuing Higher Education

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties lead the way in improving college-going rates

The Free Press WV

More West Virginia high school graduates went on to pursue higher education last year, according to a report released by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) and West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS). The college-going rate increased for the second consecutive year, inching up by 0.3 percent — or 266 students — from 2015 to 2016.

“These gains, while subtle, represent a solid step in the right direction,” Dr. Paul Hill, HEPC Chancellor, said. “For several years, the impact of the 2008 recession led to wide variations in college-going rates, not only in West Virginia but across the nation. Now that the economy is beginning to stabilize, we’re more confident that the small strides we’re witnessing represent genuine progress in creating a college-going culture in West Virginia — a process that takes time and occurs student by student, community by community.”

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties led the state in achieving the highest rates of improvement in college-going rates from 2015 to 2016. Braxton County High School (Braxton), Magnolia High School (Wetzel) and Chapmanville Regional High School (Logan) showed the greatest gains at the school level. Ohio, Mineral and Monongalia counties had the highest rates overall. A complete list of rates by school and county is available at http://www.wvhepc.edu/resources/reports-and-publications/2016-college-going-rate/.

“West Virginia needs more college graduates to grow its economy and invigorate its workforce,” Dr. Sarah Tucker, CTCS Chancellor, said. “I commend those high schools and school districts that are putting a real focus on helping their students pursue some form of postsecondary education. The future prosperity of our state depends on getting more students into college and ensuring they succeed and graduate.”

The 2016 Higher Education Report Card, released last fall by HEPC and CTCS, also outlined gains in college retention and a record number of degrees awarded by the state’s public colleges and universities.

HEPC and CTCS are charged with developing and implementing a five-year statewide strategic plan for higher education that includes a strong focus on improving access to higher education and promoting college completion and success. As part of this process, the agencies have in recent years launched a number of strategies that are proving to have an impact on higher education attainment.

For example, the federally funded “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)” initiative provides college mentoring and planning services to middle and high school students in ten of the state’s most economically challenged counties. The statewide College Foundation of West Virginia (CFWV) initiative offers information, including text message counseling, to help students navigate the college application and enrollment processes. And recent policy changes overhauling the delivery of developmental education and encouraging students to enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours per semester are showing promising results toward raising college graduation rates.

Missing Gilmer County Woman’s Body Found In Stream

The Free Press WV

The body of 42-year-old Melinda “Mendy” Rice of Gilmer County, WV, was found in a creek near Wileyville on Thursday.

West Virginia State Police confirmed Rice’s body was discovered at about 12:30 p.m. in a stream behind a home on Mountaineer Highway between Wileyville and Brock Ridge in Wetzel County.

Rice had been missing since March 20, when she walked away from a residence on Brock Ridge.

Despite a search held April 01 in the area, the missing woman’s remains were not discovered until Thursday.

Officials said there were no obvious signs of trauma to indicate a cause of death. Her body was sent to Charleston for an autopsy.

According to Rice’s family, several people searched all day on April 01 for signs of the missing mother of four. Some searched the Brock Ridge area, while others searched the ridges surrounding Brock Ridge.

The family had offered a $1,000 reward for information leading to Rice’s discovery.

They also had planned another search for next weekend. When she was last seen, Rice was wearing a dark colored West Virginia hooded sweatshirt, a pair of jeans and white tennis shoes.

Rice’s family has searched for her, or signs of her whereabouts, since her disappearance.

The family said they found an article of clothing along the road in the area where she was last seen.

The item was taken to the state police.

The state police also had taken search dogs to the area where Rice was last seen.


04.08.2017
NewsAccidentsWest VirginiaRegionGilmer CountyWetzel County

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West Virginia High Schools Recognized for Exemplary Graduation Rates

Seventy West Virginia high schools were recognized for achieving exemplary graduation rates of 90 percent or greater during the 2015-16 school year. Schools were honored by Governor Jim Justice’s Chief of Staff, Nick Casey, State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Michael Martirano and the West Virginia Board of Education.

“Our state becomes stronger with each student that graduates high school,” Martirano said. “The high schools here today deserve the praise they are receiving for achieving a 90 percent or higher graduation rate. Our schools see the potential that a high school graduate holds for our state and they, along with the Department of Education and Board of Education, have made it a top priority to ensure our students show up, work hard, and earn a diploma.”

The Free Press WV
Gilmer County Superintendent Mr. Devono and GCHS Principal Mrs. Butcher
receiving a plaque in Charleston during a recognition ceremony.


Recent data show more students in West Virginia are graduating from high school when compared to previous years. Several statewide initiatives contributed to the steady increase in the graduation rate. Most notably the creation of the state’s Early Warning System, which tracks 45 different indicators – the most important being attendance, behavior and grades – to identify students at risk of dropping out.

West Virginia’s graduation rate has continued to rise throughout the last several years. Data from the U.S. Department of Education placed West Virginia among the top 20 states for graduation rates in 2014-15, with a rate of 86.5 percent. The average graduation rate in the Mountain State for the 2015-16 school year increased even more to 89.81 percent.

Of the 70 schools recognized, four schools achieved a graduation rate of 100 percent. Those schools include; Union Educational Complex, Harman High School, Pickens High School and Paden City High School.

The 70 schools recognized represent 60.3 percent of the 116 high schools in West Virginia. The overall graduation rate for all West Virginia high schools was 89.81 percent.

 

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

Mountain Valley Pipeline Public Hearing Notice

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection – Division of Water and Waste Management will hold public hearings regarding the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline project for State 401 Water Quality Certification, Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and for Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit. Oral and written comments will be accepted at each hearing. The hearings will start at 6:00PM at the following locations:

For Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, State 401 Water Quality Certification, and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Summers County at Summers Memorial Building (451 1st Ave in Hinton) on Tuesday March 07, 2017. 

For State 401 Water Quality Certification and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Webster County at Webster County High School auditorium on Monday March 6, 2017.

• Harrison County at Robert C. Byrd High School Large Group Instruction Room on Thursday March 09, 2017.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project is comprised of approximately 195 miles of natural gas pipeline along with compressor stations, meter stations, access roads, and interconnects through: Wetzel, Harrison, Doddridge, Lewis, Braxton, Webster, Nicholas, Greenbrier, Fayette, Summers, and Monroe Counties in West Virginia. The associated Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667) would be for the discharge of stormwater associated with the disturbance of 4,214 acres of land for the of construction of this project. The Natural Streams Preservation Act permit (NSP-17-0001) being sought is for a proposed crossing of Greenbrier River in Summers County near Pence Springs. The State 401 Water Quality Certification (WQC-16-0005) would be for activities that will or may discharge fill into waters of the State. Mountain Valley Pipeline project is proposing to mitigate for the streams and wetlands permanently impacted by this project.

Any interested person may submit written comments on the Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit, the Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and/or the State 401 Water Quality Certification by addressing such to the Director of the Division of Water and Waste Management during the comment period, which begins with this notice and ends on March 19, 2017 at 8PM. Comments or requests should be emailed to or by mail addressed to:

Director, Division of Water and Management, DEP

ATTN: Sharon Mullins, Permitting Section

601 57th Street SE

Charleston, WV 25304-2345

Applicant Type Permit ID

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit WVR310667

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. State 401 Water Quality Certification WQC-16-0005

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit NSP-17-0001

Additional Information

State 401 Water Quality Certification application (WQC-16-0005) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Natural Streams Preservation Act permit application (NSP-17-0001) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667)

Instructions for navigating the Oil and Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit webpages

Mountain Valley Pipeline Information Page

Glenville State College Vice President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the Vice President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Brianna A. Shivers


Boone County: Ally K. Brown, Michele L. Epling, Crystal M. Jarrell, Gregory I. Lail


Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Coleden R. Belknap, Tyler K. Cunningham, Kathryn L. Dean, Larissa E. DeLuca, Jacob D. Haymond, Samantha N. Mazzella, Teddy J. Richardson, Cami D. Roberts, Alexis S. Spell, Heather N. Thayer, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Maranda J. Vaughan, Andrea B. Vidal, Brandon M. White, Shanna S. Wine


Calhoun County: Tiffany A. Brannon, Moriah J. CreelFox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Taylor S. Garrett, Chelsea  R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont, Johnathan X. Taylor


Clay County: Casey E. Brown, Opalene D. Huffman, William C. Robertson, Sydnee M. Vance


Doddridge County: Joshua M. Pitcock, Lindsey G. Travis


Fayette County: Vladimir V. Iotov, Kelsey L. Norris, Trevor D. Wood


Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Katelyn S. Benson, Julie A. Bishop, Monica D.  Bush, Madison L. Campbell, Sara B. Coombs, Colby G. Cunningham, Lucas D. DeMarino, Meghan Harubin, Christina L. Jenkins, Jaylin K. Johnson, Amanda R. Lamb, Tonya L. Lyons, Matthew M. Montgomery, Adam H. Moore, Cody M. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Zandel M. Sponaugle, Alexus C. Sprouse, Zaon A. Starseed, Elania N. White, Carrissa M. Wood


Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty, Tina M. Jerman


Hampshire County: Dylan G. Kesner


Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Lia Runyan


Jackson County: Ryan A. Gregory, Kirsten M. Marks, Joel E. McDonald, Sapphire N. Parsons, Clayton Swisher, Bradley J. Titus, Kelly J. Trippett


Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Mary E. Lewis, Anthony R. Vazquez


Kanawha County: Faith Donze, McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Rema K. Jordan, Zachary Lively, Jonathan L. Mullins, Jeri D. Potter, Rebecca E. Wiseman


Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, Jennifer M. Eiler, Destiny L. Grimes, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Justin P. Raines, J’Aime L. Shearer, Kelly L. Weaver


Logan County: Kaitlyn A. Bircheat, Alec G. Maynard


Marion County: Morgan P. Hardesty


Marshall County: Logen M. Lemasters


Mason County: Charles B. Walton


Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton


Monongalia County: Alyssa B. Boback


Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Michael I. Pracht, Brady A. Tritapoe


Nicholas County: Autumn G. Barnett, Jessica R. Bird, Marlyn S. Donelson, Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Morgan Francis, Taylor Keenan, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Nathan S. Spencer, Mason A. Thomas, Samuel P. Whitlock


Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Raven D. Turner


Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote


Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto, Isaac C. Hise


Preston County: Kathleen L. Faber


Putnam County: Jacob M. Stover


Raleigh County: Luke D. Carpenter, Kaylee S. Dickenson, Michael A. Layne


Randolph County: Christopher A. Cozad, Angela R. McWilliams, Kathlyne L. Simmons, Christopher D. Varner


Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Carleena P. Elliott, Olivia D. Goff, Trinity R. Muschweck


Roane County: Georgia B. Bing, Joshua C. Runyon, Bonita J. Schreckengost, James D. Williams


Taylor County: Eva S. Guthrie


Tucker County: John Chambers, Wiley T. Raines, Stephanie R. Williams


Tyler County: Devon J. Harris


Upshur County: Autumn Knight, Belinda L. Lewis


Wayne County: Taylor N. Brumfield


Webster County: Valerie L. Rule, Danielle Williams


Wetzel County: Daniel M. Jackson, Colton L. Ring, Andrew R. Tefft


Wirt County: Micheal L. Morgan, Mary M. Strong


Wood County: Taylor A. Broadwater


Wyoming County: Travis D. Gibson, Kaci M. Mullins


Out of State: Karla Y. Barr, Chandler R. Carrera, Ibrahim O. Ghanem, Dwyron K. Gillard, II, Taylor A. Gilliland, Noah R. Green, Jake Hensell, Justin S. Koogler, Momi P. Lievan, Paris M. McLeod, Anthony W. McPoyle, Emily M. Meyers, Stephen G. Mickle, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Casey R. Sheaffer, Wesley D. Stauffer, Johnni M. Tillman, Ernesto Torres, Paranda S. Uber, Jack H. Varndell, Timothy G. Wine, Hannah N. Wright

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