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Barbour County

Barbour County

Welcome Back to School and College - Students, Teacher, and Staff - 2017-2018

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Public School Start/End Dates for 2017-18 Across the Area

The Free Press WV

Barbour County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 23


Braxton County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 10

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 16


Calhoun County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Clay County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 30


Doddridge County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Gilmer County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Harrison County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 24


Lewis County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Nicholas County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Pleasants County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Ritchie County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Roane County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Tyler County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Webster County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Wetzel County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, June 07


Wirt County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Wood County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01

NWS Puts Most of State Under Flash Flood Watch Through Friday Evening

The Free Press WV

The National Weather Service in Charleston has issued a Flash Flood Watch for its entire coverage area in West Virginia through Friday at 8 p.m.

“Rounds of showers and thunderstorms with very heavy rain are expected through Friday,” the NWS message said. “This rainfall, coupled with rain that has already fallen, could produce flash flooding, especially along small streams, creeks, low spots and poor drainage areas.”

Counties under the watch include: Barbour, Boone, Braxton, Cabell, Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge, Gilmer, Harrison, Jackson WV, Kanawha, Lewis, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, McDowell, Mingo, Fayette, Nicholas, Pocahontas, Raleigh, Randolph, Webster, Pleasants, Putnam, Ritchie, Roane,Taylor, Tyler, Upshur, Wayne, Wirt, Wood and Wyoming.

The National Weather Service Office in Pittsburgh issued a similar Flash Flood Watch for the Northern Panhandle, Eastern Panhandle and north central counties from 6 a.m. Friday through 1 a.m. Saturday.

Sunday Storms Could Cause Flash Flooding

The Free Press WV

More than two dozen counties in West Virginia are under a Flash Flood Watch through Sunday evening, the National Weather Service said.

Additional rounds of thunderstorms containing very heavy rain could cause flooding along small streams and poor drainage areas, meteorologists said.

The counties under the watch include: Mason, Jackson, Wood, Pleasants, Tyler, Putnam, Kanawha, Roane, Wirt, Calhoun, Ritchie, Doddridge, Clay, Braxton, Gilmer, Lewis, Harrison, Taylor, Upshur Barbour, Fayette, Nicholas, Webster, Pocahontas, and Randolph.

Flash Flood Watch in Effect For Several WV Counties

The Free Press WV

The National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Watch for nearly two dozen West Virginia counties through Friday evening.

According to NWS meteorologists, “A frontal system is expected to pass through the region Thursday afternoon and Friday. Storms associated with it could produce excessive rainfall. This rain coupled with the wet soils across the area could produce flash flooding, especially along small streams, creeks, low spots and poor drainage areas.”

Counties named in the watch include:

  • Barbour
  • Braxton
  • Calhoun
  • Doddridge
  • Gilmer
  • Harrison
  • Jackson
  • Lewis
  • Mason
  • Pleasants
  • Pocahontas
  • Randolph
  • Ritchie
  • Roane
  • Taylor
  • Tyler
  • Upshur
  • Webster
  • Wirt
  • Wood

West Virginia Library Commission Announces Grants to Public Libraries

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Library Commission has presented $110,093 in state grants to 30 public libraries in the state. 

The grants were awarded in June, based on facility and technology proposals from each library.

17 grants were awarded for facility maintenance and 14 for technology enhancements.  The following libraries received grant funding: 

  • Bolivar-Harper’s Ferry Public Library
  • Brooke County Public Library
  • Burnsville Public Library
  • Chapmanville Public Library
  • Clay County Public Library
  • Craigsville Public Library
  • Gassaway Public Library
  • Hamlin-Lincoln County Public Library
  • Kingwood Public Library
  • Logan Area Public Library
  • Lynn Murray Public Library
  • Marion County Public Library
  • Mason County Public Library
  • Moundsville-Marshall County Public Library
  • Mountaintop Public Library
  • Nutter Fort Public Library
  • Paden City Public Library
  • Pendleton County Public Library
  • Philippi Public Library
  • Raleigh County Public Library
  • Roane County Public Library
  • Rupert Public Library
  • Shepherdstown Public Library
  • Summers County Public Library
  • Summersville Public Library
  • Sutton Public Library
  • Swayne Memorial Public Library
  • Valley Head Public Library
  • Wayne Public Library
  • Webster Addison Public Library


“These grants emphasize the important needs in West Virginia’s public libraries,” said Karen Goff, Executive Secretary of the WVLC.

“These dollars will allow libraries to make basic improvements to their facilities, as well as enhance computer access for their patrons.”


West Virginia Library Commission encourages lifelong learning, individual empowerment, civic engagement and an enriched quality of life by enhancing library and information services for all West Virginians. WVLC is an independent agency of the Office of the Secretary of Education and the Arts.

To learn more about the WVLC, please visit www.librarycommission.wv.gov or call us at 304.558.2041.

Grants Available from Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon

The Free Press WV

The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon opened its 2017-2018 grant cycle on May 01.

The foundation, formed in 2015, serves communities’ health care-related needs in Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur and Webster counties through its annual grant award process.

Letters of inquiry are due June 15. By June 30, the organization will approve the letters and invite submitters to send a full application. Complete applications are due August 15. Grants will be awarded in late September or early October.

“The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon seeks partnerships with nonprofit organizations with the potential to inspire healthier choices for the communities of Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur, and Webster counties,” Executive Director Janell E. Ray said.

The PFB focuses its funding awards in four broad health care-related areas:

• Health and Wellness – Examples include diabetes prevention, oral hygiene, prenatal care.

• Leadership Development – Examples include staff and management training, marketing and fundraising training.

• Lifestyle Education – Examples include substance and domestic violence programs, homeless assistance, mental health care.

• Spiritual and Pastoral Care – Examples include hospice care, senior services, Alzheimer and dementia care, bereavement counseling.

The Pallottine Foundation of Buckhannon provides grant funding for qualified 501(c)(3) organizations in Barbour, Lewis, Randolph, Upshur, and Webster counties in West Virginia that serve healthcare and healthcare-related needs of the community. Exclusion areas are capital projects, scholarships, endowments, and individuals. Learn more about the Foundation. pallottinebuckhannon.org/

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 11,539 Spring Turkeys In 2017

The Free Press WV

Spring turkey hunters harvested 11,539 gobblers this year, an increase of more than 11 percent from 2016, according to preliminary numbers provided by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The harvest is the largest since 2006 when 11,735 birds were harvested, and is more than 18 percent above the 10-year average.

“Weather conditions were variable across the state during this year’s spring gobbler season, so it’s nice to see hunters were able to get out and enjoy some successful hunting, which is reflected in the harvest numbers,” said Mike Peters, DNR game bird biologist.

Five of the six DNR districts reported increased harvests over last year.

District 4 was the only district in which fewer birds were harvested than in 2016.

District 1 again recorded the most birds harvested this year (2,578), followed by District 6 (2,250), District 5 (2,090), District 4 (1,858), District 3 (1,733) and District 2 (1,030).

The top five counties with the largest harvests were Preston (475), which was up more than 100 birds from last year, Mason (448), Jackson (408), Wood (380), and Harrison (327).

Youth hunters harvested 458 turkeys during the one-day youth season on April 15.

Those numbers are included on the accompanying table.

West Virginia Spring Gobbler Season Results

County

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Barbour

162

178

127

165

204

Brooke

104

84

67

78

100

Hancock

110

110

89

98

106

Harrison

355

264

247

286

327

Marion

218

149

170

192

256

Marshall

300

220

174

207

255

Monongalia

262

174

199

197

266

Ohio

131

91

109

111

113

Preston

403

344

333

371

475

Taylor

103

87

72

101

135

Tucker

57

88

82

90

97

Wetzel

256

203

168

196

244

District 1 Subtotal

2,461

1,992

1,837

2,092

2,578

Berkeley

98

112

124

115

147

Grant

129

129

131

161

145

Hampshire

124

138

156

170

184

Hardy

129

135

116

132

132

Jefferson

60

57

82

79

114

Mineral

87

96

118

134

132

Morgan

54

62

64

54

64

Pendleton

117

95

94

88

112

District 2 Subtotal

798

824

885

933

1,030

Braxton

238

175

194

197

209

Clay

147

68

83

101

120

Lewis

221

180

194

211

249

Nicholas

221

164

213

330

311

Pocahontas

160

130

145

144

143

Randolph

217

186

225

250

248

Upshur

262

229

231

228

303

Webster

118

113

114

156

150

District 3 Subtotal

1,584

1,245

1,399

1,617

1,733

Fayette

287

244

239

292

278

Greenbrier

299

245

242

308

269

McDowell

308

215

218

200

177

Mercer

177

170

161

176

192

Monroe

206

212

181

184

192

Raleigh

277

214

231

283

279

Summers

258

209

199

219

209

Wyoming

291

255

257

320

262

District 4 Subtotal

2,103

1,764

1,728

1,982

1,858

Boone

230

159

138

157

157

Cabell

138

80

110

114

176

Kanawha

332

231

227

285

319

Lincoln

213

178

169

215

228

Logan

246

181

172

181

165

Mason

370

293

314

378

448

Mingo

141

93

91

131

143

Putnam

225

150

181

210

268

Wayne

144

103

108

139

186

District 5 Subtotal

2,039

1,468

1,510

1,810

2,090

Calhoun

179

135

128

145

164

Doddridge

138

126

118

137

160

Gilmer

191

147

124

132

143

Jackson

326

293

264

302

408

Pleasants

83

73

71

80

89

Ritchie

326

245

218

216

263

Roane

236

232

210

231

256

Tyler

211

136

144

182

181

Wirt

193

177

153

174

206

Wood

294

271

248

328

380

District 6 Subtotal

2,177

1,835

1,678

1,927

2,250

State Total

11,162

9,128

9,037

10,361

11,539

8th Graders Honored For Golden Horseshoe Accomplishments

The Free Press WV

More than 200 eighth-graders from across West Virginia were honored at the state Culture Center in the annual Golden Horseshoe ceremony.

The students earned the honor of Knights of the Golden Horseshoe for their knowledge of West Virginia history.

“I am proud of each student who earned this elite honor today,” state School Superintendent Dr. Steve Paine said. “The Golden Horseshoe recognizes students’ appreciation and understanding of West Virginia and promotes pride in our state.”

The Golden Horseshoe test has been given each year since 1931 in West Virginia. This year marks the 301st anniversary of the Golden Horseshoe tradition that began in the 1700’s when West Virginia was part of Virginia.

A complete list of 2017 winners can be found by visiting HERE.

Report: More Mountain State Students Pursuing Higher Education

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties lead the way in improving college-going rates

The Free Press WV

More West Virginia high school graduates went on to pursue higher education last year, according to a report released by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) and West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS). The college-going rate increased for the second consecutive year, inching up by 0.3 percent — or 266 students — from 2015 to 2016.

“These gains, while subtle, represent a solid step in the right direction,” Dr. Paul Hill, HEPC Chancellor, said. “For several years, the impact of the 2008 recession led to wide variations in college-going rates, not only in West Virginia but across the nation. Now that the economy is beginning to stabilize, we’re more confident that the small strides we’re witnessing represent genuine progress in creating a college-going culture in West Virginia — a process that takes time and occurs student by student, community by community.”

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties led the state in achieving the highest rates of improvement in college-going rates from 2015 to 2016. Braxton County High School (Braxton), Magnolia High School (Wetzel) and Chapmanville Regional High School (Logan) showed the greatest gains at the school level. Ohio, Mineral and Monongalia counties had the highest rates overall. A complete list of rates by school and county is available at http://www.wvhepc.edu/resources/reports-and-publications/2016-college-going-rate/.

“West Virginia needs more college graduates to grow its economy and invigorate its workforce,” Dr. Sarah Tucker, CTCS Chancellor, said. “I commend those high schools and school districts that are putting a real focus on helping their students pursue some form of postsecondary education. The future prosperity of our state depends on getting more students into college and ensuring they succeed and graduate.”

The 2016 Higher Education Report Card, released last fall by HEPC and CTCS, also outlined gains in college retention and a record number of degrees awarded by the state’s public colleges and universities.

HEPC and CTCS are charged with developing and implementing a five-year statewide strategic plan for higher education that includes a strong focus on improving access to higher education and promoting college completion and success. As part of this process, the agencies have in recent years launched a number of strategies that are proving to have an impact on higher education attainment.

For example, the federally funded “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)” initiative provides college mentoring and planning services to middle and high school students in ten of the state’s most economically challenged counties. The statewide College Foundation of West Virginia (CFWV) initiative offers information, including text message counseling, to help students navigate the college application and enrollment processes. And recent policy changes overhauling the delivery of developmental education and encouraging students to enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours per semester are showing promising results toward raising college graduation rates.

Wesleyan to Hold 2nd Annual North-Central West Virginia Honor Band

The Free Press WV

On February 03, students from area county music programs will gather on the campus of West Virginia Wesleyan College for the second annual North-Central West Virginia Honor Band.  The two-day honor band, which stemmed from the idea of giving every middle and high school student in West Virginia a high-level musical experience opportunity, is facilitated by Logan Lindsey, director of bands at Wesleyan.

Students from Barbour, Upshur, Randolph, Gilmer, Lewis, and Taylor will arrive on campus on Friday to prepare for a Saturday, February 04 concert to be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Culpepper Auditorium of the Virginia Thomas Law Center for the Performing Arts.  The middle school band, comprised of 64 students, will be under the direction of Charles Doherty, director of instrumental music at Damascus High School in Damascus, MD.  The 63-piece high school band will be under the direction of Lindsey.

“The North-Central West Virginia Honor Band has taken a huge step in growth this year, adding three counties to its participating schools and looking for more in the future,” stated Lindsey.  “This is a vital part of musical development for young students as none of the participating counties offer an All-County Honor Band.  As I am sure this event will continue to grow and adapt, the most important part is that is continues to cater to the musical needs of the local students and their directors.”

Doherty directs two bands, a jazz band, and a string orchestra at Damascus High School.  He earned a bachelor of science degree in music education and a master of music in trombone performance from Duquesne University. He played principal trombone in the Symphony Band, lead trombone in the Jazz Ensemble, and principal bass trombone in the Wind Symphony, as well as conducted the Symphony Band in performance.  As a performer, Doherty has played with numerous groups in the D.C. area, including Mike Kamuf Little Big Band, Martinsburg Jazz Orchestra, The Yesterday Swing Orchestra, the Montgomery Philharmonic, and the Trinity Chamber Orchestra.

Lindsey is currently in his fourth year as Director of Bands at West Virginia Wesleyan College.  He is sought out regionally and nationally both as a soloist and conductor.  Growing up near New Orleans immersed in multiple music worlds has really shaped his performances and teaching to be very unique and always educational.  Lindsey has performed with the Modern Jazz Tuba Project, one of the premier jazz tuba/euphonium groups in the world.  He attributes his success to his teachers, mentors, and the blessings of his experiences.  Of these, his biggest influences came from Dr. Richard Perry, jazz and orchestral tubist and professor at the University of Southern Mississippi; Dr. Steven Sudduth, former low brass conductor at the University of South Dakota; and Chester Schmitz, retired Boston Pops Orchestra tubist.

The event is free and open to the public.

Glenville State College Vice President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the Vice President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Brianna A. Shivers


Boone County: Ally K. Brown, Michele L. Epling, Crystal M. Jarrell, Gregory I. Lail


Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Coleden R. Belknap, Tyler K. Cunningham, Kathryn L. Dean, Larissa E. DeLuca, Jacob D. Haymond, Samantha N. Mazzella, Teddy J. Richardson, Cami D. Roberts, Alexis S. Spell, Heather N. Thayer, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Maranda J. Vaughan, Andrea B. Vidal, Brandon M. White, Shanna S. Wine


Calhoun County: Tiffany A. Brannon, Moriah J. CreelFox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Taylor S. Garrett, Chelsea  R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont, Johnathan X. Taylor


Clay County: Casey E. Brown, Opalene D. Huffman, William C. Robertson, Sydnee M. Vance


Doddridge County: Joshua M. Pitcock, Lindsey G. Travis


Fayette County: Vladimir V. Iotov, Kelsey L. Norris, Trevor D. Wood


Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Katelyn S. Benson, Julie A. Bishop, Monica D.  Bush, Madison L. Campbell, Sara B. Coombs, Colby G. Cunningham, Lucas D. DeMarino, Meghan Harubin, Christina L. Jenkins, Jaylin K. Johnson, Amanda R. Lamb, Tonya L. Lyons, Matthew M. Montgomery, Adam H. Moore, Cody M. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Zandel M. Sponaugle, Alexus C. Sprouse, Zaon A. Starseed, Elania N. White, Carrissa M. Wood


Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty, Tina M. Jerman


Hampshire County: Dylan G. Kesner


Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Lia Runyan


Jackson County: Ryan A. Gregory, Kirsten M. Marks, Joel E. McDonald, Sapphire N. Parsons, Clayton Swisher, Bradley J. Titus, Kelly J. Trippett


Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Mary E. Lewis, Anthony R. Vazquez


Kanawha County: Faith Donze, McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Rema K. Jordan, Zachary Lively, Jonathan L. Mullins, Jeri D. Potter, Rebecca E. Wiseman


Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, Jennifer M. Eiler, Destiny L. Grimes, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Justin P. Raines, J’Aime L. Shearer, Kelly L. Weaver


Logan County: Kaitlyn A. Bircheat, Alec G. Maynard


Marion County: Morgan P. Hardesty


Marshall County: Logen M. Lemasters


Mason County: Charles B. Walton


Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton


Monongalia County: Alyssa B. Boback


Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Michael I. Pracht, Brady A. Tritapoe


Nicholas County: Autumn G. Barnett, Jessica R. Bird, Marlyn S. Donelson, Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Morgan Francis, Taylor Keenan, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Nathan S. Spencer, Mason A. Thomas, Samuel P. Whitlock


Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Raven D. Turner


Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote


Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto, Isaac C. Hise


Preston County: Kathleen L. Faber


Putnam County: Jacob M. Stover


Raleigh County: Luke D. Carpenter, Kaylee S. Dickenson, Michael A. Layne


Randolph County: Christopher A. Cozad, Angela R. McWilliams, Kathlyne L. Simmons, Christopher D. Varner


Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Carleena P. Elliott, Olivia D. Goff, Trinity R. Muschweck


Roane County: Georgia B. Bing, Joshua C. Runyon, Bonita J. Schreckengost, James D. Williams


Taylor County: Eva S. Guthrie


Tucker County: John Chambers, Wiley T. Raines, Stephanie R. Williams


Tyler County: Devon J. Harris


Upshur County: Autumn Knight, Belinda L. Lewis


Wayne County: Taylor N. Brumfield


Webster County: Valerie L. Rule, Danielle Williams


Wetzel County: Daniel M. Jackson, Colton L. Ring, Andrew R. Tefft


Wirt County: Micheal L. Morgan, Mary M. Strong


Wood County: Taylor A. Broadwater


Wyoming County: Travis D. Gibson, Kaci M. Mullins


Out of State: Karla Y. Barr, Chandler R. Carrera, Ibrahim O. Ghanem, Dwyron K. Gillard, II, Taylor A. Gilliland, Noah R. Green, Jake Hensell, Justin S. Koogler, Momi P. Lievan, Paris M. McLeod, Anthony W. McPoyle, Emily M. Meyers, Stephen G. Mickle, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Casey R. Sheaffer, Wesley D. Stauffer, Johnni M. Tillman, Ernesto Torres, Paranda S. Uber, Jack H. Varndell, Timothy G. Wine, Hannah N. Wright

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 112,384 Deer In 2016

The Free Press WV

Preliminary counts indicate West Virginia hunters harvested 112,384 white-tailed deer during the recently completed bucks firearms, antlerless, muzzleloader, archery, crossbow, and youth/Class Q/Class XS deer seasons, according to Paul Johansen, chief of the Division of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife Resources Section. This year’s total harvest was 19 percent below the 2015 deer harvest of 138,493 and 15 percent below the five-year average of 132,466.

A breakdown of the combined 2016 deer seasons reveals 46,071 bucks harvested during the traditional buck firearm season, 32,508 antlerless deer taken during all antlerless firearm hunting opportunities, 28,808 deer harvested by bows and crossbows, and 4,997 deer taken by muzzleloader hunters.


Antlerless Deer Season

The 2016 antlerless deer season harvest, which includes the youth/Class Q/Class XS deer season, was 18 percent less than in 2015 and 26.5 percent below the five-year average of 44,239.  “It is important to note that the antlerless harvest is the key component to any deer management strategy, as it controls the future deer population,” said Johansen.  Hunters are reminded that on March 13 and 14, 2017, the DNR will hold 12 public meetings across the state to gather comments on proposed fall 2017 antlerless deer hunting seasons in each of the 51 counties where firearms deer hunting is permitted.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,535), Upshur (1,485), Lewis (1,292), Mason (1,269), Jackson (1,224), Ritchie (1,215), Wood (1,126), Roane (1,034), Harrison (972), and Braxton (854).


Muzzleloader Deer Season

The 2016 muzzleloader harvest of 4,997 was 3 percent below the 2015 harvest of 5,178, and 21 percent below the five-year average of 6,344. The top 10 counties are Randolph (243), Nicholas (232), Preston (217), Upshur (185), Lewis (168), Jackson (158), Braxton (157), Mason (153), Wood (141), and Webster (139).


Archery and Crossbow Deer Season

The bow and crossbow hunter’s take of 28,808 deer was 11 percent less than the 2015 archery season harvest of 32,540, and four percent above the five-year average archery season harvest of 27,596.  Archery harvests are inversely correlated to hard mast crops. The below-average acorn crop in 2015, followed by a better acorn crop in 2016, likely contributed to the lower 2016 harvest; however, the proportion of the harvest taken using a crossbow increased in 2016 over that recorded in 2015.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,365), Randolph (975), Wood (945), Kanawha (921), Upshur (867), Wyoming (867), Mason (791), Jackson (785), Nicholas (765), and Raleigh (738).


WESTVIRGINIA DEER HARVEST, 2016

County

BuckFirearms

Antlerless

Muzzleloader

Archery/Crossbow

Total

Barbour

1,098

773

133

568

2,572

Brooke

268

367

38

287

960

Hancock

209

164

34

357

764

Harrison

1,138

972

113

632

2,855

Marion

765

787

113

521

2,186

Marshall

727

493

73

357

1,650

Monongalia

827

644

91

707

2,269

Ohio

270

222

46

294

832

Preston

1,774

1,535

217

1,365

4,891

Taylor

581

490

70

303

1,444

Tucker

730

191

73

409

1,403

Wetzel

899

819

90

335

2,143

District 1Subtotal

9,286

7,457

1,091

6,135

23,969

Berkeley

737

627

67

582

2,013

Grant

954

439

81

351

1,825

Hampshire

1,197

836

88

421

2,542

Hardy

1,076

610

63

317

2,066

Jefferson

422

413

54

417

1,306

Mineral

922

684

80

404

2,090

Morgan

437

406

44

241

1,128

Pendleton

1,088

448

70

345

1,951

District 2 Subtotal

6,833

4,463

547

3,078

14,921

Braxton

1,102

854

157

571

2,684

Clay

390

164

43

241

838

Lewis

1,246

1,292

168

629

3,335

Nicholas

1,044

470

232

765

2,511

Pocahontas

921

202

56

278

1,457

Randolph

1,617

803

243

975

3,638

Upshur

1,399

1,485

185

867

3,936

Webster

941

303

139

548

1,931

District 3 Subtotal

8,660

5,573

1,223

4,874

20,330

Fayette

889

266

124

718

1,997

Greenbrier

1,447

699

135

565

2,846

McDowell

456

456

Mercer

636

383

86

684

1,789

Monroe

1,099

752

70

550

2,471

Raleigh

648

206

70

738

1,662

Summers

657

562

62

403

1,684

Wyoming

 

 

 

867

867

District 4 Subtotal

5,376

2,868

547

4,981

13,772

Boone

573

147

72

364

1,156

Cabell

677

404

60

434

1,575

Kanawha

1,058

385

78

921

2,442

Lincoln

846

522

106

466

1,940

Logan

574

574

Mason

1,267

1,269

153

791

3,480

Mingo

386

386

Putnam

992

803

119

661

2,575

Wayne

815

252

62

419

1,548

District 5 Subtotal

6,228

3,782

650

5,016

15,676

Calhoun

705

599

69

326

1,699

Doddridge

946

706

70

308

2,030

Gilmer

791

634

93

311

1,829

Jackson

1,487

1,224

158

785

3,654

Pleasants

334

251

27

154

766

Ritchie

1,422

1,215

102

630

3,369

Roane

1,178

1,034

105

544

2,861

Tyler

855

766

82

330

2,033

Wirt

777

810

92

391

2,070

Wood

1,193

1,126

141

945

3,405

District 6 Subtotal

9,688

8,365

939

4,724

23,716

StateTotal

46,071

32,508

4,997

28,808

112,384

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 3,012 Black Bears In 2016

The Free Press WV

West Virginia hunters harvested 3,012 black bears during the combined 2016 archery, crossbow and firearms seasons, according to Colin Carpenter, Black Bear Project leader for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The preliminary black bear harvest data for the combined 2016 seasons were 6 percent lower than the record set in 2015. The harvest is the second highest bear kill recorded and is the second time the harvest has topped 3,000.

“The mast index for all oak species in 2016 increased significantly over 2015 and was above the long-term average,” said Carpenter. “Historically, an abundance of oak mast makes bears harder to target for archery hunters. Conversely, increased oak mast typically means a higher December firearms harvest because many bears delay entering their dens due to the abundance of food.”

Carpenter added, “In the 2016 Mast Survey and Hunting Outlook, we predicted a decreased archery harvest and a similar-to-slightly greater December firearms harvest over the levels observed in 2015. Our prediction held true for the archery season, but did not hold up in the December season.”

“Overall, the 2016 harvest declined during the archery, buck-gun and December seasons over the levels recorded in 2015. However, those decreases were partially offset by very successful early gun seasons in September and October.

Hunters killed 1,012 bears during the first segment of the 2016 archery season (Sept. 24 – Nov. 19).  They took 584 bears with vertical bows and 428 with crossbows. The top five counties were Randolph (82), Fayette (74), Nicholas (60), Greenbrier (55) and Preston (52).

Firearms hunters harvested 2,000 bears during 2016. Hunters took 883 bears in September and October, 349 during the concurrent buck-gun bear season, and 768 during the traditional December season. The top five counties were Pendleton (177), Randolph (167), Pocahontas (161), Nicholas (153) and Hardy (133).

2016 WEST VIRGINIA BLACK BEAR HARVEST

County

Bow/Crossbow

Sept/Oct Gun

Buck Gun

December

Total

Barbour

45

20

1

0

66

Brooke

0

0

0

0

0

Hancock

0

0

0

0

0

Harrison

16

0

2

0

18

Marion

3

0

0

0

3

Marshall

2

0

0

0

2

Monongalia

7

0

2

0

9

Ohio

0

0

0

0

0

Preston

52

41

22

22

137

Taylor

17

0

1

0

18

Tucker

35

37

6

50

128

Wetzel

1

0

0

1

2

District 1 Subtotal

178

98

34

73

383

Berkeley

3

0

3

0

6

Grant

25

31

6

39

101

Hampshire

17

0

29

4

50

Hardy

26

61

14

58

159

Jefferson

3

0

2

0

5

Mineral

11

0

0

9

20

Morgan

8

0

11

0

19

Pendleton

37

100

10

67

214

District 2 Subtotal

130

192

75

177

574

Braxton

36

11

4

11

62

Clay

9

13

7

16

45

Lewis

13

0

5

0

18

Nicholas

60

56

31

66

213

Pocahontas

23

62

11

88

184

Randolph

82

99

4

64

249

Upshur

14

10

2

6

32

Webster

38

50

9

52

149

District 3 Subtotal

275

301

73

303

952

Fayette

74

21

39

13

147

Greenbrier

55

45

12

73

185

McDowell

49

38

5

16

108

Mercer

33

0

4

2

39

Monroe

24

27

17

29

97

Raleigh

36

25

9

7

77

Summers

26

0

8

0

34

Wyoming

24

30

1

2

57

District 4 Subtotal

321

186

95

142

744

Boone

23

28

30

32

113

Cabell

0

0

0

0

0

Kanawha

26

38

33

28

125

Lincoln

1

0

0

0

1

Logan

22

26

1

2

51

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

Mingo

13

14

0

7

34

Putnam

0

0

0

0

0

Wayne

1

0

0

0

1

District 5 Subtotal

86

106

64

69

325

Calhoun

1

0

3

0

4

Doddridge

3

0

0

0

3

Gilmer

7

0

4

3

14

Jackson

0

0

0

0

0

Pleasants

0

0

0

0

0

Ritchie

4

0

0

0

4

Roane

1

0

0

0

1

Tyler

2

0

0

0

2

Wirt

4

0

1

1

6

Wood

0

0

0

0

0

District 6 Subtotal

22

0

8

4

34

State Total

1012

883

349

768

3012

Bears listed for Logan, McDowell and Wyoming counties as"Buck Gun” are bow or crossbow kills from 11.21.16 -12.031

November 19, 2016. All other bow and crossbow kills have been separated based on the seasonsin which they were killed
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