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Nicholas County

Nicholas County

Welcome Back to School and College - Students, Teacher, and Staff - 2017-2018

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Public School Start/End Dates for 2017-18 Across the Area

The Free Press WV

Barbour County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 23


Braxton County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 10

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 16


Calhoun County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Clay County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Wednesday, May 30


Doddridge County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Gilmer County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Harrison County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Tuesday, August 15

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 24


Lewis County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Tuesday, May 22


Nicholas County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Pleasants County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Ritchie County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, May 31


Roane County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Tyler County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Webster County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 14

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, May 25


Wetzel County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 21

Last Day of School for Students: Thursday, June 07


Wirt County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Thursday, August 17

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01


Wood County Schools

First Day of School for Students: Wednesday, August 16

Last Day of School for Students: Friday, June 01

NWS Puts Most of State Under Flash Flood Watch Through Friday Evening

The Free Press WV

The National Weather Service in Charleston has issued a Flash Flood Watch for its entire coverage area in West Virginia through Friday at 8 p.m.

“Rounds of showers and thunderstorms with very heavy rain are expected through Friday,” the NWS message said. “This rainfall, coupled with rain that has already fallen, could produce flash flooding, especially along small streams, creeks, low spots and poor drainage areas.”

Counties under the watch include: Barbour, Boone, Braxton, Cabell, Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge, Gilmer, Harrison, Jackson WV, Kanawha, Lewis, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, McDowell, Mingo, Fayette, Nicholas, Pocahontas, Raleigh, Randolph, Webster, Pleasants, Putnam, Ritchie, Roane,Taylor, Tyler, Upshur, Wayne, Wirt, Wood and Wyoming.

The National Weather Service Office in Pittsburgh issued a similar Flash Flood Watch for the Northern Panhandle, Eastern Panhandle and north central counties from 6 a.m. Friday through 1 a.m. Saturday.

Sunday Storms Could Cause Flash Flooding

The Free Press WV

More than two dozen counties in West Virginia are under a Flash Flood Watch through Sunday evening, the National Weather Service said.

Additional rounds of thunderstorms containing very heavy rain could cause flooding along small streams and poor drainage areas, meteorologists said.

The counties under the watch include: Mason, Jackson, Wood, Pleasants, Tyler, Putnam, Kanawha, Roane, Wirt, Calhoun, Ritchie, Doddridge, Clay, Braxton, Gilmer, Lewis, Harrison, Taylor, Upshur Barbour, Fayette, Nicholas, Webster, Pocahontas, and Randolph.

Nicholas County Consolidation Issue Tests Local vs. State Authority

The Free Press WV

School consolidation is almost always controversial and emotional.  Proponents see the benefits of new facilities and economies of scale.  Opponents lament losing their community school and long bus rides for their children.

Nicholas County is currently in the throes of just such a debate. Richwood High and Middle School and Summersville Middle were destroyed in last year’s flood. The local school board has approved a plan to combine five schools at one campus near Summersville.

Nicholas County and Richwood High Schools would be merged, as would Richwood and Summersville Middle Schools. The county’s vocational school would also be on the new campus.

Most of the consolidation opponents are Richwood residents who want to preserve the schools in their community.  They believe the schools are important linchpins as they rebuild following the flood.  The Nicholas County School Board believes their consolidation plan makes the most sense because of the declining student population and the cost of replacing the damaged schools.

The State Board of Education has twice rejected the plan with some members contending the local board did not give full consideration to the views of consolidation opponents. The local board went to court, claiming the state board has no justification for rejecting its consolidation plan.

Both sides spent all day Tuesday in front of Kanawha Court Circuit Court Judge Duke Bloom making their cases. The question Bloom has to decide is whether the local board or the state board has final say.  The answer is not immediately clear.

The State Supreme Court took up a similar case in 1990.  In Kanawha County Board of Education v. The West Virginia Board of Education, the State Supreme Court ruled that the State Board is empowered to approve or disapprove a county school consolidation plan.

However, that power is not unlimited.  Justice Tom Miller, writing for the majority, referenced the Handbook on Planning School Facilities that said the State Board cannot overrule the county board “unless the proposal does not comply with the education and facility standards established by the State Board, or the county board has not complied with procedural requirements.”

So according to the late Justice Miller, the State Board does trump the local board, but it cannot act in an arbitrary manner.

Governor Jim Justice has injected himself into the controversy, starting with his statement during the State of the State address last February.  “I hope and pray that we end up with a school in Richwood,” he said.  Additionally, former State School Board nominee Barbara Whitecotton believes her name was withdrawn because she appeared to favor the Nicholas County School Board’s plan.

It’s understandable that Richwood wants to keep its schools. However, voters elected the local school board to act in the best interest of the community.  If the State Board can arbitrarily supersede the local board, then the concept of local control for schools is just an illusion.

If Nicholas County strongly objects to their school board’s decisions, the voters can send them on their way in the next election. The voters have no such option with the State Board.

West Virginia Library Commission Announces Grants to Public Libraries

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Library Commission has presented $110,093 in state grants to 30 public libraries in the state. 

The grants were awarded in June, based on facility and technology proposals from each library.

17 grants were awarded for facility maintenance and 14 for technology enhancements.  The following libraries received grant funding: 

  • Bolivar-Harper’s Ferry Public Library
  • Brooke County Public Library
  • Burnsville Public Library
  • Chapmanville Public Library
  • Clay County Public Library
  • Craigsville Public Library
  • Gassaway Public Library
  • Hamlin-Lincoln County Public Library
  • Kingwood Public Library
  • Logan Area Public Library
  • Lynn Murray Public Library
  • Marion County Public Library
  • Mason County Public Library
  • Moundsville-Marshall County Public Library
  • Mountaintop Public Library
  • Nutter Fort Public Library
  • Paden City Public Library
  • Pendleton County Public Library
  • Philippi Public Library
  • Raleigh County Public Library
  • Roane County Public Library
  • Rupert Public Library
  • Shepherdstown Public Library
  • Summers County Public Library
  • Summersville Public Library
  • Sutton Public Library
  • Swayne Memorial Public Library
  • Valley Head Public Library
  • Wayne Public Library
  • Webster Addison Public Library


“These grants emphasize the important needs in West Virginia’s public libraries,” said Karen Goff, Executive Secretary of the WVLC.

“These dollars will allow libraries to make basic improvements to their facilities, as well as enhance computer access for their patrons.”


West Virginia Library Commission encourages lifelong learning, individual empowerment, civic engagement and an enriched quality of life by enhancing library and information services for all West Virginians. WVLC is an independent agency of the Office of the Secretary of Education and the Arts.

To learn more about the WVLC, please visit www.librarycommission.wv.gov or call us at 304.558.2041.

Students Named to Spring 2017 Honor Lists at GSC

The Free Press WV

The names of students who attained the Glenville State College President’s and Vice President’s Honor Lists for the Spring 2017 semester have been announced.

To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison

Boone County: Tiffany D. Muller

Braxton County: Coleden R. Belknap, Bridget D. Carr, Amber N. Hyre

Calhoun County: Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont

Clay County:  Dalton M. Holcomb

Doddridge County:  Dennis M. Bowling, Jr., Joshua M. Pitcock

Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth

Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Jonathan E. Clark, Michaela L. Gumm, Christina L. Jenkins, Amanda R. Lamb, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Halee N. Wildman

Grant County: Larissa A. Henry

Jackson County: Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical, Clayton Swisher

Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Jasmine N. Tarman

Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Rebecca E. Wiseman

Lewis County: Jennifer M. Eiler, Justin P. Raines, Kelly L. Weaver

Logan County: Matthew A. Zachary

Marshall County: Logen M. LeMasters

Mason County: Anthony ‘AJ’ Howard

Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton

Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg, Michael I. Pracht

Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Mark H. Sanson

Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto

Preston County: Madison H. Null, Josiah D. Nuse

Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne

Randolph County: Chad E. Cook, Daniel T. Crawford, Christopher D. Varner

Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff

Roane County: Georgia B. Bing

Tucker County: Wiley T. Raines

Upshur County: Skylar A. Fulton, Belinda L. Lewis

Wayne County: James M. Egnor

Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule

Wirt County: Mary M. Strong

Wood County:  Taylor A. Broadwater

Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Raven P. Fatool, Raven C. Greer, Jake Hensell, Momi P. Lievan, Allison A. Parski, Victoria L. Peterson, Brian S. Williams

***

To be named to the GSC Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:

Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Logan M. Renner

Boone County: Andrew K. Boktor, Gregory I. Lail, Mackenzie R. Smith

Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Tyler K. Cunningham, Larissa E. DeLuca, Garrett E. Hacker, Sean R. Hawkins, Jacob D. Haymond, Tonya L. Lyons, Christian M. Pritt, Joshua L. Rexroad, Teddy J. Richardson, Randy A. Stiers, Andrew R. Tefft, Erica N. Toler, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Andrea B. Vidal, Elania N. White, Shanna S. Wine

Calhoun County: Moriah J. Creelfox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Amber N. Frymier, Chelsea R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Devon T. Toppings

Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Carrie G. Huffman, Caitlyn M. Rogers, Kristie D. Taylor

Doddridge County: Ryan M. Mizia, Megan J. Sheets, Lindsey G. Travis

Fayette County: Breanna N. Bennett, Anthony J. Murdock, II, Travis C. Myers, Trevor D. Wood

Gilmer County: Katelyn S. Benson, Madison L. Campbell, Janessia S. Cool, Teayria G. Cool, Sara B. Coombs, Tara S. Evans, Conner T. Ferguson, Samantha L. McCune, Matthew M. Montgomery, Cody M. Moore, Dawn R. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Hunter Moore, Zaon A. Starseed, Lexsey A. Wagner, Timothy G. Wine, Carrissa M. Wood, Trevor D. Wright

Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty

Hardy County: Faith V. Smith

Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Abby S. McCarty, Hannah M. Mick, Lia Runyan, Megan E. Ruppert, Amy A. Weiss, Bettie M. Wilfong

Kanawha County:  McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Jacob T. Lutsy, Jeri D. Potter, Bethany N. Spelock

Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, James Z. Browning, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Daniel M. Pascasio, Mitchell D. Queen, Torie A. Riffle

Logan County: Kristin A. DesRocher

Marion County:  Emily A. Stoller

Mason County:  Kaylee M. Howard

Monongalia County: Hunter A. Given

Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Brady A. Tritapoe

Nicholas County: Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Kimmy K. Little, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Eric W. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Joshua ‘Cameron’ Woods

Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Brittany L. Huffman, Chase M. Simmons, Raven D. Turner

Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote

Pocahontas County: Lucas W. Fuller, Isaac C. Hise, Brooke A. Riffe

Putnam County: Tori L. Ward

Raleigh County: Jordan B. Coalson, Jacob Coots, Michael A. Layne, Matthew Welch

Randolph County: Jerome W. Smith

Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Olivia D. Goff, Valerie E. Ogle

Roane County: Bonita J. Schreckengost, Cassidy M. Taylor, James D. Williams

Tucker County: Catherine Chambers

Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber

Upshur County: Heather A. Gregory

Webster County: Richard M. Burns, Tonya N. Sahl, Danielle Williams

Wetzel County: Colton L. Ring, Brandon M. Smith

Wood County: Brooke N. Radabaugh

Wyoming County: Kaci M. Mullins

Out of State: Ali P. Capobianco, Jr, Brianna T. D’Angelo, Jessica D. Digennaro, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Alex E. Gilmore, Tanner B. Helms, Cedric J. Johnson, Justin S. Koogler, Julia E. Lindberg, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Asiya B. Smith, Tayana L. Stewart, Johnni M. Tillman

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 11,539 Spring Turkeys In 2017

The Free Press WV

Spring turkey hunters harvested 11,539 gobblers this year, an increase of more than 11 percent from 2016, according to preliminary numbers provided by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The harvest is the largest since 2006 when 11,735 birds were harvested, and is more than 18 percent above the 10-year average.

“Weather conditions were variable across the state during this year’s spring gobbler season, so it’s nice to see hunters were able to get out and enjoy some successful hunting, which is reflected in the harvest numbers,” said Mike Peters, DNR game bird biologist.

Five of the six DNR districts reported increased harvests over last year.

District 4 was the only district in which fewer birds were harvested than in 2016.

District 1 again recorded the most birds harvested this year (2,578), followed by District 6 (2,250), District 5 (2,090), District 4 (1,858), District 3 (1,733) and District 2 (1,030).

The top five counties with the largest harvests were Preston (475), which was up more than 100 birds from last year, Mason (448), Jackson (408), Wood (380), and Harrison (327).

Youth hunters harvested 458 turkeys during the one-day youth season on April 15.

Those numbers are included on the accompanying table.

West Virginia Spring Gobbler Season Results

County

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Barbour

162

178

127

165

204

Brooke

104

84

67

78

100

Hancock

110

110

89

98

106

Harrison

355

264

247

286

327

Marion

218

149

170

192

256

Marshall

300

220

174

207

255

Monongalia

262

174

199

197

266

Ohio

131

91

109

111

113

Preston

403

344

333

371

475

Taylor

103

87

72

101

135

Tucker

57

88

82

90

97

Wetzel

256

203

168

196

244

District 1 Subtotal

2,461

1,992

1,837

2,092

2,578

Berkeley

98

112

124

115

147

Grant

129

129

131

161

145

Hampshire

124

138

156

170

184

Hardy

129

135

116

132

132

Jefferson

60

57

82

79

114

Mineral

87

96

118

134

132

Morgan

54

62

64

54

64

Pendleton

117

95

94

88

112

District 2 Subtotal

798

824

885

933

1,030

Braxton

238

175

194

197

209

Clay

147

68

83

101

120

Lewis

221

180

194

211

249

Nicholas

221

164

213

330

311

Pocahontas

160

130

145

144

143

Randolph

217

186

225

250

248

Upshur

262

229

231

228

303

Webster

118

113

114

156

150

District 3 Subtotal

1,584

1,245

1,399

1,617

1,733

Fayette

287

244

239

292

278

Greenbrier

299

245

242

308

269

McDowell

308

215

218

200

177

Mercer

177

170

161

176

192

Monroe

206

212

181

184

192

Raleigh

277

214

231

283

279

Summers

258

209

199

219

209

Wyoming

291

255

257

320

262

District 4 Subtotal

2,103

1,764

1,728

1,982

1,858

Boone

230

159

138

157

157

Cabell

138

80

110

114

176

Kanawha

332

231

227

285

319

Lincoln

213

178

169

215

228

Logan

246

181

172

181

165

Mason

370

293

314

378

448

Mingo

141

93

91

131

143

Putnam

225

150

181

210

268

Wayne

144

103

108

139

186

District 5 Subtotal

2,039

1,468

1,510

1,810

2,090

Calhoun

179

135

128

145

164

Doddridge

138

126

118

137

160

Gilmer

191

147

124

132

143

Jackson

326

293

264

302

408

Pleasants

83

73

71

80

89

Ritchie

326

245

218

216

263

Roane

236

232

210

231

256

Tyler

211

136

144

182

181

Wirt

193

177

153

174

206

Wood

294

271

248

328

380

District 6 Subtotal

2,177

1,835

1,678

1,927

2,250

State Total

11,162

9,128

9,037

10,361

11,539

8th Graders Honored For Golden Horseshoe Accomplishments

The Free Press WV

More than 200 eighth-graders from across West Virginia were honored at the state Culture Center in the annual Golden Horseshoe ceremony.

The students earned the honor of Knights of the Golden Horseshoe for their knowledge of West Virginia history.

“I am proud of each student who earned this elite honor today,” state School Superintendent Dr. Steve Paine said. “The Golden Horseshoe recognizes students’ appreciation and understanding of West Virginia and promotes pride in our state.”

The Golden Horseshoe test has been given each year since 1931 in West Virginia. This year marks the 301st anniversary of the Golden Horseshoe tradition that began in the 1700’s when West Virginia was part of Virginia.

A complete list of 2017 winners can be found by visiting HERE.

Gilmer Students Among GSC Business Department Honorees

The Glenville State College Department of Business recently announced its list of Distinguished Business Students for 2017. Recognition of these top twenty business students is based on multiple criteria including academic achievement, class rank, campus involvement, and leadership in department classes and programs. Additionally, some students are recognized for specific departmental awards.

Those recognized as Distinguished Business Students included: Julie Bishop from Glenville, West Virginia; Kristin DesRocher from Chapmanville, West Virginia; Conner Ferguson from Glenville, West Virginia; Bryan Foster from Jacksonville, Florida; Landon Gumm from Glenville, West Virginia; Charles Kendall III from Grantsville, West Virginia; and Stephen Mickle from Woodbridge, Virginia.

The Free Press WV
GSC Assistant Professor of Business Administration Dr. Dwight Heaster with Julie Bishop


The Free Press WV
GSC Professor of Economics Dr. Gary Arbogast with Conner Ferguson


The Free Press WV
GSC Professor of Economics Dr. Gary Arbogast with Landon Gumm


The Free Press WV
GSC Professor of Economics Dr. Gary Arbogast with Brett Rinehart


Specific award recipients included:

  • Ernest H. Smith Award and Outstanding Accounting Student – Raven Fatool of Sunbury, Pennsylvania

  • Freshman with the Highest Major Fields Test Score – Jakob Payne of Webster Springs, West Virginia

  • Senior with the Highest Major Fields Test Score – Brett Rinehart of Cumberland, Maryland

  • Outstanding Computer Science Student – Jordan Batton of Flatwoods, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Management Student – Abigail Jerden of Weston, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Marketing Student – McKenzie Edmonds of Clendenin, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Sport Management Student – Hunter Given of Cowen, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Business Education Student – Nathan Kincaid of Summersville, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Two-Year Student – Tiffany Brannon of Chloe, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Freshman Business Student – Gregory Lail of Hickory, North Carolina

  • Outstanding Sophomore Business Student – Daniel Crawford of Elkins, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Junior Business Student – Luke Carpenter of Glen Daniel, West Virginia

  • Outstanding Senior Business Student – Moriah Creelfox Sr. of Alma, West Virginia

For more information on the event or the GSC Department of Business, call 304.462.4123.

Report: More Mountain State Students Pursuing Higher Education

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties lead the way in improving college-going rates

The Free Press WV

More West Virginia high school graduates went on to pursue higher education last year, according to a report released by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) and West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS). The college-going rate increased for the second consecutive year, inching up by 0.3 percent — or 266 students — from 2015 to 2016.

“These gains, while subtle, represent a solid step in the right direction,” Dr. Paul Hill, HEPC Chancellor, said. “For several years, the impact of the 2008 recession led to wide variations in college-going rates, not only in West Virginia but across the nation. Now that the economy is beginning to stabilize, we’re more confident that the small strides we’re witnessing represent genuine progress in creating a college-going culture in West Virginia — a process that takes time and occurs student by student, community by community.”

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties led the state in achieving the highest rates of improvement in college-going rates from 2015 to 2016. Braxton County High School (Braxton), Magnolia High School (Wetzel) and Chapmanville Regional High School (Logan) showed the greatest gains at the school level. Ohio, Mineral and Monongalia counties had the highest rates overall. A complete list of rates by school and county is available at http://www.wvhepc.edu/resources/reports-and-publications/2016-college-going-rate/.

“West Virginia needs more college graduates to grow its economy and invigorate its workforce,” Dr. Sarah Tucker, CTCS Chancellor, said. “I commend those high schools and school districts that are putting a real focus on helping their students pursue some form of postsecondary education. The future prosperity of our state depends on getting more students into college and ensuring they succeed and graduate.”

The 2016 Higher Education Report Card, released last fall by HEPC and CTCS, also outlined gains in college retention and a record number of degrees awarded by the state’s public colleges and universities.

HEPC and CTCS are charged with developing and implementing a five-year statewide strategic plan for higher education that includes a strong focus on improving access to higher education and promoting college completion and success. As part of this process, the agencies have in recent years launched a number of strategies that are proving to have an impact on higher education attainment.

For example, the federally funded “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)” initiative provides college mentoring and planning services to middle and high school students in ten of the state’s most economically challenged counties. The statewide College Foundation of West Virginia (CFWV) initiative offers information, including text message counseling, to help students navigate the college application and enrollment processes. And recent policy changes overhauling the delivery of developmental education and encouraging students to enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours per semester are showing promising results toward raising college graduation rates.

Bob Henry Baber, Richwood Mayor Speaks Out

The Gilmer Free Press

According to Richwood Mayor Bob Henry Baber, Huntington did its part. So too did several towns, cities, private citizens and businesses across the state.

For its part, Huntington Mayor Steve Williams donated holiday trees to Baber’s town, which was devastated by last summer’s flooding.

To say nearly nothing is the same in Richwood these days is an understatement. The town, as we knew it, was destroyed.

One ray of hope for reclamation of the town, its heritage and its lifeblood came when the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced it would provide funding to rebuild two destroyed schools, Richwood Middle and Richwood High School.

The intervening weeks, however, have seen local political machinations essentially “take” the funds from the devastation in Richwood and “give” it to the pristine, non-flooded area of Summersville. For years, Nicholas County operated with a high school enigma. The one located in Summersville was inappropriately known as Nicholas County High while Richwood High remained open serving its 200 or 300 students. Generally, a “county high” designation means there is just one such entity serving an entire county’s school population.

Now, after many rancorous public hearings and meetings, Summersville will get what it always wanted. As Baber says, “the people are stealing our schools under the guise of a devastating flood. It’s ridiculous.”

Powers-that-be at the statehouse, particularly at the state Board of Education, have never seen a consolidation they didn’t like. The die is cast and Richwood loses again.

Baber has one potential move he’d still like to try, hoping to alter the outcome. He wants to take the Richwood Lumberjack band to play music in front of the White House. He hopes that would attract enough attention to make consolidation proponents pause. “I’m no Trump supporter,” said Baber, “but maybe he’ll see or hear us and come out to see what’s going on. I DO think he’d understand how outrageous this is.”

~~  Ron Gregory ~~


03.10.2017
EducationNewsWest VirginiaRegionNicholas County

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West Virginia High Schools Recognized for Exemplary Graduation Rates

Seventy West Virginia high schools were recognized for achieving exemplary graduation rates of 90 percent or greater during the 2015-16 school year. Schools were honored by Governor Jim Justice’s Chief of Staff, Nick Casey, State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Michael Martirano and the West Virginia Board of Education.

“Our state becomes stronger with each student that graduates high school,” Martirano said. “The high schools here today deserve the praise they are receiving for achieving a 90 percent or higher graduation rate. Our schools see the potential that a high school graduate holds for our state and they, along with the Department of Education and Board of Education, have made it a top priority to ensure our students show up, work hard, and earn a diploma.”

The Free Press WV
Gilmer County Superintendent Mr. Devono and GCHS Principal Mrs. Butcher
receiving a plaque in Charleston during a recognition ceremony.


Recent data show more students in West Virginia are graduating from high school when compared to previous years. Several statewide initiatives contributed to the steady increase in the graduation rate. Most notably the creation of the state’s Early Warning System, which tracks 45 different indicators – the most important being attendance, behavior and grades – to identify students at risk of dropping out.

West Virginia’s graduation rate has continued to rise throughout the last several years. Data from the U.S. Department of Education placed West Virginia among the top 20 states for graduation rates in 2014-15, with a rate of 86.5 percent. The average graduation rate in the Mountain State for the 2015-16 school year increased even more to 89.81 percent.

Of the 70 schools recognized, four schools achieved a graduation rate of 100 percent. Those schools include; Union Educational Complex, Harman High School, Pickens High School and Paden City High School.

The 70 schools recognized represent 60.3 percent of the 116 high schools in West Virginia. The overall graduation rate for all West Virginia high schools was 89.81 percent.

 

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

Mountain Valley Pipeline Public Hearing Notice

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection – Division of Water and Waste Management will hold public hearings regarding the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline project for State 401 Water Quality Certification, Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and for Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit. Oral and written comments will be accepted at each hearing. The hearings will start at 6:00PM at the following locations:

For Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, State 401 Water Quality Certification, and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Summers County at Summers Memorial Building (451 1st Ave in Hinton) on Tuesday March 07, 2017. 

For State 401 Water Quality Certification and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Webster County at Webster County High School auditorium on Monday March 6, 2017.

• Harrison County at Robert C. Byrd High School Large Group Instruction Room on Thursday March 09, 2017.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project is comprised of approximately 195 miles of natural gas pipeline along with compressor stations, meter stations, access roads, and interconnects through: Wetzel, Harrison, Doddridge, Lewis, Braxton, Webster, Nicholas, Greenbrier, Fayette, Summers, and Monroe Counties in West Virginia. The associated Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667) would be for the discharge of stormwater associated with the disturbance of 4,214 acres of land for the of construction of this project. The Natural Streams Preservation Act permit (NSP-17-0001) being sought is for a proposed crossing of Greenbrier River in Summers County near Pence Springs. The State 401 Water Quality Certification (WQC-16-0005) would be for activities that will or may discharge fill into waters of the State. Mountain Valley Pipeline project is proposing to mitigate for the streams and wetlands permanently impacted by this project.

Any interested person may submit written comments on the Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit, the Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and/or the State 401 Water Quality Certification by addressing such to the Director of the Division of Water and Waste Management during the comment period, which begins with this notice and ends on March 19, 2017 at 8PM. Comments or requests should be emailed to or by mail addressed to:

Director, Division of Water and Management, DEP

ATTN: Sharon Mullins, Permitting Section

601 57th Street SE

Charleston, WV 25304-2345

Applicant Type Permit ID

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit WVR310667

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. State 401 Water Quality Certification WQC-16-0005

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit NSP-17-0001

Additional Information

State 401 Water Quality Certification application (WQC-16-0005) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Natural Streams Preservation Act permit application (NSP-17-0001) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667)

Instructions for navigating the Oil and Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit webpages

Mountain Valley Pipeline Information Page

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