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Nicholas County

Nicholas County

Bob Henry Baber, Richwood Mayor Speaks Out

The Gilmer Free Press

According to Richwood Mayor Bob Henry Baber, Huntington did its part. So too did several towns, cities, private citizens and businesses across the state.

For its part, Huntington Mayor Steve Williams donated holiday trees to Baber’s town, which was devastated by last summer’s flooding.

To say nearly nothing is the same in Richwood these days is an understatement. The town, as we knew it, was destroyed.

One ray of hope for reclamation of the town, its heritage and its lifeblood came when the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced it would provide funding to rebuild two destroyed schools, Richwood Middle and Richwood High School.

The intervening weeks, however, have seen local political machinations essentially “take” the funds from the devastation in Richwood and “give” it to the pristine, non-flooded area of Summersville. For years, Nicholas County operated with a high school enigma. The one located in Summersville was inappropriately known as Nicholas County High while Richwood High remained open serving its 200 or 300 students. Generally, a “county high” designation means there is just one such entity serving an entire county’s school population.

Now, after many rancorous public hearings and meetings, Summersville will get what it always wanted. As Baber says, “the people are stealing our schools under the guise of a devastating flood. It’s ridiculous.”

Powers-that-be at the statehouse, particularly at the state Board of Education, have never seen a consolidation they didn’t like. The die is cast and Richwood loses again.

Baber has one potential move he’d still like to try, hoping to alter the outcome. He wants to take the Richwood Lumberjack band to play music in front of the White House. He hopes that would attract enough attention to make consolidation proponents pause. “I’m no Trump supporter,” said Baber, “but maybe he’ll see or hear us and come out to see what’s going on. I DO think he’d understand how outrageous this is.”

~~  Ron Gregory ~~


03.10.2017
EducationNewsWest VirginiaRegionNicholas County

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West Virginia High Schools Recognized for Exemplary Graduation Rates

Seventy West Virginia high schools were recognized for achieving exemplary graduation rates of 90 percent or greater during the 2015-16 school year. Schools were honored by Governor Jim Justice’s Chief of Staff, Nick Casey, State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Michael Martirano and the West Virginia Board of Education.

“Our state becomes stronger with each student that graduates high school,” Martirano said. “The high schools here today deserve the praise they are receiving for achieving a 90 percent or higher graduation rate. Our schools see the potential that a high school graduate holds for our state and they, along with the Department of Education and Board of Education, have made it a top priority to ensure our students show up, work hard, and earn a diploma.”

The Free Press WV
Gilmer County Superintendent Mr. Devono and GCHS Principal Mrs. Butcher
receiving a plaque in Charleston during a recognition ceremony.


Recent data show more students in West Virginia are graduating from high school when compared to previous years. Several statewide initiatives contributed to the steady increase in the graduation rate. Most notably the creation of the state’s Early Warning System, which tracks 45 different indicators – the most important being attendance, behavior and grades – to identify students at risk of dropping out.

West Virginia’s graduation rate has continued to rise throughout the last several years. Data from the U.S. Department of Education placed West Virginia among the top 20 states for graduation rates in 2014-15, with a rate of 86.5 percent. The average graduation rate in the Mountain State for the 2015-16 school year increased even more to 89.81 percent.

Of the 70 schools recognized, four schools achieved a graduation rate of 100 percent. Those schools include; Union Educational Complex, Harman High School, Pickens High School and Paden City High School.

The 70 schools recognized represent 60.3 percent of the 116 high schools in West Virginia. The overall graduation rate for all West Virginia high schools was 89.81 percent.

 

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

Mountain Valley Pipeline Public Hearing Notice

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection – Division of Water and Waste Management will hold public hearings regarding the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline project for State 401 Water Quality Certification, Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and for Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit. Oral and written comments will be accepted at each hearing. The hearings will start at 6:00PM at the following locations:

For Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, State 401 Water Quality Certification, and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Summers County at Summers Memorial Building (451 1st Ave in Hinton) on Tuesday March 07, 2017. 

For State 401 Water Quality Certification and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Webster County at Webster County High School auditorium on Monday March 6, 2017.

• Harrison County at Robert C. Byrd High School Large Group Instruction Room on Thursday March 09, 2017.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project is comprised of approximately 195 miles of natural gas pipeline along with compressor stations, meter stations, access roads, and interconnects through: Wetzel, Harrison, Doddridge, Lewis, Braxton, Webster, Nicholas, Greenbrier, Fayette, Summers, and Monroe Counties in West Virginia. The associated Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667) would be for the discharge of stormwater associated with the disturbance of 4,214 acres of land for the of construction of this project. The Natural Streams Preservation Act permit (NSP-17-0001) being sought is for a proposed crossing of Greenbrier River in Summers County near Pence Springs. The State 401 Water Quality Certification (WQC-16-0005) would be for activities that will or may discharge fill into waters of the State. Mountain Valley Pipeline project is proposing to mitigate for the streams and wetlands permanently impacted by this project.

Any interested person may submit written comments on the Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit, the Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and/or the State 401 Water Quality Certification by addressing such to the Director of the Division of Water and Waste Management during the comment period, which begins with this notice and ends on March 19, 2017 at 8PM. Comments or requests should be emailed to or by mail addressed to:

Director, Division of Water and Management, DEP

ATTN: Sharon Mullins, Permitting Section

601 57th Street SE

Charleston, WV 25304-2345

Applicant Type Permit ID

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit WVR310667

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. State 401 Water Quality Certification WQC-16-0005

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit NSP-17-0001

Additional Information

State 401 Water Quality Certification application (WQC-16-0005) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Natural Streams Preservation Act permit application (NSP-17-0001) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667)

Instructions for navigating the Oil and Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit webpages

Mountain Valley Pipeline Information Page

Glenville State College President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison, Lawrence C. Wolf


Braxton County: Bridget D. Carr, Dakota S. Johnson, Stacy N. Loyd, Brittany V. White


Calhoun County: Devon T. Toppings


Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Dalton M. Holcomb, Carrie G. Huffman, Andrea P. Litton, Kaitlyn J. Samples


Doddridge County: Joshua L. Smith


Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth


Gilmer County: Jonathan E. Clark, Landon P. Gumm, Michaela L. Gumm, Sean M. Lang, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Trevor D. Wright


Grant County: Larissa A. Henry


Greenbrier County: Myka K. Perry


Hardy County: Faith V. Smith


Harrison County: Joseph M. Bush, Cecilia A. Matheney, Megan E. Ruppert


Jackson County: Brittaney M. Burdette, Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical


Jefferson County: Jasmine Z. Tarman


Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Jerrica D. Hilbert


Lewis County: James Z. Browning, Daniel C. Conrad, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Torie A. Riffle


Logan County: Hannah P. Runyon, Matthew A. Zachary


Marion County: Phillip J. Poling


Mason County: Kaylee M. Howard


Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg


Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Joshua D. Huffman, Eric W. Peyatt, Kathryn G. Waddell


Preston County: Madison H. Null


Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne


Randolph County: Diana R. Miller, Melissa D. Nicholson


Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff, Kimberly A. Smith


Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber


Upshur County: Brandy L. Bachman, Skylar A. Fulton


Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Hunter A. Given, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule


Wood County: Michael L. Briggs


Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Raven P. Fatool, Cedric J. Johnson, Kellie N. Kinsinger, Allison A. Parski, John S. Peloro, Victoria L. Peterson, Emily A. Walker, Brian S. Williams

Glenville State College Vice President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the Vice President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Brianna A. Shivers


Boone County: Ally K. Brown, Michele L. Epling, Crystal M. Jarrell, Gregory I. Lail


Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Coleden R. Belknap, Tyler K. Cunningham, Kathryn L. Dean, Larissa E. DeLuca, Jacob D. Haymond, Samantha N. Mazzella, Teddy J. Richardson, Cami D. Roberts, Alexis S. Spell, Heather N. Thayer, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Maranda J. Vaughan, Andrea B. Vidal, Brandon M. White, Shanna S. Wine


Calhoun County: Tiffany A. Brannon, Moriah J. CreelFox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Taylor S. Garrett, Chelsea  R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont, Johnathan X. Taylor


Clay County: Casey E. Brown, Opalene D. Huffman, William C. Robertson, Sydnee M. Vance


Doddridge County: Joshua M. Pitcock, Lindsey G. Travis


Fayette County: Vladimir V. Iotov, Kelsey L. Norris, Trevor D. Wood


Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Katelyn S. Benson, Julie A. Bishop, Monica D.  Bush, Madison L. Campbell, Sara B. Coombs, Colby G. Cunningham, Lucas D. DeMarino, Meghan Harubin, Christina L. Jenkins, Jaylin K. Johnson, Amanda R. Lamb, Tonya L. Lyons, Matthew M. Montgomery, Adam H. Moore, Cody M. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Zandel M. Sponaugle, Alexus C. Sprouse, Zaon A. Starseed, Elania N. White, Carrissa M. Wood


Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty, Tina M. Jerman


Hampshire County: Dylan G. Kesner


Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Lia Runyan


Jackson County: Ryan A. Gregory, Kirsten M. Marks, Joel E. McDonald, Sapphire N. Parsons, Clayton Swisher, Bradley J. Titus, Kelly J. Trippett


Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Mary E. Lewis, Anthony R. Vazquez


Kanawha County: Faith Donze, McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Rema K. Jordan, Zachary Lively, Jonathan L. Mullins, Jeri D. Potter, Rebecca E. Wiseman


Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, Jennifer M. Eiler, Destiny L. Grimes, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Justin P. Raines, J’Aime L. Shearer, Kelly L. Weaver


Logan County: Kaitlyn A. Bircheat, Alec G. Maynard


Marion County: Morgan P. Hardesty


Marshall County: Logen M. Lemasters


Mason County: Charles B. Walton


Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton


Monongalia County: Alyssa B. Boback


Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Michael I. Pracht, Brady A. Tritapoe


Nicholas County: Autumn G. Barnett, Jessica R. Bird, Marlyn S. Donelson, Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Morgan Francis, Taylor Keenan, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Nathan S. Spencer, Mason A. Thomas, Samuel P. Whitlock


Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Raven D. Turner


Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote


Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto, Isaac C. Hise


Preston County: Kathleen L. Faber


Putnam County: Jacob M. Stover


Raleigh County: Luke D. Carpenter, Kaylee S. Dickenson, Michael A. Layne


Randolph County: Christopher A. Cozad, Angela R. McWilliams, Kathlyne L. Simmons, Christopher D. Varner


Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Carleena P. Elliott, Olivia D. Goff, Trinity R. Muschweck


Roane County: Georgia B. Bing, Joshua C. Runyon, Bonita J. Schreckengost, James D. Williams


Taylor County: Eva S. Guthrie


Tucker County: John Chambers, Wiley T. Raines, Stephanie R. Williams


Tyler County: Devon J. Harris


Upshur County: Autumn Knight, Belinda L. Lewis


Wayne County: Taylor N. Brumfield


Webster County: Valerie L. Rule, Danielle Williams


Wetzel County: Daniel M. Jackson, Colton L. Ring, Andrew R. Tefft


Wirt County: Micheal L. Morgan, Mary M. Strong


Wood County: Taylor A. Broadwater


Wyoming County: Travis D. Gibson, Kaci M. Mullins


Out of State: Karla Y. Barr, Chandler R. Carrera, Ibrahim O. Ghanem, Dwyron K. Gillard, II, Taylor A. Gilliland, Noah R. Green, Jake Hensell, Justin S. Koogler, Momi P. Lievan, Paris M. McLeod, Anthony W. McPoyle, Emily M. Meyers, Stephen G. Mickle, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Casey R. Sheaffer, Wesley D. Stauffer, Johnni M. Tillman, Ernesto Torres, Paranda S. Uber, Jack H. Varndell, Timothy G. Wine, Hannah N. Wright

Bob Henry Baber: Loss Of Schools To Consolidation Is A Blow Richwood Should Not Absorb

The Free Press WV

Richwood is smack dab in the middle of tourist country. We are a federally designated historic district with a rich history, artists, writers, musicians, wood carvers and more. We are situated at the base of one of the most beautiful forests in the country. Within a stone’s throw are the Falls of Hills Creek, the Cranberry Wilderness and Backcountry, Cranberry Glades, the Highland Scenic Highway and the best hiking, camping, cross-country skiing, and fishing in the east.

We are America’s best kept secret — but not for long. And remarkably, houses and storefronts are for sale for 50 to 75 percent off or more. Truly, we are the Gabe’s of towns, a bargain, and West Virginians and Americans love a bargain.

Since the June 23 flood, we have had to address many issues — over $10 million dollars and counting worth of flood/FEMA damages. And the paperwork — it’s monstrous! FEMA is an insurance claim on steroids. But we have had lots of help in our recovery. The cities of Summersville, Hurricane and Shepherdstown have all stepped up to the plate. And so has the Brooke County EMS team. Many other communities, church groups, and individuals have also helped. It has been an amazing experience seemingly meeting angels dropped down from heaven. God bless all of you.

We are doing our best to capture our carnage so FEMA can reimburse us for our damages. Our people have rocked and rolled with the punches — but we what we never expected was two haymakers from a new and inexperienced school superintendent out to prove she is smarter than FEMA, the State, and local citizenry.

The dreaded “C” word, consolidation, was put on the table on Jan. 9 for the first time in Nicholas County history. How shocking that a shivering town that has pulled itself from flood waters like a half-drowned dog may be kicked again while it’s down. In America we root for underdogs, we don’t give them the boot.

Now the superintendent and I both have Ph.D.’s, but there is a big difference between us. I’ve been humbled enough by FEMA over the past half year to readily admit I don’t know squat about FEMA’s incredibly complex and ever-changing rules and regulations. She, on the other hand, apparently believes she has “got this.”

She does not. I have a dozen great people around me, and I’m drowning in a sea of red tape. I’ve learned: Nobody understands FEMA — least of all FEMA itself. And if either FEMA or the state is telling you you’re doing a good job, you’d better put your hand on your wallet. Both are telling the superintendent just that, and she believes them.

We can’t wait to fix ourselves. As I write this, it is happening, organically. The old bank, long dilapidated, is being flipped into a daycare center; the C & S restaurant has reopened as the Oakford Diner; the old bakery near the Sculpture Garden is being recycled into the String and Bean restaurant; the Hole in the Wall Pizzeria has been rebooted; and the Rite Aid and Dollar General stores have cleaned and restocked.

New roads, a new water intake, improved water lines and millions of dollars in remediation are coming our way. We are about to get 30 new tiny, medium and large houses built and dozens of flooded homes rehabbed with major grants and volunteers.

Everyone in the state is pulling for us. We are going to put South Fork Lake back on the table and create West Virginia’s newest white water attraction on the very river that ravaged us, the Cherry. And water is going up on Hinkle Mountain and to the Cherry Hill golf course. That area will grow exponentially.

However, we have to protect our schools and all our students.

We want what FEMA and the superintendent promised us in the aftermath of the flood: restoration. We expect them to stand by their words and their missions and put back what was — our schools. If it ain’t broke … don’t break it.

The superintendent keeps talking about “data.” We all know “data” can prove or disprove anything. All data on consolidation proves that bigger is never better — especially for low-income learners.

But we are neither data nor biological specimens dipped into formaldehyde to be coldly dissected. We are human beings. We are Richwood. We will crawl back without the schools, but we will sprint back with them. We want to be the tip of the arrow of the new West Virginia.

When we get our new middle and high schools back, we will have them to draw us together and draw people to us. We KNOW Richwood will come back. It’s just a matter of faith and time. But we must keep our small family-oriented schools. They are priority No. 1 — and our heart and soul. Please share our optimism and pray for us. Richwood: the town that wouldn’t die! That’s us.

Bob Henry Baber is mayor of Richwood.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 112,384 Deer In 2016

The Free Press WV

Preliminary counts indicate West Virginia hunters harvested 112,384 white-tailed deer during the recently completed bucks firearms, antlerless, muzzleloader, archery, crossbow, and youth/Class Q/Class XS deer seasons, according to Paul Johansen, chief of the Division of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife Resources Section. This year’s total harvest was 19 percent below the 2015 deer harvest of 138,493 and 15 percent below the five-year average of 132,466.

A breakdown of the combined 2016 deer seasons reveals 46,071 bucks harvested during the traditional buck firearm season, 32,508 antlerless deer taken during all antlerless firearm hunting opportunities, 28,808 deer harvested by bows and crossbows, and 4,997 deer taken by muzzleloader hunters.


Antlerless Deer Season

The 2016 antlerless deer season harvest, which includes the youth/Class Q/Class XS deer season, was 18 percent less than in 2015 and 26.5 percent below the five-year average of 44,239.  “It is important to note that the antlerless harvest is the key component to any deer management strategy, as it controls the future deer population,” said Johansen.  Hunters are reminded that on March 13 and 14, 2017, the DNR will hold 12 public meetings across the state to gather comments on proposed fall 2017 antlerless deer hunting seasons in each of the 51 counties where firearms deer hunting is permitted.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,535), Upshur (1,485), Lewis (1,292), Mason (1,269), Jackson (1,224), Ritchie (1,215), Wood (1,126), Roane (1,034), Harrison (972), and Braxton (854).


Muzzleloader Deer Season

The 2016 muzzleloader harvest of 4,997 was 3 percent below the 2015 harvest of 5,178, and 21 percent below the five-year average of 6,344. The top 10 counties are Randolph (243), Nicholas (232), Preston (217), Upshur (185), Lewis (168), Jackson (158), Braxton (157), Mason (153), Wood (141), and Webster (139).


Archery and Crossbow Deer Season

The bow and crossbow hunter’s take of 28,808 deer was 11 percent less than the 2015 archery season harvest of 32,540, and four percent above the five-year average archery season harvest of 27,596.  Archery harvests are inversely correlated to hard mast crops. The below-average acorn crop in 2015, followed by a better acorn crop in 2016, likely contributed to the lower 2016 harvest; however, the proportion of the harvest taken using a crossbow increased in 2016 over that recorded in 2015.  The 2016 top 10 counties are: Preston (1,365), Randolph (975), Wood (945), Kanawha (921), Upshur (867), Wyoming (867), Mason (791), Jackson (785), Nicholas (765), and Raleigh (738).


WESTVIRGINIA DEER HARVEST, 2016

County

BuckFirearms

Antlerless

Muzzleloader

Archery/Crossbow

Total

Barbour

1,098

773

133

568

2,572

Brooke

268

367

38

287

960

Hancock

209

164

34

357

764

Harrison

1,138

972

113

632

2,855

Marion

765

787

113

521

2,186

Marshall

727

493

73

357

1,650

Monongalia

827

644

91

707

2,269

Ohio

270

222

46

294

832

Preston

1,774

1,535

217

1,365

4,891

Taylor

581

490

70

303

1,444

Tucker

730

191

73

409

1,403

Wetzel

899

819

90

335

2,143

District 1Subtotal

9,286

7,457

1,091

6,135

23,969

Berkeley

737

627

67

582

2,013

Grant

954

439

81

351

1,825

Hampshire

1,197

836

88

421

2,542

Hardy

1,076

610

63

317

2,066

Jefferson

422

413

54

417

1,306

Mineral

922

684

80

404

2,090

Morgan

437

406

44

241

1,128

Pendleton

1,088

448

70

345

1,951

District 2 Subtotal

6,833

4,463

547

3,078

14,921

Braxton

1,102

854

157

571

2,684

Clay

390

164

43

241

838

Lewis

1,246

1,292

168

629

3,335

Nicholas

1,044

470

232

765

2,511

Pocahontas

921

202

56

278

1,457

Randolph

1,617

803

243

975

3,638

Upshur

1,399

1,485

185

867

3,936

Webster

941

303

139

548

1,931

District 3 Subtotal

8,660

5,573

1,223

4,874

20,330

Fayette

889

266

124

718

1,997

Greenbrier

1,447

699

135

565

2,846

McDowell

456

456

Mercer

636

383

86

684

1,789

Monroe

1,099

752

70

550

2,471

Raleigh

648

206

70

738

1,662

Summers

657

562

62

403

1,684

Wyoming

 

 

 

867

867

District 4 Subtotal

5,376

2,868

547

4,981

13,772

Boone

573

147

72

364

1,156

Cabell

677

404

60

434

1,575

Kanawha

1,058

385

78

921

2,442

Lincoln

846

522

106

466

1,940

Logan

574

574

Mason

1,267

1,269

153

791

3,480

Mingo

386

386

Putnam

992

803

119

661

2,575

Wayne

815

252

62

419

1,548

District 5 Subtotal

6,228

3,782

650

5,016

15,676

Calhoun

705

599

69

326

1,699

Doddridge

946

706

70

308

2,030

Gilmer

791

634

93

311

1,829

Jackson

1,487

1,224

158

785

3,654

Pleasants

334

251

27

154

766

Ritchie

1,422

1,215

102

630

3,369

Roane

1,178

1,034

105

544

2,861

Tyler

855

766

82

330

2,033

Wirt

777

810

92

391

2,070

Wood

1,193

1,126

141

945

3,405

District 6 Subtotal

9,688

8,365

939

4,724

23,716

StateTotal

46,071

32,508

4,997

28,808

112,384

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 3,012 Black Bears In 2016

The Free Press WV

West Virginia hunters harvested 3,012 black bears during the combined 2016 archery, crossbow and firearms seasons, according to Colin Carpenter, Black Bear Project leader for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The preliminary black bear harvest data for the combined 2016 seasons were 6 percent lower than the record set in 2015. The harvest is the second highest bear kill recorded and is the second time the harvest has topped 3,000.

“The mast index for all oak species in 2016 increased significantly over 2015 and was above the long-term average,” said Carpenter. “Historically, an abundance of oak mast makes bears harder to target for archery hunters. Conversely, increased oak mast typically means a higher December firearms harvest because many bears delay entering their dens due to the abundance of food.”

Carpenter added, “In the 2016 Mast Survey and Hunting Outlook, we predicted a decreased archery harvest and a similar-to-slightly greater December firearms harvest over the levels observed in 2015. Our prediction held true for the archery season, but did not hold up in the December season.”

“Overall, the 2016 harvest declined during the archery, buck-gun and December seasons over the levels recorded in 2015. However, those decreases were partially offset by very successful early gun seasons in September and October.

Hunters killed 1,012 bears during the first segment of the 2016 archery season (Sept. 24 – Nov. 19).  They took 584 bears with vertical bows and 428 with crossbows. The top five counties were Randolph (82), Fayette (74), Nicholas (60), Greenbrier (55) and Preston (52).

Firearms hunters harvested 2,000 bears during 2016. Hunters took 883 bears in September and October, 349 during the concurrent buck-gun bear season, and 768 during the traditional December season. The top five counties were Pendleton (177), Randolph (167), Pocahontas (161), Nicholas (153) and Hardy (133).

2016 WEST VIRGINIA BLACK BEAR HARVEST

County

Bow/Crossbow

Sept/Oct Gun

Buck Gun

December

Total

Barbour

45

20

1

0

66

Brooke

0

0

0

0

0

Hancock

0

0

0

0

0

Harrison

16

0

2

0

18

Marion

3

0

0

0

3

Marshall

2

0

0

0

2

Monongalia

7

0

2

0

9

Ohio

0

0

0

0

0

Preston

52

41

22

22

137

Taylor

17

0

1

0

18

Tucker

35

37

6

50

128

Wetzel

1

0

0

1

2

District 1 Subtotal

178

98

34

73

383

Berkeley

3

0

3

0

6

Grant

25

31

6

39

101

Hampshire

17

0

29

4

50

Hardy

26

61

14

58

159

Jefferson

3

0

2

0

5

Mineral

11

0

0

9

20

Morgan

8

0

11

0

19

Pendleton

37

100

10

67

214

District 2 Subtotal

130

192

75

177

574

Braxton

36

11

4

11

62

Clay

9

13

7

16

45

Lewis

13

0

5

0

18

Nicholas

60

56

31

66

213

Pocahontas

23

62

11

88

184

Randolph

82

99

4

64

249

Upshur

14

10

2

6

32

Webster

38

50

9

52

149

District 3 Subtotal

275

301

73

303

952

Fayette

74

21

39

13

147

Greenbrier

55

45

12

73

185

McDowell

49

38

5

16

108

Mercer

33

0

4

2

39

Monroe

24

27

17

29

97

Raleigh

36

25

9

7

77

Summers

26

0

8

0

34

Wyoming

24

30

1

2

57

District 4 Subtotal

321

186

95

142

744

Boone

23

28

30

32

113

Cabell

0

0

0

0

0

Kanawha

26

38

33

28

125

Lincoln

1

0

0

0

1

Logan

22

26

1

2

51

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

Mingo

13

14

0

7

34

Putnam

0

0

0

0

0

Wayne

1

0

0

0

1

District 5 Subtotal

86

106

64

69

325

Calhoun

1

0

3

0

4

Doddridge

3

0

0

0

3

Gilmer

7

0

4

3

14

Jackson

0

0

0

0

0

Pleasants

0

0

0

0

0

Ritchie

4

0

0

0

4

Roane

1

0

0

0

1

Tyler

2

0

0

0

2

Wirt

4

0

1

1

6

Wood

0

0

0

0

0

District 6 Subtotal

22

0

8

4

34

State Total

1012

883

349

768

3012

Bears listed for Logan, McDowell and Wyoming counties as"Buck Gun” are bow or crossbow kills from 11.21.16 -12.031

November 19, 2016. All other bow and crossbow kills have been separated based on the seasonsin which they were killed

Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 05, 2017

The Free Press WV
Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 05, 2017
 
Closings and Delays
Early Dismissal
Glenville State College  
Gilmer County Board of Education  
Gilmer County Courthouse  
Gilmer County Health Department  
Gilmer County Senior Center  
Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic 
Gilmer County Schools   Closing at 12:30 PM
Braxton County Schools   Closing 1 Hour Early
Calhoun County Schools   Closing at 12:00 PM
Doddridge County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Lewis County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Ritchie County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Barbour County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Clay County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Harrison County Schools  
Nicholas County Schools  
Pleasants County Schools   Closing at 1:00 PM
Roane County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Tyler County Schools   Closing 3 Hours Early
Upshur County Schools   Closing at 1:00 PM
Webster County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wetzel County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wirt County Schools   Closing 2 Hours Early
Wood County Schools  
Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700


The Free Press WV

RISE West Virginia Grants for Flood Recovery Top $1.8 Million

The Free Press WV

More businesses in Greenbrier County received grant funding from the RISE West Virginia program than any other county hit hard in June 23 storms.

In all, 229 small businesses in ten counties received $1.8 million in grant funding via RISE West Virginia, according to numbers from the state Department of Commerce.

The awards by county were as follows:

Clay – 13
Fayette – 9
Greenbrier – 121
Jackson – 1
Kanawha – 37
Nicholas – 33
Pocahontas – 2
Roane – 7
Summers – 1
Webster – 9

The application deadline for mini-grants of up to $10,000 was Nov. 23.

RISE West Virginia was created to help the Mountain State’s small businesses keep their doors open and their operations up and running after the June flood.

Applicant criteria included being located in one of the affected counties, being in good standing with the state, having a verifiable business at the time of the June flooding and a plan for usage of the grant assistance.

“It was enough to, maybe, make payroll or pay the rent or replace some equipment that was lost,” Keith Burdette, state commerce secretary, previously said.

“We think it’s had a positive effect and we think it’s a model to be used in other situations.”

Initial funding for RISE West Virginia, which launched in July with a combination of public and private dollars, was $2 million.

Governor Tomblin Presents Tiny Homes to Flood Survivors

Houses constructed by more than 2,000 high school students across the state

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin today presented survivors of the June 2016 floods with keys to new tiny homes in a ceremony at the 130th Airlift Wing of the West Virginia National Guard. Through the “Big Hearts Give Tiny Homes” project, 15 homes were constructed by students of Simulated Workplace programs, an initiative of the West Virginia Department of Education’s Career Technical Education division.

More than 2,000 students from 12 high schools designed, constructed and managed the tiny homes project with guidance from certified industry instructors over the course of seven weeks. The students also worked with businesses and organizations within their communities to gather donations to equip the homes with linens, beds, washers and dryers, groceries, televisions and other appliances.

“Time and again, in the aftermath of this tragic flooding, I have seen the spirit of West Virginians make a difference for their neighbors. These students have shown that spirit in a truly remarkable way,” Governor Tomblin said. “I know how eager the students have been to meet the families whose lives will change for the better because of them. And I join them in hoping these homes provide warmth and a sense of place and home to these families – this holiday season and beyond.”

Through West Virginia’s Simulated Workplace programs, high school classrooms have been transformed into companies, giving students the opportunity to gain hands-on training and learn high-demand skills. All Simulated Workplace companies – from HVAC to electrical, plumbing and carpentry – collaborated to make the tiny homes construction possible.

“This was a true collaborative effort among our Simulated Workplace programs and their communities,” said State Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Michael Martirano. “These incredibly talented students, along with their teachers and communities, worked tirelessly to help families in need. Their work is a true testament to both their skills and their generosity.”

West Virginia National Guard units from across West Virginia transported the tiny homes from each Career Technical Education center for the ceremony and will transport the homes to their final locations for the families.

“This is another example of how West Virginia comes together in times of need,” said Major General James Hoyer. “The West Virginia National Guard is proud to work with the Department of Education to help facilitate the tiny homes project. Our schools, local businesses, citizens and all aspects of our communities have come together to build these homes to help their fellow Mountaineers in the recovery and healing from this summer’s devastating floods. We are honored to participate in this program.”

The Governor’s Office, West Virginia Department of Education, West Virginia National Guard and West Virginia Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) partnered to make the project possible. The West Virginia United Methodist Committee on Relief, a VOAD organization, is providing the resources needed to put the homes in place and connect them to utilities.

The schools participating in “Big Hearts Give Tiny Homes” were:

  —- Cabell County Career Center

  —- Calhoun/Gilmer Career Center

  —- Carver Career Center

  —- Fayette Institute of Technology

  —- James Rumsey Technical Institute

  —- Marion County Career Center

  —- Mingo County High School

  —- Monongalia Technical Center

  —- Nicholas County Career Center

  —- Putnam County Career Center

  —- Spring Valley High School

  —- Wyoming County Career Center

Merry Christmas 2016

image

Fall Interns Complete Student Teaching for GSC

Sixteen students have completed their student teaching internships for Glenville State College and participated in GSC’s December Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, December 10.

The Free Press WV
(L-R) Sarah Gillespie, Katie Stover, Kennedy Cochran, Justin Oney, Justin Lewis,
Nathan Kincaid, Larisa Gray, Krystal Jones, Elizabeth Shuman, Jacob Yocum,
Athena Morris, Seth Elmore, Amanda Hanks, Anissa Cox, Kayla Rose, and Paige Tuttle

  • Kennedy Cochran completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Multi- Categorical Special Education (K-6) at Leading Creek Elementary School with Brianna Short and Melissa Wood. Dr. Shelly Ratliff and Dr. Tara Cosco were her GSC supervisors. She is the daughter of Clinton and Lisa Cochran of Clifftop, West Virginia. Cochran was also named Outstanding Student Teacher of the fall semester by the education honor society Kappa Delta Pi.


  • Anissa Cox completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and English Education (5-9) at Jane Lew Elementary School and Robert L. Bland Middle School with Carmen Shafer and Traci McCarty. Dr. Shara Curry and Dr. Melody Wise were her GSC supervisors. She is the daughter of Charles Holcomb of Paden City, West Virginia and Yvonne and Brian Tannous of Weston, West Virginia. She currently resides in Jane Lew, West Virginia with her husband Brent and son Elliot.


  • Seth Elmore completed his student teaching in Music Education (5-adult) at Gilmer County Elementary School and Lewis County High School with Judy Leggett, Allen Heath, and Tina Norman. Dr. David Lewis, Dr. Shara Curry, and Donald Sheets were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Joseph Wayne and Kandi Jo Elmore of Greenville, West Virginia. He currently resides in Dixie, West Virginia with his wife Courtney.


  • Sarah Gillespie completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6), and General Math-Algebra I (5-9) at Tennerton Elementary School and Buckhannon-Upshur Middle School with Rachel Stump and Carol Shenuski. Dr. John Taylor and Joseph Wood were her GSC Supervisors. She is the daughter of Matthew and Rena Gillespie of Buckhannon, West Virginia. She currently resides with her Fiancé Daniel Nolte in Buckhannon, West Virginia.


  • Larisa Gray completed her student teaching in Math Education (5-adult) at Robert L. Bland Middle School and Lewis County High School with Tammie Lattea and Theresa Johnston. Dr. John Taylor and Joseph Wood were her GSC supervisors. She is the daughter of Daniel and Victoria Gordon of Cox’s Mills, West Virginia. She currently resides with her husband, Breken, in Westminster, Maryland.


  • Amanda Hanks completed her student teaching in Early Education (PreK-K) and Elementary Education (K-6) at Glade Creek Elementary School with Lori Symes and Briana Waters. Frances Fry was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Mike and Kim Hanks of Summersville, West Virginia.


  • Krystal Jones completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Multi-Categorical Special Education (K-6) at Summersville Elementary School with Aime Thomas and Betsy Strickland. Dr. John Taylor was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Myrtle Jones and Donald Barnes of Milford, Virginia.


  • Nathan Kincaid completed his student teaching in Business and Marketing Education (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School with Lora Chapman. Dr. Kevin Cain and Dr. John Taylor were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Michael and Sandra Kincaid of Summersville, West Virginia.


  • Justin Lewis completed his student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School and Calhoun County Middle/High School with Karen McClain and Brandi Richards. Dr. Shara Curry was his GSC supervisor. He is the son of Danny and MaLesa Lewis of Boonsboro, Maryland.


  • Athena Morris completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Multi-Categorical Special Education (K-6) at Arnoldsburg Elementary School with Tammey Webb and Maria Arnold. Dr. Tara Cosco was her GSC supervisor. She currently resides in Glenville, West Virginia with her husband Gary and children Kevin, Sebastian, and Isabel.


  • Justin Oney completed his student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School and Calhoun County Middle/High School with Lindsey Bush and Dan Cosgrove. Dr. Shara Curry and Don Sheets were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Eric and Kristi Oney of Logan, West Virginia.


  • Kayla Rose completed her student teaching in Elementary Education (K-6) and Early Education (PreK-K) at Burnsville Elementary School with Sherri Stalnaker and Melinda Wilson. Frances Fry was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Jessica Rose of Weston, West Virginia. She currently resides with her husband JR in Clarksburg, West Virginia.


  • Elizabeth Shuman completed her student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) and Elementary Education (K-6) at Lewis County High School and Jane Lew Elementary School with Ben Whetsell and Lisa Vaillancourt. Dr. Shara Curry was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of Kelly Shuman of Jane Lew, West Virginia and Nelson Shuman of Fairview, West Virginia and is the mother of Karus Musselman.


  • Katie Stover completed her student teaching in English Education (5-adult) at Braxton County High School and Geary Elementary School with Janis Collins and Staci Moore. Her GSC supervisors were Dr. Shara Curry, Dr. Melody Wise, and Frances Fry. She is the daughter of Brett and Kara Stover of Wallback, West Virginia.


  • Paige Tuttle completed her student teaching in Early Education (PreK-K) and Elementary Education (K-6) at Gilmer County Elementary School with Ronni Facemire and Tanya Stewart. Dr. Shelly Ratliff was her GSC supervisor. She is the daughter of David and Heather Tuttle of Fairview, West Virginia.


  • Jacob Yocum completed his student teaching in Social Studies (5-adult) at Gilmer County High School and Braxton County Middle School with McKinley Buckley and Lori Dittman. Frances Fry and Don Sheets were his GSC supervisors. He is the son of Jennifer and Rodney Thompson of Elkins, West Virginia.


  • Senior teacher education students take part in an internship during their final semester at GSC. At the conclusion of their internship students must complete a presentation illustrating their mastery of the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards as well as the standards of their particular area of study.


For more information about the Teacher Education Program at Glenville State College, contact 304.462.4119.

Governor Tomblin Presents 12 Communities with Small Cities Block Grants

Grants support more than $12 million in local projects
The Free Press WV

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin today presented more than $12 million in Small Cities Block Grant funds for 12 critical infrastructure projects to support communities across West Virginia. In total, more than $47 million in other federal, state and local funds will support these projects, serving more than 6,500 residents and approximately 1,000 West Virginia households, improving infrastructure reliability statewide.

“During my time as governor, we have awarded hundreds of improvement projects to cities and communities across West Virginia, and I am pleased to continue that tradition once more with these awards,” Gov. Tomblin said. “The economic development projects and infrastructure improvements supported by the Small Cities Block Grant program truly do make a difference. Not only do they improve our statewide infrastructure and poise West Virginia for future economic growth, they support West Virginia households in need and improve the quality of life for our residents.”

Small Cities Block Grant funding is provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Community Development Division of the West Virginia Development Office manages the administration of these funds.


TOWN OF CAIRO (Ritchie County)
$1,500,000
This $2.5 million project will enable the Town of Cairo to repair its wastewater treatment plant. The project will correct many deficiencies within the aging system and will ensure its reliability. 


TOWN OF CHAPMANVILLE (Logan)
$1,500,000
This $2.53 million project will improve the water system serving more than 900 existing residential households and businesses in the Town of Chapmanville and surrounding areas through system upgrades and the replacement of leaking water lines.


TOWN OF CLAY (Clay County)
$1,500,000
This $2.3 million project will include the construction of nearly 4.5 miles of new water lines to bring water to more than 54 households currently served by private water supplies. The project will include construction of a new water storage tank, booster station and related improvements, including fire protection, in this unserved area.


TOWN OF DAVIS (Tucker County)
$200,000
This $2.34 million project will replace the existing water system serving the town, which is antiquated and plagued by frequent line breaks. The project will also include the rehabilitation of a water impoundment and water treatment plant updates to serve more than 430 residential households and businesses.


GREENBRIER COUNTY COMMISSION
$1,300,000
This $10 million project will enable the Greenbrier County Public Service District to extend water service to 405 unserved households in Crawley, Shawver’s Crossing, Sam Black Church, Clintonville, Alta, Willamsburg and Trout. The installation of water lines, hydrants and a storage tank will also include an interconnection with the Town of Rupert. Overall, this project will serve more than 900 households.


MCDOWELL COUNTY COMMISSION
$1,300,000
This $1.95 million project is the first phase in the construction of the Coalwood Sewer System which replaces an outdated system that allows raw sewage discharge into the Clear Fork River, a tributary to the Tug Fork River. Long-term plans include the development of a system to serve additional area residents.


MARION COUNTY COMMISSION
$1,261,306
This $2.14 million project will allow the Colfax Public Service District to decommission its waste water treatment plant and extend the Colfax sewage system to the Kingmill Valley Public Service District. This project will serve 126 households and protect public water sources by halting overflow into the Tygart River.


MINGO COUNTY COMMISSION
$1,500,000
This $4.79 million project will enable the Mingo County Public Service District to complete the Beech Creek water extension project. This project will provide dependable water service and fire protection to 252 unserved households that currently rely on private water sources. 


TOWN OF PAX (Fayette County)  
$200,000
This $2.3 million project will provide 52 households in the Willis Branch area with public sewer service to alleviate contamination of the local watershed. The project will also upgrade the existing Town of Pax treatment facility which will benefit more than 160 households and increase capacity for future expansion. 


CITY OF RICHWOOD (Nicholas County)      
$1,300,000
This $6.53 million project will upgrade and expand water service to the Hinkle Mountain and Little Laurel areas of the city in which residents do not have a reliable source of water. The upgrade will benefit approximately 1,200 households, and extend water service to 100 unserved households.


UPSHUR COUNTY COMMISSION
$283,434
This $6.5 million project will make improvements to the Elkins Road Public Service District water distribution system and extend new water service to 82 households which currently rely on private water supplies and wells with poor quality water.  In all, more than 1,100 households will benefit from this project.


TOWN OF WEST UNION (Doddridge County)                
$200,000
This $3.5 million project will improve infrastructure in the Wabash area of the Town of West Union to Middle Island Creek through the construction of a new sanitary sewer system.  More than 100 households will directly benefit from this project, while the project will improve environmental conditions in the surrounding area. 

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