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Harrison County

Harrison County

Pediatric Nurse Celebrates 50th Anniversary at UHC

This year marks the 50th anniversary that Sharon Norman, RN, has been a priceless asset to the United Hospital Center pediatric nursing staff. “I never became a nurse for the praise; I did it for the children and for the sense of achievement,” said Norman.

Sharon Norman has had the caregiving gene running through her since she was a little girl. “I can’t remember ever wanting to be anything but a nurse,” said Norman. “I used to practice on animals, dolls, and even my sisters whenever they would get a cut or scrape.”

After graduating St. Mary’s Nursing School in 1967, Norman hit the ground running with her devoted career in pediatrics. Over the years, she has seen it all. She recalls seeing all types of patients from kids coming back for repeat treatment to kids having surgeries or broken bones fixed.

Norman recollects a time when she cared for a child who had a broken elbow and had to hold the young girl’s arm so the doctor could position a pin to fix the break. Sometime after, the child encountered Norman again and excitedly cried, “That’s my nurse!” Norman said that it feels good to know that she might be impacting her patients as much as they impact her.

The Free Press WV


Not only has she dealt with a wide variety of patients from cancer to asthma to broken bones, but she has also watched her profession as a whole evolve and advance. Norman says that when she first started she had to prepare and sterilized things by hand. Today, the supplies already come prepackaged or sterilized.

During her career, she has watched technology slowly take its place in both medical techniques and something as basic as medical records. However, these changes have never slowed her down. “I always try to keep an open mind. If I were ever faced with an obstacle, I would just remind myself to stay positive and be patient,” said Norman.

She said that her favorite part of the job by far was all of the wonderful children with which she encountered. “It was easy to get attached to them, especially the ones I would see repeatedly,” said Norman. Through her warm smile, she recounted how in the evenings the nurses would pop popcorn and gather with the parents and patients for a movie before tucking them into bed. Some of her fondest memories consist of birthday parties and holidays for the pediatric patients.

Not only does Sharon Norman dedicate herself to the children during work hours, but she also volunteers her extra time as well. A long-time volunteer of Camp Catch Your Breath, a UHC summer program for asthmatic children, Norman goes above and beyond for these kids. “At camp, I am a nurse in the med room. When the kids get a cut or scrape, they’ll come see me,” explained Norman. “My favorite part about camp is watching the kids that return year-after-year grow up.”

Norman said that she could go on for ages about all the cherished memories she has made at UHC. In fact, a fellow colleague and she have considered writing a book about their careers. When asked what she would include in the book Norman said, “I have so many stories about the kids, the experiences, and the friendships I’ve built here. I would just tell my story and everything that made me who I am.”

Norman made it a point to note that the person she owes all of her success to was her mother. She considered her the best supporter, cheerleader, and friend. “She was always there for me. My mother would tell everyone she met that her daughter was a nurse and that she was so proud.”

However, Norman never did it for the glory. She notes that this milestone was an accomplishment for her and the pride she takes in her profession. When asked what advice she would offer to young nurses, she replied, “Just keep an open mind because you can learn something new every day. Nursing is such a rewarding profession and it gives you a chance to make an impact on someone’s life.”

Limited Bear Firearms Season Permit Applications Available Online

The West Virginia Division of Natural Resources is now accepting applications for a limited number of permits for black bear hunting during the traditional deer gun season in eight counties. The application deadline is midnight August 13.
 
Hunters with these permits will be allowed to hunt bear without dogs on public and private land in Cabell, Doddridge, Harrison, Lincoln, Marion, Marshall, Mineral and Wetzel counties, from November 20 through December 02, 2017. Resident landowners, their resident children or resident tenants who live on the land are not required to apply for a limited bear firearms season permit or purchase a class DS bear hunting stamp to hunt on their own land.
 
“Counties open for bear hunting during the buck-gun season are above their management objective and need additional bears harvested to achieve their goal,” said Colin Carpenter, DNR black bear project leader. “Timing is critical when setting bear hunting seasons, and the limited bear firearms season will occur when the maximum number of hunters are in the woods. This is the fifth year with expanded bear hunting opportunities during the buck-gun season, and we hope hunters will continue to take advantage of them.”
 
Hunters must apply for a limited bear firearms permit by using the Electronic Licensing System at www.wvhunt.com. To apply, licensed hunters must log in to their account and click on “Enter Lottery” on the home screen, select “2017 Black Bear Hunt” and select the desired county. Hunters also may call their local DNR district office for help with the application process.
 
Successful applicants will be notified by mail by the first week of October. Applicants can see if they received a permit, starting September 01, by logging into their account. Neither the permit, nor the class DS stamp, is transferable, and the county of hunt cannot be changed.
 
Hunters are also reminded that 31 counties in West Virginia do not require permits to hunt black bears during the buck-gun season. Details concerning bear hunting seasons can be found in the 2017-2018 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Summary, available soon at license agents and online at www.wvdnr.gov.

#wvhunt
 

The Free Press WV



Permits Available

 

Cabell

100

 

 

Doddridge

100

 

 

Harrison

100

 

 

Lincoln

100

 

 

Marion

100

 

 

Marshall

100

 

 

Mineral

100

 

 

Wetzel

100

 

 

Total

800

 

Understanding Family History and Risk Factors of Cancer

Whether you have recently been diagnosed with cancer or are concerned about your risk, understanding your own family history is important. However, this requires a basic understanding of how genes work.

The nucleus is at the center of almost every cell in your body. It is helpful to think of this as the gene’s control center. Inside of the nucleus are 23 pairs of chromosomes containing genes. Human beings have approximately 25,000 genes. These are coded messages that dictate how cells behave. Genes control how your body grows and develops from birth.

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Cancer is the Result of Faulty Genes

Cancer occurs when something has gone wrong with one or more of the genes in a cell. Gene changes are called mutations or faults. “Typically, a cell must have at least six mutations before cancer develops,” said Linda Carte, vice president of oncology and post-acute care at United Hospital Center. “When that happens, it can divide rapidly and grow uncontrollably.”

Most changes to genes happen during a person’s lifetime, but a parent can also pass along gene mutations to his or her children. Acquired mutations, such as those that occur due to smoking or excessive sun exposure, cannot be passed to children.

Genes normally protect people from cancer by correcting DNA damage when cells divide. In the case of cancer genes, also called cancer susceptibility genes, the inherited mutation prevents repair of damaged DNA cells. Cancer can develop due to this.

“You inherit 23 chromosomes from your mother and 23 from your father,” said Carte. “If one of your parents has a gene mutation, you have a 50 percent chance of acquiring it yourself.”  Although this can increase your risk of cancer, it doesn’t mean you will absolutely develop it. In addition to your higher risk, you are more likely to develop cancer at an earlier age than normal if you inherited a gene mutation. This is known as having a genetic pre-disposition to cancer.


Occurrence of Cancer Caused by an Inherited Gene Mutation

According to the American Cancer Society, cancer caused by an inherited defective gene accounts for 5-10 percent of all cancers diagnosed. Aging, chance, lifestyle factors, and environmental factors play a much larger role in the development of cancer. Additionally, different types of gene faults cause more cases of cancer than others. If you’re concerned about inheriting a specific type of cancer from a parent, a genetic specialist may be able to test for the following types:

• Bowel
• Breast
• Kidney
• Melanoma
• Ovarian
• Pancreatic
• Prostate
• Retinoblastoma
• Thyroid
• Uterine
• Womb

Cancer is a common disease and occurs most frequently as the result of aging. “Having family members diagnosed with cancer after age 60 doesn’t increase your risk at all,” said Carte. “When considering your own risk, look at who in your family has or had cancer and their age at diagnosis.”

Your risk is higher if your family history contains any of the following:

• A close blood relative has discovered a gene mutation after having a genetic test
• Two or more relatives on your mother’s or father’s side of the family have had cancer, such as an aunt, uncle, or grandparent
• Your relatives have been diagnosed with the same type of cancer or different variations of cancer caused by the same genetic fault
• The family members developed cancer at age 50 or younger


Non-Familial Risk Factors

Since 90 to 95 percent of cancers occur for reasons other than genetics, it’s important to understand the risks and control what you can. For example, choose not to smoke, practice smart sun safety habits, and maintain a healthy body weight. ”Some known risk factors, such as getting older, are out of your control,” said Carte. “Even so, I encourage you to speak to your doctor about your likelihood of developing cancer as well as what you can do to lower your risk.” He or she may recommend a screening test such as a mammogram or colonoscopy or prescribe a specific medication.

Your care team at the Cecil B. Highland, Jr. and Barbara B. Highland Cancer Center at UHC welcomes your questions at any time. We will also help you locate additional resources to help manage your risks and deal with cancer. For more information please call 681.342.1830. 

UHC Nurse Honored As a Woman of Distinction

United Hospital Center’s (UHC) Cheryl Farley, RN, BSN, manager of Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehab, was recently honored at the 2017 Progressive Women’s Association (PWA) Women of Distinction Award Ceremony on Friday, June 02 in Bridgeport. Farley is the manager of the Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehab.

“Cheryl does a remarkable job. When I’ve observed her interacting with her patients, the mutual respect and heartfelt care between them is clearly evident,” said John Fernandez, vice president of operations at UHC. “Cheryl is someone that I and the community can always count on.”

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The theme of the award luncheon, coordinated by the PWA, was Celebrate America. Farley and nine other women were honored for the work they do to better the region.

Farley is not only devoted to her job but also to educating the public. In addition to working with the American Heart Association, she also conducts screening events throughout the area and does newspaper, TV, and radio interviews to keep people well-informed on heart, stroke, and vascular disease, as well as other health concerns.

“It is an honor to be recognized and it feels good to know I am making a positive impact,” said Farley. “I love all of my patients, coworkers, and fellow UHC Associates. Over the years, working at UHC has never felt like work.”

UHC Pharmacist is Preceptor of the Year

Carlton “Sonny” Hoskinson Jr., Class of 1986, spends much of his time in his role as a clinical pharmacist helping educate future pharmacy professionals. He has been a pharmacist at United Hospital Center (UHC) in Bridgeport for 30 years and has been working with WVU student pharmacists almost the entirety of his career.

“I really enjoy helping students with these educational experiences because I feel it is an interesting way to help foster the learning process,” Hoskinson said.

Hoskinson is the director of Camp Catch Your Breath—a camp for children ages 8-13 with asthma—and has been involved with the organization for approximately 25 years. The specialty camp is staffed by medical professionals, such as nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists and a physician, and annually gives 70 children with asthma a summer camp experience that they might otherwise not be able to have.

The Free Press WV


Our student pharmacists have the opportunity to complete a rotation at the camp with Hoskinson as their preceptor each summer. During this rotation, our students build their clinical skills through completing medication profiles, showing the children how to properly use their inhalers and nebulizers and answering any questions the children might have.

“By participating in Camp Catch Your Breath, the students get to see the outcomes that we as pharmacists might not see in outpatient settings,” Hoskinson said. “It’s really great when you listen and hear someone’s breathing clear up after a treatment and know that you were able to help them. I tell the students that, more than likely, they will not see the children again after camp, but you don’t know what kind of impact you are going to have on someone.

In pharmacy, we provide medication treatments, and we may not always see it, but we are helping a patient feel better and are giving them more quality time with their families.”

Hoskinson has received numerous positive responses from students about the uniqueness of the rotation. Several students have been inspired to further their education and complete hospital pharmacy residency programs, and some have even completed programs to become certified asthma educators.

In a rotation evaluation, one student stated, “Sonny demonstrates his commitment to our school and profession by consistently volunteering to accept students on rotation at both UHC and through his Asthma Camp rotation at Camp Catch Your Breath. Camp Catch Your Breath is a prominent example to Sonny’s willingness to lead and further our profession.”

Hoskinson hopes that student pharmacists see a more diverse picture of the profession of pharmacy when they complete rotations at Camp Catch Your Breath. He strives to provide students with memorable learning experiences and encourages them to get “hands-on” and involved in all aspects of the rotation.

West Fork Conservation District Farm Field Day Event!

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District encourages producers and students to attend the 2017 “Grazing Management Strategies” Field Day on Friday July 21st, and Saturday July 22nd, 2017. This field day will be for producers interested in learning about improving grazing practices and soil health, to make their operations more productive and profitable!

What are we talking about? The WFCD, along with WVU Extension, and The Natural Resource Conservation Service, will welcome renowned key note speakers, Mr. Greg Judy, and Dr. Matt Poore, who will come together to educate West Virginia’s local beef producers about extending forage production, successful cattle handling, and many other key features to successful farming.

Rancher and public speaker, Greg Judy, has given numerous talks and seminars all over the US, New Zealand & Canada, teaching the benefits of holistic high density planned grazing, leasing land, multi-species grazing, custom grazing, agroforestry and wildlife management. Mr. Judy will talk about “securing and developing economical grazing leases and mob grazing.”

Dr. Matt Poore, a Professor at North Carolina State University and Extension Beef Specialist, will teach about “making adaptive grazing work for you while maintaining soil health”.

There is something for everyone in this field day, and you do not want to miss these once in a lifetime keynote speakers! (Please note that you will need to pre-register with the District office to attend these events).

The field day will be a two-day event, with a dinner meeting featuring both Mr. Judy and Dr. Poore, taking place Friday, July 21st, at 6:00 p.m. at the Doddridge Co. Park on Snow Bird Road in Doddridge County, WV.

Saturday, July 22nd, will be a day filled with a morning seminar and an afternoon pasture walk, featuring Mr. Judy, Dr. Poore and West Fork’s NRCS District Conservationist, Jeff Griffith. Saturday’s event will start at 9:00 a.m. at the Maxwell farm, owned by John & Sue Ann Spiker, in Doddridge County, WV.

RSVP’s, including payment to attend, will need to be made by July 14th, 2017, and should include the number attending and the events that you wish to attend. We hope to see all of you out there for a chance to take away some great information and make great connections! To register, or for more information on this event, please contact WFCD at
304.627.2160 x 4.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 11,539 Spring Turkeys In 2017

The Free Press WV

Spring turkey hunters harvested 11,539 gobblers this year, an increase of more than 11 percent from 2016, according to preliminary numbers provided by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The harvest is the largest since 2006 when 11,735 birds were harvested, and is more than 18 percent above the 10-year average.

“Weather conditions were variable across the state during this year’s spring gobbler season, so it’s nice to see hunters were able to get out and enjoy some successful hunting, which is reflected in the harvest numbers,” said Mike Peters, DNR game bird biologist.

Five of the six DNR districts reported increased harvests over last year.

District 4 was the only district in which fewer birds were harvested than in 2016.

District 1 again recorded the most birds harvested this year (2,578), followed by District 6 (2,250), District 5 (2,090), District 4 (1,858), District 3 (1,733) and District 2 (1,030).

The top five counties with the largest harvests were Preston (475), which was up more than 100 birds from last year, Mason (448), Jackson (408), Wood (380), and Harrison (327).

Youth hunters harvested 458 turkeys during the one-day youth season on April 15.

Those numbers are included on the accompanying table.

West Virginia Spring Gobbler Season Results

County

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Barbour

162

178

127

165

204

Brooke

104

84

67

78

100

Hancock

110

110

89

98

106

Harrison

355

264

247

286

327

Marion

218

149

170

192

256

Marshall

300

220

174

207

255

Monongalia

262

174

199

197

266

Ohio

131

91

109

111

113

Preston

403

344

333

371

475

Taylor

103

87

72

101

135

Tucker

57

88

82

90

97

Wetzel

256

203

168

196

244

District 1 Subtotal

2,461

1,992

1,837

2,092

2,578

Berkeley

98

112

124

115

147

Grant

129

129

131

161

145

Hampshire

124

138

156

170

184

Hardy

129

135

116

132

132

Jefferson

60

57

82

79

114

Mineral

87

96

118

134

132

Morgan

54

62

64

54

64

Pendleton

117

95

94

88

112

District 2 Subtotal

798

824

885

933

1,030

Braxton

238

175

194

197

209

Clay

147

68

83

101

120

Lewis

221

180

194

211

249

Nicholas

221

164

213

330

311

Pocahontas

160

130

145

144

143

Randolph

217

186

225

250

248

Upshur

262

229

231

228

303

Webster

118

113

114

156

150

District 3 Subtotal

1,584

1,245

1,399

1,617

1,733

Fayette

287

244

239

292

278

Greenbrier

299

245

242

308

269

McDowell

308

215

218

200

177

Mercer

177

170

161

176

192

Monroe

206

212

181

184

192

Raleigh

277

214

231

283

279

Summers

258

209

199

219

209

Wyoming

291

255

257

320

262

District 4 Subtotal

2,103

1,764

1,728

1,982

1,858

Boone

230

159

138

157

157

Cabell

138

80

110

114

176

Kanawha

332

231

227

285

319

Lincoln

213

178

169

215

228

Logan

246

181

172

181

165

Mason

370

293

314

378

448

Mingo

141

93

91

131

143

Putnam

225

150

181

210

268

Wayne

144

103

108

139

186

District 5 Subtotal

2,039

1,468

1,510

1,810

2,090

Calhoun

179

135

128

145

164

Doddridge

138

126

118

137

160

Gilmer

191

147

124

132

143

Jackson

326

293

264

302

408

Pleasants

83

73

71

80

89

Ritchie

326

245

218

216

263

Roane

236

232

210

231

256

Tyler

211

136

144

182

181

Wirt

193

177

153

174

206

Wood

294

271

248

328

380

District 6 Subtotal

2,177

1,835

1,678

1,927

2,250

State Total

11,162

9,128

9,037

10,361

11,539

8th Graders Honored For Golden Horseshoe Accomplishments

The Free Press WV

More than 200 eighth-graders from across West Virginia were honored at the state Culture Center in the annual Golden Horseshoe ceremony.

The students earned the honor of Knights of the Golden Horseshoe for their knowledge of West Virginia history.

“I am proud of each student who earned this elite honor today,” state School Superintendent Dr. Steve Paine said. “The Golden Horseshoe recognizes students’ appreciation and understanding of West Virginia and promotes pride in our state.”

The Golden Horseshoe test has been given each year since 1931 in West Virginia. This year marks the 301st anniversary of the Golden Horseshoe tradition that began in the 1700’s when West Virginia was part of Virginia.

A complete list of 2017 winners can be found by visiting HERE.

Report: More Mountain State Students Pursuing Higher Education

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties lead the way in improving college-going rates

The Free Press WV

More West Virginia high school graduates went on to pursue higher education last year, according to a report released by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) and West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS). The college-going rate increased for the second consecutive year, inching up by 0.3 percent — or 266 students — from 2015 to 2016.

“These gains, while subtle, represent a solid step in the right direction,” Dr. Paul Hill, HEPC Chancellor, said. “For several years, the impact of the 2008 recession led to wide variations in college-going rates, not only in West Virginia but across the nation. Now that the economy is beginning to stabilize, we’re more confident that the small strides we’re witnessing represent genuine progress in creating a college-going culture in West Virginia — a process that takes time and occurs student by student, community by community.”

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties led the state in achieving the highest rates of improvement in college-going rates from 2015 to 2016. Braxton County High School (Braxton), Magnolia High School (Wetzel) and Chapmanville Regional High School (Logan) showed the greatest gains at the school level. Ohio, Mineral and Monongalia counties had the highest rates overall. A complete list of rates by school and county is available at http://www.wvhepc.edu/resources/reports-and-publications/2016-college-going-rate/.

“West Virginia needs more college graduates to grow its economy and invigorate its workforce,” Dr. Sarah Tucker, CTCS Chancellor, said. “I commend those high schools and school districts that are putting a real focus on helping their students pursue some form of postsecondary education. The future prosperity of our state depends on getting more students into college and ensuring they succeed and graduate.”

The 2016 Higher Education Report Card, released last fall by HEPC and CTCS, also outlined gains in college retention and a record number of degrees awarded by the state’s public colleges and universities.

HEPC and CTCS are charged with developing and implementing a five-year statewide strategic plan for higher education that includes a strong focus on improving access to higher education and promoting college completion and success. As part of this process, the agencies have in recent years launched a number of strategies that are proving to have an impact on higher education attainment.

For example, the federally funded “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)” initiative provides college mentoring and planning services to middle and high school students in ten of the state’s most economically challenged counties. The statewide College Foundation of West Virginia (CFWV) initiative offers information, including text message counseling, to help students navigate the college application and enrollment processes. And recent policy changes overhauling the delivery of developmental education and encouraging students to enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours per semester are showing promising results toward raising college graduation rates.

Shrine Clubs to Sponsor Orthopaedic Screening for Children at UHC

The Free Press WV

The Central WV Shrine Club, the Lewis County Shrine Club and United Hospital Center are sponsoring the 21st Annual Shriners Hospital local Orthopaedic Screening Clinic on Saturday, April 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

The purpose for the clinic is to identify any child who might benefit from treatment in a Shriners Hospital. 

Approximately 1,000 children have been treated from past clinics.

Shriners Hospitals for Children® is a health care system of 22 hospitals providing high quality pediatric and other specialty care to thousands of kids each year. 

All care is provided without any financial obligation to the patient or their family.

Shriners Hospitals treat problems such as:  club feet, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, scoliosis, hand and back problems, bowed legs, rickets, dislocated hips, spinal cord injuries, burns, and cleft lip and palate.  The age range for children who may be assisted includes newborns to age 18.

The Saturday, April 29, clinic will be held in the Family Medicine Center, 5th floor of the Physicians Office Building, on the campus of UHC, I-79 at the Jerry Dove exit. 

To schedule an appointment, call 681.342.3646, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Walk-ins will also be welcomed.

Camp Catch Your Breath Receives a Generous Donation from the Eastern Star

The Free Press WV
United Hospital Center (UHC) and Camp Catch Your Breath (CCYB) received $5,013 donation recently, which brings the total donations since 2016 to more than $20,000, from the WV Grand Chapter Order of the Eastern Star. Their support helps Camp Catch Your Breath, a statewide asthma camp for children ages 8 through 13. Eastern Star Chapters donate funds to a wide variety of worthy charities. Pictured left: Greg Kennedy, Past Grand Patron and Fran Lemley, Past Grand Matron, both are presenting a check on behalf of the WV Grand Chapter Order of the Eastern Star to Sonny Hoskinson, clinical director of the pharmacy at UHC and Camp Catch Your Breath director.“ This generous donation helps to offset camp expenses including food and lodging for campers, as well as equipment, supplies, and educational material, said Hoskinson. “CCYB offers an opportunity for children who, as a result of their asthma, would not otherwise be able to participate in a ‘camp’ experience.”

Winkie of Bridgeport Named Fourteen Fulbright Scholar at Wesleyan

Mason Winkie, a senior biochemistry and psychology major and honors minor from Bridgeport, WV, has been named West Virginia Wesleyan College’s fourteenth Fulbright Scholar.

Sponsored by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the Fulbright Program provides funding for students, scholars, teachers, and professionals to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools.

Winkie received an English Teaching Assistant Award to travel to the Czech Republic from September 1 through June 30.  His main objective while in the Czech Republic will be helping students learn English and more about American culture.

“I chose the Czech Republic mainly because of familial ties to the country through my maternal Grandfather,” Winkie commented.

The Free Press WV
Boyd Creasman, Interim President of the College; Fulbright Scholar Mason Winkie; Dr. Jordan Kuck, assistant professor of history; and Katie Loudin ‘07, former Fulbright Scholar and assistant director of the Center for Community Engagement & Leadership Development during this morning’s press conference.


Winkie says that he is so interested in international travel simply because he wants to widen his perspective to include cultures outside the United States.

“The idea that I know so little about the rest of the world and the billions of people that live outside my sphere of understanding led me to try to connect with as many people from different cultures as possible through opportunities like the Fulbright Scholar program,” he said.

Knowing that having a broad perspective is the key to success, Winkie is excited to gain a wider understanding and appreciation for those outside the American culture.

“An opportunity like the Fulbright Scholarship allows me to live life from a completely new perspective and more fully appreciate my shared connection with the many people on Earth through their happiness, their struggles, and their progress,” he said.  “These shared conditions are what can and will unite people in our struggle to overcome all future crisis.”

During his time at Wesleyan, Winkie has volunteered as an English as a Second Language (ESL) tutor, a Bobcat Outdoor Orientation Trip (BOOT) Camp leader, a member of WE LEAD’s Appalachian Experience Interest Team, and was a student representative for the Board of Trustees Enrollment Council.  He credits his experience with Wesleyan’s faculty and staff as a key player in his success thus far.

“I have to thank the faculty and staff at Wesleyan who have helped mentor or aid me through my time here,” Winkie stated.  “They do such a remarkable job in making me feel like I am their only student by the amount of dedication and friendliness they put into assisting me,” he said.  “However, it is their ability to provide all students with this feeling that makes attending Wesleyan such a happy and rewarding experience for everyone.”

Previous Fulbright Scholars from Wesleyan include Katie Oreskovich Loudin, Thailand, 2007; Laura Full, Macao, 2008; Michelle Mayhew, Malaysia, 2008; Brad Foster, Thailand, 2008; Carolyn Bugg, Taiwan, 2010; Jillian Moga, South Korea, 2010; Lucy Swecker, South Korea, 2011; Cassandra Bodkins, Bulgaria, 2012; Kaitlin Whitt, Bulgaria, 2012; Gabrielle LaFata, South Korea, 2013; and Leisa Kimelaskas, Slovakia, 2014.  Other Fulbright Scholars Bethanie Thompson, 2008, and Marie Franco, 2010, elected to pursue other opportunities.

West Fork Conservation District Spring Agricultural Enhancement Program Funding

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has approved the following cooperators for financial assistance through the Spring FY17 Agricultural Enhancement Program:

  • Bee, Ann (Gilmer): Lime - $923.79

  • Blake, Nelson (Harrison): Lime - $1,931.00

  • Grogg, Billie (Gilmer): Lime - $2,382.00

  • Huff, Denzil (Gilmer): Nutrient Management - $420.00

  • Kefauver, Ronald (Harrison): Lime - $200.00

  • Lang, David (Harrison): Lime - $523.80

  • Lowther, Bill (Lewis): Lime - $1,829.50, Nutrient Management - $424.40

  • Marshall, Greg (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $276.90

  • Maxwell, Robert (Doddridge): Lime - $1,136.00

  • Nutter, Lisa (Harrison): Lime - $2,209.30

  • Oldaker, John (Lewis): Lime - $ 2,160.00

  • Pennington, Bernard (Doddridge): Nutrient Management: - $246.00

  • Potesta, A. Robert (Harrison): Lime - $498.00

  • Robinson, Anne (Doddridge): Lime - $1,380.00

  • Rockwell, Virginia (Harrison): Lime - $2,958.00

  • Shiflet, Michael (Gilmer): Lime - $3,000.00

  • Short, Eldon (Lewis): Lime - $1,333.50

  • Stout II, Lowell (Harrison): Lime - $364.80

  • Stutler, Kermit (Harrison): Nutrient Management: - $356.40

  • Suan, Bill (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Suan, Robert (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $90.00

  • Sypolt, Charles (Gilmer): Lime - $506.00

  • Tomes, Edward (Harrison): Lime - $3,000.00

  • White, L. Frank (Lewis): Lime - $420.00

  • White, William (Harrison): Lime - $2,200.00

  • Wolfe, Lynwood (Lewis): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Workman, Joseph (Harrison): Lime - $2,650.00

WEST FORK CONSERVATION DISTRICT Education Programs and Scholarship Opportunities

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has a busy schedule already planned for educational events to take place in 2017.

Eligible students from grades K-12 are encouraged to look at some of these programs, and see if they may be of interest to them. Information about these programs will be going out to Principals, Guidance Counselors, and select science teachers in schools located in Lewis, Doddridge, Gilmer and Harrison Counties.

Included in this news release is a list of the various programs to take part in, and a brief description of each along with their deadlines and dates to remember!

Please call the WFCD office at 304.627.2160 x 4, for additional information on our programs.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity for Seniors:  The West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts awards nine $500 college scholarships to graduating high school seniors who plan on majoring in an agriculture related field. Students must submit applications to their Conservation District Office by March 6th, 2017. The recipients will be notified in May. Applications are available at your Guidance Counselor’s office or the WFCD office.

  2. Grassland Evaluation Contest: All high school 4-H and FFA students may compete at the Grassland Contest. It is held in conjunction with the Beef Expo on April 7th, 2017 at Jackson’s Mills. The contest covers the topics of grassland condition, soil interpretation, wildlife habitation and plant identification. Scholarships are awarded to top winners. The registration form can be found at wvca.us/education/grassland_contest.cfm.

  3. Sixth Grade Conservation Field Day: Gilmer County holds a special field day for all sixth grade students. It is scheduled for April 25th, 2017 at Cedar Creek State Park. Stations are set up covering soils, forests, wildlife, oil and gas environmental concerns, beekeeping, streams, etc. It is a full day of learning for students. If your school is interested in having a conservation field day, contact the WFCD for more information.

  4. Samara Exam: The Samara Exam is a test that measures the knowledge students have attained about the environment up through the 6th grade. The test is administered in March or April at the teacher’s convenience. Teachers, if you are interested in conducting this fun activity, you can use the links found on our website at wvca.us, under the education programs tab, or contact the WFCD for more information. It’s fun, educational and free!

  5. Envirothon Training Day:  This workshop is for teams of 9th-12th grade students to explore current environmental and earth sciences within the framework of five disciplines: aquatics, forestry, soils, wildlife and a current environmental topic. The contest will be held at the Doddridge County Park and will help teams prepare for the field competition to be held on April 20th & 21st, 2017 at Camp Caesar at Cowen, WV. The team with the highest score from the field competition will become the state champion and will represent West Virginia in the NCF Envirothon. You will find all needed information and can register your team at wvca.us under the education tab or contact the WFCD office.

  6. Forestry Contest: The Upper Ohio, Little Kanawha and West Fork Conservation Districts in conjunction with the West Virginia Division of Forestry will again be holding their annual Forestry Contest. This year it will be held in the Upper Ohio Conservation District area. It will be based on WV career development events for forestry. FFA teachers will receive announcements in the near future detailing the contest.

  7. Tri District Land Judging: Land judging is a program to help students learn about the different types of soils and their characteristics and how to judge depth, erosion, slope and permeability. They learn how to use these factors to classify land and learn some of the conservation practices needed to maintain or improve lands. The winning regional Vo-Ag teams will advance to the State Vo-Ag contest. The winning local 4-H groups attend the State 4-H contest. The winning teams from the State Vo-Ag and State 4-H contests are eligible to participate in the National Land Judging Contest in Oklahoma the following Spring. The District Contest is scheduled for May 11th, 2017. Information will be forthcoming to Tri-District Extension Agents, FFA Instructors and Conservation Districts regarding the dates, locations and times.
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