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Harrison County

West Fork Conservation District Farm Field Day Event!

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District encourages producers and students to attend the 2017 “Grazing Management Strategies” Field Day on Friday July 21st, and Saturday July 22nd, 2017. This field day will be for producers interested in learning about improving grazing practices and soil health, to make their operations more productive and profitable!

What are we talking about? The WFCD, along with WVU Extension, and The Natural Resource Conservation Service, will welcome renowned key note speakers, Mr. Greg Judy, and Dr. Matt Poore, who will come together to educate West Virginia’s local beef producers about extending forage production, successful cattle handling, and many other key features to successful farming.

Rancher and public speaker, Greg Judy, has given numerous talks and seminars all over the US, New Zealand & Canada, teaching the benefits of holistic high density planned grazing, leasing land, multi-species grazing, custom grazing, agroforestry and wildlife management. Mr. Judy will talk about “securing and developing economical grazing leases and mob grazing.”

Dr. Matt Poore, a Professor at North Carolina State University and Extension Beef Specialist, will teach about “making adaptive grazing work for you while maintaining soil health”.

There is something for everyone in this field day, and you do not want to miss these once in a lifetime keynote speakers! (Please note that you will need to pre-register with the District office to attend these events).

The field day will be a two-day event, with a dinner meeting featuring both Mr. Judy and Dr. Poore, taking place Friday, July 21st, at 6:00 p.m. at the Doddridge Co. Park on Snow Bird Road in Doddridge County, WV.

Saturday, July 22nd, will be a day filled with a morning seminar and an afternoon pasture walk, featuring Mr. Judy, Dr. Poore and West Fork’s NRCS District Conservationist, Jeff Griffith. Saturday’s event will start at 9:00 a.m. at the Maxwell farm, owned by John & Sue Ann Spiker, in Doddridge County, WV.

RSVP’s, including payment to attend, will need to be made by July 14th, 2017, and should include the number attending and the events that you wish to attend. We hope to see all of you out there for a chance to take away some great information and make great connections! To register, or for more information on this event, please contact WFCD at
304.627.2160 x 4.

West Virginia Hunters Harvest 11,539 Spring Turkeys In 2017

The Free Press WV

Spring turkey hunters harvested 11,539 gobblers this year, an increase of more than 11 percent from 2016, according to preliminary numbers provided by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources.

The harvest is the largest since 2006 when 11,735 birds were harvested, and is more than 18 percent above the 10-year average.

“Weather conditions were variable across the state during this year’s spring gobbler season, so it’s nice to see hunters were able to get out and enjoy some successful hunting, which is reflected in the harvest numbers,” said Mike Peters, DNR game bird biologist.

Five of the six DNR districts reported increased harvests over last year.

District 4 was the only district in which fewer birds were harvested than in 2016.

District 1 again recorded the most birds harvested this year (2,578), followed by District 6 (2,250), District 5 (2,090), District 4 (1,858), District 3 (1,733) and District 2 (1,030).

The top five counties with the largest harvests were Preston (475), which was up more than 100 birds from last year, Mason (448), Jackson (408), Wood (380), and Harrison (327).

Youth hunters harvested 458 turkeys during the one-day youth season on April 15.

Those numbers are included on the accompanying table.

West Virginia Spring Gobbler Season Results

County

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Barbour

162

178

127

165

204

Brooke

104

84

67

78

100

Hancock

110

110

89

98

106

Harrison

355

264

247

286

327

Marion

218

149

170

192

256

Marshall

300

220

174

207

255

Monongalia

262

174

199

197

266

Ohio

131

91

109

111

113

Preston

403

344

333

371

475

Taylor

103

87

72

101

135

Tucker

57

88

82

90

97

Wetzel

256

203

168

196

244

District 1 Subtotal

2,461

1,992

1,837

2,092

2,578

Berkeley

98

112

124

115

147

Grant

129

129

131

161

145

Hampshire

124

138

156

170

184

Hardy

129

135

116

132

132

Jefferson

60

57

82

79

114

Mineral

87

96

118

134

132

Morgan

54

62

64

54

64

Pendleton

117

95

94

88

112

District 2 Subtotal

798

824

885

933

1,030

Braxton

238

175

194

197

209

Clay

147

68

83

101

120

Lewis

221

180

194

211

249

Nicholas

221

164

213

330

311

Pocahontas

160

130

145

144

143

Randolph

217

186

225

250

248

Upshur

262

229

231

228

303

Webster

118

113

114

156

150

District 3 Subtotal

1,584

1,245

1,399

1,617

1,733

Fayette

287

244

239

292

278

Greenbrier

299

245

242

308

269

McDowell

308

215

218

200

177

Mercer

177

170

161

176

192

Monroe

206

212

181

184

192

Raleigh

277

214

231

283

279

Summers

258

209

199

219

209

Wyoming

291

255

257

320

262

District 4 Subtotal

2,103

1,764

1,728

1,982

1,858

Boone

230

159

138

157

157

Cabell

138

80

110

114

176

Kanawha

332

231

227

285

319

Lincoln

213

178

169

215

228

Logan

246

181

172

181

165

Mason

370

293

314

378

448

Mingo

141

93

91

131

143

Putnam

225

150

181

210

268

Wayne

144

103

108

139

186

District 5 Subtotal

2,039

1,468

1,510

1,810

2,090

Calhoun

179

135

128

145

164

Doddridge

138

126

118

137

160

Gilmer

191

147

124

132

143

Jackson

326

293

264

302

408

Pleasants

83

73

71

80

89

Ritchie

326

245

218

216

263

Roane

236

232

210

231

256

Tyler

211

136

144

182

181

Wirt

193

177

153

174

206

Wood

294

271

248

328

380

District 6 Subtotal

2,177

1,835

1,678

1,927

2,250

State Total

11,162

9,128

9,037

10,361

11,539

8th Graders Honored For Golden Horseshoe Accomplishments

The Free Press WV

More than 200 eighth-graders from across West Virginia were honored at the state Culture Center in the annual Golden Horseshoe ceremony.

The students earned the honor of Knights of the Golden Horseshoe for their knowledge of West Virginia history.

“I am proud of each student who earned this elite honor today,” state School Superintendent Dr. Steve Paine said. “The Golden Horseshoe recognizes students’ appreciation and understanding of West Virginia and promotes pride in our state.”

The Golden Horseshoe test has been given each year since 1931 in West Virginia. This year marks the 301st anniversary of the Golden Horseshoe tradition that began in the 1700’s when West Virginia was part of Virginia.

A complete list of 2017 winners can be found by visiting HERE.

Report: More Mountain State Students Pursuing Higher Education

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties lead the way in improving college-going rates

The Free Press WV

More West Virginia high school graduates went on to pursue higher education last year, according to a report released by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) and West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS). The college-going rate increased for the second consecutive year, inching up by 0.3 percent — or 266 students — from 2015 to 2016.

“These gains, while subtle, represent a solid step in the right direction,” Dr. Paul Hill, HEPC Chancellor, said. “For several years, the impact of the 2008 recession led to wide variations in college-going rates, not only in West Virginia but across the nation. Now that the economy is beginning to stabilize, we’re more confident that the small strides we’re witnessing represent genuine progress in creating a college-going culture in West Virginia — a process that takes time and occurs student by student, community by community.”

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties led the state in achieving the highest rates of improvement in college-going rates from 2015 to 2016. Braxton County High School (Braxton), Magnolia High School (Wetzel) and Chapmanville Regional High School (Logan) showed the greatest gains at the school level. Ohio, Mineral and Monongalia counties had the highest rates overall. A complete list of rates by school and county is available at http://www.wvhepc.edu/resources/reports-and-publications/2016-college-going-rate/.

“West Virginia needs more college graduates to grow its economy and invigorate its workforce,” Dr. Sarah Tucker, CTCS Chancellor, said. “I commend those high schools and school districts that are putting a real focus on helping their students pursue some form of postsecondary education. The future prosperity of our state depends on getting more students into college and ensuring they succeed and graduate.”

The 2016 Higher Education Report Card, released last fall by HEPC and CTCS, also outlined gains in college retention and a record number of degrees awarded by the state’s public colleges and universities.

HEPC and CTCS are charged with developing and implementing a five-year statewide strategic plan for higher education that includes a strong focus on improving access to higher education and promoting college completion and success. As part of this process, the agencies have in recent years launched a number of strategies that are proving to have an impact on higher education attainment.

For example, the federally funded “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)” initiative provides college mentoring and planning services to middle and high school students in ten of the state’s most economically challenged counties. The statewide College Foundation of West Virginia (CFWV) initiative offers information, including text message counseling, to help students navigate the college application and enrollment processes. And recent policy changes overhauling the delivery of developmental education and encouraging students to enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours per semester are showing promising results toward raising college graduation rates.

Shrine Clubs to Sponsor Orthopaedic Screening for Children at UHC

The Free Press WV

The Central WV Shrine Club, the Lewis County Shrine Club and United Hospital Center are sponsoring the 21st Annual Shriners Hospital local Orthopaedic Screening Clinic on Saturday, April 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

The purpose for the clinic is to identify any child who might benefit from treatment in a Shriners Hospital. 

Approximately 1,000 children have been treated from past clinics.

Shriners Hospitals for Children® is a health care system of 22 hospitals providing high quality pediatric and other specialty care to thousands of kids each year. 

All care is provided without any financial obligation to the patient or their family.

Shriners Hospitals treat problems such as:  club feet, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, scoliosis, hand and back problems, bowed legs, rickets, dislocated hips, spinal cord injuries, burns, and cleft lip and palate.  The age range for children who may be assisted includes newborns to age 18.

The Saturday, April 29, clinic will be held in the Family Medicine Center, 5th floor of the Physicians Office Building, on the campus of UHC, I-79 at the Jerry Dove exit. 

To schedule an appointment, call 681.342.3646, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Walk-ins will also be welcomed.

Camp Catch Your Breath Receives a Generous Donation from the Eastern Star

The Free Press WV
United Hospital Center (UHC) and Camp Catch Your Breath (CCYB) received $5,013 donation recently, which brings the total donations since 2016 to more than $20,000, from the WV Grand Chapter Order of the Eastern Star. Their support helps Camp Catch Your Breath, a statewide asthma camp for children ages 8 through 13. Eastern Star Chapters donate funds to a wide variety of worthy charities. Pictured left: Greg Kennedy, Past Grand Patron and Fran Lemley, Past Grand Matron, both are presenting a check on behalf of the WV Grand Chapter Order of the Eastern Star to Sonny Hoskinson, clinical director of the pharmacy at UHC and Camp Catch Your Breath director.“ This generous donation helps to offset camp expenses including food and lodging for campers, as well as equipment, supplies, and educational material, said Hoskinson. “CCYB offers an opportunity for children who, as a result of their asthma, would not otherwise be able to participate in a ‘camp’ experience.”

Winkie of Bridgeport Named Fourteen Fulbright Scholar at Wesleyan

Mason Winkie, a senior biochemistry and psychology major and honors minor from Bridgeport, WV, has been named West Virginia Wesleyan College’s fourteenth Fulbright Scholar.

Sponsored by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the Fulbright Program provides funding for students, scholars, teachers, and professionals to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools.

Winkie received an English Teaching Assistant Award to travel to the Czech Republic from September 1 through June 30.  His main objective while in the Czech Republic will be helping students learn English and more about American culture.

“I chose the Czech Republic mainly because of familial ties to the country through my maternal Grandfather,” Winkie commented.

The Free Press WV
Boyd Creasman, Interim President of the College; Fulbright Scholar Mason Winkie; Dr. Jordan Kuck, assistant professor of history; and Katie Loudin ‘07, former Fulbright Scholar and assistant director of the Center for Community Engagement & Leadership Development during this morning’s press conference.


Winkie says that he is so interested in international travel simply because he wants to widen his perspective to include cultures outside the United States.

“The idea that I know so little about the rest of the world and the billions of people that live outside my sphere of understanding led me to try to connect with as many people from different cultures as possible through opportunities like the Fulbright Scholar program,” he said.

Knowing that having a broad perspective is the key to success, Winkie is excited to gain a wider understanding and appreciation for those outside the American culture.

“An opportunity like the Fulbright Scholarship allows me to live life from a completely new perspective and more fully appreciate my shared connection with the many people on Earth through their happiness, their struggles, and their progress,” he said.  “These shared conditions are what can and will unite people in our struggle to overcome all future crisis.”

During his time at Wesleyan, Winkie has volunteered as an English as a Second Language (ESL) tutor, a Bobcat Outdoor Orientation Trip (BOOT) Camp leader, a member of WE LEAD’s Appalachian Experience Interest Team, and was a student representative for the Board of Trustees Enrollment Council.  He credits his experience with Wesleyan’s faculty and staff as a key player in his success thus far.

“I have to thank the faculty and staff at Wesleyan who have helped mentor or aid me through my time here,” Winkie stated.  “They do such a remarkable job in making me feel like I am their only student by the amount of dedication and friendliness they put into assisting me,” he said.  “However, it is their ability to provide all students with this feeling that makes attending Wesleyan such a happy and rewarding experience for everyone.”

Previous Fulbright Scholars from Wesleyan include Katie Oreskovich Loudin, Thailand, 2007; Laura Full, Macao, 2008; Michelle Mayhew, Malaysia, 2008; Brad Foster, Thailand, 2008; Carolyn Bugg, Taiwan, 2010; Jillian Moga, South Korea, 2010; Lucy Swecker, South Korea, 2011; Cassandra Bodkins, Bulgaria, 2012; Kaitlin Whitt, Bulgaria, 2012; Gabrielle LaFata, South Korea, 2013; and Leisa Kimelaskas, Slovakia, 2014.  Other Fulbright Scholars Bethanie Thompson, 2008, and Marie Franco, 2010, elected to pursue other opportunities.

West Fork Conservation District Spring Agricultural Enhancement Program Funding

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has approved the following cooperators for financial assistance through the Spring FY17 Agricultural Enhancement Program:

  • Bee, Ann (Gilmer): Lime - $923.79

  • Blake, Nelson (Harrison): Lime - $1,931.00

  • Grogg, Billie (Gilmer): Lime - $2,382.00

  • Huff, Denzil (Gilmer): Nutrient Management - $420.00

  • Kefauver, Ronald (Harrison): Lime - $200.00

  • Lang, David (Harrison): Lime - $523.80

  • Lowther, Bill (Lewis): Lime - $1,829.50, Nutrient Management - $424.40

  • Marshall, Greg (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $276.90

  • Maxwell, Robert (Doddridge): Lime - $1,136.00

  • Nutter, Lisa (Harrison): Lime - $2,209.30

  • Oldaker, John (Lewis): Lime - $ 2,160.00

  • Pennington, Bernard (Doddridge): Nutrient Management: - $246.00

  • Potesta, A. Robert (Harrison): Lime - $498.00

  • Robinson, Anne (Doddridge): Lime - $1,380.00

  • Rockwell, Virginia (Harrison): Lime - $2,958.00

  • Shiflet, Michael (Gilmer): Lime - $3,000.00

  • Short, Eldon (Lewis): Lime - $1,333.50

  • Stout II, Lowell (Harrison): Lime - $364.80

  • Stutler, Kermit (Harrison): Nutrient Management: - $356.40

  • Suan, Bill (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Suan, Robert (Harrison): Nutrient Management - $90.00

  • Sypolt, Charles (Gilmer): Lime - $506.00

  • Tomes, Edward (Harrison): Lime - $3,000.00

  • White, L. Frank (Lewis): Lime - $420.00

  • White, William (Harrison): Lime - $2,200.00

  • Wolfe, Lynwood (Lewis): Nutrient Management - $600.00

  • Workman, Joseph (Harrison): Lime - $2,650.00

WEST FORK CONSERVATION DISTRICT Education Programs and Scholarship Opportunities

The Free Press WV

The West Fork Conservation District has a busy schedule already planned for educational events to take place in 2017.

Eligible students from grades K-12 are encouraged to look at some of these programs, and see if they may be of interest to them. Information about these programs will be going out to Principals, Guidance Counselors, and select science teachers in schools located in Lewis, Doddridge, Gilmer and Harrison Counties.

Included in this news release is a list of the various programs to take part in, and a brief description of each along with their deadlines and dates to remember!

Please call the WFCD office at 304.627.2160 x 4, for additional information on our programs.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity for Seniors:  The West Virginia Association of Conservation Districts awards nine $500 college scholarships to graduating high school seniors who plan on majoring in an agriculture related field. Students must submit applications to their Conservation District Office by March 6th, 2017. The recipients will be notified in May. Applications are available at your Guidance Counselor’s office or the WFCD office.

  2. Grassland Evaluation Contest: All high school 4-H and FFA students may compete at the Grassland Contest. It is held in conjunction with the Beef Expo on April 7th, 2017 at Jackson’s Mills. The contest covers the topics of grassland condition, soil interpretation, wildlife habitation and plant identification. Scholarships are awarded to top winners. The registration form can be found at wvca.us/education/grassland_contest.cfm.

  3. Sixth Grade Conservation Field Day: Gilmer County holds a special field day for all sixth grade students. It is scheduled for April 25th, 2017 at Cedar Creek State Park. Stations are set up covering soils, forests, wildlife, oil and gas environmental concerns, beekeeping, streams, etc. It is a full day of learning for students. If your school is interested in having a conservation field day, contact the WFCD for more information.

  4. Samara Exam: The Samara Exam is a test that measures the knowledge students have attained about the environment up through the 6th grade. The test is administered in March or April at the teacher’s convenience. Teachers, if you are interested in conducting this fun activity, you can use the links found on our website at wvca.us, under the education programs tab, or contact the WFCD for more information. It’s fun, educational and free!

  5. Envirothon Training Day:  This workshop is for teams of 9th-12th grade students to explore current environmental and earth sciences within the framework of five disciplines: aquatics, forestry, soils, wildlife and a current environmental topic. The contest will be held at the Doddridge County Park and will help teams prepare for the field competition to be held on April 20th & 21st, 2017 at Camp Caesar at Cowen, WV. The team with the highest score from the field competition will become the state champion and will represent West Virginia in the NCF Envirothon. You will find all needed information and can register your team at wvca.us under the education tab or contact the WFCD office.

  6. Forestry Contest: The Upper Ohio, Little Kanawha and West Fork Conservation Districts in conjunction with the West Virginia Division of Forestry will again be holding their annual Forestry Contest. This year it will be held in the Upper Ohio Conservation District area. It will be based on WV career development events for forestry. FFA teachers will receive announcements in the near future detailing the contest.

  7. Tri District Land Judging: Land judging is a program to help students learn about the different types of soils and their characteristics and how to judge depth, erosion, slope and permeability. They learn how to use these factors to classify land and learn some of the conservation practices needed to maintain or improve lands. The winning regional Vo-Ag teams will advance to the State Vo-Ag contest. The winning local 4-H groups attend the State 4-H contest. The winning teams from the State Vo-Ag and State 4-H contests are eligible to participate in the National Land Judging Contest in Oklahoma the following Spring. The District Contest is scheduled for May 11th, 2017. Information will be forthcoming to Tri-District Extension Agents, FFA Instructors and Conservation Districts regarding the dates, locations and times.

Secretary of State’s Office Announces Field Representative for Mid-Ohio Valley

The Free Press WV

West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner is pleased to announce that Dot Underwood has joined his staff as Field Service Representative for Tyler, Pleasants, Doddridge, Harrison, Ritchie, Gilmer, Braxton, Wood and Wirt counties.

“Dot Underwood is one of a group of dedicated individuals who are helping us launch our new Field Service Representative initiative,’ Warner said. “Our Field Service Representatives will assist new businesses with registration and licensing, work side-by-side with county clerks to improve our office’s assistance, reach out to voters and candidates, assisting with registration, election questions, and associated issues.”

Dot Underwood is no stranger to the region she is serving. She was a Regional Representative for former Governors Joe Manchin and Earl Ray Tomblin, serving many of the same counties. As a Regional Representative, Underwood represented the Governor’s Office for official functions, as well as helping constituents with questions and issues.

“Our field representatives will serve as mobile Secretary of State offices, providing instant communication between citizens, businesses, and our office as needed,” Warner said. “I can think of no one better than Dot Underwood to represent this office in the Mid-Ohio Valley area.”

West Virginia High Schools Recognized for Exemplary Graduation Rates

Seventy West Virginia high schools were recognized for achieving exemplary graduation rates of 90 percent or greater during the 2015-16 school year. Schools were honored by Governor Jim Justice’s Chief of Staff, Nick Casey, State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Michael Martirano and the West Virginia Board of Education.

“Our state becomes stronger with each student that graduates high school,” Martirano said. “The high schools here today deserve the praise they are receiving for achieving a 90 percent or higher graduation rate. Our schools see the potential that a high school graduate holds for our state and they, along with the Department of Education and Board of Education, have made it a top priority to ensure our students show up, work hard, and earn a diploma.”

The Free Press WV
Gilmer County Superintendent Mr. Devono and GCHS Principal Mrs. Butcher
receiving a plaque in Charleston during a recognition ceremony.


Recent data show more students in West Virginia are graduating from high school when compared to previous years. Several statewide initiatives contributed to the steady increase in the graduation rate. Most notably the creation of the state’s Early Warning System, which tracks 45 different indicators – the most important being attendance, behavior and grades – to identify students at risk of dropping out.

West Virginia’s graduation rate has continued to rise throughout the last several years. Data from the U.S. Department of Education placed West Virginia among the top 20 states for graduation rates in 2014-15, with a rate of 86.5 percent. The average graduation rate in the Mountain State for the 2015-16 school year increased even more to 89.81 percent.

Of the 70 schools recognized, four schools achieved a graduation rate of 100 percent. Those schools include; Union Educational Complex, Harman High School, Pickens High School and Paden City High School.

The 70 schools recognized represent 60.3 percent of the 116 high schools in West Virginia. The overall graduation rate for all West Virginia high schools was 89.81 percent.

 

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

Mountain Valley Pipeline Public Hearing Notice

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection – Division of Water and Waste Management will hold public hearings regarding the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline project for State 401 Water Quality Certification, Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and for Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit. Oral and written comments will be accepted at each hearing. The hearings will start at 6:00PM at the following locations:

For Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, State 401 Water Quality Certification, and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Summers County at Summers Memorial Building (451 1st Ave in Hinton) on Tuesday March 07, 2017. 

For State 401 Water Quality Certification and Oil and Gas General Water Pollution Control Permit:

• Webster County at Webster County High School auditorium on Monday March 6, 2017.

• Harrison County at Robert C. Byrd High School Large Group Instruction Room on Thursday March 09, 2017.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project is comprised of approximately 195 miles of natural gas pipeline along with compressor stations, meter stations, access roads, and interconnects through: Wetzel, Harrison, Doddridge, Lewis, Braxton, Webster, Nicholas, Greenbrier, Fayette, Summers, and Monroe Counties in West Virginia. The associated Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667) would be for the discharge of stormwater associated with the disturbance of 4,214 acres of land for the of construction of this project. The Natural Streams Preservation Act permit (NSP-17-0001) being sought is for a proposed crossing of Greenbrier River in Summers County near Pence Springs. The State 401 Water Quality Certification (WQC-16-0005) would be for activities that will or may discharge fill into waters of the State. Mountain Valley Pipeline project is proposing to mitigate for the streams and wetlands permanently impacted by this project.

Any interested person may submit written comments on the Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit, the Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit, and/or the State 401 Water Quality Certification by addressing such to the Director of the Division of Water and Waste Management during the comment period, which begins with this notice and ends on March 19, 2017 at 8PM. Comments or requests should be emailed to or by mail addressed to:

Director, Division of Water and Management, DEP

ATTN: Sharon Mullins, Permitting Section

601 57th Street SE

Charleston, WV 25304-2345

Applicant Type Permit ID

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit WVR310667

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. State 401 Water Quality Certification WQC-16-0005

Mountain Valley Pipeline, INC. Natural Streams Preservation Act Permit NSP-17-0001

Additional Information

State 401 Water Quality Certification application (WQC-16-0005) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Natural Streams Preservation Act permit application (NSP-17-0001) (This is a large PDF file, which may take a moment to download and view)

Oil & Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit (WVR310667)

Instructions for navigating the Oil and Gas Construction Stormwater General Permit webpages

Mountain Valley Pipeline Information Page

Glenville State College President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the President’s Honor List, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average.

The students making the President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Brianna D. Caison, Lawrence C. Wolf


Braxton County: Bridget D. Carr, Dakota S. Johnson, Stacy N. Loyd, Brittany V. White


Calhoun County: Devon T. Toppings


Clay County: Jessica M. Beckett, Julie A. Gross, Dalton M. Holcomb, Carrie G. Huffman, Andrea P. Litton, Kaitlyn J. Samples


Doddridge County: Joshua L. Smith


Fayette County: Matthew H. Hackworth


Gilmer County: Jonathan E. Clark, Landon P. Gumm, Michaela L. Gumm, Sean M. Lang, Brett M. Rinehart, Wesley A. Self, Hilari E. Sprouse, Trevor D. Wright


Grant County: Larissa A. Henry


Greenbrier County: Myka K. Perry


Hardy County: Faith V. Smith


Harrison County: Joseph M. Bush, Cecilia A. Matheney, Megan E. Ruppert


Jackson County: Brittaney M. Burdette, Chelsey Hager, Evan D. Merical


Jefferson County: Jasmine Z. Tarman


Kanawha County: Austin Broussard, Jerrica D. Hilbert


Lewis County: James Z. Browning, Daniel C. Conrad, Mariah L. Daniels, Abigail E. Jerden, Torie A. Riffle


Logan County: Hannah P. Runyon, Matthew A. Zachary


Marion County: Phillip J. Poling


Mason County: Kaylee M. Howard


Morgan County: Colton L. Brandenburg


Nicholas County: Lindsey S. Butcher, Joshua D. Huffman, Eric W. Peyatt, Kathryn G. Waddell


Preston County: Madison H. Null


Putnam County: Joshua L. Brennan, Jessica A. Layne


Randolph County: Diana R. Miller, Melissa D. Nicholson


Ritchie County: Brianna N. Ratliff, Kimberly A. Smith


Tyler County: Jessica L. Fiber


Upshur County: Brandy L. Bachman, Skylar A. Fulton


Webster County: Samuel A. Canfield, Hunter A. Given, Amber N. King, Chelsea E. Rule


Wood County: Michael L. Briggs


Out of State: Chere Y. Davis, Jacqueline T. Deary, Sarah M. DiSpaltro, Raven P. Fatool, Cedric J. Johnson, Kellie N. Kinsinger, Allison A. Parski, John S. Peloro, Victoria L. Peterson, Emily A. Walker, Brian S. Williams

Glenville State College Vice President’s Honor List for Fall 2016

The Free Press WV

Glenville State College has announced the names of GSC students who attained the Vice President’s Honor List for the Fall 2016 semester.  To be named to the Vice President’s Honor List, a student must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average on a minimum of 12 semester hours.

The students making the Vice President’s Honor List are listed as follows according to their county of residence:


Berkeley County: Alexander R. Miller, Brianna A. Shivers


Boone County: Ally K. Brown, Michele L. Epling, Crystal M. Jarrell, Gregory I. Lail


Braxton County: Jordan D. Batton, Coleden R. Belknap, Tyler K. Cunningham, Kathryn L. Dean, Larissa E. DeLuca, Jacob D. Haymond, Samantha N. Mazzella, Teddy J. Richardson, Cami D. Roberts, Alexis S. Spell, Heather N. Thayer, Kelsie R. Tonkin, Maranda J. Vaughan, Andrea B. Vidal, Brandon M. White, Shanna S. Wine


Calhoun County: Tiffany A. Brannon, Moriah J. CreelFox, Sr., Jared B. Fitzwater, Taylor S. Garrett, Chelsea  R. Hicks, Kelsey E. Jett, Erica N. Jones, Danielle N. Kendall, Cassandra D. Lamont, Johnathan X. Taylor


Clay County: Casey E. Brown, Opalene D. Huffman, William C. Robertson, Sydnee M. Vance


Doddridge County: Joshua M. Pitcock, Lindsey G. Travis


Fayette County: Vladimir V. Iotov, Kelsey L. Norris, Trevor D. Wood


Gilmer County: Anthony K. Aviles, Katelyn S. Benson, Julie A. Bishop, Monica D.  Bush, Madison L. Campbell, Sara B. Coombs, Colby G. Cunningham, Lucas D. DeMarino, Meghan Harubin, Christina L. Jenkins, Jaylin K. Johnson, Amanda R. Lamb, Tonya L. Lyons, Matthew M. Montgomery, Adam H. Moore, Cody M. Moore, Hannah M. Moore, Zandel M. Sponaugle, Alexus C. Sprouse, Zaon A. Starseed, Elania N. White, Carrissa M. Wood


Greenbrier County: Sarah Brunty, Tina M. Jerman


Hampshire County: Dylan G. Kesner


Harrison County: Hannah J. Barron, Lia Runyan


Jackson County: Ryan A. Gregory, Kirsten M. Marks, Joel E. McDonald, Sapphire N. Parsons, Clayton Swisher, Bradley J. Titus, Kelly J. Trippett


Jefferson County: Taylor L. Corey, Mary E. Lewis, Anthony R. Vazquez


Kanawha County: Faith Donze, McKenzie M. Edmonds, Kayli N. Hudson, Rema K. Jordan, Zachary Lively, Jonathan L. Mullins, Jeri D. Potter, Rebecca E. Wiseman


Lewis County: Haley R. Biller, Jennifer M. Eiler, Destiny L. Grimes, Michael W. Marion, James W. Martin, III, Justin P. Raines, J’Aime L. Shearer, Kelly L. Weaver


Logan County: Kaitlyn A. Bircheat, Alec G. Maynard


Marion County: Morgan P. Hardesty


Marshall County: Logen M. Lemasters


Mason County: Charles B. Walton


Mercer County: Lindsey R. Compton


Monongalia County: Alyssa B. Boback


Morgan County: Michaela A. Munson, Michael I. Pracht, Brady A. Tritapoe


Nicholas County: Autumn G. Barnett, Jessica R. Bird, Marlyn S. Donelson, Zachary G. Dotson, Madison R. Frame, Morgan Francis, Taylor Keenan, William Z. Lyons, Elizabeth M. Messer, Kaitlyn D. Peyatt, Autumn Siminski, Brooke A. Spencer, Nathan S. Spencer, Mason A. Thomas, Samuel P. Whitlock


Pendleton County: Virginia L. Bruce, Raven D. Turner


Pleasants County: Bethany G. Mote


Pocahontas County: Steven L. Casto, Isaac C. Hise


Preston County: Kathleen L. Faber


Putnam County: Jacob M. Stover


Raleigh County: Luke D. Carpenter, Kaylee S. Dickenson, Michael A. Layne


Randolph County: Christopher A. Cozad, Angela R. McWilliams, Kathlyne L. Simmons, Christopher D. Varner


Ritchie County: Madison E. Cunningham, Carleena P. Elliott, Olivia D. Goff, Trinity R. Muschweck


Roane County: Georgia B. Bing, Joshua C. Runyon, Bonita J. Schreckengost, James D. Williams


Taylor County: Eva S. Guthrie


Tucker County: John Chambers, Wiley T. Raines, Stephanie R. Williams


Tyler County: Devon J. Harris


Upshur County: Autumn Knight, Belinda L. Lewis


Wayne County: Taylor N. Brumfield


Webster County: Valerie L. Rule, Danielle Williams


Wetzel County: Daniel M. Jackson, Colton L. Ring, Andrew R. Tefft


Wirt County: Micheal L. Morgan, Mary M. Strong


Wood County: Taylor A. Broadwater


Wyoming County: Travis D. Gibson, Kaci M. Mullins


Out of State: Karla Y. Barr, Chandler R. Carrera, Ibrahim O. Ghanem, Dwyron K. Gillard, II, Taylor A. Gilliland, Noah R. Green, Jake Hensell, Justin S. Koogler, Momi P. Lievan, Paris M. McLeod, Anthony W. McPoyle, Emily M. Meyers, Stephen G. Mickle, Art’om T. Rank, John F. Routzahn, Isaiah R. Sattelmaier, Casey R. Sheaffer, Wesley D. Stauffer, Johnni M. Tillman, Ernesto Torres, Paranda S. Uber, Jack H. Varndell, Timothy G. Wine, Hannah N. Wright

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