GilmerFreePress.net

Study | Report | Audit | Survey | Research

Study, Report, Audit, Survey, Research

How to Cut WV Poverty Rate? Pay Women More

The Free Press WV

In a new report, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research compared incomes of women and men of the same ages and education levels, working the same number of hours.

It found for West Virginia, women would see their average earnings increase almost $6,500 a year if paid the same as men.

And, since women are now breadwinners in half of American families with young children, the report says 26 million children across the U.S. also would benefit from their moms making more.

So, study director Jessica Milli says closing the gender wage gap is much more than a women’s issue.

“The additional income that equal pay would add to family incomes would reduce the poverty rate among children by nearly half, and so that was also a really striking finding from our analysis,“ she states.

The report says closing the pay gap would reduce the poverty rate in West Virginia from 8.5 percent to 5.3 percent, and add about $2.5 billion annually to the state’s economy.

Now, on average, a woman would have to work 10 years longer than a man to close the pay gap.

Milli adds the gap isn’t always a result of intentional unfairness – it’s partly because more women work in jobs that have traditionally paid less.

She says states and Congress could do more to modernize pay-related laws.

“Legislation that prohibits employers from asking potential new hires for their salary histories when they’re thinking about making an offer to them would have a huge impact on pay equality between men and women,“ she states.

Milli notes closing the pay gap would boost the entire U.S. economy, adding $500 billion a year nationally.

For now, women earn about 80 cents for every dollar a man makes, which translates to a loss that tops $415,000 dollars over a 40-year career.

~~  Chris Thomas ~~


05.20.2017
FeaturesStudy | Report | Audit | Survey | ResearchFinancial & Economy | G-Fin™ | GrantsNewsWest Virginia(1) Comments

Permalink - Link to This Article

~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

I just heard of a study done nationwide that states women are actually paid the same as men in similar jobs.  The difference is women are the birthers of children and often leave the workforce for a period of time or take part-time work or lesser paying jobs to be the nurturing parent of those children.
Has nothing to do with earning less at the same job.

By Truth  on  05.20.2017

Leave a CommentPrint This Article


Tumblr StumbleUpon Reddit Print Email LinkedIn Pinterest Google+ Facebook Twitter Addthis

City of Glenville Police Report

The Gilmer Free Press
City of Glenville, WV Police Report
Crime/Ordinance Violation
Officer
Disposition
Location
Overdose Garrett Subject transported to hospital Conrad Motel
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning S. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning Issued for Defective Equipment and Cited for Expired Operators W. Main Street
Illegal Use of Horn Garrett Warnings Issued for Illegal use of horn and failure to change address W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Child Restraint Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Robbery Garrett Criminal Investigation Started W. Main Street
Cellphone Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warnings Issued for Speeding and Unsigned Registration W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings Issued for Speeding, No Proof of Registration, and no Proof of Insurance N. Lewis Street
No Plates Huffman No Proof of registration and No Plates on vehicle (driver stated plates had been stolen) N. Lewis Street
No Seatbelt Huffman Cited for No Seatbelt and Cell phone while driving N. Lewis Street
Trespassing Huffman Children removed from the property and informed if they returned they would be charged for trespassing Brooklyn
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Cited Powell Street
Speeding Huffman Cited N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited N. Lewis Street
Assist another agency Huffman Assisted Sheriff Department with a missing persons Lick Run
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle unlocked Glenville Gardens
Speeding Huffman Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and warning Issued for No Proof of Registration N. Lewis Street
Serve Capias Huffman/Garrett One Subject arrested and transported to Central Regional Jail Magistrate Court
Speeding Huffman 2 vehicles stopped for speeding 1st vehicle cited for speeding and no proof of insurance 2nd vehicle cited for speeding and driving on suspended 1st offense W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Huffman Cited W. Main Street
Improper Registration Garrett Warning E. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Passing in no passing zone Garrett Warning W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Suspicious Person Huffman Located subject approximately an hour after initial call everything was ok I sent the individual back to his motel room and advised him that if I had anymore calls about him  I would take him to Central Regional Jail College Street

Glenville City Council Meeting Report

The Free Press WV
GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES
April 03, 2017
7:00 PM

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Mayor Dennis Fitzpatrick with Council members Fisher, Wiant, and Walters present. 

Councilmembers Taylor and Huffman were absent.


Pledge of Allegiance


I. Call to Order


Public Comments

Jessica Greenlief came before council with proclamations for Alcohol Awareness and Child Abuse Prevention. 

She noted the blue pinwheels is the national symbol for child abuse prevention and April is designated as Child Abuse Prevention month. 

Her daughter, Aurora Williams, gave each council member a blue pinwheel lapel pin representing Child Abuse Prevention. 

Many blue pinwheels have been placed around the city and they will have a brunch to honor grandparents for caring for many of the children in addition to many other activities. 

This is also Alcohol Awareness month. 

The proclamations for Child Abuse Prevention and Alcohol Awareness and were read and signed by Mayor Fitzpatrick. 


A. Approval of Minutes – January 04, 2016

The minutes from the March 06, 2017 meeting were reviewed. 

No corrections were noted and minutes were placed on file for audit.
 

II. Reports

Financial

We are currently at 75.61% if fiscal year budget with 86.39% revenue and 67.59% expenses. 

The new budget request was submitted to the state auditor’s office with confirmation of receipt. 

The payment for Gilmer Management will move to the Treasurer’s Office line item. 

Councilman Walters made a motion to approve the financial report as presented.  Councilman Fisher seconded the motion.  Motion passed.

Councilman Walters made a motion to approve a pay raise for the office assistant, Mindi Fitzpatrick, beginning July 01, 2017. 

Councilman Fisher seconded the motion.  Motion passed.


Street Report

Mayor Fitzpatrick provided the street report. 

The workers are very busy daily.


Police Report

Chief Huffman provided the police report to council. 

The new city officer will begin work on May 16 with his application to the Academy due by April 28 and will attend the academy on June 12.


Glenville Utility

Mayor attended the utility meeting on March 28. 

No leaks to report.

The Lift station pump installation is complete. 

Western Auto slip has been corrected.


Recorder

Nothing to report


Mayor Comments

- Enforce penalty phase in existing Municipal Fee Ordinance

Penalty phase still in progress

- Citywide clean up – April 08.

GSC football team will volunteer for this yearly activity.

- Lay the Levy – April 18th

Council meeting is scheduled for April 18, at 6:00 p.m. to Lay the Levy.

- 5:30 Paint the Town Blue (honoring our police officers) the 27th

A public event to honor our police officers is scheduled for April 27th at 5:30 p.m. at the City Park.

5K Run/Walk – April 07, 2017

Glenville State College student organization Pioneers for a Cause is planning the annual Relay for Life walk on April 07 from 6:00 p.m. to 1200 midnight and the annual Color the World without Autism 5K run/walk on April 11 beginning at 5:30 p.m. 


III. Unfinished Business

None


IV. New Business

Chief Huffman mentioned that the Gilmer County Pony League is planning 5K run/walk and he is working to set up route. 

They will request council approval in May.


V. Other Business to come before Council

Councilman Walters asked about paving the remaining streets this year. 

Councilman Fisher made a motion to approve Mayor Fitzpatrick secure estimates to pave the remaining streets in the city for 2017. 

Councilman Walters seconded the motion.  Motion passed.

*Chief Huffman asked about the schedule for the roundabout. 

Mayor Fitzpatrick noted that he had a letter from the state that they would be seeing some activity at the end of 2016 and hope to start actual work on roundabout end of 2017 or beginning of 2018.

Mayor Fitzpatrick has talked with McKenzie Murphy regarding the bridge repair on Sycamore.

They have corrected the engineering issues and are waiting on supplies to begin the bridge repair.


Next City Council Meeting

The next council meeting will be May 01, 2017, at 7:00 p.m.


VI. Adjourn

Meeting adjourned at 7:20 p.m.

Report: More Mountain State Students Pursuing Higher Education

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties lead the way in improving college-going rates

The Free Press WV

More West Virginia high school graduates went on to pursue higher education last year, according to a report released by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) and West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS). The college-going rate increased for the second consecutive year, inching up by 0.3 percent — or 266 students — from 2015 to 2016.

“These gains, while subtle, represent a solid step in the right direction,” Dr. Paul Hill, HEPC Chancellor, said. “For several years, the impact of the 2008 recession led to wide variations in college-going rates, not only in West Virginia but across the nation. Now that the economy is beginning to stabilize, we’re more confident that the small strides we’re witnessing represent genuine progress in creating a college-going culture in West Virginia — a process that takes time and occurs student by student, community by community.”

Braxton, Doddridge and Clay counties led the state in achieving the highest rates of improvement in college-going rates from 2015 to 2016. Braxton County High School (Braxton), Magnolia High School (Wetzel) and Chapmanville Regional High School (Logan) showed the greatest gains at the school level. Ohio, Mineral and Monongalia counties had the highest rates overall. A complete list of rates by school and county is available at http://www.wvhepc.edu/resources/reports-and-publications/2016-college-going-rate/.

“West Virginia needs more college graduates to grow its economy and invigorate its workforce,” Dr. Sarah Tucker, CTCS Chancellor, said. “I commend those high schools and school districts that are putting a real focus on helping their students pursue some form of postsecondary education. The future prosperity of our state depends on getting more students into college and ensuring they succeed and graduate.”

The 2016 Higher Education Report Card, released last fall by HEPC and CTCS, also outlined gains in college retention and a record number of degrees awarded by the state’s public colleges and universities.

HEPC and CTCS are charged with developing and implementing a five-year statewide strategic plan for higher education that includes a strong focus on improving access to higher education and promoting college completion and success. As part of this process, the agencies have in recent years launched a number of strategies that are proving to have an impact on higher education attainment.

For example, the federally funded “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)” initiative provides college mentoring and planning services to middle and high school students in ten of the state’s most economically challenged counties. The statewide College Foundation of West Virginia (CFWV) initiative offers information, including text message counseling, to help students navigate the college application and enrollment processes. And recent policy changes overhauling the delivery of developmental education and encouraging students to enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours per semester are showing promising results toward raising college graduation rates.

Glenville City Council Meeting Minutes

The Free Press WV
GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES
March 06, 2017
7:00 p.m.

 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Mayor Fitzpatrick with Council members Wiant, Taylor, Walters, and Fisher present. Councilwoman Huffman was absent.


Pledge of Allegiance

 

Led by the Boy Scout Troop


I. Call to Order


II. Public

 

None


A. Approval of Minutes – February 06, 2017

 

Minutes for the February 06, 2017, meeting were reviewed and placed on file for audit.


III. Reports


B. Financial

 

The budget is currently at 68.21% of fiscal year with revenue at 77.74% and expenditures at 62.00%. The book keeper requested a transfer of funds to the following:

 

$9000 from 700 - Police Dept to 750 - Street Dept

 

$6200 from 699 - Contingency Fund to 410 – City Council ($3000) and 413 – Treasurers Office ($3200)

 

$1000 – Coal Severance to 916 – Library

 

Councilwoman Taylor made a motion to approve the transfer of funds. Councilman Walters seconded the motion. Motion passed.

The budget workshop went well and the new budget will be submitted to the State Auditor’s office for approval. Council will meet on April 18 to Lay the Levy.

 

Councilman Walters made a motion to approve the financial report as presented. Councilman Wiant seconded the motion. Motion passed.


C. Street report

 

Mayor Fitzpatrick provided the street report and noted the workers installed the LED lights in the stoplight.


D. Police

 

Chief Huffman provided the police report to council. He requested executive session to discuss personnel matters.

 

Council will go into executive session at the end of the meeting.


E. Glenville Utility

 

Mayor Fitzpatrick attended the February 28 meeting.

 

There were three (3) service line leaks that were repaired.

 

On sewer side, the new pump installation was completed at the lift station at Fitzwater’s on Rt. 5E.

 

There was approximately 300 ft. slip behind Western Auto and the pipe was replaced.


F. Recorder

 

Nothing to report.


G. Mayors Comments


- Update Municipal Ordinance Penalty Phase

Still in progress


- City Wide Clean Up – April 08

Make It Shine is scheduled for April 08 at 9:00 a.m.

 

Volunteers will meet at the football field and cover the city limits.

 

This will take approximately 2 hours.

 

The GSC football team will volunteer.


- Pi 5K Run 9:00 a.m. – (Route may change) Saturday March 18th

There will be a change in route for 5K run due to the bridge being out on Sycamore.

 

They will begin at the WACO center to Sycamore Road and return.


- Update on Camp Workers

Lost 2 camp workers last fall. Now have a new worker with hope to get a second worker.

 

Mayor has sent a letter to FCI-Gilmer requesting second worker.


- Laying of Levy April 18th

Council will meet to Lay the Levy on Tuesday, April 18, at 6:00 p.m.


- Resolution (guardrails installed on Route 5 going East)

The resolution was read on behalf of the citizens in Gilmer County that Glenville City Council supports this idea.

 

Mayor Fitzpatrick signed the resolution.

Councilman Wiant made a motion to move into executive session at 7:11 p.m. Councilman Fisher seconded the motion. Motion passed.

 

Councilman Wiant made a motion for council to move out of executive session at 7:27 p.m. Councilwoman Taylor seconded the motion. Motion passed.

 

Councilman Walters made a motion to approve Chief Huffman to hire Mr. Gandy as the new police officer. Councilwoman Taylor seconded the motion. Motion passed.

 

Councilwoman Taylor made a motion to approve Chief Huffman to participate in Drug Take-back Day. Councilman Wiant seconded the motion. Motion passed.


IV. Unfinished Business

 

None


V. New Business

 

Councilman Wiant asked about the River Clean Up project through grant money. He suggested trees under the bridge would be a good area to clean up and noted the project should start this week. Mayor Fitzpatrick will talk with Eric Squires.

 

Councilman Walters asked about the decision for the River Street property. It had been previously suggested to become a community garden and Mayor Fitzpatrick would like to continue with this.

 

Councilman Wiant understood the walkway on old bridge is scheduled for possible repair.


VI. Other Business to come before Council

 

None


VII. Next council meeting

 

April 03, 2017 at 7:00 p.m.

 

Meeting to Lay the Levy – Tuesday, April 18, at 6:00 p.m.


VIII. Adjourn

Meeting adjourned at 7:32 p.m.

___________________________

WV’s Public Colleges and Universities….

WV’S PUBLIC COLLEGES/UNIVERSITIES COSTS INCREASED 150% OVER 15 YEARS

State Has Lowest Number Of College Grads
The Free Press WV

West Virginia, among the lowest number of college and university graduates, has had the average tuition increased by about $4,200 a year, or roughly 147 percent, in the past 15 years,according to the WV Center on Budget and Policy.

The highest rate of increase in that time period was at Glenville State College, where tuition went from $2,700 to $7,344, a 172 percent increase, according to the report.

Charleston lawmakers are debating how much higher education should be cut in next year’s budget.

The West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy said incremental increases eroded how much of a student’s tuition financial aid programs are able to cover.

“I think this is important to be aware of in a state like West Virginia, which has the lowest level of college-educated adults in its workforce, higher education is one of the areas we should be investing in, not cutting,” said Sean O’Leary, a senior policy analyst at the center.

“The proposals that have come out of the Legislature this year all have further cuts to higher education,” said O’Leary.

In his first State of the State address, Gov. Jim Justice proposed cutting state funding to West Virginia University and Marshall University by 4.4 percent each, which would be roughly $5.9 million and $2.8 million respectively.

The House Finance Committee got a glimpse of what could be the House’s budget for next year. It kept the cuts Gov. Justice proposed, while also cutting $1.28 million from community and technical colleges and about $5 million more from other four-year colleges.

“The colleges can use tuition increase to make up for those cuts, and that’s exactly what we’ve been seeing,” O’Leary said. “I think we’re starting to get to the point now where tuition increases have really made colleges a lot less affordable than it use to be.”

His report, which pulled data from the Higher Education Policy Commission, the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Department of Education, does not take into consideration fees or the cost of room and board.

Had the cost of tuition kept pace with the rate of inflation, O’Leary said tuition would have increased only 33 percent from 2002 to 2016.

Some education experts say the problem with college debt is ever increasing in the USA.

Research Raises Doubts About Benefits of Consolidation

The Free Press WV

Policies that promote school consolidation are likely to do more harm than good, conclude the authors of a new policy brief published today by the National Education Policy Center (NEPC) at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Consolidation of Schools and Districts: What the Research Says and What It Means, authored by Craig Howley, Jerry Johnson, and Jennifer Petrie of Ohio University, provides a comprehensive review and analysis of research literature on school consolidation.

The brief comes at a time when policymakers, driven in part by a desire to save money, are showing renewed interest in school consolidation. At least eight states have considered or enacted consolidation proposals in recent years despite strong evidence that school and district consolidation does not generally save money.

Howley, Johnson and Petrie point out that since the mid-20th century school consolidation has advanced rapidly. In 1931 there were 117,500 U.S. school districts. By 1997 there were only 14,000 districts. Correspondingly, in 1869, 6.87 million students were enrolled in 100,000 public schools; by 1999, 47.9 million students were enrolled in just 65,000 public schools.

For decades, consolidation was championed by school reformers as a way to provide more comprehensive education and to provide other benefits, such as single-grade classes and greater professionalization among teachers and administrators alike. But since 1970, according to the brief’s authors, research findings have raised significant questions about the benefits of consolidation. They note that “contemporary research, as a body and almost to a study, has not recommended consolidation as either a way to save tax dollars or to improve the outcomes or quality of schooling.”

“Research on the effects of contemporary consolidation suggests that new consolidation is likely to result in neither greater efficiency nor better instructional outcomes—especially when it results from state policy that implements large-scale forced consolidation,” the authors write. “The consolidation strategy seems to have reached the point at which markedly diminished returns should be anticipated.”

The brief identifies a number of reasons for concern about further school and district consolidation. Research findings show that larger school and district sizes are associated with reduced rates of student participation, more dangerous school environments, lower graduation rates, and larger achievement gaps along lines of poverty, race and gender.

Impoverished students, moreover, are especially hard hit, the authors write. A strong body of research evidence makes it clear that less affluent communities “often benefit from smaller schools and districts, and they can suffer irreversible damage if consolidation occurs.” In short, “state-level consolidation proposals appear to serve a public relations purpose in times of fiscal crisis, rather than substantive fiscal or educational purposes.”

The authors offer a series of recommendations, including that some especially large schools and districts consider deconsolidation to improve outcomes and achieve efficiencies; that policymakers treat with skepticism claims of widespread benefits of consolidation in cost savings or learning, in light of a large body research showing otherwise; and that even deconsolidation be considered only on a case-by-case basis “with attention to the devilish details that sweeping state policies cannot provide.”

Find Consolidation of Schools and Districts: What the Research Says and What It Means, by Craig Howley, Jerry Johnson, and Jennifer Petrie on the web at:
http://nepc.colorado.edu/publication/consolidation-schools-districts, or click here to download a copy from the Rural Trust library.

The mission of the National Education Policy Center is to produce and disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. We are guided by the belief that the democratic governance of public education is strengthened when policies are based on sound evidence. For more information on NEPC, please visit http://nepc.colorado.edu/.

This policy/legislative brief was made possible in part by the generous support of the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice (greatlakescenter.org).

West Virginia Drug OD Deaths Rose 15% in 2016

The Free Press WV

The number of reported overdose deaths that occurred last year in West Virginia has continued to rise.

According to data just released at least 844 people died in the state of drug overdoses in 2016.

That number is a 15 percent increase over 2015’s tally of 731 drug deaths, West Virginia’s previous all-time high.

Fatal overdoses related to fentanyl, an opioid that’s 100 times stronger than prescription morphine, have fueled a 46 percent increase of overdose deaths in the state in just four years. Drug traffickers often mix fentanyl with heroin.

The West Virginia Health Statistics Center compiles the state’s overdose data from death certificates certified by the chief medical examiner. Additional deaths are expected to be added to the total in the coming weeks.

Does Incarceration Feed the Achievement Gap?

Mass incarceration of African Americans from the war on drugs feeds the achievement gap in U.S. schools, according to a new report.

The study from the Economic Policy Institute found 1-in-4 African American students has a parent who is or has been incarcerated - and an African American child is six times more likely than a white child to have a parent who has been in prison. According to Leila Morsy, senior lecturer at the University of New South Wales and co-author of the report, when parents are sent to prison, their children become more susceptible to depression, behavioral problems and ADHD.

The Free Press WV
A new study suggests the disproportionate number of African Americans behind bars
in West Virginia is feeding the state’s educational achievement gap.
(Prison Policy Initiative)


“Their grade point average drops. They’re also more likely to drop out of school,” Morsy said. “They’re less likely to vote. They’re less likely to trust the government. They’re also less likely to engage in community service.“

African Americans are not more likely to sell or take drugs, but they are much more likely to be arrested and convicted for drug offenses. In recent years, West Virginia has worked to reduce the number of nonviolent offenders behind bars, but during the current legislative session, lawmakers look likely to toughen some drug penalties.

African Americans make up about 3 percent of West Virginia’s population but nearly 30 percent of the inmates in prisons and jails.

Ames Grawert, counsel at the Brennan Center for Justice, said reforming the criminal justice system will improve children’s educational prospects, and not just that.

“Having spent time in prison is significantly worse for someone’s prospects going forward, for the prospects of somebody’s family going forwards than just having been through, say, probation,” Grawert said.

Morsy stressed that sentencing reform and increased educational and employment opportunities for released offenders also would benefit those left behind when a parent goes to jail.

“Improvements in our criminal justice policies will lead to improved outcomes for children,” she said. “It will make teachers’ jobs easier and are very likely to contribute to narrowing the achievement gap.“

In 2014, more than 600,000 inmates nationally were serving sentences of a year or more in state prisons for nonviolent crimes.

~~  Dan Heyman ~~

Glenville City Council Meeting Minutes

The Free Press WV
GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES
February 06, 2017
7:00 PM

 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Mayor Fitzpatrick with Council members Wiant, Huffman, Walters, and Fisher present.  Councilwoman Taylor was absent.

Pledge of Allegiance

I. Call to Order

 

Mayor Fitzpatrick thanked Councilwoman Huffman for presiding over the January 2017 meeting in his absence.


II. Public

 

None

A. Approval of Minutes – January 02, 2017

 

Minutes for the January 02, 2017, meeting were reviewed and placed on file for audit.


III. Reports


B. Financial

 

The budget is currently at 60.54% of fiscal year with revenue at 67.54% and expenditures at 54.25%.

 

The bookkeeper noted that money needed to be transferred to line items 410 – City Council ($3000), 750 – Street Dept. ($9000), and 916- Library ($1000). 

 

Mayor Fitzpatrick suggested this be tabled until the March meeting.

 

The budget meeting to prepare next year’s estimated budget to submit to the State Auditor’s office no later than March 28 was scheduled for Monday, March 06, at 6:15 PM.

 

The invoice tabled at the January meeting has been paid.

 

Councilwoman Huffman made a motion to approve the financial summary as presented.  Councilman Fisher seconded the motion. Motion passed.


C. Street report

 

Mayor Fitzpatrick provided the street report and noted the workers will put LED lights in the stoplight.


D. Police

 

Chief Huffman provided the police report to council.

 

He requested executive session to discuss a personnel matter. 

 

Councilman Huffman made a motion to move into executive session at 7:09 PM.  Councilman Walters seconded the motion.  Motion passed.

 

Councilman Huffman made a motion to come out of executive session at 7:11 PM.  Councilman Walters seconded the motion.  Motion passed.

 

No action was taken in executive session.


E.  Glenville Utility

 

Mayor Fitzpatrick noted there was a 2 inch line water leak on Bailey Street and a new pump is needed at the lift station at Fitzwater’s at a cost of approximately $25,000.


F.  Recorder

 

Nothing to report.


G.  Mayors Comments


- Update Municipal Ordinance Penalty Phase

 

The municipal fee penalty phase update is still in progress.


- Approval of Folk Festival and Vendor Fees

 

Received a letter from the Folk Festival Committee requesting approval to hold the Folk Festival on June 15-18, 2017.  Council has previously discussed assessing a nominal fee for use of the park and electricity.

 

The Folk Festival Committee agreed to charge $5 for each booth in the park shelter with an additional charge of $5 for electricity if used.  Councilwoman Huffman made a motion to approve the Folk Festival to be held on June 15-18, 2017, and the additional $5 fee for a booth inside the park.  Councilman Walters seconded the motion. Motion passed.


-

Martin Hess offered the electric pole between United Bank and the City Park to the city. If the city does not want to take possession of the pole the fire department will offer it to the folk festival committee. The city declined the offer to take over the possession of the electric pole in question. This pole is owned by the Fire Department and costs about $10/month, but is problematic.


- Auditor Training reference Budget in Bridgeport on the 17th of this month (approval for reimbursement)

 

Mayor requested travel reimbursement to attend the Auditor’s Training on February 17th in Bridgeport.  Councilman Walters made a motion to approve travel reimbursement on February 17.  Councilman Fisher seconded the motion.  Motion passed.


-

GCHS requested approval to hold the Pi Day 5K run on Saturday, March 18, beginning at 9:00 a.m. starting at United Bank and going up Sycamore Road.  Chief Huffman will take care of escort.  Councilman Fisher made a motion to approve the Pi Day 5K run on March 18 at 9:00 a.m.  Councilman Walters seconded the motion.  Motion passed.


IV. Unfinished Business

 

None


V. New Business


VI. Other Business to come before Council

 

None


VII. Next council meeting

 

March 06, 2017 at 7:00 PM

 

Budget Meeting – March 06, 2017, at 6:15 PM


VIII. Adjourn

 

Meeting adjourned at 7:18 PM.

City of Glenville Police Report

The Gilmer Free Press
City of Glenville, WV Police Report
Crime/Ordinance Violation
Officer
Disposition
Location
Left of Center Huffman Cited for Driving while Revoked and No Seatbelt Warning Issued for left of center WV HWY 5E
Speeding Garrett Cited W. Main Street
Cell phone while driving Garrett Cited College Street
Speeding Garrett Cited College Street
Speeding Garrett Cited College Street
Speeding Garrett Cited College Street
Speeding Garrett Cited College Street
Expired Registration Garrett Cited for Expired Registration and No proof of Insurance W. Main Street
Breaking and entering Huffman Suspect arrested for Entering without breaking, Display of pornographic material to a minor, attempted escape, Obstructing EMS, and Fleeing (No Vehicle) River Street
Child In roadway Huffman Child was taken back to residence he was staying in.  Spoke to mother and advised that I would have to make a CPS referral warrants issued S. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Cited N. Lewis Street
Assist another agency Huffman Assisted WVSP with Search Warrant Pioneer Village
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and Warning Issued for No Proof of Registration W. Main Street
Expired MVI Huffman Cited for No Proof of Insurance and Warnings Issued for Expired MVI and Failure to carry Operators N. Lewis Street
Drug Complaint Huffman Unable to locate where smell was coming from Mineral Road
Drug Complaint Huffman Unable to locate where smell was coming from Mineral Road
Trash Complaint Huffman Spoke to subject advised them they must have trash pickup Warnings Issued for Failure to have trash pickup and creating a dump E. Main Street
Def Equipment Garrett Warning S. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Warnings Issued for Light Bar, Speeding, and One Way Violation College Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warnings Issued for Defective Equipment and Unsigned Registration College Street
Serve Warrants Huffman 1 female arrested and transported to Magistrate court S. Lewis Street
Attempt to serve Warrants Huffman GSC PD and myself attempted to serve warrants negative contact Goodwin Hall
Serve Warrants Huffman GCSD, GSC PD and myself served warrants 1 male subject arrested and transported to magistrate court Pioneer Village
Possible intoxicated driver Garrett Located the vehicle parked on Whiting Avenue and spoke to the alleged driver Whiting Ave
Suicidal Tendencies Huffman Received messages about a juvenile cutting herself contacted dispatch and responded to the scene subject was transported to the hospital by EMS Barker Drive
Harassment Garrett Spoke to victim alleged mother was harassing her. Spoke to mother and advised her that if she continued she would be arrested for harassing phone calls Howard Street
Inactive Domestic Huffman Received a statement from the victim warrants issued for suspect for Domestic Violence 3rd offense Howard Street
Defective Equipment Huffman Warnings Issued for Defective Equipment, Expired Registration and Unsigned Registration S. Lewis Street
Serve Warrants Huffman Subject arrested on Domestic Violence 3rd offense charges College Street
Dog Bite Huffman All information given to health department victim refused medical treatment and dog quarantined Howard Street
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Rich Oil
Eviction Huffman Subject wasn’t there landlord changed locks on doors Glenville Gardens
Battery Huffman Spoke to victim and they refused to file charges Glenville
Speeding Huffman Warnings Issued for Speeding and Unsigned Registration W. Main Street
Stop Sign Violation Huffman Warning High Street
Speeding Huffman Warnings Issued for speeding and Unsigned Registration S. Lewis Street
Stop Sign Violation Huffman Warnings Issued for Stop Sign Violation and Improper Display High Street
Stop Sign Violation Huffman Cited for stop Sign and warning issued for Unsigned registration Linn Street
Stop Sign Violation Huffman Cited for Stop Sign Violation x2 and Warning Issued for No Proof of Registration Linn Street/High Street
No Seatbelt Huffman Cited for No Seatbelt x2 Church Street
Speeding Garrett Warning Mineral Road
Defective Equipment Garrett Warnings issued for defective Equipment and tires out to far N. Lewis Street
Defective equipment Garrett Warning for Defective Equipment and cited for No Proof of Insurance Mineral Road
Noise complaint Garrett Music was turned down prior to arrival Mineral Road
Assist another agency Garrett Assisted WVSP with Shots fired call subject arrested and transported to CRJ Rosedale
Drug Complaint Garrett Unable to locate where smell was coming from Mineral Road
Expired MVI Huffman Cited Mineral Road
Speeding Huffman Cited for Speeding and Warning Issued for Unsigned Registration N. Lewis Street
911 Hang up Huffman Child playing with phone advised the mother that we have had trouble with her child doing this before and we would make an arrest if she continued to allow her child to play with the phone and he continues to repeatedly contacts 911 River Street
Breaking and Entering Huffman Front door was opened property care taker and I walked through the house but unable to determine if anything was missing due to owner being in jail caretaker re-secured the door with new lock S. Lewis Street
Expired MVI Huffman Warnings issued for Expired MVI, Expired Registration, No Proof of Registration, and No Proof of Insurance College Street
No Seatbelt Huffman Cited S. Lewis Street
Alarm Investigation Huffman Everything ok wrong pass code was entered Kanawha Street
Trash Complaint Huffman Subjects are cleaning up a house to rent out they are hauling the trash out daily Howard Street
Obstructing traffic Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Warnings Issued for Speeding and Unsigned Registration N. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Cited N. Lewis Street
911 hang up Garrett Everything ok Rite Aid
Serve search Warrant Huffman Residence searched multiple items recovered to be sent to WVSP crime Lab S. Lewis Street
Defective equipment Garrett Warning Spring Street
Speeding Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Speeding Garrett Warnings Issued for Speeding and Unsigned Registration N. Lewis Street
Subject laying in roadway Garrett Subject passed out in roadway subject was transported to Hospital by EMS N. Lewis Street
Driving without Headlights Garrett Warning College Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Warning N. Lewis Street
Active Domestic Huffman Spoke to male subject he advised all verbal and that the female subject had taken off in the opposite direction after an hour I found the female subject and she advised that it was all verbal Go Mart
Assist Another agency Huffman Assisted GCSD locating a vehicle due to having suspended driver S. Lewis Street
Noise Complaint/Parking in roadway Garrett Party shut down and vehicles were moved Norris Road
Vehicle Unlock Huffman Vehicle Unlocked Walnut Street
Defective Equipment Garrett Cited for No Proof of Insurance and Warning Issued for Defective Equipment N. Lewis Street

G-ICYMI™: WV Transgender

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

Study: WV has nation’s highest percent of teens who identify as transgender

A study released in January estimated that West Virginia has, out of all 50 states, the highest percentage of 13- to 17-year-olds who would identify as transgender.

The Williams Institute’s study estimated that 1.04 percent of West Virginians in that age range would identify as transgender, compared to the national percentage of .73 percent. The study estimated that the Mountain State has 1,150 13- to 17-year-olds who would identify as transgender, compared with 149,750 nationally in that age group.

Hawaii was estimated to have the next-highest percentage, at 1.01 percent, followed by New Mexico at .88 and California and Minnesota, both at .85 percent. Connecticut and Iowa came in last, at .39 percent.

Along with the 50 states, the study also did an estimate for Washington, D.C., which would surpass all 50 states at 1.12 percent.

Jody L. Herman, scholar of public policy at The Williams Institute and an author of the study, said the organization is a research center whose main mission is to study law and policy issues related to sexual orientation and gender identity. She said the center was founded in 2001 and is housed within the University of California-Los Angeles’ School of Law.

The study has not yet finished being peer reviewed, and Herman said she hopes to have a description of the methods and findings published in an academic journal.

The study didn’t actually poll 13- to 17-year-olds across the nation. Instead, it estimated how many people in that age range would identify as transgender by using data on how many adults identify as transgender.

It took this data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys, which are done via phone. The report, “Age of Individuals Who Identify as Transgender in the United States,” notes that not all states use the optional module of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System that contains the question “Do you consider yourself to be transgender?”

West Virginia wasn’t among the 19 states that asked that question in 2014, but it was among the 21 states that did so in 2015.

Herman said that because West Virginia didn’t ask the question in 2014, a past Williams Institute study of how many adults identify as transgender used a “predictive model” to estimate the percentage in the Mountain State based on the information available from other states and considerations like social climate and demographics.

The adult report thus estimated that .42 percent of Mountain State adults would identify as transgender, compared with a .58 percent national average. That ranked West Virginia 42nd in the nation.

But Herman said the new youth estimate study now takes into account the actual 2015 poll of West Virginia adults.

“West Virginia has a relatively high percentage of adults who identify as transgender,” Herman said. “Somewhat surprisingly so. ... When you have actual data from West Virginia, the picture looks very different.”

She said the past predictive model would’ve suggested West Virginia would have a below-national-average percentage of 13- to 17-year-olds who identify as transgender. For instance, West Virginia is overwhelmingly white, and Herman said a higher proportion of people of color identify as transgender compared to whites.

But using the 2015 poll of West Virginia adults to estimate the percentage of 13-17-year-olds who would identify as transgender changed the picture.

Herman said the study unfortunately doesn’t answer why West Virginia has the nation’s highest estimated percentage.

“West Virginia is a mystery,” she said.

“It makes it all the more important that we have to protect these teenagers because they’re a very vulnerable population,” Andrew Schneider, executive director of the LGBT rights group Fairness West Virginia, said of the study’s finding. “They experience discrimination in greater numbers than other people.”

“We need our schools to adopt policies that will make sure that transgender students feel protected and safe within the school environment,” he said. “Transgender students should be able to use a bathroom without fear of harm or harassment.”

Of the superintendents of the state’s 55 counties, each of which has a single countywide public school system, Hardy County Superintendent Matthew Dotson remained as of September the only one publicly saying his school system would comply with the Obama administration’s guidance that transgender students — while they can be offered private bathroom facilities — must be allowed to use gender-identity matching accommodations if they so desire.

The Trump administration rescinded that guidance last week, but a U.S. Supreme Court case that could set national precedent for transgender students to have that right is scheduled for oral arguments later this month.

The superintendents for Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge and Marion counties said they would deny access, and most superintendents either didn’t provide a clear answer on whether they would deny access or didn’t respond to the Gazette-Mail’s past calls.

~~  Ryan Quinn - Gazette-Mail ~~

West Virginia Debt Rating Downgraded by Moody’s

The Free Press WV

The Justice administration says Moody’s Investors Service has downgraded the state’s general obligation debt rating, citing growing structural instability between the government’s financial resources and expense liability.

Revenue Secretary Dave Hardy says Moody’s downgrade from AA1 to AA2 follows similar moves last year by Fitch Ratings and Standard & Poor’s.

Gov. Jim Justice says state borrowing “just got more expensive” and criticized legislative proposals to refinance some of the state’s pension debt.

The Democrat has proposed fractional sales and corporate tax increases, establishing a surplus safety fund and a bond-funded highway reconstruction program to close a projected $500 million state deficit in the coming year and boost West Virginia’s economy.

Republican legislative leaders have criticized the tax proposals.

Report: “Pervasive” Threats of Lead in School Drinking Water

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

In the wake of the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, a new report says lead in schools’ drinking water is a pervasive problem. The District of Columbia received the best grade in the report - a “B” - for facing the issue, in part because of a proposal likely to pass the city council.

But the bill’s sponsor, D.C. councilwoman Mary Chen, said the problem is far from solved.

“Even just last week, the parents of one school here, J.O. Wilson Elementary, got a letter from the school system reporting that there were elevated lead levels found one month ago,” Chen said.

Even before the problems in Flint, D.C. had been battling lead in its own water supply. The new report, “Get the Lead Out,“ said the problem is widespread in schools. Although the study did not include West Virginia, incidents such as the 2014 Elk River chemical spill have affected many facilities that serve children.

Environment America and the U.S. Public Interest Research Group are launching a campaign to prompt state and local officials to eliminate lead in drinking water at schools, focusing on 16 states. Yanna Lambrinidou, a researcher at Virginia Tech and a national expert on lead and drinking water, said older school buildings are especially vulnerable to corrosion in pipes.

“When water sits in plumbing for a prolonged period of time, it has the opportunity to absorb more lead from the lead-bearing plumbing than if it just kept moving through the pipes,” Lambinidou said.

The report called for schools to remove lead service lines, including lead-bearing parts, and install and maintain water filters. It also urged school districts to be proactive in taking these steps before testing shows elevated lead levels.

Report co-author John Rumpler, Clean Water Program director with the group Environment America, said kids’ health is at stake.

“It is estimated that 24 million children across the country will lose IQ points due to low levels of lead exposure,” Rumpler said. “That is a really serious, widespread problem - not just a few cities, all across the country.“

D.C. scored the highest in the study for its steps so far to remove lead from school drinking water. Out of 16 states in the report, 12 got failing grades.

~~  Dan Heyman ~~

Click Below for additional Articles...

Page 1 of 37 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »








The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVI The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved