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Advisory, Notice, Cancellation

Missing Pet

The Free Press WV

Zoe is a 14 year old white shepherd.

She can’t hear and her vision is failing.

She’s skittish due to this.

She was last seen in Cedarville on Saturday, December 1st.

She was walking towards the Chapel/Normantown area.

There is a $100 reward to anyone that finds her even if she is deceased.

Please contact Heather at 304,462,7443 with any information.

GCPSD: Main Waterline Break

The Free Press WV

The Gilmer County PSD had reported a main water line break.

This will affect approximately 85 customers in the Troy/Linn area and Upper Ellis Road.

A boil water advisory is in effect until further notice.

Any questions may be directed to the GCPSD @ 304.462.4272.

WVDA Warns Public to be on the Lookout for Exotic Tick

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) is advising the public to be on the lookout for a potential, new tick threat to West Virginia.

On Monday, May 14, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, IA confirmed the finding of the Haemaphysalis longicornis tick (otherwise known as the East Asian or longhorned tick) in Virginia.

The tick appeared on an orphaned calf found on a beef farm located in Albemarle County, VA.

“Our beef industry is the second largest agricultural commodity in the state. This exotic tick is a threat to angus and beef farmers a like,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Kent Leonhardt. “We are asking the public to be aware this tick may already be in West Virginia.”

In late 2017, the longhorned tick was found initially in New Jersey.

No known direct link exists between the Virginia farm and the area in New Jersey where the tick first appeared.

The WVDA is working with the United States Department of Agriculture and other West Virginia stakeholders to determine if the tick is present in the state.

Active tick surveillance and livestock infestation investigations have been initiated.

Suspicious ticks will be submitted to the NVSL for analysis and confirmation.

“Livestock producers, animal owners and veterinarians should notify the State Veterinarian’s office if they notice any unusual ticks, or ticks that occur in large numbers on an individual animal. Typically, these ticks are seen in the greatest numbers in spring and fall but can persist through all four seasons, especially in warmer weather,” said State Veterinarian Dr. James Maxwell. “Livestock producers can work with their veterinarians to develop a tick prevention and control program.”

For more information, please contact the WVDA’s Animal Health Division at 304-.558.2214.

Missing Dogs

The Free Press WV

Area Closings, Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 25, 2018

The Free Press WV

Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 25, 2018

 

Closings and Delays

Early Dismissal
Gilmer County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Braxton County Schools

3-Hour Delay

 

Calhoun County Schools

 

 

Doddridge County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Lewis County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Ritchie County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

 
Barbour County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Clay County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Harrison County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Nicholas County Schools

3-Hour Delay

 

Pleasants County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Roane County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Tyler County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Upshur County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Webster County Schools

3-Hour Delay

 

Wetzel County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Wirt County Schools

 

 

Wood County Schools

 

Glenville State College

 

Gilmer County Board of Education

 

Gilmer County Courthouse

 

Gilmer County Health Department

 

Gilmer County Senior Center

 

Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic

 

 

Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700

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01.25.2018 @  05:15 AM

Area Closings, Delays and Early Dismissal on Tuesday, January 09, 2018

The Free Press WV

Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Tuesday, January 09, 2018

 

Closings and Delays

Early Dismissal
Gilmer County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Braxton County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Calhoun County Schools

3-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Doddridge County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Lewis County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Ritchie County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

 
Barbour County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Clay County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Harrison County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Nicholas County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Pleasants County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Roane County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Tyler County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Upshur County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Webster County Schools

3-Hour Delay

 

Wetzel County Schools

All Closed

 

Wirt County Schools

2-Hour Delay

 

Wood County Schools

2-Hour Delay

Glenville State College

 

Gilmer County Board of Education

 

Gilmer County Courthouse

 

Gilmer County Health Department

 

Gilmer County Senior Center

 

Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic

 

 

Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700

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01.09.2018 @  09:10 AM


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01.09.2018 @  08:30 AM


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01.08.2018 @  08:30 PM


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01.08.2018 @  06:45 PM

Area Closings, Delays and Early Dismissal on Monday, January 08, 2018

The Free Press WV

Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Monday, January 08, 2018

 

Closings and Delays

Early Dismissal
Gilmer County Schools

All Closed

 

Braxton County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Calhoun County Schools

All Closed

 

Doddridge County Schools

All Closed

 

Lewis County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Ritchie County Schools

All Closed

 

 
Barbour County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Clay County Schools

All Closed

 

Harrison County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Nicholas County Schools

All Closed

 

Pleasants County Schools

All Closed

 

Roane County Schools

All Closed

 

Tyler County Schools

All Closed

 

Upshur County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Webster County Schools

All Closed

 

Wetzel County Schools

All Closed

 

Wirt County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

 

Wood County Schools

2-Hour Delay  >> All Closed

Glenville State College

 

Gilmer County Board of Education

Board Meeting Rescheduled to Wednesday

Gilmer County Courthouse

 

Gilmer County Health Department

 

Gilmer County Senior Center

Closed Due to Weather

Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic

 

 

Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700

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01.08.2018 @  12:00 PM


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01.08.2018 @  08:30 AM


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01.07.2018 @  07:30 PM


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01.07.2018 @  06:30 PM

Area Closings, Delays and Early Dismissal on Friday, January 05, 2018

The Free Press WV
Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Friday, January 05, 2018
 
Closings and Delays
Early Dismissal
Gilmer County Schools All Closed  
Braxton County Schools All Closed  
Calhoun County Schools All Closed  
Doddridge County Schools All Closed  
Lewis County Schools All Closed  
Ritchie County Schools All Closed  
 
Barbour County Schools All Closed  
Clay County Schools All Closed  
Harrison County Schools All Closed  
Nicholas County Schools All Closed  
Pleasants County Schools All Closed  
Roane County Schools All Closed  
Tyler County Schools All Closed  
Upshur County Schools All Closed  
Webster County Schools All Closed  
Wetzel County Schools All Closed  
Wirt County Schools All Closed  
Wood County Schools All Closed
Glenville State College  
Gilmer County Board of Education  
Gilmer County Courthouse  
Gilmer County Health Department  
Gilmer County Senior Center  
Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic 

 

Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700

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01.05.2018 @  06:00 AM


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01.04.2018 @  06:30 PM


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01.04.2018 @  05:30 PM

Area Closings, Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 04, 2018

The Free Press WV
Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Thursday, January 04, 2018
 
Closings and Delays
Early Dismissal
Gilmer County Schools 2-Hour Delay >> All Closed  
Braxton County Schools All Closed  
Calhoun County Schools 3-Hour Delay  
Doddridge County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Lewis County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Ritchie County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
 
Barbour County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Clay County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Harrison County Schools 3-Hour Delay  
Nicholas County Schools All Closed  
Pleasants County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Roane County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Tyler County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Upshur County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Webster County Schools All Closed  
Wetzel County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Wirt County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Wood County Schools 2-Hour Delay
Glenville State College  
Gilmer County Board of Education  
Gilmer County Courthouse  
Gilmer County Health Department  
Gilmer County Senior Center  
Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic 

 

Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700

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01.04.2018 @  06:30 AM


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01.03.2018 @  07:30 PM


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01.03.2018 @  05:30 PM

Area Closings, Delays and Early Dismissal on Tuesday, January 02, 2018

The Free Press WV
Status of Area Closings Delays and Early Dismissal on Tuesday, January 02, 2018
 
Closings and Delays
Early Dismissal
Glenville State College  
Gilmer County Board of Education  
Gilmer County Courthouse  
Gilmer County Health Department  
Gilmer County Senior Center  
Minnie Hamilton Health System, Glenville Office Clinic 
Gilmer County Schools All Closed  
Braxton County Schools 2-Hour Delay (Staff  to Report On Time)  
Calhoun County Schools 3-Hour Delay  
Doddridge County Schools    
Lewis County Schools All Closed  
Ritchie County Schools    
 
Barbour County Schools All Closed  
Clay County Schools 2-Hour Delay  
Harrison County Schools    
Nicholas County Schools 3-Hour Delay  
Pleasants County Schools    
Roane County Schools    
Tyler County Schools    
Upshur County Schools All Closed  
Webster County Schools 3-Hour Delay  
Wetzel County Schools    
Wirt County Schools 3-Hour Delay  
Wood County Schools 2-Hour Delay
Please Send us your closings and delays:  ‘tellus@gilmerfreepress.net’  or   304.462.8700

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01.01.2018 @  06:30 PM


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01.01.2018 @  05:00 PM



The Free Press WV

Gilmer County PSD Boil Advisory Has Been Lifted

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The boil water advisory issued by the Gilmer County PSD for Dusk Camp, Industrial Park, Barkers Drive and Starlins Drive has been lifted.

WVDEP Accepting Photo Entries for Roadsides in Bloom Calendar

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) is accepting photo entries to appear in the 2017 edition of the Operation Wildflower “Roadsides in Bloom” calendar. The deadline to enter photos in the contest is October 01, 2016. The contest is a joint project of the WVDEP and West Virginia Department of Transportation (WVDOT).

There are several requirements that must be met for the entry to be accepted. 

        - Photographs must be taken in West Virginia. 

        - Entries must be submitted as 8"x10” color prints and must be landscape orientation (portrait orientation will not be accepted). Each entry must also include a digital copy on a CD, DVD or flash drive submitted with the color print. 

        - Flowers must be growing along a road and the road must be prominently visible in the photo. The flowers may be growing naturally or in an Operation Wildflower bed planted by the WVDOT’s Division of Highways staff. Pictures of cultivated species planted in arranged beds, such as marigolds, pansies, etc., do not qualify. 

        - Name, address, phone number and e-mail address (if applicable) of entrant and a short description of the photo, including location and county where photo was taken, must appear in the upper left hand corner on the back of the photo. Photos become property of the WVDEP and will not be returned. 

        - No more than three entries per person will be accepted. However, only one winning photo will be selected from any photographer’s entries. 
 
        - 12 winners will be selected to represent the months of the year. A grand prize winner will be chosen to appear on the calendar cover.

To see the 2016 Roadsides in Bloom calendar, click here: http://www.dep.wv.gov/dlr/reap/ow/Documents/Roadsides%20in%20Bloom%202016%20Calendar.pdf.

Entries for the 2017 calendar contest should be mailed to:

WV Operation Wildflower
Roadsides in Bloom Calendar Contest
West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection/REAP
601 57th Street, S.E.
Charleston, WV 25304

For more DEP news and information, go to www.dep.wv.gov. Also, be sure to connect with the agency on all social media platforms. Follow @DEPWV on Twitter and find us on YouTube by searching “Environment Matters.” For specific information about our REAP (Rehabilitation Environmental Action Plan), West Virginia Project WET (Water Education for Teachers), West Virginia Watershed Improvement Branch, Youth Environmental Program and Human Resources initiatives, connect on Facebook.

Zika Virus Response Planning: Interim Guidance for Schools

The Free Press WV

Summary

What is already known about this topic?


Zika virus is transmitted primarily through the bite of infected Aedes species mosquitoes. Zika virus is not transmitted directly from one person to another through casual contact. There is no evidence that risk for transmission on school properties will be higher than in other areas of the local community.



What is added by this report?


If suspected or confirmed Zika virus infection occurs in a student or staff member, schools should continue to prioritize strategies to prevent mosquito bites on school grounds, to prevent further transmission through infected mosquitoes. Because Zika virus is not transmitted from person to person by casual contact, it is not necessary to issue a schoolwide notification, and students or staff members with travel-related Zika virus exposure or confirmed Zika virus infection do not need to be removed from school. Isolation of persons with Zika virus disease or quarantine of exposed persons is neither recommended nor appropriate. Schools should maintain privacy and nondiscrimination protections for all students and employees. In the case of local Zika virus transmission, it is not necessary to cancel school-related activities.



What are the implications for public health practice?


School, local, and public health authorities should work together to implement mosquito control activities and mosquito bite prevention measures in schools to decrease risk of Zika virus transmission, to apply appropriate policies for educating students and staff members, and for continuation of school operations.


                             

CDC has developed interim guidance for kindergarten through grade 12 (K–12) district and school administrators for public health actions pertaining to Zika virus infection. This guidance is intended to address concerns about the risk for Zika virus infection in K–12 schools in the continental United States and Hawaii, provide school districts with information for planning school-related activities, and recommend actions that can be taken, in consultation with local public health authorities and government officials, to reduce the potential risk for Zika virus transmission on school premises and among students. This guidance provides an overview of the potential roles and responsibilities of public health authorities and school officials, describes prevention measures that schools can take to reduce mosquito exposure, and provides information on responding to a case of travel-associated Zika virus infection or confirmed local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus (See Key Points). Considerations for child care, camp, and higher education settings also are addressed. This guidance will be updated as needed when new information becomes available. The latest available Zika virus information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online. Related relevant resources are summarized in Additional Resources below.


General Information about Zika Virus

Since 2007, Zika virus disease outbreaks have been reported in the South Pacific, and since 2015, Zika virus has rapidly spread in the Western Hemisphere.1,2 Zika virus is transmitted primarily through the bite of infected Aedes species mosquitoes.3 Mosquitoes become infected when they consume blood from a person infected with the virus. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other persons through bites. Direct human-to-human transmission of Zika virus can occur through sexual contact and from a pregnant woman to her fetus.4,5 Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause severe birth defects, including microcephaly.5 Zika virus is not transmitted directly from one person to another through casual contact.

The signs and symptoms of Zika virus infection in children are similar to those in adults.6 Most persons infected with Zika virus will not have symptoms; among those who do become ill, the most common signs and symptoms are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis, and these usually occur within a week of infection.6 The illness is typically mild, with symptoms lasting for several days to a week. Most children and adults infected with Zika virus do not become ill enough to seek medical care or require hospitalization, and death from Zika virus infection is rare. Cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare autoimmune condition manifested by muscle weakness (occasionally leading to temporary paralysis), have been reported among persons who have had Zika virus infection. 7 It is not known how often Guillain-Barré syndrome has occurred in children after Zika virus infection. There is currently no vaccine or specific drug to prevent or treat Zika virus infection.

Zika virus infection in childhood has not currently been linked to developmental delays or impaired growth. Because symptoms of Zika virus disease are similar to symptoms of other viral infections that commonly occur among school children, as well as less common infections such as measles, it is important that educators remain vigilant in recognizing signs and symptoms of more easily transmissible infections while planning specific interventions related to Zika virus disease.

As of July 12, 2016, no local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus has been reported in the continental United States or Hawaii, although travel-associated cases, including travel-associated sexually transmitted cases, have been reported.8 In light of the ongoing outbreak in the Region of the Americas and Pacific Islands, the number of Zika virus disease cases among travelers visiting or returning to the United States likely will increase. These imported cases could result in local transmission of the virus in some areas of the United States where the Aedes species mosquitoes that can transmit Zika virus can be found.3,9 However, there is no evidence that risk for transmission on school properties will be higher than in other areas of the local community.


Roles and Responsibilities of School Officials and Public Health Authorities

Public health authorities play a pivotal role in identifying the risk for Zika virus exposure in different settings and providing advice on actions to reduce the risk. Schools, functioning both as educational settings and as employers, have a critical role in sharing information from public health authorities, as well as in addressing concerns and questions raised by students, families, and staff members about Zika virus, and implementing public health authorities’ recommendations for schools in a timely fashion. School administrators should understand the roles and responsibilities of public health authorities and consult with them regarding questions or issues related to Zika virus infection.

Public health authorities and school districts should proactively and collaboratively establish direct communication channels and clearly define each partner’s roles and responsibilities. Initial efforts should include identifying points of contact for communication and developing protocols for implementing public health recommendations. School authorities, working collaboratively with local public health authorities, should review and ensure compliance with public health codes and applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, including OSHA guidance for protecting workers from occupational exposure to Zika virus.10 OSHA recommends that employers provide insect repellents for outdoor workers and consider modifying work responsibilities, if requested by the employee, of women who are pregnant or who might become pregnant, and men who have a sexual partner who is pregnant or might become pregnant.10


Planning for Possible Zika Virus Transmission in K–12 Schools

Outside of their homes, children and adolescents spend much of their time at school. Accordingly, district and school administrators play an important role in efforts to prevent possible Zika virus transmission among students and their families, particularly in schools that open their facilities to the community for events, extracurricular programs, and recreational use.

Prevention of mosquito bites through an integrated vector management plan is of paramount importance for avoiding Zika virus infections.11 Schools can help to reduce risk for students, families, and the community by implementing mosquito control measures on school grounds, such as identifying and removing sources of standing water that can serve as mosquito breeding sites. Common sources on school grounds can include buckets, trash cans, planters, tires, tall grasses, playground equipment, and spaces beneath temporary modular structures. Adjustments can be made to ensure these do not become mosquito breeding areas, including regularly cleaning, turning over, tightly covering, or completely removing (if appropriate) these sources; sweeping away pools of water; and keeping all grassy areas mowed (including less-traveled and hard-to-access areas such as under bleachers). In addition, efforts should be made to prevent mosquitoes from entering classrooms by placing new screens or replacing damaged screens in windows and doors, or by using air conditioning when available.

The use of other methods of mosquito control in a school or community, including insecticide spraying, is decided upon by the local and state jurisdictions. The public health and school partnership can work with local government officials to learn which approaches are available and appropriate to prevent transmission of Zika and other mosquito-borne viruses, such as West Nile, dengue, and chikungunya.12 If presence of mosquitoes at a school appears to remain high despite taking recommended steps, including removing sources of standing water, this might indicate unrecognized breeding sites, which can be a considerable source of mosquitoes. Local mosquito control authorities or licensed pest control contractors should be contacted to facilitate remediation.

When possible, students, staff members, and family members participating in outdoor activities in areas with mosquito activity should be advised to follow CDC Zika virus prevention guidelines, including wearing long pants and sleeves and using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–registered insect repellents, all of which are considered safe for school-aged children and pregnant women.13,14 Schools should review and, if necessary, update their policies regarding student possession and application of insect repellent, and inform students, their caregivers, and staff members of updated plans or policies. Administrators might also need to consider logistical issues involved, including purchasing responsibilities for repellents and the processes for applying them to large groups of children when necessary. Schools should consider risk for potential exposure to mosquito-borne diseases when planning field trips and other school-sponsored travel. Although the mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus are more active during the day, they can bite and spread infection at any time.13 If travel outside the continental United States and Hawaii is planned, risk for exposure to Zika virus might exist. CDC’s Travel Information website includes information about the current Zika virus situation in specific countries.15

Zika virus can also be transmitted sexually.4 Nationwide, 41% of high school–aged students report having had sexual intercourse at least once.16 Therefore, age-appropriate sexual health education should include information regarding the risk for Zika virus during pregnancy and the potential for sexual transmission of Zika virus, including that correct and consistent condom use can reduce the likelihood of sexual transmission of Zika virus, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintentional pregnancy, and that abstinence can eliminate these risks.4,17


Responding to a Case of Zika Virus Infection in K–12 Schools

While planning for possible cases of Zika virus infection in schools, educators should maintain provision of a safe, consistent, and effective learning environment. If a case of Zika virus infection is suspected or confirmed in a student or staff member, schools should continue to prioritize strategies to prevent mosquito bites on school grounds, to prevent further transmission through infected mosquitoes. Administrators, educators, and school health professionals can disseminate accurate Zika virus information to students and families, and prevent stigma related to perception of a student’s risk for Zika virus through efforts such as dispelling of myths and ensuring no particular students or groups are targeted for social exclusion.

In the event of a case of Zika virus disease in a student or staff member at a K–12 school, medical privacy and confidentiality should be maintained. Because Zika virus is not transmitted from person to person by casual contact, it is not necessary to issue a schoolwide notification, and students or staff members with travel-related Zika virus exposure or confirmed Zika virus infection do not need to be removed from school. Isolation of persons with Zika virus disease or quarantine of exposed persons is neither recommended nor appropriate. Patients with symptomatic illness should receive appropriate supportive medical management.

Children with fever or symptoms that might be associated with Zika virus infection, including rash, conjunctivitis, or joint pain, should be managed according to school illness policies, regardless of potential for Zika virus infection.18 School nurses and other staff members should continue to adhere to OSHA bloodborne pathogen standard precautions for any potential body fluid contact in the course of their duties.19


Responding to Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus in the Local Area

If local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus occurs, state and local jurisdictions and public health authorities will inform school districts of the range of the affected areas, provide recommendations based on cases reported in the local community, and guide schools and school districts in the implementation of enhanced measures, if required.12 This might include providing options, if requested by the employee, to limit outdoor duties or activities of students and staff members who are pregnant, who might be pregnant, or who are trying to conceive. While implementing these measures, schools should continue to maintain privacy and nondiscrimination protections for all students and employees. Zika virus testing might be offered by health authorities for pregnant staff members and students, and for persons exhibiting symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease.20

School administrators, in close coordination with local officials, will need to consider local factors, such as climate, landscape of school grounds and their surroundings, and proximity of Zika virus transmission to the school, to determine what additional measures to undertake.12 It is not necessary to suspend or cancel classes (including physical education classes), outdoor recess or outdoor activities, outdoor sporting events, or extracurricular activities.


Considerations for Child Care, Camp, and Higher Education Settings

In addition to schools, locations where children and adolescents routinely gather, such as child care facilities, camps (including day camps and overnight camps), and institutions of higher education (colleges and universities), should also consider strategies for preventing Zika virus transmission. In these settings, interventions to prevent and prepare for Zika virus infection should, at minimum, be consistent with the recommendations for K–12 schools. Administrators should act in accordance with regulations concerning public health issues relevant to their specific settings. The Administration for Children and Families has developed informational resources for child care providers to prepare for Zika virus21, and CDC has developed Zika virus communication toolkits for day camp and overnight camp settings, as well as for colleges and universities.22 College and university administrators should pay particular attention to issues relevant to students in this age group, including sexual transmission, guidance for pregnant women and their male sexual partners, and travel advisories.


Key Points

  • Zika virus is spread primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito, through sexual contact, or from a pregnant woman to her fetus. Zika virus is not passed directly from person to person through casual contact.
  • For most children and adults, Zika virus infection will not cause symptoms or will only cause mild symptoms.
  • Zika virus infection during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and certain birth defects; therefore, special considerations for preventing exposure might be needed for pregnant women, women trying to conceive, and their male sexual partners.
  • School jurisdictions should proactively establish effective channels of communication with local government and public health authorities regarding response plans for local transmission of Zika virus disease.
  • School administrators can help provide safe school environments through mosquito bite prevention efforts and sharing of accurate Zika virus information with staff members, students, and families.
  • It is not recommended for schools to remove students or staff members who have Zika virus disease or who were exposed to Zika virus, or to cancel school-related activities because of Zika virus concerns.
  • Nondiscrimination and privacy and confidentiality measures should be maintained for all students and staff members.

References

     
  1. Duffy MR, Chen TH, Hancock WT, et al. Zika virus outbreak on Yap Island, Federated States of Micronesia. N Engl J Med 2009;360:2536–43.
  2.  
  3. CDC. Zika virus: Areas with Zika. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  4.  
  5. CDC. Zika virus: About estimated range of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in the United States, 2016 Maps. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  6.  
  7. Oster AM, Russell K, Stryker JE, et al. Update: Interim guidance for prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus—United States, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:323–5.
  8.  
  9. Rasmussen SA, Jamieson DJ, Honein MA, Petersen LR. Zika virus and birth defects—reviewing the evidence for causality. N Engl J Med 2016;374:1981–7.
  10.  
  11. CDC. Zika virus: What parents should know about Zika. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  12.  
  13. Cao-Lormeau VM, Blake A, Mons S, et al. Guillain-Barré syndrome outbreak associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia: a case-control study. Lancet 2016;387:1531–9.
  14.  
  15. CDC. Zika virus disease in the United States, 2015–2016. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  16.  
  17. Hahn MB, Eisen RJ, Eisen L, et al. Reported distribution of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus in the United States, 1995–2016 (Diptera: Culicidae). J Med Entomol 2016. Epub June 9, 2016.
  18.  
  19. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Interim guidance for protecting workers from occupational exposure to Zika virus. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration; 2016.
  20.  
  21. CDC. Controlling mosquitoes at home. Atlanta, GA. US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  22.  
  23. CDC. Draft interim CDC Zika response plan (CONUS and Hawaii): Initial response to Zika virus. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  24.  
  25. CDC. Zika virus: Prevention. Atlanta, GA. US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  26.  
  27. US Environmental Protection Agency. Find the insect repellent that is right for you. Washington, DC: US Environmental Protection Agency; 2016.
  28.  
  29. CDC. Zika travel information. Atlanta, GA. US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  30.  
  31. Kann L, McManus T, Harris WA, et al. Youth risk behavior surveillance—United States, 2015. MMWR Surveill Summ 2016;65(No. SS-6).
  32.  
  33. CDC. Zika virus: Pregnant women: how to protect yourself. Atlanta, GA. US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  34.  
  35.  Aronson SS, Shope T, editors. Managing infectious diseases in child care and schools. 3rd ed. Chicago, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 2013.
  36.  
  37. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Bloodborne pathogens and needlestick prevention. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration; 2016.
  38.  
  39. Oduyebo T, Petersen EE, Rasmussen SA, et al. Update: interim guidelines for health care providers caring for pregnant women and women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure—United States, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:122–7.
  40.  
  41. Administration for Children and Families. Zika virus resources. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families; 2016.
  42.  
  43. CDC. Zika communication toolkits. Atlanta, GA. US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.


Additional Resources

ATV Safety

The Free Press WV

Bridgeport, WV – Although All Terrain Vehicles (ATV) can make for a fun day, recreational vehicles can also be very dangerous. If not treated with the respect that ATV’s deserve, someone can seriously hurt themselves or even others. Take time to become acquainted with your ATV, know the rules and take the proper precautions.

“One wrong move or misuse of your off-road vehicle can take you from the trails, to the emergency room within minutes,” said Thomas Marshall, M.D., Medical Director at United Hospital Center. “ATV safety is a very serious issue, which needs to be addressed. The lack of ATV safety brings thousands of people annually to emergency departments all over the United States.”


Statistics

“People often forget that ATV’s are not toys, they are a vehicle and should be driven with just as much caution as you would a car,” said Dr. Marshall. “In 2014 the Consumer Product Safety Commission recorded that more than 700 deaths and over 100,000 ATV related injuries occurred in the United States.”

These statistics can be lowered if we work to keep people informed about potential accidents that can occur with the misuse of an ATV. Remember that not all recreational vehicles are meant to be handled by children and to always wear the proper safety equipment when operating your off-road vehicle.


Operation

When operating your off-road vehicle, there are a few things that everyone should keep in mind. The first being never operate an ATV while under the influence of alcohol. Next, always read the operation manual before ever attempting to drive. “Ninety-two percent of recreational vehicle-related fatalities are due to warned-against behaviors,” said Dr. Marshall. “Know your ATV’s limits and never attempt to ride on dangerous terrain.”


Safety Equipment

“The use of safety equipment when riding recreational vehicles is extremely important,” said Dr. Marshall. “It is estimated that helmets alone reduce the risk of a fatality in an accident by 42 percent.” Other equipment such as goggles, gloves, long sleeve shirts, pants and over-ankle boots should be worn at all times. These pieces of equipment could be the difference between life and death on any given day. They should always be worn, even by the most experienced driver.


Purchasing

Purchasing an ATV is not a decision that should be taken lightly. Before ever purchasing an ATV, it is important for you to locate and participate in a riding course.

“ATV accidents can happen to the most experienced riders, don’t become another statistic,” said Dr. Marshall. “Know the equipment you are riding.”

Independence Day Safety

The Free Press WV

Bridgeport, WV – The Fourth of July holiday is right around the corner. As it approaches we must remember to keep safety as a first priority. There are dangers that come along with celebrating and it is important to take the necessary precautions to prevent accidents from occurring.

“Whether you’re spending the day on the water or enjoying a nice family barbecue, dangers can be found all around you,” said Christopher S. Goode, MD, FACEP, executive vice chair Department of Emergency Medicine at WVU Medicine, with clinical responsibilities at United Hospital Center’s Emergency Department. “The Fourth July, although a time of celebration, comes with many safety risks. The launching of fireworks, traveling, boating and consumption of alcohol can all have severe consequences if not properly handled.”


Traveling

There will be a lot of people traveling during the Fourth of July holiday this year, so it cannot be stressed enough how important it is to follow a few safety tips. Remember to stay off your cell phones and other devices while driving.
“Always be aware of your surroundings and buckle your seatbelt,” said Dr. Goode. “It is estimated that seatbelts can save 155 lives during holidays like the Fourth of July.”


Boating

One of the favorite ways of celebrating the Fourth of July is by getting the family together and hitting the lake. People enjoy taking their boats on the water, especially on a hot, holiday weekend. This can become dangerous when people start to neglect safety rules and regulations.

The number of boating related injuries this time of year has been on the rise. Dr. Goode says that between the years of 2013 and 2014, the number of deaths increased eight percent. People will neglect simple safety laws such as wearing a life jacket, which statistics consistently show that 80 percent of those who perished in boating accidents were not wearing. Boaters must also stay aware of others on the water. There will not only be other boats, but also kayakers and swimmers.


Fireworks

“In 2013 fireworks accounted for 11,400 injuries and eight deaths in the United States,” said Dr. Goode. “People need to remember that fireworks are explosives and should be handled with caution. That is why I always recommend that you should go see a fireworks display.”

However, we know that not everyone will heed such advice. Therefore, here are a few simple safety measures you can take to keep yourself and others around you safe when launching fireworks this Fourth of July. Remember to read all instructions before ever lighting a firework. Always launch off a flat surface and safely away from any bystanders, houses or flammable materials. Fireworks are to only be handled by adults; never should these be given to children, regardless of the type. A sparkler burns at 2000 degrees Fahrenheit which can melt some metals and easily injure a child’s hand. 


Drinking and Driving

“Drinking and driving can be a deadly combination when mixed together. People under the influence of alcohol are 11 times more likely to be in a car accident than those who are not,” said Dr. Goode. “In 2014 there were approximately 9,967 people killed in drunken driving incidences in the United States.”

If you want to keep yourself and others on the road safe this holiday weekend, then remember these rules:

• Always have a designated driver who can take you home, if your holiday celebrating includes the consumption of alcohol.

• A cab is also an option if you cannot find someone sober to drive you.

“The July Fourth celebration of our nation’s independence is one we all look forward to; just remember no matter how you choose to celebrate this great day, take a few moments to make safety part of your holiday plans,” said Dr. Goode.

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Readers' Recent Comments

John & Family,  Sorry to hear of Nyla’s passing!  GOD will take care of you!!  GOD BLESS EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU IN THIS SAD TIME !!!  RIP Nyla !

By Anita L. Adams - New Concord, Ohio on 02.15.2019

From the entry: 'Nyla Leah Frymier Poole'.

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“But Cathy Kunkel, an energy analyst with the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, said utility filings in those states now show the outlook has changed dramatically - in part because of competition from cheap, renewable energy.“

That is utter rubbish.  There is no “cheap, renewable energy.“  Solar and wind are more expensive, even taking subsidies into consideration.  Hydro is more expensive, nuclear is more expensive.

Claiming otherwise is at best fake news, and at worst deliberate misdirection and lying.  Merely claiming renewable energy is less expensive doesn’t make it so.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 02.15.2019

From the entry: 'Need for Atlantic Coast Pipeline Falls'.

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It was brought to my attention there was an article published in the Gilmer Free Press under Reader’s Comments dated 2-11-19.
This was written by Tammy White which many think it was me (Tammy Foster).  Twenty years (or more) “White” was my last name.
My son does take daily medication at the high school (which somehow this is quite a coincidence).  I want to clarify that I DID NOT write that article!
Now that I have straighten this out….. please read what I have say about this situation at Gilmer County High School:
The secretary or secretaries that were mentioned have never been rude to me or my son in person or by phone.  It is actually the opposite!  They are kind, caring, professional and thorough with distributing my son’s meds.
Not only do they make sure he gets the correct dosage daily but they keep a close inventory on the meds and call me when I need to restock them.
It broke my heart to read the negative article written last week and I was appalled my (old) name was on it.
My son and I trust and depend on these wonderful ladies.  We would like to take this opportunity to THANK them for taking excellent responsibility and care of our child and other students.

By Tammy Foster (not White) on 02.13.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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I’m sorry for your loss.

By Danny Nicholson on 02.12.2019

From the entry: 'Vera Marlene Lyons'.

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There is some issues going on at GCHS. I’m starting here in Hope’s that it will be addressed and corrected.  The secretary was rude when I turned in medicine for my son to be taken on a daily basis. Nor is it her business why he takes it, or how often. Anyway, is she certified in giving meds out.  I thought that the school employed a nurse. Maybe she should answer the phone or should I say message on her cell. She had no idea how many I handed in she didnt count them. Talks about her co workers. Then she gets upset nobody talks to her. She is 2 face. Talking about them is very unprofessional.
I hope this is taken care of or my next step is to the state department. Your choice

By Tammy white on 02.11.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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It is welcomed news as reported in the Democrat that Gilmer’s GCES students are making progress in learning math and English Learning Arts.

The principal, teachers, and all staff deserve high praise for the progress. Let’s not forget efforts of students too plus their parents who encourage them at home.

In addition to rates of increase for learning progress it would be helpful to be informed of percentages of students in the different grades who are at grade level for math and ELA.

Nothing was reported about learning progress at the GCHS and the LCES bi-county school. When are reports for those schools going to be given?

By Positive School News on 02.08.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The lights are up at the Linn school.
Often flashing nights and weekends when NO ONE is on school property.

And you expect lights to work….???
when the WVDE, the WVBE built the school with FIVE TOO MANY CLASSROOMS !!??

*** The WVBE is incapable of meaningful education.
Why do you think the WV Legislature created the current ‘education overhaul’ bill without consulting the WV State Board of Ed? ***

By you are joking I guess? on 02.07.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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“The Environmental Protection Agency issued regular updates for about 100 water pollutants almost four years ago ... “

That would have been the Obama EPA, and the intention wasn’t to provide better water, it was an attempt to control business activity through the use of regulation.

In other words, a power-grab by a politician obsessed with it.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pay McGroyne on 02.06.2019

From the entry: 'One Charleston Manufacturer Pressing for Delay of Water Rules'.

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Would the County’s school board take action to help improve safety conditions at the LCES?

The way it is now it can be uncertain if children are present at the school to require a reduction of speed to 15 mph while on Rt. 33.

It would eliminate uncertainty if a flashing lights system were to be installed so the lights could be turned on when children are present.

By LCES Safety Concern on 01.31.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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Why is it that on Gilmer County’s school system web site biographical information including education backgrounds for all school board members and their pictures are not posted?

Other counties have the information. Why not us?

By School Board Member Backgrounds? on 01.23.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The only reason for our not using a version of the goal-driven Kentucky method would be a veto by controlling elitists opposed to establishing meaningful accountability for Gilmer County’s school system.

Without using the method it would be easier to continue to pawn off information that cannot be used to accurately document progress with student proficiencies for reading, math, science, and college and career readiness.

By School System Accountability Needed on 01.20.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The KY approach would be valuable to Gilmer County for use in disclosing progress of our two schools in contributing to better lives for our children.

For goals for which progress would be off schedule, the tracking approach would be an objective basis for making mid-course adjustments in our school system to get better results.

By using the approach school board members could be more effective with goal-driven governing, and getting results would be the responsibility of the County’s Superintendent of Schools and school principals.

Overall,the approach would establish meaningful accountability which is sorely lacking in WV’s school systems.

By Establish School System Accountability on 01.18.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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Accomplished communicators have a knack for reducing complex information to its simplest form for effectiveness in getting messages across.

WV’s convoluted strategic plans for schools must follow the State’s rigid guidelines. The plans are confusing and inadequately designed for establishing accountability for getting results.

Kentucky is making progress with improving K-12 education outcomes and one reason is the clarity of specific goals for its schools and the job being done with tracking results.

Google—-2018 Prichard Committee Update to glean what is being done in Kentucky. The approach could be used for Gilmer’s two schools with a single sheet of paper for each school.

The beauty of the Prichard approach is that instead of relying on confusing and lengthy written out material with undefined abbreviations, technical jargon, and head scratching generalities, specific goals and annual results in achieving them are presented graphically.

Perfect real world example of a picture being worth a thousand words.

Board of Education members why couldn’t the Prichard approach be used for Gilmer County? It would be inexpensive, it could be updated easily on an annual basis, and everyone in the County would know how the school system is being administered to achieve measurable results.

Perhaps Mr. David Ramezan could post Prichard material on the GFP to show its simplicity.

By Advocate For Clarity on 01.17.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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The scandal of the too small school?
Don’t forget…
The scandal of the too big school is half of the whole state intervention mess.  FIVE rooms more than needed at the Linn, Lewis County school.

Results are from nepotism, cronyism, and educational stupidity….as well as scoffing at those who attempted to sound the alarm.

Bloated egos was the frosting on the Litter Box Cake Mix.

By School Truth is in the Litter Box on 01.17.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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During intervention the State had dictatorial control of our school system to include all decisions related to the GCES.

One result is that the GCES was built too small.

An investigation is needed to determine who was responsible for the bad decision, and what role the no-bid architectural firm had in designing and constructing the school.

Something major happened to cause the GCES to be built too small. Was something dropped at the expense of adequate class room space as a result of having to spend extra money because a poor site was selected?

Minimally, gross incompetency on the State’s part is the explanation for the disaster foisted onto the County.

A question pertains to the new gym. Lots of effort was taken by the State to try to convince the public that a competition gym instead of a regular gym was needed.

Did the competition gym cost extra money at the expense of needed classroom space? If the answer is affirmative who was responsible for deciding on the more expensive gym?

What about the enormous pit at the GCES? Was money spent on it at the expense of classrooms because something was wrong with the school’s site that was selected by the State?

Nothing similar to the pit has been seen at other sites where new WV schools were built.

Why has there been a failure for a thorough investigation to have occurred to expose the facts?

The obvious explanation is that powerful elitists in control do not want tracks leading to them, and they have veto power over a meaningful investigation including one done by a leading newspaper.

By GCES Built Too Small Scandal on 01.15.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Pat McGroyne is spot on.
High speed internet is simply another failure of WV state government.

If the elected in our state, were doing the job expected by voters….we should have very few problems or issues?

By Gilmer resident on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Muddling has another distinct symptom. It is the tendency for administrators in control to emphasize processes and procedures while avoiding disclosure of progress, or the lack thereof, in achieving learning results.

The purpose is another way to avoid personal accountability for school system failures.

By Muddling Epidemic In WV School Systems on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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West Virginia is number one!
Our politicians are the best that can be had.
They are also the lobbyers dream come true.
No one—-can out-muddle our elected reps !

By we know it on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Suggestion after reading strategic plans for the GCHS and the GCES.

How about the school board requiring that for each school an informative executive summary be written to include——where each school stands on reading, math, and science proficiency, what the term proficiency means to eliminate the confusion, student proficiency goals for the two school, target time to expect goals to be achieved, and a statement to commit to keeping the public informed of progress in achieving the goals at designated intervals (e.g. quarterly) during a school year.

Omit confusing abbreviations and technical terms understood only by a select few in the education field, and written for comprehension by reasonable persons.

Leave it up to the County’s professional educators to determine how to get the job done with continual laser-like focus on getting results.

By Student Learning at GCHS and GCES on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Muddling infects federal, state, and local government entities where personal accountability for top officials to get measurable results rarely exists.

Muddling practitioners are famous for passing off information unrelated to measurable proof that effective problem-solving has occurred. A common example is emphasizing how much public money is being spent to attempt to convince tax payers that magnitudes of expenditures are always directly correlated to levels of problem-solving successes.

Muddling by an organization is characterized by the existence of thick planning documents replete with vagueness and lack of clarity, undefined technical terms, and mysterious acronyms.

Muddling thrives on intentional ambiguity and confusion designed to protect muddlers and their organizations.

By Muddling 101 on 01.11.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Gilmer County is not the only place in the USA that has been faced with its students failing to meet proficiency standards for science, reading, and math.

The difference here is that evidence is lacking to conclusively demonstrate that Gilmer County’s officials in control have exerted proper efforts to profit form powerful lessons learned elsewhere to use that knowledge to help solve learning deficiencies in our schools.

In fact, a convincing argument could be made that the approach in the County has been the one professional planners designate as muddling through.

Classic symptoms of muddling through include failure to thoroughly analyze categories of causes contributing to problems followed up by using the information to develop a comprehensive plan to do the most good in getting better results by treating key causes instead of symptoms.

Muddling typically involves officials assigning blame for lack of progress to outside forces e.g., the “culture”, the State did it to us, and poverty. Haven’t we heard plenty of that?

Muddling must be eliminated if we want progress in solving non-performance problems within the County’s school system. Does anyone disagree?

By End School System Muddling on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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It is unclear after reading school board meeting minutes what progress if any is being made by GCHS and GCES principals in improving student proficiency in reading, math and science.

Why not allocate a few sentences in the minutes to summarize what the two principals reported to the school board?

All it would take to get the critical information out to citizens would be for the new school board to act on this.

Does anyone have a problem with the suggested change to keep Gilmer’s bill paying public informed?

By Need Specifics For Principal's Reports on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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“High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).“

I disagree with much of what Mr.Boggs believes.  That said, high-speed broadband is the single most important step the State of WV could take to improve the business climate and provide more opportunities for its citizens.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Conversation at local eatery.
Shortly after election.
Individuals were educators.

‘You think we have school problems now, wait until these new folks take the steering wheel’.

‘Students, parents, staff are all going to be in the soup’.

Sounds as if Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving vacation-deer season times have all taken a big hit.  If that is true, the union teachers need to come together, stand their ground, along with parents, and hold this new board accountable.

Have a local strike if need be.
Request resignations.
Vote of no confidence.

Schools employees can win.
You have done it before.
Just stick together.

By overheard conversation on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Scholarship must be the most important focus in Gilmer County’s schools.

Brought up the ZOOMWV Data Dashboard site to review the most recent State achievement test results for GCHS’s 11th grade.

Folks, Gilmer is in serious trouble. Proficiency for math=24%, reading=41%, and science=24%.

On an A through F grading scales the GCHS gets an F for all three subject areas.

What does the new school board have to show for inroads it has made since last July to make critically needed proficiency improvements at the HS? Citizens deserve answers to the question.

By ZOOMWV Data Dashboard on 01.07.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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A thorough accounting for where all the public money went could be easily achieved by a competent accountant.

Isn’t there a special account at the County’s school board office for expenditures related to all bills paid and who got the money?

Following the money trail always gets results along with verification of means, motives, and access.

By Let An Accountant Dig It Out on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If central office financial records for all public money paid out for everything from site planning, site studies and development, and everything else to get to completion of the GCES and the LES—- what is the reason?

It is known that money was spent on the Arbuckle site and Cedar Creek, and public money was paid out for the LES too.

Were County records for the spending purged and if that happened who ordered the action? The records are either in the County’s central office or they aren’t.

By End Financial Secrecy on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Hasn’t the time come to finally start naming names and making people accountable?

By Get It Done on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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How about the “BIG WV WINDFALL”....?

For 3 or 4 months now we keep hearing about the millions of dollars of tax revenue collected.

Millions and millions above ‘estimates’.  Were those ‘estimates’ honest, or fudged to begin with, so as to request higher tax rates?

Well, Justice and the Legislature now have our dollars, what will become of this windfall? Will we see tax rates lowered?  Doubt full, but we should.

Likely this windfall, created by “over-taxation”, will simply create a “party atmosphere” of legislative spending. Watch the Charleston ‘gangsters’ get their wish lists ready this coming session.

By taxpayers always lose on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Yes.  The blame Does seem to fall to ‘local’ people. In small places like Gilmer County, it’s just a poker game, boys, and the deep pockets win.  Money speaks volumes where ‘officials’ stay silent.  Go ask for the records, see what they’ve got.

By CheatersNeverWin on 11.20.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Teachers and staff knew from the beginning that the GCES was going to be too small. They were ordered by the State to keep quiet about the shortfall and other serious concerns too.

A sixth grader could understood how many rooms were needed by dividing total student numbers to attend the school by how many students should be in a classroom.

Under sizing was the State’s fault and it cannot be rationalized any other way including to assign the blame to local people. Same applies to the over sized LCES.

By Corrupt State Intervention on 11.19.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There will never be a full, public accounting of the gross mishandling of tax dollars during WVDOE intervention.
Too many local jobs and too many embarrassments of both elected and appointed bureaucrats.
These types cover dirt for each other.

Any local whistle blowers?  Doubtful.

One school built short 4 classrooms and another built with 5 too many.  Can it get more stupid than that?
Mr. Degree and Ms. Common Sense seldom travel together.

By Full accounting will never be revealed. Never. on 11.18.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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GCBOE when the two principals give reports at board meeting could the gist of what they said be summarized in minutes to keep the County informed?

It was a welcomed development by the Board to require principals to give reports particularly if there are required updates on progress designed to improve student learning for reading, math, and other subjects.

We still have not been informed about the status of science proficiency at the GCHS based on the latest testing. Why has the State failed to release the data? Were results too dismal?

By More Specifics For Principal's Reports on 11.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If it is going to cost extra money to eliminate over crowding at the GCES the financial information referenced by Do It Ourselves should be presented to Charleston and the press too.

That would help frame a solid case that crowding problems were not caused by Gilmer County because all decisions related to facilities were dictated by officials over whom the County had no oversight authority during the State’s intervention.

By Follow The Money on 11.16.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is assumed that all records for spending to include money paid out for the LCES, dropped Arbuckle site, dropped Cedar Creek site, and all bills for the GCES are in the Gilmer Schools central office.

The new GCBOE has authority to get to the truth by demanding a thorough accounting for all the spending.

Afterwards the financial officer in the central office could easily access existing computerized records and to use the information for a report to the GCBOE and the public.

By Do It Ourselves on 11.15.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Notice that most of the ‘officials’ in Gilmer County also hold regular day jobs - sometimes working on more than one paying ‘job’ at a time in the same office space. This common practice is concerning for many reasons, and it needs to be talked about when so many go without.

By QuestionablePractice on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There are two views in the County related to the under built GCES. Although the State built the school with inadequate classrooms one group believes that we should move on to let go of the past.

Isn’t this a form of advocacy for a coverup to prevent accountability for the State’s incompetence and mismanagement?

The other group believes that there should be a full accounting for all public money spent up to the time the GCES was completed to include disclosure of recipients of the public money. 

The accounting should be done for all public money spent at the LCES, the Arbuckle site, Cedar Creek, and finally the GCES.

Reasons for the under built GCES should be fully disclosed too. When the State was in control this information was kept secret from the public with loud claims that there was adequate space at the GCES.

Now it is known that there is inadequate space at the GCES and the problem is left to Gilmer County to fix. Only in WV!

By Citizens For Financial Disclosure on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Unprofessional issues,rude commentsand rolling eyes at the high school has become an issue. Being on cell phone talking to boyfriends,when parents etc.going into the office. Since the teachers were ask not to be on them while students in the classroom. The one in the office should not be allowed to talk personal to her boyfriend, or whoever. Also, I hope this is corrected, the personal days, etc that the board provides to staff shouldn’t be allowed to use to work or operate a second job. Let’s get the priorities straight.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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GULMER COUNTY BOE. It is time for me to let you know some issues that is going on at the High school.  I’m hoping this will be addressed at the next board meeting. 1. It should not matter if an employee has a second job or run a business. The priority job is for the board. One should not be allowed to use any time from the board to run your business. There is going on
If they want to run your business than go but not on the boards time. I would like for all employees be treated the equal. They should not be allowed to use the time the board gives them for other jobs.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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While at it there should be an investigation of why the LES was build with too many classrooms and the GCES was built with too few. At the very least what happened is a WV horror story example of the State’s waste and mismanagement.

By Where Is The Investigation? on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is obvious that the GCES has a major space problem.

What options for dealing with the State’s mismanagement to cause the serious blunder are being considered by the Board of Education?

Could the original architectural design for the dropped Cedar Creek site be compared to what resulted at the GCES to accurately determine the extent of classroom space alterations?

If the architectural design at the GCES is different than the original plan for Cedar Creek the next step should be to determine reasons for the changes and where the money originally planned for needed classrooms went.

By INFO REQUEST TO GCBOE on 11.09.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It’s long been known that Justice doesn’t happen in Gilmer County “because it all comes down to money”. And for those in charge of handling it and making decisions, it comes down to being competent to do the job,  keep accurate books and accounts and I’m sorry to say, that is seriously lacking in Gilmer County.

By Follow the Paycheck(s) on 11.06.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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What is GSC’s BOG’s plan for getting money for the next payment on the $38,000,000 bond loan the Gilmer County Commission approved?

Will the State pay or will the money come from private donations?

Money will have to come from somewhere to avoid a default.

By Where Is The Money? on 11.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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So sorry to hear of Kendall’s passing. I have fond memories of him at Uncle Paul’s store and the family reunions. I’m sure he will be missed greatly by those closest to him.
Please accept condolences from me and my family.

By Steve Lewis on 11.04.2018

From the entry: 'Kendall Goodwin'.

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GSC’s present plight is no secret and its future existence is in question.

Instead of expressing attitudes that GSC is being picked on could the Blue Ribbon Commission reveal why the College “tested out” as it did to fail to get more State money?

Was the “grading system” based on student enrollment trends, retention, time taken to get a degree, academic reputation, inept governance and administration, and other factors to block more funding? Informative specifics were not disclosed.

Teachers know that concerned students who want to do better always seek advice on what needs to be done to get better grades.

Similar to concerned students GSC’s supporters should be informed of what needs to be done to position the College for improved chances for survival to include eligibility for more State funding.

Saying that GSC is being picked on does nothing to help solve its nagging problems.

By What Was The Grading System? on 10.30.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Well thank you, Details Please,  for asking!  So many problems in Gilmer and education is just one.  Look at the town, take a good look around.  Remember who runs unopposed at election time.  Vote.  Make a difference.  Hold authority figures responsible.  Allow videos, minutes and more to be shared on GFP again, for transparency.  Know your neighbors, help a friend.  Be good to each other. Amen.

By Reader7 on 10.29.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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I will truly miss my Uncle Stephen.  Telling me so much information about from gardening to canning. Just to listening to him talk with such passion for everything that he does… he had a sense of humor that always warms my heart.. listening to him play the banjo sometimes even when he didn’t feel good. he is always willing to share his recipes and his ways of doing things… his solar information he was always studying something ... I’m remember one time we asked him where he got his blackberries when it wasn’t Blackberry season and he go there’s a store down the road it’s called Walmart they have everything… He was so funny.  I love you.. xoxo.

By Robin Nunez on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Sorry for your loss. He sure did look like his father.

By Buck Edwards on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Reader 7, please give details for your suggested solutions to the County’s concerns you addressed.

The information would be helpful for consideration by school system administrators and the general public.

By Details Please on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is speculation that the plan is for GSC to convert to an education center for low risk federal inmates. Is this something the County and central WV needs?

By GSC's New Mission? on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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Dr. Pellett’s commentary in the 10/26/2018 issue of the Gazette includes a statement that GSC is responsible for injecting $28,000,000 into the local economy.

If GSC were to close loss of the money would cause the County to have more severe poverty than it has now.

The pressing challenge is for GSC’s administrators including its Board of Governors to exercise effective leadership to prevent closure.

Why can’t GSC take action on the long standing suggestion for it to be an innovator by establishing a five year teacher education program to enable students to earn a masters degree by graduation time?

Something must be done in WV to deal with the 700 positions for which certified teachers including those for math, science and special education are not in the classrooms.

Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors why is a new teacher education program at the College not a viable option? Nothing else seems to be working.

The need exists, a similar program of excellence does not exist anywhere in the State, and GSC’s status would be elevated by having a masters degree program.

By GSC Alumni on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Paine: Plan to improve math scores to focus on algebra where a third of teachers aren’t certified'.

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GSC could make a valuable contribution to WV by doing a study to report on how grade and elementary schools with excellent results in math and reading did it.

Then, other schools could use the information as guidance instead of going it alone to reinvent the wheel.

With the Ed.D. expertise at GSC it would be a natural to take on the assignment. Dr. Pellett, would you back the initiative?

By Opportunity for GSC on 10.23.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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There is reference to signing an agreement with the State for math4life for all WV school districts. What has Gilmer County agreed to do to fix our problems?

By Agreements Matter on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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This important news has potential for making significant progress in improving math and reading outcomes in WV.

It hinges on how quickly advantage can be taken from lessons learned in schools that excelled.

The WVBE could do an analysis of reasons for excelling and to quickly provide guidance information to other schools.

That is the way the private sector approaches problem-solving because chronic failures have consequences and the unfit are weeded out.

Dr. O’Cull could help if the WVBE is not responsive. There could be panels of individuals from excelling schools to make presentations at WV School Board Association meetings to explain what their schools did to make the achievements.

By Why Reinvent The Wheel? on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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A characteristic of a good strategic plan is to simplify language to enable a clear understanding of all its details.

Regarding the comment about abbreviations, a simple fix for them and terms (e.g. lexile) would be to insert an asterisk or a footnote symbol the first time one of them is used to refer readers to a section at the end of the documents where the entries are defined.

This comment is not intended to be a criticism. All specialty fields have a language of their own including the teaching profession.

Suggested clarity improvements in the plans would not be time consuming for principals at the County’s two schools.

By Clarity Is Always Good on 10.18.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Looked at the strategic plan for the GCES. It is a major achievement for the new GCBE to provide the information to the public.

Suggestion. Could the GCBOE post a meaning of all abbreviations in the plan? Doing that would make it far easier for readers to understand details in the plan.

By Help Understanding on 10.17.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Thanks Mrs. Lowther and the BOE for providing meeting minutes for the public to read.

Those of us who voted for the levy would appreciate receiving specific information for what is being done at the grade school and the high school to make needed improvements for college and career readiness.

Could a current overview and updates throughout the school year be provided to the public?

Why not put the details on websites of the two schools to give the principals a chance to shine?

By Levy Supporter on 10.16.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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“engage in pedantic colloquy?“

No Bill.

By WEKNOWYOU on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Correct.  I do not wish to engage in back and forth useless ‘banter’ with big words and no results.  What I AM interested in is Gilmer County, in all it’s ways.  Education, Food, Law and Transparency.  Fancy words are often used to hide, divide, and distract..  Plain words speaking truth for the safety and well being of the people is what I’m looking for..  Gilmer is suffering… I want it to stop. I want to see the citizens healthy, educated and strong. I want to see more jobs instead of food banks.  I want Committee meetings for all to see. I want the law to do what it should, when it should.  Plain english would work fine.  Thanks for asking.

By Reader7 on 10.14.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Lol 7, you do not wish to engage in a pedantic colloquy?

By Smart Feller on 10.13.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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All nice but a small request? Can we simplify some of the language?  Don’t mean to be rude, but fancy works aren’t needed for the Truth.

By Reader7 on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Stop living the delusion the state will fix education.
They have caused the problem.
Remember, for them, job one IS job protection.

Rare in history, that the cause of a problem, has come forth with a solution to what they have caused. They keep resetting testing standards so as not have any ‘yardstick’ they can be measured against.  Apparently people just don’t get it?  And the WVBOE is so happy about that.

By it-ain't-a-gonna-happen. period. on 10.12.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is a continuum for sophistication regarding what is done with data.

Collecting and compiling it is at the low end of sophistication.

Synthesis is at the high end.

This means using results and other information to make specific recommendations for making improvements.

The State took its typical easy way out by failing to go beyond the data compilation stage.

By Easy Way Out on 10.10.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The comment about need to find out what was done at high performance schools to determine what we could do in Gilmer County to get the same results merits a comment.

The comment flags what is wrong with the State BOE in failing to provide effective leadership.

Does anyone recall a single instance, after tens of millions of dollars were spent on amassing data, when the State BOE did anything to effectively address lessons learned at high performance schools for application at other schools?

Of course not! It is the easy way out for those in high income brackets in Charleston to collect data instead of using it to the maximum to take full advantage of lessons learned.

Could the WV School Board Association help fill the gap?

By Lost Opportunity on 10.07.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Harry, So sorry to hear of the passing of your wife.  I’m also sorry that I never got to know her because if she was anything like you, I’m sure she was pretty special.  Please know that you and your family will be in my thoughts and prayers.  May God’s love be with you my friend.

By Greg Garvin on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Judith “Judy” Carolyn Buckley Rich'.

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What is the BOE’s proficiency goal for English and mathematics and what is the time frame for achieving the goal? That is news citizens want.

Then too, how can citizens at large get involved to honor and to encourage students who improve, and what of a similar nature could be done to give special recognition to outstanding teachers who contribute to improved learning for English and math?

By Positive Changes Made By New BOE on 10.04.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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The BOE and Mrs Lowther deserve high praise for disclosing proficiency information to the public.

It is the first time since 2011 anything like this has happened.

We still do not know about results for science, and it is understood that Charleston is still “working” on it.

Now we know our serious shortcomings in math and English and there is new hope for burrowing out of the mess with everyone in Gilmer working together.

By Thanks Gilmer BOE on 10.03.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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Well, dear citizen… sometimes the local ‘law’ gets it wrong.  #truth #JusticeForGilmer

By Transparency matters on 09.30.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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Soooo…...why do we never see a big drug bust in Gilmer?
With the college and others, there are plenty sources.
Seems strange?

By citizen 3 on 09.23.2018

From the entry: '33 charged in methamphetamine distribution operations in Harrison, Marion, and Monongalia Counties'.

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If you access http://www.mywvschool.com it is evident that some schools outpace others for math and English.

For examples look at data for Lizemore Elementary in Clay County, Alum Creek Elementary in Kanawha County, Rock Branch Elementary in Putnam county, and Greenmont Elementary in Wood County.

Gilmer BOE why not assign someone to evaluate what is being done at those school and others to make them State standouts and to apply lessons learned to our elementary schools?

The same applies to learning from others regarding how to get high marks at GCHS.

By Learn What Works From Others on 09.23.2018

From the entry: 'WV and Area Counties Balanced Scorecard for School Year 2017-2018'.

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I have not read anyone blaming our teachers.  Quite the contrary.
There have been some well thought out comments submitted too.
I am old enough to remember when we had few issues about quality education.

Forget Charleston? Better not.
Believe we are still in their “probation” period.
You better check out just what that means.

By GC--still on state probation? on 09.22.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Why not go for it on our own and use the tried and widely accepted Iowa Test of Basic Skills to evaluate learning proficiency of our children?

It is the longest running test in America and it goes back to 1936.

One outcome of using the test is that each grade would be evaluated and compared to performances to schools in other parts of America.

We would probably have to go through hoop jumps of the State’s everchanging testing too.

By Iowa Test For Gilmer on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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To compound complexity of the issue, Gilmer is different from McDowell and both are different than Monongahela.

The implication is that getting out of the crisis must be county-specific and there is no one size that will fit all of WV’s 55 school systems.

Each county is on its own and ones with the best planning, local boards of education, and administrators will shine. Forget about Charleston!

By County-Specific on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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Similar to most complex problems there are several categories contributing to WV’s dismal failure in improving education results in our grade and high schools.

Information in referred journal is beginning to show up. Some of the categories include curriculum issues in high schools, block scheduling failures in high schools, inordinate emphasis on sports at the expense of academics, inadequate prep of grade schoolers to ensure that they get firm foundations in math and English Language Arts, failure to instill need for life long learning at early ages, failure for school systems to fund continuing education of teachers to prepare them for newly emerged practices for enhanced student learning, cultural impediments including failure of some families to encourage children and to give them extra learning help at home, dysfunctional families for children to grow up in caused by drug and alcohol abuse and chronic unemployment, grade inflation characterized by too many As and Bs and attitudes that nobody fails so pass them along, failure of school boards to hire the best qualified superintendents and teachers because of local emphasis on favoring “home grow” individuals, failure of school boards to define performance expectations for superintendents to make effective accountability impossible, constantly changing types of State mandated testing to cause chaos and morale problems, poor compensation of teachers necessary to attract and keep the best and the brightest, etc.

To blame all problems on teachers is a cruel travesty.

One of the weakest links contributing to a lack of progress in improving WV schools is that instead of analyzing the full spectrum of contributing problems and focusing on ones with the biggest payoff potential, the trend in Charleston is to constantly apply band aid approaches with hopes that “cures” will be stumbled on accidentally.

By Do Not Blame It All On Our Teachers on 09.21.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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The problem with preK-12 education in WV is that a holistic and and technically defensible evaluation of contributing factors to cause WV’s problems and how to deal with them has not occurred.

Instead, under direction of clueless politicians ineffective muddling prevails while selling what is done at a particular time as the definitive solution.

How many times have we witnessed muddling over the past 20-30 Years? It still goes on in Charleston.

Why not obtain a grant to have qualified experts analyze success stories around the Nation and use findings to craft a demonstration project in Gilmer County to improve our school system?

Regardless of what we do there must be open minds in seeking out what to do in homes, schools,  teacher education programs in our institutions of higher learning, continuing education for classroom teachers, and to involve various factions in our community to achieve acceptable results. Everyone must band together as a unified team to make it work.

One trap is over emphasis of sports. If the same magnitude of attention and importance were to be focused on solving preK-12 education problems in WV, great strides could be made to benefit deserving children.

By Muddling on 09.19.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: Wood County Schools exceeds state test averages'.

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