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Arts, Crafts & Photography

Annual Glenville State College Student Art Show Winners Announced

Winners of the annual Glenville State College Juried Student Art Show have been announced.

The show was open to any full time GSC student who wished to submit a pieces of original art created during their college career.

The show was judged by GSC Associate Professor of English Melissa Gish.

“We are very proud of our art majors and all of the works in the show. This show wonderfully showcases the growth of our art students as well as the department,” said Department of Fine Arts Chair Dr. Lloyd Bone.

Heather Chambers of Parsons, West Virginia won first place for her ‘Howling Wolf’ digital painting and took third place for her ceramic piece ‘Demon Wolf.’ She is the daughter of Margaret and Matthew Chambers and is a senior studio art major with a minor in music.

The Free Press WV
Heather Chambers – First and Third Place Recipient


“My love for art comes from my twin sister. When we were little we would have competitions to see who the better artist was, but as I got older it became less about competition and more of a passion. I enjoy working with a wide variety of mediums, and I’m always excited to learn more,” said Chambers.

Gavin McCord of Walkersville, West Virginia won second place for his oil painting ‘Oni.’ He is the son of Shelia Watson and Andy McCord and is a sophomore graphic design and digital media major.

The Free Press WV
Gavin McCord – Second Place Recipient


“This is the first step in my career which I’m looking to expand. I’d like to thank Professor [Chris] Cosner for seeing my potential and drive and for inspiring me to put in the hard work to create this piece,” said McCord.

Four students - Taylor Brumfield, Joshua Smith, Sarah Lines, and Heather Coleman - were recognized with honorable mention certificates for their entries.

Gish, who judged the show, is the author of more than 90 juvenile nonfiction natural history and science books. Her writing and artwork has been published in a variety of small press journals. Her collections of found object art has been featured in the GSC Fine Arts Center Gallery, and she is currently working with GSC’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Guild student organization on their first chapbook of creative writing and art.

For more information about the GSC gallery, contact Assistant Professor of Art Chris Cosner at or 304.462.6349.

WV Education and the Arts Announces Opening of Submissions for the Congressional Art Competition

The Free Press WV

Submissions are being accepted from now until February 9, 2018 for the Congressional Art Competition. High School students may submit art work for a chance to have their work displayed at the United States Capitol in Washington D.C. Cabinet Secretary of Education and the Arts said, “This unique opportunity gives students the ability to display their artwork on a national level, promoting our state’s rich artistic culture.” Art work categories include paintings, drawings, collage prints, mixed media, computer generated arts, and photography.

The competition is a partnership with members of the West Virginia Congressional Delegation, the Office of Secretary of Education and the Arts, and the West Virginia Division of Culture and History. “This is a great opportunity to highlight the incredible talents of our young people in West Virginia. I encourage any student with an artistic interest to participate and make a submission,” Congressman Alex Mooney said.

There will be one winner from each of the three congressional districts and they will receive a $100.00 Dick Blick art supplies gift card. A $50.00 Dick Blick art supplies gift card will be awarded to five second place winners. Congressman Evan Jenkins said, “The arts allow students to express themselves, develop their voices, and explore their creativity. This competition gives young artists from across West Virginia and the nation a chance to display their works for thousands of visitors to the U.S. Capitol. I encourage all of our students to share their creations and am honored to display the winner’s work in Washington.” On March 2, 2018, there will be an art workshop and awards ceremony for participants at the Culture Center in Charleston, WV.

“Each year of this competition we see some fantastic works of art produced by our students. The First District has a wealth of creative talent. I look forward to seeing this year’s winning piece on display in the Capitol each day as I am representing you in Washington,” said Congressman David McKinley.

Students may seek application material(s) and guidelines from their art teachers or principals. They may also contact the Office of Secretary of Education and the Arts for more information.

Local Artist with Sculptures in GSC’s RFK Library Passes Away at 89

A half-century ago, Glenville State College became the recipient of two sculptures from local artist Wolfgang Hubert Flor.

In 1966, Glenville State College’s newly completed library named a designated juvenile section after longtime librarian Alma J. Arbuckle. Obtained by faculty members, the room would include a piece by Flor. The carving, entitled ‘What Next,’ is still on display in the children’s room at the Robert F. Kidd Library.

The Free Press WV
Wolfgang Flor piece titled ‘What Next’ that is on display in the Alma J. Arbuckle children’s room in Glenville State College’s Robert F. Kidd Library


The following year, Flor was commissioned by the faculty and staff at GSC to design a sculpture to accent the library’s main floor. He spent time studying the area and meditating on what would be appropriate for the space. “He saw that a library could be a place where students meet the ancients and speak with them in silence. It was the base of the pyramid of learning and was a place utilized by students for individual studying and reflecting. He believed that people develop the capability to acquire wisdom on their own with the right amount of support, and the library enabled these independent learners to find their own path in life,” said GSC Archivist Jason Gum. These themes resonated with Flor, and he used them to create a piece of art that would exemplify the importance of education, the thirst for knowledge, and to symbolize the path towards enlightenment.

What ended up becoming his final design for the piece used the parable of the prodigal son in The Bible to represent the return of a beloved child to his aging father after he had left home to seek out wisdom on his own. The father embraces and comforts his child knowing that he could never have given his son the knowledge that he gained through his own personal experiences in the world. Flor also wanted the old man to characterize the wisdom that the child had begun to attain through his own personal journeys. The ‘Prodigal Son’ became the title of the carving that was accepted by then Library Director Dr. David Gillespie on October 17, 1968.

On Saturday, December 02, 2017, Mr. Flor passed away at the age of 89.

Flor was born in Naumburg, Silesia, Germany. When he was a teenager, he was forced from his homeland after World War II because allied forces had overtaken the area. While remaining in parts of Germany, doing many different jobs in the English and American sections, he eventually wound up in a whittler’s shop, a job that would spark his passion for artwork.

He made his way to America and traveled extensively throughout the country. In 1961, he made his home in Rock Cave, West Virginia and began creating sculptures on a 30-acre tract of land. He even set up a workshop/studio in a barn without many of the modern-day comforts that most enjoyed at the time.

The Free Press WV
Wolfgang Flor wood carving ‘Prodigal Son’ that is located on the main floor of GSC’s Robert F. Kidd Library


In addition to his pieces on display at Glenville State College, he also carved the college seal of West Virginia Wesleyan College as well as the 12 apostles and family tree which are displayed in Wesley Chapel on the WV Wesleyan campus. His piece, ‘Integration,’ is displayed at West Virginia University and he also has works at the West Virginia Culture and History Center in Charleston. These are in addition to pieces on display in numerous other places in West Virginia and across the country.

“Glenville State College is proud to have these unique pieces from Mr. Flor on display. We hope his legacy is able to carry on through his artwork,” Gum added.

Several GSC Artists Featured in Buckhannon Art Exhibit

Three Glenville State College Department of Fine Arts students and two alumni were recently featured in an exhibit titled ‘The Importance of Dreams.’

The Artist Collective of West Virginia, the Blaxxsmith Shop in Buckhannon, West Virginia, and Alien Gold collaborated to hold the art exhibition.

The Free Press WV
(L-R) Ezekiel Bonnett, Heather Coleman, Ryan Spangenberg, Sarah Normant,
Heather Chambers, Danielle Shepherd, and Christopher Cunningham at
‘The Importance of Dreams’ exhibit opening | Photo by Mike Normant


An opening reception took place on Friday, April 07 at the Blaxxsmith Shop.

GSC students Heather Chambers, Chris Cunningham, and Danielle Shepherd, GSC alumni Sarah Normant and Ezekiel Bonnett, and GSC Academic Support Center employee Heather Coleman all had work showcased in the exhibit.

In preparing for the show, the students learned more about being ‘gallery ready’ with their work in addition to networking, communication with clients, sales and commission, how to create business cards, how to sell their work and show professionally, and the communication process with gallery owners. Coleman said, “The students had a very enriching educational experience at this gallery.”

Each student had two pieces in the show including oil paintings, collage, ceramics, and glass sculpture. GSC Assistant Professor of Art Chris Cosner is a member of the Artist Collective.

The exhibition was on display Friday and Saturday nights from 4:00-10:00 p.m.

Crutchfield Selected for Barr Professional Development Award

Glenville State College Public Relations Specialist Dustin Crutchfield has been selected to receive the 2017 Pete and Betsy Barr Professional Development Award. The award is rotated annually between GSC faculty and staff and must be used within eighteen months of being awarded. The award is designed primarily for the recipient to further their professional growth, although the awardee can use the money to further their particular area of interest in lieu of traditional professional development activities. Crutchfield has used the funds to purchase assorted recording equipment in order to make online and social media video content.

The Free Press WV
GSC Public Relations Specialist Dustin Crutchfield with some of the equipment purchased with the Barr Professional Development Award


“Video has been and continues to be a popular format to share information online. Outside research has shown it to be an effective way to communicate with a variety of groups, especially younger audiences like potential students,” Crutchfield said. “My intent when applying for the award was to acquire some compact, easy-to-use equipment and software that would allow us to be a little more agile with our online content; something that would allow us to go from idea to output a bit more seamlessly, especially for brief messages.”

The addition of the equipment will mark the first time that the Marketing and Public Relations office will be generating their own video content. “I’m hoping that we can work to slowly begin integrating more video content into our everyday communications to both current and prospective students, alumni, the general public, and others,” he said. Crutchfield says he expects a learning curve and looks forward to working with some experts on campus to acquire new skills.

“I was pleased and surprised to learn that my proposal had been selected. The goal is to live up to the high standards set by the eight previous recipients in their professional development efforts to assist the campus. I extend my thanks to the Barrs’ for funding the award and to the numerous well-wishers who have congratulated me since hearing of the award decision,” said Crutchfield.

Crutchfield graduated from Glenville State College with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree with an emphasis in marketing in 2009. He is currently in the process of completing a master’s degree from the West Virginia University Reed College of Media. He is a Burnsville, West Virginia native.

Previous recipients of the Barr Award have included: GSC Assistant Professor of Biology Dr. Sara Sawyer (2010), Administrative Secretary for the GSC Athletic Department and Title IX Coordinator/Senior Women’s Administrator Amanda Frymier (2011), Associate Professor of Business Cheryl Fleming McKinney, CPA (2012), Registrar’s Office Certification Analyst Denise Ellyson (2013), Assistant Professor of Spanish Dr. Megan Gibbons (2014), GSC’s Sports Medicine Staff (2015), and Professor Dennis Wemm (2016).

The next Barr Award will be presented in January 2018 to a selected faculty applicant. A committee comprised of two faculty members and two staff representatives reviews all applications and selects the awardee.

For more information about the Pete and Betsy Barr Professional Development Award, contact Vice President for College Advancement and Executive Director of GSC Foundation and Chairman of the Pete and Betsy Barr Professional Development Award Selection Committee Denny Pounds at or 304.462.6381.

Bonnett to Hold Senior Art Show at GSC

Glenville State College senior studio art and graphics and digital media major Ezekiel Bonnett from Cox’s Mills, West Virginia is presenting his senior art show. The show, titled ‘Because Humans,’ will be on display until Friday, December 09. A reception will be held on Thursday, December 01 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public and refreshments will be provided.

The Free Press WV
“Shark Toaster” by Zeke Bonnett


Bonnett describes the pieces in his exhibit as simplistic and abstract. He says the focus on the ideas, emotions, and expression in his artwork is more than art for art’s sake. Most of his mediums are traditional, the majority being metalwork and mixed media. Exploration of duality and the human condition, often featured in his works, mostly express concerns about psychology and philosophy.

The GSC gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. and one hour before all Fine Arts Department musical performances.

For more information, call the Fine Arts Department at 304.462.6340.

WVDEP Accepting Photo Entries for Roadsides in Bloom Calendar

The Free Press WV

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) is accepting photo entries to appear in the 2017 edition of the Operation Wildflower “Roadsides in Bloom” calendar. The deadline to enter photos in the contest is October 01, 2016. The contest is a joint project of the WVDEP and West Virginia Department of Transportation (WVDOT).

There are several requirements that must be met for the entry to be accepted. 

        - Photographs must be taken in West Virginia. 

        - Entries must be submitted as 8"x10” color prints and must be landscape orientation (portrait orientation will not be accepted). Each entry must also include a digital copy on a CD, DVD or flash drive submitted with the color print. 

        - Flowers must be growing along a road and the road must be prominently visible in the photo. The flowers may be growing naturally or in an Operation Wildflower bed planted by the WVDOT’s Division of Highways staff. Pictures of cultivated species planted in arranged beds, such as marigolds, pansies, etc., do not qualify. 

        - Name, address, phone number and e-mail address (if applicable) of entrant and a short description of the photo, including location and county where photo was taken, must appear in the upper left hand corner on the back of the photo. Photos become property of the WVDEP and will not be returned. 

        - No more than three entries per person will be accepted. However, only one winning photo will be selected from any photographer’s entries. 
 
        - 12 winners will be selected to represent the months of the year. A grand prize winner will be chosen to appear on the calendar cover.

To see the 2016 Roadsides in Bloom calendar, click here: http://www.dep.wv.gov/dlr/reap/ow/Documents/Roadsides%20in%20Bloom%202016%20Calendar.pdf.

Entries for the 2017 calendar contest should be mailed to:

WV Operation Wildflower
Roadsides in Bloom Calendar Contest
West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection/REAP
601 57th Street, S.E.
Charleston, WV 25304

For more DEP news and information, go to www.dep.wv.gov. Also, be sure to connect with the agency on all social media platforms. Follow @DEPWV on Twitter and find us on YouTube by searching “Environment Matters.” For specific information about our REAP (Rehabilitation Environmental Action Plan), West Virginia Project WET (Water Education for Teachers), West Virginia Watershed Improvement Branch, Youth Environmental Program and Human Resources initiatives, connect on Facebook.

NEARLY $700,000 FOR COMMUNITY ART PROGRAMS ACROSS WEST VIRGINIA

The Free Press WV

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) announced a $697,600 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for West Virginia nonprofit and art organizations. The funding will be used to preserve the Mountain State’s cultural heritage and expand opportunities for residents to experience and participate in the arts.

“As West Virginians, we take pride in our rich, cultural heritage and this funding from the NEA will help preserve our unique history and traditions,” Senator Manchin said. “These resources will go towards exposing our kids to traditional music and the arts and give them the opportunity to be creative in different ways while expressing themselves.”

“West Virginia is rich with history and culture, and I believe it is important to keep our state’s creative spirit and proud traditions alive,” said Senator Capito. “This funding will support projects that encourage community engagement and educational opportunities for our students. I applaud the award recipients for their commitment to strengthening our communities through the arts.”

Established in 1965, NEA has funded programs that support arts education, sustains and celebrates our nation’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and promotes equal access to the arts in every community across America. For Fiscal Year 2016, NEA will make 1,148 awards totaling $82,357,050 to nonprofit art and design organizations in all 50 states plus five U.S. jurisdictions.

Individual awards and details are listed below:

    •  $667,600 – West Virginia Division of Culture and History: Funding will be awarded to the Commission on the Arts (WVCA) to support programs and events that promote creative expression and art appreciation for the benefit of West Virginia citizens and visitors.

    •  $20,000 –West Virginia Symphony Orchestra, Inc.: Funding will be used to support a statewide touring and community engagement project. The orchestra, under the leadership of Artistic Director and Conductor Grant Cooper, will introduce orchestral and chamber music to new audiences throughout West Virginia, as well as present educational programming in schools. Programming may include Young People’s Concerts and The Sounds of West Virginia, which will feature commissioned works by West Virginia composers like Charleston native Matthew Jackfert. Concerts and events will be presented in rural and small towns in West Virginia, such as Beckley, Elkins, Fairmont, Hinton, Lewisburg, Parkersburg, Summersville and Morgantown.

    •  $10,000 –Wheeling Symphony Society, Inc.: Funding will be used to support a regional performance tour with related educational outreach programs. The orchestra, under the direction of Music Director Andre Raphel, will present a Young People’s Concert program in venues across West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio. In collaboration with guest artist ensemble Classical Kids Live!, programming will feature an innovative program, such as “Beethoven Lives Upstairs,“ that engages listeners to explore music through dramatic artistry. The project will include teacher workshops and pre-concert instruction for elementary school children.

West Virginia Spotlights Student Talent in Annual Arts Alive Celebration

The Free Press WV

CHARLESTON, WV – The West Virginia Department of Education’s (WVDE) tenth annual Arts Alive celebration is Friday, April 22 at the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences in Charleston. This distinctive arts event showcases outstanding arts education programs and student achievements from across the state including works in dance, theatre, music and visual art.

Arts Alive aims to support developing and establishing arts programs in public schools throughout West Virginia, to inspire local education systems to embrace the arts as an essential part of every child’s education, and to empower the broader learning community to be advocates for comprehensive arts education in public schools.

The tenth year of Arts Alive brings with it the continuation of free master classes provided to students on the day of the event. The young artists featured in Arts Alive will have the opportunity to take classes with West Virginia arts professionals, who are donating their time and expertise to advance the educational mission and focus of Arts Alive.

“This year, we are exhibiting more students and providing opportunities for students to work with master arts professionals in continuing to promote the arts and expand interdisciplinary partnerships throughout the state,” said WVDE Arts Alive Coordinator Dr. Raymond Lowther. “It is inspiring that we are still choosing to focus on and showcase the work of students in these areas.”

The Art Exhibit will open at 6:00 p.m. The program begins at 6:45 p.m. and main stage performance at 7:00 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public but assigned seating is required. For tickets, call the Clay Center Box Office at 304.561.3570.

Murphy to Hold Senior Art Show at GSC

GLENVILLE, WV - Glenville State College senior studio art major Quentin Murphy from Grantsville, West Virginia is getting ready for his senior art show.

The show, titled ‘Larger Than Life,’ will be on display until Friday, May 7th. His exhibit features original photography, drawings, and paintings.

The exhibition will begin with an opening reception on Monday, April 04 from 6:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m.

The reception is free and open to the public and refreshments will be provided.

The Free Press WV


“Art is life; it begins with the creative process of finding yourself. At that moment, thatis when you realize your potential of making your life and everyone’s life around youone worth living. That defines art. It becomes Larger Than Life,” said Murphy.

The GSC gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. and one hour before all Fine Arts Department musical performances.

For more information contact Associate Professor of Art John Selburg at or call 304.462.6346.

G-Eye™: Gilmer County CEOS Holiday House

Gilmer County CEOS Holiday House on December 04, 2015

The Free Press WV

 

 

 

FIRST LADY TOMBLIN INTRODUCES 2015 GOVERNOR’S MANSION HOLIDAY ORNAMENT

Ornament features gingerbread man and holiday candies

CHARLESTON, WV - First Lady Joanne Jaeger Tomblin today unveiled the 2015 West Virginia Governor’s Mansion limited-edition holiday ornament, the sixth in the series of her annual holiday ornament collection. Keeping with West Virginia tradition, the 2015 holiday ornament was painted by Logan native and Alum Creek resident artist Shelley Goodman, and features a jolly gingerbread man and sparkling holiday candies.

The Free Press WV
First Lady Tomblin and artist Shelley Goodman show off
the 2015 Governor’s Mansion holiday ornament.


“It is always a wonderful experience collaborating with Shelley and the Division of Culture and History to choose what will be featured each year,“ First Lady Joanne Jaeger Tomblin said.  “No confection symbolizes the holidays quite like gingerbread, and Shelley’s detailed painting style really brings it to life.  We are honored that she continues to share her talent with us and the citizens of the Mountain State.“

Goodman uses enamel paints to create detailed nature and floral paintings. Although her artistic touch is most often found in kitchenware, she enjoys the challenge of designing the Governor’s Mansion holiday ornaments each year.

Her works, titled “Designs by Shelley,“ are sold at Tamarack in Beckley and at a number of West Virginia’s fairs and festivals across the state.  Goodman also designed the 2010 Governor’s Mansion holiday ornament featuring the Cardinal, the 2011 ornament featuring the Rhododendron, the 2012 ornament featuring the Black Bear and Honey Bee, the 2013 ornament featuring Sugar Maple leaves and Monarch butterfly and last year’s ornament featuring white Poinsettia leaves and Holly berries. Goodman also designed the official West Virginia Sesquicentennial ornament.

The Free Press WV
The 2015 limited-edition Governor’s Mansion holiday ornament features
a gingerbread man, peppermint lollipop and gumdrop candies.


Funding support for the 2015 Governor’s Mansion ornament was partially provided by a grant from The Tamarack Foundation. In addition, Dunbar artist Steve Cassle’s drawing of the Governor’s Mansion is featured on the ornament card.

This year’s ornament is available for purchase at the West Virginia State Museum Shop at the Culture Center in Charleston, at Tamarack in Beckley, or online at http://www.tamarackwv.com for $24. A portion of each sale will be donated to the West Virginia Governor’s Mansion Preservation Fund to help preserve the mansion for future generations to enjoy.

G-LtE™: Mountain State Art & Craft Fair

The Free Press WV

Friends,

      As artists, crafts people, business people, and taxpayers, I believe you will be SIGNIFICANTLY CONCERNED about this.  I have recently learned that the Mountain State Art & Craft Fair Board of Directors will be VOTING OCTOBER 21, 2015 to END the tradition of the Mountain State Art & Craft Fair in July.

      Many of us have a vested interest in the success of the MSACF and realize that it has suffered from declining attendance and budgetary woes.  There are many contributing factors to this decline of “The Fair”.  None of us can deny that the marketing of art & craft work has changed in recent years and we recognize that some changes have to be made to make “The Fair” profitable again.  Rather than make some changes to revitalize the 51 year tradition of “The Fair”, a decision has been made to discard everything and ‘start a new festival in September’ with a new name.

      I do not want to implicate or accuse any one of any wrong-doing.  I only seek to share concerns and information so that YOU CAN TAKE ACTION based on YOUR OPINIONS.  Some areas of concern for me:


•  The MSACF receives a notable amount of TAXPAYER funding through support/sponsorship of various WV State agencies.  The money from those agencies is for the MSACF, and I would suggest that it is NOT LEGAL to simply redirect those funds without action from each of those agencies and possibly from the WV Legislature.

•  The president and a small number of the board of directors have made these plans in NON-PUBLIC meetings and presented their plan to the full board of directors indicating “this is what we’ll vote on next meeting” and “let us know if you have a problem with this”.  I maintain that ALL decisions for “The Fair” should be discussed, debated and decided in an OPEN, PUBLIC FORUM….no back room meetings and behind the scenes schemes

•  There is a required PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD for people to voice concerns and offer alternate solutions.  However, this time line is being fast-tracked to avoid controversy of what will, undoubtedly, be a controversial issue.

•  The dates for the 2016 MSACF have already been published and promoted.  People will show up for an event that will not be occurring….those folks may have spent their entire vacation budget to “come home” to WV for a long-standing tradition.

•  ARTS and CRAFTS will be a small portion of the focus of the new September festival, with focus on ethnic “Villages” , antiques, craft beer tasting, wine tasting and a Mini-Epcot Center.  ART will be a ‘side-line’.

•  One of the main missions of the WV Art & Craft Guild has been to promote & support the MSACF, yet the WVACG has been virtually shut out from any discussions about the future of “The Fair”.

•  Emphasis on High Quality ART & CRAFT work has been discarded


      Overall, it seems to me that the tradition of ART & CRAFT in WV is being tossed aside and the funds which are intended by our citizens to be used to support and promote the ARTS & CRAFTS for our future generations are being used in a way which concerns me.

      IF THE FUTURE OF the Mountain State Art & Craft Fair is important to you, PLEASE contact the commissioner or directors of those sponsoring agencies, and contact Governor Tomblin, and remember….THE MEETING IS AN OPEN, PUBLIC MEETING.  10:00 A.M.  October 21, 2015 at Cedar Lakes Conference Center, Ripley, WV

Sponsoring agencies’ directors are listed at the following website:

http://msacf.com/contact/

Respectfully,
Kenneth D. Westfall, Treasurer
West Virginia Art & Craft Guild

Opening Reception for Ceramics Exhibit is October 15 at GSC - Today

GLENVILLE, WV - The community is invited to attend an Opening Reception for ‘Magic Tricks’ the Ceramics Exhibit by Jacob Grant and Jacob Miller on Thursday, October 15, 2015 from 3:00-6:00 p.m. in the Glenville State College Fine Arts Center Gallery.

The Gilmer Free Press
Jacob Grant and Jacob Miller will bring their ceramics show ‘Magic Tricks’ to Glenville State College;
an opening reception is planned for Thursday, October 15


Grant has an MFA in Ceramics from Bradley University in Peoria, IL and he owns Wheel Art Pottery Studio in Peoria. Miller has his BFA from Alfred University in Ceramics.

If you miss the opening reception, don’t worry. The show will be on display until Friday, November 20 and the gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. and one hour before all Fine Arts Department musical performances.

For more information call 304.462.6340.

GSC Graduate to Display Artwork during Homecoming Week

The Gilmer Free Press

GLENVILLE, WV - Glenville State College alumnus Joseph Pettit will be presenting several of his oil paintings in front of the Robert F. Kidd Library on Friday, September 25 from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. as part of this year’s Homecoming Week festivities.

Before graduating from GSC in 1976, Pettit spent two years in the United States Army. He then taught school for 10 years, worked 25 years in the saw mill industry, and is now retired. He is a native of Braxton County, West Virginia and resides in Sutton.

Again this year, he is providing one original painting for a drawing. Everyone is welcome to stop by the library, view the paintings, and enter their name in the drawing which will be held at 3:45 p.m.

In the event of adverse weather, his artwork will be on display inside the RFK Library on first floor.

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Readers' Recent Comments

Excellent meeting minutes I wish we could see more local news like this..  Where can I find information on the recent lawsuit between the Gilmer County Commission and Prosecutor Hough?  I understand Judge Alsop issued a decision?

By Reader on 07.14.2018

From the entry: 'GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES'.

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Praises go to Governor Justice, Dr. Paine, and the entire State Board for producing this outstanding report.

For the first time in memory comprehensive information is included in one source for the public and it is written in an understandable
style.

A request is made to the Gilmer County Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther to produce a similar report by this fall for the specific status of our school system.

We could celebrate achievements for which we excel and we could profit from our weak points as opportunities for corrective measures to take.

Forget about what other counties are doing—we are competing against ourselves.

The often cited excuse that we are just as good as other counties with WV ranking near bottom should no longer be tolerated.

By fall results of recent SAT testing would be available to Superintendent Lowther and the County Board to include in the report.

One advantage of the suggested County report and ones in successive years would be a basis for the public to use to judge effectiveness of Gilmer’s Board of Education and Superintendent Lowther.

The GFP is applauded for its role in being a leader in WV for making education news accessible on the Internet.

By Frank Wiseman on 07.14.2018

From the entry: 'State Superintendent of Schools Delivers the State of Education'.

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Dr. Pellett, you attacked accuracy of the NCHEMS report in your Gazette article today.

It would be informative for you to give an Internet link to the report to permit it to be read and for you to publish a detailed critique of errors in it with backup evidence as proof.

By GSC EMPLOYEE on 07.13.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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A basic truism for a highly successful start up business is to offer a new top quality product in high demand at a price consumers can afford.

Why do Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors reject the concept? Specifically, as printed in the Democrat there is a proposal to establish a premiere five year teacher education program at the College with grads to receive a masters degree in teaching. A program of that type is desperately needed in WV and it is not offered elsewhere.

Word circulating is that Dr. Pellet, the Board of Governors, and dominant members of the County’s elite have summarily rejected the idea.

One excuse heard is that local power brokers do not want WVU involved with the College. Yet, in the Democrat Dr. Pellett is quoted saying that he is working on a new nursing program with WVU’s involvement.

Is the true reason of veto of the innovative teacher education program because Dr. Pellet and the Board of Governors were not originators of the idea to automatically cause its rejection?

Dr. Pellett is invited to explain to the public and concerned alumni why the program would not be in GSC’s long term best interests.

By Why Dr. Pellet and GSC BOG? on 07.13.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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The Glenville mayor is doing an excellent job and the town is lucky to have him on the job. Getting old houses torn down was a kept promise and the town looks much better at those places. Let’s have more of it.

By Citizen on 07.11.2018

From the entry: 'GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES'.

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Why is it that when tax dollars were spent on the higher education reorganization study by the Colorado NCHEMS group it is being keep secret from the public? Mr. Boggs how about helping out by informing voters how to get a copy of the report to read and decide for themselves?

By Voters Watching on 07.10.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Oops! Bay of Pigs not Figs. Shows that college profs are not immune to embarrassing gaffs.

By WVU Prof. on 07.09.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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There are two examples in Janis’ book regarding the Kennedy presidency. The first one deals with the group think Bay Of Figs disaster.

Those in Washington associated with invasion decisions considered themselves to be infallible world class thinkers. That mistake prevented critical and constructive review from anyone outside that tight group of political operatives.

The other example covers the Cuban Missile Crisis as an example of masterful diplomacy and planning to prevent a nuclear holocaust. President Kennedy deserved credit because he avoided group think traps from Bay Of Pigs lessons learned.

Higher education decisions in WV are made by individual tight knit Boards of Governors with excessive autonomy and no meaningful oversight.

Also, board members are there through political appointments at local levels. Governors traditionally rubber stamp the recommended appointments.

When serious group think mistakes occur at colleges and universities Boards are conditioned to assume that State bail outs will cover damages.

If private businesses are group think practitioners they never last unless they change strategies to avoid brutal market place penalties.

By WVU Political Scientist on 07.08.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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“Governance Changes Needed at GSC” is 100% correct.

Basically GSC Board of Governors and other leadership positions, have been a result of nepotism and crony friend choices.

Those two ‘tools’ rarely, if ever, give the best persons available to whatever the position requires.

Incest often produces less than desired outcomes as well.

By PAST Time for change @ GSC on 07.08.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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Advice for GSC’s president is to read Janis’book entitled Victims of Group Think.

The theme for the book is that alike thinkers of a group of elites in control can have colossal failures because they believe that their decision-making processes are unworthy of outside scrutiny.

Think about it. Did the airport to accommodate jet traffic at the mouth of Cedar Creek work out and did the federal prison result in economic prosperity with a hefty upsurge with GSC’s
enrollment?

What about the millions of dollars of new construction at GSC? Did it result in healthy enrollments as promised.

Some elites associated with GSC were strong advocates for the ill fated ventures.

GSC has been controlled too long by members of the same families. With the undeniable track record of declining conditions a few resignations would be a positive step.

The nagging governance problem affecting GSC has been shielding elite individuals from personal accountability without penalties for bad decisions.

By Governance Changes Needed At GSC on 07.06.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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Bigger is better? Rarely.

Everyone knows that school consolidation has resulted in failed outcomes.

This is laying the ground work, for an ego driven power grab.  The big institutions have no limit to their desire for money.

Stay small, and if failure occurs, fewer people are impacted.  Too large, and management of that soon turns into a problem.

By Its just planned failure. on 07.05.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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This information including details in the referenced full Report helps put GSC’s precarious standing in perspective. More information can be accessed at http://www.collegesimply.com.

That web site provides SAT student information for WV institutions of higher learning and GSC has the lowest scores.

Inferences from the scores and material in the report are that because GSC gets a large percentage of students from poor counties including Gilmer County, school systems there need improving.

Also, with employers becoming more sophisticated in hiring the best qualified graduates they access information of the type published on the web site given above.

The reason is that institutions with the best prepared students have more rigorous academic programs and they do not have to expend valuable time on remediation.

Provision of this comment is not intended to be a slam at GSC. The purpose is to encourage Dr. Pellett and the Board of Governors to devise a viable strategy for making the College a center of excellence to improve its standing in WV. It is that simple for guaranteed survival in the future.

By GSC GRAD on 07.05.2018

From the entry: 'Report recommends merging Bluefield, Concord, Glenville, WVSU boards'.

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We must be wary of how County K-12 achievement information is presented.

From the outset the new school board should focus on exactly how well our students are performing with mastering subjects, and not to fall victim to news unrelated to demonstrated student learning.

For one example the GCHS was awarded for its high graduation rate, but it ranked in the bottom 10% among WV high schools for college and career readiness of seniors.

This is not to say that graduation rates are unimportant, but they cannot be interpreted as fact of a direct relationship with how well students are prepared for college and careers.

For some schools an unusually high graduation rate could be a function of enforced “everyone passes” policy.

The point is that there is need for vigilance when student performance information is disclosed to the public so school board get all of it out so voters can decide where the County’s school system really stands.

By Give All Facts on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

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Word is that officers on the County’s school board have changed with Doug Cottrill becoming the new president and Shackleford the VP.

Voters request to know what the new board’s plans are for improving the County’s standing with the quality of K-12 education for math, reading, science, and other subjects, and correcting remaining problems at the new grade school contractors have not fixed.

Why not publishing monthly progress reports to cover the new board’s accomplishments? That job would be a good assignment for the new president.

By Voters Watching on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

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There is no mention of the facts Jumpin Jim defaulted on a 9 million dollar loan, poor record of paying taxes, nor the mess of the RISE flood funds handling. 

No wonder the poor score.  Anyone think it was ‘earned’?

By Jumpin Jim Nose Dives on 07.03.2018

From the entry: 'Low favorable marks for Manchin, Morrisey, Justice in latest PPP poll'.

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This news has great implications for GSC and Gilmer County. The College could form a partnership with the County’s school system to close the K-12 achievement gap.

For years while under State intervention it was denied that a gap existed, and the mantra was that the County was doing as well as the State as a whole.

That was like saying that we are OK with the State being ranked near the bottom for the quality of its K-12 education system and we should be content to wallow at the bottom too.

Ms. Patty Lowther, the new superintendent of schools, states that we must close the K-12 achievement gap and it is within the County’s capabilities.

She and her staff including Shelly Mason the new curriculum expert, principals, and the County’s teachers are actively involved with devising solutions to eliminate problems.

Regarding GSC, Dr. Pellett is on record with definite innovations to improve the College’s standing.

He has an unique opportunity to guide the College to contribute to Gilmer County having the best school system in WV as a model to emulate throughout the State and Appalachia.

In the past the typical Charleston trap has been to collect achievement data without expending successful efforts to interpret its meaning for use in solving under-achievement.

Dr. Pellett, Ms. Lowther, and Shelly Mason, with the help of other professionals in our schools can jettison that long standing road block to make Gilmer County a K-12 education standout.

Dr. Pellett in particular has an unparalleled opportunity to make his mark on guiding the College to improve K-12 education in the County and to let successes spread as examples throughout Appalachia.

There would not be a better way to justify the necessity of the College’s continuing existence for Gilmer County, central WV, and the entire State.

By Good News For WV on 06.29.2018

From the entry: 'Governor Justice Announces Blue Ribbon Commission on Four-Year Higher Education'.

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If you can’t trust judges to do the right thing…. is there any reason to trust our whole system of government?  One has to wonder.

Now we are reading a judge likely to be impeached as well as the legislature is considering impeaching the governor?

Are the any honest people running for offices?

By crooks everywhere? on 06.27.2018

From the entry: 'Auditors Seek Answers on State Supreme Court Spending'.

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This does not rise to the level of impeachment. “Slick Willy” got a head job in the peoples oval office, and dripped semen on the peoples carpet then lied about it, and according to the democrats back then, that did not rise to the level of impeachment.

By The Silent Majority on 06.21.2018

From the entry: 'Senate and House Democratic Leaders Renew Call for Immediate Legislative Action on Justice Loughry'.

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Something happening is good.
That building has been empty far too long.

Now we shall see if it workable.
Hope for all involved, that their efforts work out for GC and GSC.

By Good on 06.21.2018

From the entry: 'GSC Bluegrass Music Education Center to hold Ribbon Cutting Ceremony'.

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Numbers of new businesses is not the important factor. It is how many new jobs were created for local employees. Politicians like to cite meaningless numbers to crow about and they get by with it too often. Empty store fronts on Main Street have not diminished in numbers. Where are the jobs and what do they pay?

By New Jobs? on 06.20.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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Similar to EDA if Gilmer’s SAT results were rosy the news would be out in banner headlines. Elites see to it to keep peasants at bay.

By SAT Checker on 06.19.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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Straddlin Joe had a chance to embrace conservatism and convert to Republican, as Governor Justice and much of the state has done. Politics in the state are no longer ruled by mine union bosses. It’s time we send him back to Marion County, as we did with Natalie Tennant.

By The Silent Majority on 06.18.2018

From the entry: 'Joe Manchin: Political games would cost West Virginians with pre-existing conditions'.

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If the so called business creation were true?
Wouldn’t the EDA be having all sorts of news releases?
You would think so.

EDA used to have monthly public meetings.
Now only four times a year?

Business things that slim nothing to discuss?
Or maybe secret meetings by the insiders?

By Gilmer EDA...private club ? on 06.15.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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If we can ask Jeff Campbell questions as a Gilmer County official why can’t we get timely information from other officials too?

For an example how did the County do with recent SAT testing?

Superintendents have the information so when is it going to be made public?

Hopefully the newly elected school board will take it on as a priority to get accurate student achievement information to the public with specific plans to make improvements where needed.

By End Public Information Embargo on 06.13.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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If true, this would be great news!

The Gilmer County Economic Development Association should be telling us in press releases who/what/where those new businesses are?

How about it GCEDA President Jeff Campbell?

Lets hear from you.

By reader6 on 06.11.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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Interesting chart.

But….it shows 4 new businesses in Gilmer…..in each of the past 3 months.
That…..is TWELVE new businesses!

BUT, BUT, where are they?

By Where are they? on 06.08.2018

From the entry: '866 New Businesses in West Virginia for May 2018'.

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You will find most ticks down low on grass blades along well traveled trails, where the unfed adults and even larvae and eggs are brushed off by a passing varmint. Another myth is that ticks will jump on you, of the thousands of ticks I have picked off grass blades and dropped in a cup of gasoline, I have never had one jump at me.

By Trespasser Will on 06.08.2018

From the entry: 'Insect-related illnesses are trending up'.

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Ticks don’t go, they are carried there by host animals. They are best controlled by controlling the host varmints in your back yard. As bad as Lyme disease is, from personal experience, believe me you don’t want Rocky Mountain spotted fever either.

By Trespasser Will on 06.07.2018

From the entry: 'Insect-related illnesses are trending up'.

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NEWS FLASH !
Rural West Virginia is STILL WAITING for that high speed internet that these two have been promising for 20 years!

By Rural WV still waiting.... on 06.06.2018

From the entry: 'U.S. Senators Manchin, Capito announce funding for rural communities'.

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Dilapidated buildings seem to make the news on a regular basis.

Dilapidated buildings are nothing more than an great indicator of a ‘dilapidated’ economy.

By WV's dilapidated economy on 06.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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I don’t know how the state can say that, male bears have been known to attack for unknown reasons, and of course females will attack if they perceive their cub is in danger. The best thing to do is shut the #### up and don’t be posting on Facebook what you have done.

By Tresspasser Will on 06.03.2018

From the entry: 'West Virginia man accused of wrongfully shooting bear'.

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Steve and John,
My deepest heartfelt sympathy to you at this most difficult time.
I will miss your mother, my best friend, immensely! We laughed hard together and we cried together, only as two close cousins could do! We spent many hours on the phone chatting either catching up or talking about cooking, any hour day or night,it never mattered to us.

Our words to each other every time we spoke, “I love you sweet cousin of mine”

God’s Speed until we meet again!💞💓
Rest In Peace for eternity💓

Love you dearly,

Cousin, Jo Ann xoxoxo

By Jo Ann Emrick on 06.01.2018

From the entry: 'Catherine Ann Umanetz'.

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The loss of money at Cedar Creek was only part of it. Money spent on Leading Creek, more money to fill the huge hole at GCES, money to fix land slide at GCES because of poor site design work, money spent to fix various other botches that should have been done right to begin with, uncalled for huge pay raises to select central office staff to buy them off, money for playground equipment when existing equipment could have been used, money for an unneeded payroll clerk at the central office, money for a principal at Troy when the individual did not do the work, and more to include building GCES too small and Leading Creek too large with public funds. Will anything be done about it? Of course not except to continue the cover-up. Money trail too hot to handle.

By Etched Memory on 05.31.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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Many kudos to both the PACF people as well as their supporters!

Hard to believe how much good they are doing for so many, in just a few short years!

Keep up the good works!

By many kudos ! on 05.31.2018

From the entry: 'Grants Support Area Charities (Little Kanawha Area)'.

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Minney was just another ‘enabler’ for the blatant, bold faced, incompetent, corruption during the West Virginia State Board of Education overthrow of the Gilmer County School System.

Thousands of dollars wasted.  Do not forget the Cedar Creek property chosen by State Appointed Superintendent Blankenship in coercion with the former, ousted, GSC President Simmons.  The money spent clearing forest, the money spent bulldozing a road, until it finally became clear, they were on a ‘fools errand’.

Then to get out of that mess, Blankenship and Simmons,  trade that property, so a school could be built in a flood plain?

‘Education’ and common sense do not always go hand in hand.

If only people were as smart as they think they are.

By Another black eye for state intervention ! on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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All this Minney stuff brings up at least 2 questions:

WHY did state appointed super Devano hire Minney?

Why did the Doddridge folks hire Minney when he doesn’t have the required financial ‘credentials’ to be a district treasurer?

Either poor hiring practices or someone pulling strings.

By questions but no answers ? on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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And to think that OUR own little Gilmer County Library ranks in the top ten of libraries in the whole state!

By WOW--WOW--WOW ! ! ! on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'West Virginia Libraries Rock Out with Summer Reading Programs'.

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Didn’t Mr. Minney approve paying select employees on payroll, for the days they did not work without board or superintendent’s knowledge or approval? Fortunately, he got caught by the board.

By Ridiculous on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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If you follow the money, you can easily see where all the money went in construction of Gilmer Elementary, why the school has so many physical issues and why there have been problems to get them fixed. Thanks the board for choosing a different auditor.

By FTM on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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There were a lot of corruptions under state control and superintendent Devano. They mismanaged funds and paid off several employees to keep their mouth shut. When the local controlled board chose a different auditor from the norm, they got caught. I think the remaining paid off employees need to talk the facts, quit, or get prosecuted.

By They were bad on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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That was far from the first time Mr. DM had gotten into trouble with the auditors. In previous years, findings for mismanagement of funds were issued against him in connection with other work places leading to dismissal.
The audit which is available on state DOE site couldn’t find any justification of board approval for payments, and mismanagement of funds.

By Don LK on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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He got caught of mismanagement of public funds.

By Jeremy D on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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I hear Gilmer schools treasurer Dan Minney is leaving. Why?

By Just Curious on 05.30.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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Good to see this program return after having it gone missing under the state appointed superintendent.

It was reported there was no place for it to take place.

Thank you Gilmer County Board of Education for making it happen.

By Some remember on 05.21.2018

From the entry: 'FREE breakfast and lunch this summer for Gilmer County Kids'.

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Pam,
Sorry to read of your mom’s passing. I remember may times spent in your home with your parents and brothers. Sending love and prayers to you and your brothers.
Sherry Broggi

By Sherry Straley Broggi and Rita Straley on 05.17.2018

From the entry: 'Lora Faye Tomblin'.

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Really cool project to all who volunteered and those helping financially as well!

Where’s DR? He never misses these events?

By Very nice project - great volunteers! on 05.17.2018

From the entry: 'CommunityImprovement™: Pavilion'.

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The GSC retention post must relate to those beginning in 2014 who planned for 4 year degrees and they dropped out. There probably were students who began in 2014 and they earned 2 year degrees before 2018 so they were not drop outs.

By GSC RETENTION? on 05.15.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Congratulations kids!  Setting up a scholarship fund is a GREAT idea! Where can we get information on who to contact and what local needs are?

By Reader on 05.14.2018

From the entry: 'Calhoun-Gilmer Career Center Celebrates Seniors'.

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How large was GSC’s graduating class of 2018 last week and what was its original size the fall of 2014?

Accurate information should be available to indicate retention. One news source reported that 100 graduated in the class of 2018.

By Alumni on 05.13.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Some interesting results.  Should shake the trees a little.

By Spring cleaning! on 05.09.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Local Election Results - May 2018'.

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So sorry for your loss.  Prayers.

By Betty Woofter on 05.07.2018

From the entry: 'Ina Mae (Foster) Clem'.

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Anyone interested in facts for graduation rates after four years of college can access information on WV’s Education Policy Commission web site.

The last time information was reported WV State was listed at 13.6% compared to WVU’s at 35.9%. GSC was at 25.1%.

Comments submitted so far flag a serious problem in WV. Student achievement information is scattered all over with it being reported by the State, the federal government, and testing organizations including ACT.

Because WV lacks an effective State clearing house to sort through the information and to interpret it for practical application in improving our pubic school systems, too much important quality control material is neglected.

When citizens take initiative to obtain the information and they cite it they are often berated to be a form of “attack the messenger”.

Then too there are the perennial apologists who say that everything is “just fine” to help confuse the issue even more to detract from school improvements.

By WVDE Career Employees on 05.06.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Too often students have to go an extra year or longer to graduate from college with under graduate degrees because they were not prepared when they got there to enable them to complete on time.

The 35% graduation rate includes incoming freshmen who do not finish in four years, and it is factual that some of our public colleges have worse records than others.

WVU does above average, but it has large numbers of-out-of state better prepared students.

By R. Page on 05.06.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Rex Page claims we have a college graduation rate of approximately 35%.

In essence that is a FAILURE rate of 65% !

Think of how many dollars are wasted, and how many students are burdened with student loans, that basically will do them little good in life.

Oh yes.  It does pump money into the flawed system.

By Wv Has a FLAWED educational system ! on 05.05.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Even with enrolling in colleges where acceptance is noncompetitive, meaning that all applicants with at least C averages are accepted, the graduation rate to get a degree is around 35%.

This fact is more evidence for WV’s failed public education system and solid proof that a major top to bottom over haul is needed.

If we accept the often cited excuse that there is a problem with kids and their families to cause under achievement in school that line of reasoning suggests that West Virginians are inherently flawed. This is untrue and the problem lies with WV’s under performing education system.

By Rex Page on 05.03.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Disgraceful that WV lacks a top quality education system to prepare more high school graduates to be eligible for acceptance into the best colleges where there is competition for acceptance.

The deficiency forces students to attend lower tier places where everyone is accepted.

Why does WV fail to make improvements? It is because education delivery in our State is designed to be void of meaningful accountability for administrators.

By WVDE Watcher on 05.03.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Little doubt the block schedule system at the high school gives GC lower scores.

This has been proven over and over in other school systems.

Its an out dated and antiquated system.  Our board of education needs to get rid of it.

Gilmer County Board of Education….are you up to the job?

By Block Schedule Supported By Blockheads on 05.02.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Hopefully this is the beginning of doing better with getting out school news to Gilmer. It is far better to read timely news than to have to go to the Cornerstone to get it.

We wish Mr. Shuff the best in improving learning results at the HS. If he tackles problems like he engaged in athletics the HS will be put on the map for academic excellence.

When he gets his school improvement plan together everyone in the County will pitch in to help him succeed. Thank you GCBOE.

By Pleased Parents on 05.02.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education News'.

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Mr. Williams has it nailed down.  Solid.

America’s entire education system is a farce.
Education administrators worry about their job than worry about the children.

Youth is our future.
By creating dummies, do not expect much of a future.

The children are being short changed, robbed.
America is being short changed, robbed.

But the failed administrators keep their jobs.

By Time To Clean the Education House! on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Is this article some sort of a joke ?
Certainly would seem so!

We are almost daily bombarded with chemical spraying from above.
We rarely actually have that clear, deep blue sky that God gave us.

If it happens we do get a clear(?) day, we will have the light blue, almost whispy white cloud sky.

Set a white bowl out in the rains.  Check to see what color the water is after a rain.  You will be
surprised.  Color will vary depending what is being sprayed on a given day.

If it were winter, I’d tell you to look at the snowflakes.  No more are all snowflakes different.  Watch what falls on your clothing, you will see 1,000’s of flakes all the same shape.  Again, depends what toxic material we are being blasted with.

Asthma attacks, ER visits are on the rise.
Do some web searching, plenty of websites report this travesty.  You tax dollars at ‘work’.

By WHERE ARE THE ENVIRONMENTALISTS ? ? on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Air Quality Awareness Week is April 30 – May 04'.

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Fraud is not only rampant in education, it consumes Gilmer County..  Those who Have want to keep it any and all costs, and those that don’t, want.  Gilmer needs a good house cleaning of court and legal ‘authorities’ as well if anything is Ever going to change.

By Spring cleaning! on 05.01.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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Fraud is committed in Gilmer County when citizens are told that our high school grads are prepared to be highly competitive for entry into the modern world.

The misinformation conflicts with verification that our grads lag when it comes to being college and career ready.

By being disadvantaged academically too many students drop out of college when they cannot compete and they often must go an extra year at a greater expense to catch-up.

There is another type of fraud not pointed out in the posting. It relates to bragging about the “fine” ACT test scores made by students at the GCHS.

For the ACT the average GCHS score as touted by school officials is close to 20. This may be slightly higher than average State scores, but here is the rub.

Our kids could not get accepted into top quality colleges and universities with stringent academic requirements to include those for ACT scores higher than most made at the GCHS.

What do they do? They attend institutions with relaxed acceptance criteria with some not having any basic requirements for ACT or SAT scores.

As a parent with a son at the Career Center I know that there must be remedial instruction in math and English for success in chosen career fields. It is called embedded instruction.

Because teachers must be hired at the Center for the catch-up it means that tax payers are paying twice (more fraud) for instruction that should have been done at the GCHS!

What can we do? Gilmer County must determine what must be done in our schools to make necessary improvements for the better to enable our kids to be the best they can be after HS. Simple isn’t it?

By We Want Better Schools on 04.30.2018

From the entry: 'Education system perpetuates fraud at every level'.

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It is easy to see through the motive for avoiding application of the same assessment approach in all of WV’s school systems.

The powerful in control do not want to make achievement results available for voters to compare academic results among districts!

That way opportunities for more accountability in ways school systems are administered will be nipped in the bud.

Interesting isn’t it that for sports minute attention is paid to comparing performances of all kinds of teams throughout WV.

Unfortunately the strategy will be to keep voters keenly focused on sports so they will not ask questions about education spending and how children are doing in mastering subjects in our school systems.

By WVDOE Disgusted on 04.20.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: State might let counties switch standardized test from SAT to ACT'.

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The West Virginia State Board of Education has operated as a “pin the tail on the donkey” bureaucratic nightmare for over a generation.

Currently, it is hard to envision any positive change in their SOP?

Try this, try that.  Change this, change that.
Continual evidence that all is being run as an experiment?
The WVBOE has no real clue what to actually do, in order to fix anything.

Money wasted. Children cheated of a good education.
Parents and taxpayers cheated.  Opportunities missed.

This is the WVBOE legacy.

By State BOE - dysfunctional is an understatement? on 04.16.2018

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: State might let counties switch standardized test from SAT to ACT'.

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Maybe Jimmy can pay some of his tax bills now?

By Justice, pay your tax bills! on 04.15.2018

From the entry: 'City to purchase club owned by the governor’s company'.

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Reread the article and see what a wonderful set of excuses have been set forward.

Taxpayers give the state the funds for education.  It is then properly squandered leaving students with substandard educations.

These people have the audacity to blame the teachers on top of it.

State BOE, suck it up, fix the problem you and your previous board members have created. 

Make President Truman’s desk saying your motto:  “The buck stops here.“

That is, if you are up to it.

By Kanawha Reader on 04.15.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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West Virginia made national news again with its spending per student to be in the top third among the 55 states.

We spend more than $11,000 on average per pupil in our public schools. For comparison Utah spends about $6,500 per pupil and it ranks in the top third for the quality of its education system.

It would be interesting to know how much Gilmer County spends per pupil counting total funding from all sources.

WV is certainly no way near the top third with getting students college, career, and jobs ready right out of high school. Where is all our money going? What could we learn from rural states similar to Utah?

The worst culprit seems to be too many high paid people on WV payrolls who are non-contributers to making better lives for our kids.

By Economist on 04.14.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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Those of us who keep close tabs on student achievement want to know reasons for unacceptable reading, science, and math scores in Gilmer County and what is being done to correct them. For something this important the problems and solutions surely have been looked into.

By R. A. Beasley on 04.14.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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HaHaHaHaHaHaHa!

By Don't bring them to Gilmer! on 04.13.2018

From the entry: 'NEW “ALMOST HEAVEN” CAMPAIGN'.

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No matter what is going on in the State our concern is Gilmer County. The State reports on Zoom that 10th graders at the GCHS perform at the 35.9% proficiency rate for science.

Proficiency for 11th graders is 37% in math and it is commendable that the rate for them for reading is 64%.

What is being done to make improvements for science and math when students are about ready to graduate from HS? We hope that scores for reading hold up and even improve.

Why do we fail to receive updates for plans for proficiency improvements in the County’s schools?

In other WV counties superintendents provide that type of information on a routine basis.

By GCHS Parents on 04.12.2018

From the entry: 'State board members react to national test results'.

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This well written article makes is clear what actually a businessman can do.

Businessman turned politician.  Can actually make an entire state look like idiots.  Idiots for electing him at the minimum.

Looks like we have to find the patience to tolerate this bs two more years…...and hope he turns into a one term disaster.

Congratulations to the WV state employees giving him a good lesson. Nice job folks.

By Makin Arch Look Good on 04.09.2018

From the entry: 'ICYMI™: A 'billionaire' should be embarrassed to let schools, local governments, vendor bills'.

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Why is important school system improvement news of the type addressed in the other comment not on the County’s school system’s web site?

Someone in the board office should be assigned to write up news to keep citizens informed.

We are expected to vote in more tax money to run the schools and we deserve to be informed of positive improvements being made with our money instead of taking our support for granted. It works both ways.

By R. Curry on 04.06.2018

From the entry: 'Howard O'Cull: School 'work action' a teachable moment'.

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This is a suggestion for getting breaking news out to the community concerning important new improvements in the County’s school system.

We hear that improvements are being made to increase student performances in mathematics, reading, and other areas. The changes include getting back to basics for math teaching to eliminate achievement gaps.

Would someone write up something to explain the new changes to keep the community informed? One improvement I know is that progress reports come home regularly so families can track how kids are doing.

There is nothing wrong with positive news getting out to demonstrate that Gilmer County is positioning itself to become a leader in public education. The County deserves all the positive press it can get.

By Appreciative Parent on 04.05.2018

From the entry: 'Howard O'Cull: School 'work action' a teachable moment'.

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The Governors and the elected Legislators made the time ripe for the “educators revolt”.

The past 20 years, state employees, all who work outside the ‘capitol complex’ have been dissed.

Put off.  Put down.  Worked around.
That was clearly understood by our state employees.

That dissention was completely ignored by our failed state leadership.

Clearly it was time for action.  Social media was a major player….for the good.

The Governor, the Legislators, have now been put on notice to not ignore state issues, while they feather their own nests.

Now, lets see social media swing into action,  straighten out the Public Service Commission, and their gross failure to hold Frontier Communications lack of customer service to the fore. Some leader needs to step forward and make it happen.

We see what can happen with some leadership.  Social media is the citizens friend.  The election is just a few weeks away.  Its time to build a fire under the Public Service Commission.  Governor Justice you might even give it a shot to fire them…...up?

By J.P. on 03.30.2018

From the entry: 'Howard O'Cull: School 'work action' a teachable moment'.

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We want the County to become WV’s star performer known throughout the State for producing the highest achievement students.

How can this be done? Simple. Establish goals for math, science, and other subjects and aggressively manage the school system accordingly.

This will require establishment of a clearly written, professionally done holistic plan containing specific goals to achieve, establishment of personal accountability at different levels in the school system, accurate and timely reporting of achievement results as we proceed, and applying improved approaches when necessary to keep the plan on track.

We have heard for too long that everything is “just fine” in the County, and we continue to hear it today from some quarters.

Folks, things are not ‘just fine’ when too many of our students leave high school unprepared for college and careers. Where we go from here is the primary responsibility of the elected school board.

Teachers and staffs are more than ready to deal with obstacles confronting them and all they need is to be enabled to do their jobs.

The time is over for continuing to be hampered with lame excuses for why major improvements cannot be made i.e., Gilmer County is too poor, too many kids lack family support they deserve, and keen focus on public education is foreign to the community’s culture.

By Gilmer County Teacher on 03.30.2018

From the entry: 'Howard O'Cull: School 'work action' a teachable moment'.

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