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Politics, Government, Election

G-ICYMI™: Improving teacher quality in West Virginia

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

In a press release issued on February 23, 2017, Governor Jim Justice, after referencing West Virginia as being “50th,” commendably declared that “it’s time to restructure and rebuild our school system from the bottom up.”

I suggest the two foremost foundations upon which an exemplary public-school system should be restructured and rebuilt are teacher quality, and the learning/teaching model employed inside and outside the classroom.

By far the most important source of variation in student achievement is teacher quality.

The book “Surpassing Shanghai, An Agenda for American Education Built on the World’s Leading Systems,” by a number of contributing authors edited by Marc S. Tucker, undertakes to answer this single question:

“How would we redesign the American education system if the aim were to take advantage of everything that has been learned by the countries with the best education systems in order to build a system better than any that now exists anywhere?”

The World’s Leading Education Systems reviewed were those of Shanghai (the head of the class); Finland (superb teachers — how to get them, how to use them); Japan (perennial league leader); Singapore (a journey to the top, step by step); and Canada (looks a lot like us but gets better results).

Obviously, everyone interested in improving student academic achievements would agree that public schools should attract educators with the highest level of general intelligence as can be achieved.

The achievability of that statement depends, in large part, upon the quality of the pool of young adults from which prospective teachers are recruited. As Marc Tucker noted in the cited book, “No private firm, much less than an entire industry, would prefer to recruit its professional staff from the least-able college graduates if it could do better than that.”

And yet, the College Board reported in 2008 that when high school graduates going on to college were asked what their intended major was, those who decided on education scored in the bottom third on their SATs. Their combined scores in mathematics and reading came in at 57 points below the national average.

According to Surpassing Shanghai, “Three things directly affect the quality of the pool from which a nation recruits its teachers: (1) the status of teaching in the eyes of the potential recruit relative to the status of other occupations to which he or she aspires, (2) the compensation offered relative to other possible choices, and (3) the conditions of work, or the degree to which the way the work is organized, makes it look more like professional work or like blue-collar work.”

Tucker observes that of these five top-performing countries, most have moved teacher education out of their lower-tier institutions and into their top-tier institutions, in contrast to what Tucker describes as “teacher education in the United State [is] generally done in second- and third-tier, relatively low-status institutions, many of which were formerly normal schools.”

Relevant to the discussion of where teacher prospects should be educated is that West Virginia now has some 19 private and public colleges and universities authorized by the West Virginia Department of Education to offer one or more approved programs leading to educator licensure in the public schools of the state.

Compensation and other emoluments provided to teachers is such an important incentive to attracting top-flight students to the teaching profession and educating them in top-tier institutions that the very subject should be off the table as a consideration when able young people are making career decisions, so observed Singapore’s minister of education.

Being off the table does not mean, however, the adjustments that will have to be made to pay scale for such prospective teachers will not shock citizens who are complacent with business as usual in the state’s public school system.

Teaching is now the most popular profession among Finnish young people, attracting the top quartile of high school graduates into its highly competitive teacher training programs.

Cultural factors, such as respect for teaching as a profession, are also an important part of the Finnish success story, which add to the complexity of replicating the Finnish experience in the United States, and especially in West Virginia.

Considering that (1) by far, the most important source of variation in student achievement is teacher quality; (2) the character of the pool of young adults from which teacher-college applicants are recruited is highly relevant to the ultimate quality of the teachers graduating therefrom; (3) the quality of the teacher colleges themselves are highly pertinent to the quality of the graduating future teachers; and (4) that some of the factors that have contributed to the five high performing education systems are cultural in nature, the time is now for West Virginia to start addressing and changing its complacency in improving teacher quality in its public schools.

The Free Press WV      Charles McElwee is a Charleston lawyer and a GSC grad

Gilmer County Clerk: Notice to Creditors and Beneficiaries

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CLERK OF THE COUNTY COMMISSION OF GILMER COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND BENEFICIARIES

The administration of the estates(s) of the following deceased is pending before the Clerk of the County Commission of Gilmer County, 10 Howard Street, Glenville WV 26351.

The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below.

Notice is hereby given that the estate(s) of the following has been opened for probate.  Any interested person objecting to the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative or the venue or jurisdiction of the court, shall file notice of an objection with the County Commission within ninety days after the date of the first publication or within 30 days of service of notice, whichever is later.  If an objection is not timely filed, the objection is forever barred.

All persons having claims against the estate(s) of the said following deceased, whether due or not, are notified to exhibit their claims, with the voucher thereof, legally verified, to the undersigned, at the County Clerk’s Office on or before May 13, 2019  otherwise they may by law be excluded from all benefit of said estate(s).  All beneficiaries of said estate(s) may appear on or before said day to examine said claims and otherwise protect their interests.

Claims against the estate must be filed in accordance with West Virginia Code 44-1-14a.

 

DECENDENT NAME PER.REP/NAME REPER.REP/ADDRESS
Ruth Claire Garrett Rick J. Garrett PO Box 369
Glenville, WV 26351
David Thomas Lewis David T. Lewis Jr. PO Box 312
Dalton, OH 44618
Eleanor G. Lewis David T. Lewis Jr. PO Box 312
Dalton, OH 44618
Mildred E. Dye Michael L. Dye 609 McKee Road
Washington, PA 15301


Clerk of Gilmer County Commission
Jean Butcher
10 Howard Street
Glenville, WV 26351

The date of the first publication of this Notice is : March 14, 2019

Governor seeks statewide nominations for volunteer awards

Deadline is May 17th

The Free Press WV

Governor Jim Justice announced that citizens can submit nominations to Volunteer West Virginia for the 2019 Governor’s Service Awards.

The Governor’s Service Awards, the state’s most prestigious volunteer award, honors individuals and organizations who roll up their sleeves to solve community problems in an innovative way.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to share the stories of everyday heroes in the Mountain State,” said Governor Jim Justice. “If you know an outstanding individual, family, group, or business who shines as a volunteer superstar, I encourage you to nominate them for these awards.”

In recent years, recipients of the award improved their communities in many creative ways. Some examples include: mentoring and empowering youth; initiating neighborhood activities and support for older citizens; and incubating ideas and enthusiasm for community revitalization projects.

Outstanding West Virginia individuals and organizations that are selected as recipients will be honored at a special banquet at the Culture Center in Charleston on September 5th. The event is coordinated by Volunteer West Virginia, the State’s Commission for National and Community Service. 

Nomination forms are available on Volunteer West Virginia’s website, www.volunteerwv.org, or by calling 304.558.0111.  The deadline for nominations is May 17th, 2019.

Glenville City Council Meeting Minutes

The Free Press WV
GLENVILLE CITY COUNCIL MINUTES
February 04, 2019
7:00 p.m.

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Mayor Dennis Fitzpatrick with Council members Fisher, Wiant, Dean and Bone present. Councilwoman Taylor was absent.


Pledge of Allegiance


I. Call to Order


Public Comments

Mr. Corcoran addressed council inquiring about the City’s contract with the current trash service. He noted there continues to be a monthly fuel surcharge assessed even though fuel prices have dropped. Mayor Fitzpatrick will call MSW to check on this.

Mayor Fitzpatrick noted that according to Robert’s Rules of Order guidelines, it is not necessary to note who seconded on a motion for a small group meeting, so this will be omitted as we move forward.


A. Approval of Minutes – January 07, 2019

The minutes from the January 07, 2019, meeting were reviewed. No corrections were noted and minutes were placed on file for audit.


II. Reports


Financial

The City’s budget is currently at 60% of the fiscal year with 71.48% revenue and 54.44% expenditures. Councilman Bone made a motion to approve the financial report as presented. Motion passed.


Street Report

Mayor Fitzpatrick reviewed the street report with council. He noted that the City has been fortunate to have good street workers.


Police Report

Chief Huffman provided the police report to council. He noted the new police cruiser has been decaled with ghosted graphics. A quote has been received for new lights, radio, and complete installation of radar, cameras, etc. and will not exceed $7000. The estimated total for this new vehicle will be approx. $36000. Mayor Fitzpatrick added we will receive reimbursement of 35 percent of total cost from the USDA Grant.


Glenville Utility

Mayor Fitzpatrick attended the utility meeting on January 23. There were three small water leaks, 1 inch line on Rt 33, 2 inch on Spring Street, and 10 inch on Vanhorn Drive that goes to the tank. Nothing to report on sewer side.


Recorder

The recorder reminded council that Saturday, February 09, was the Special Levy election and stated that council would canvass this election on February 15, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.


Mayor Comments

* Decaled City Cruiser

* February 9th Election Day

* Canvas votes/ballots on the 15th of February

* Budget meeting

The first meeting to work on next year’s budget will be March 07 at 6:00 p.m. This meeting is open to the public. We must submit our budget to the State Auditors office by March 28.

* Reminder to council to look for street light outages in their wards and get the pole number if possible so repairs can be made. Councilman Bone noted that there is a street light out near the GSC Administration Building. Chief Huffman will get the pole number.


III. Other Business

None


IV. Next City Council Meeting

The next council meeting will be March 04, at 7:00 p.m.


V. Adjourn

Meeting adjourned at 7:14 p.m.

Major Broadband Investment in West Virginia

The Free Press WV

Governor Jim Justice announced today that West Virginia’s internet infrastructure is expanding through a collaboration with Facebook.

Facebook, through their subsidiary Middle Mile Infrastructure, is planning to build a high capacity fiber optic cable network crossing a portion of West Virginia as part of the company’s ongoing larger network infrastructure build stretching from Virginia to Ohio.

The State plans to maximize the benefit of this advanced internet infrastructure by using excess bandwidth on the fiber to expand connectivity into West Virginia communities. Governor Justice’s administration is committed to working with West Virginia’s congressional delegation and private partners to improve broadband connectivity in West Virginia. This project provides the foundation necessary for additional broadband infrastructure expansion.

“Broadband development is absolutely critical to moving West Virginia forward,” Governor Justice said. “An investment of this magnitude in our state is really big news and will help us continue to show the world how great West Virginia truly is.”

U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito joined Governor Justice to announce the development.

“Making sure West Virginia has reliable, high-speed internet has been a priority of mine since I was first elected to Congress,” Senator Capito said. “Today’s announcement with Facebook is an important step toward ensuring our state has the critical infrastructure to support broadband deployment, and I know it will help so many in our state, especially the rural communities that are unserved. I’m excited for what a fully connected West Virginia can offer the rest of the country, as well as what it can do for the future of our state. Today’s announcement brings us another step closer to achieving that goal.”

The route will travel approximately 275 miles through West Virginia, starting at the western border, through the Kanawha Valley, then turn northwest to bring the fiber through the Appalachia region adding an important piece of fiber infrastructure to the Appalachia region.

Work is slated to begin in 2019 and is expected to take about 18 to 24 months to complete.

“Access to broadband internet drives economic growth and opportunity, but there are still too many unserved communities, including here in West Virginia. We see the need for long haul fiber as an opportunity to provide critical infrastructure where it did not previously exist. To that end, we’ve designed our project to attract potential local and regional providers to expand broadband internet access for the communities surrounding our builds,” said Kevin Salvadori, Director of Network Investments, Facebook.

The project will provide the opportunity to significantly enhance internet connectivity in West Virginia. The project builds upon West Virginia’s proximity between major internet exchanges and establishes the State as a preferred route for fiber backbone construction. With access to this internet infrastructure, broadband providers can expand middle-mile networks into communities along the route.

“We are very excited to expand West Virginia’s internet infrastructure through this partnership with Facebook,” Commerce Secretary Ed Gaunch said. “I supported Governor Justice’s Roads to Prosperity initiative because good roads are crucial to our state’s economic success — and in today’s economy, internet infrastructure is every bit as important.”


NewsWest VirginiaPolitics | Government | ElectionState-WVTechnology | Computer | Science | G-TechNote™

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~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

Broadband coming?  Think we heard this before?
How many times?  I’ve lost count.  You remember?

This will be like JimmyBoys “roads to prosperity” program?
Take the citizens money?  Give ‘em nothing.

Republicans. Democrats. All the same political bs from both.
Voters believe them.  Keep bringing back the old mules so they can give us a repeat performance.

By Just More Dog n Pony Show 4 U  on  03.04.2019

Roads are a mess.
Population continues the 50+ year decrease.

But for deep gas, no new employment.

Education system total failure.
Legislature impotent.

Grand finale in Charleston.
We have a brawl in the Capitol Building.

That out-of-control delegate needs to resign!

By WV continues the slow death  on  03.04.2019

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ICYMI™: WV’s own border wall needs to tumble down

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

Only hours after the state’s teachers and school service personnel unions called a strike last week, American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten flew in to rally striking teachers and preach the evils of school choice and charter schools.

Why would the state’s three school worker unions listen to her? She is from out of state.

That’s a ridiculous argument, but from listening to the strikers chants, comments in the news media and on social media, it appears powerful out-of-state groups are trying to ruin West Virginia’s monopolistic and bureaucratic education system with student-hurting ideas like school choice, charter schools and every other evil idea the state Senate concocted in Senate Bill 451.

But doesn’t Randi Weingarten represent a powerful monied out-of-state interest? Why didn’t the strikers run her out on a rail?

The lack of quality answers to that question goes hand in hand with the lack of quality answers for the other questions that in-state and out-of-state education reformers keep asking those who oppose education reform.

Why are education reforms that are being adopted and readily accepted in so many other states — strong Democrat and strong union states included — so “bad” for students in West Virginia? Why wouldn’t concepts that work well above the Mason-Dixon Line, west of the Ohio and Big Sandy rivers, and east of the Alleghenies not work in the Mountain State?

A Daily Mail columnist, formerly a Charleston resident, tweeted actively during the strike in favor of reforms. Those opposed to SB 451 on Twitter asked in many variations: “Why should anyone listen to her? She’s from out of state.”

But it’s not just in education-related issues that there appears to be a strong bias against people and ideas from outside West Virginia.

Publicly traded corporations with headquarters located outside the state — those that actually provide secure, high-paying jobs to many in West Virginia — are often the target of hostility, even when they have significant offices and operations in West Virginia.

The critics make it sound as if out-of-staters are coming in and “taking our jobs,” yet West Virginia has the lowest rate of entrepreneurial job creation and the lowest workforce participation rate. Anyone providing jobs in the state aren’t taking jobs, they are providing them to West Virginians willing to work.

As we all know, our state naturally ranks No. 1 in the hearts of West Virginians. Unfortunately, it ranks low in too many economic, education and cultural measures to count.

In the marketplace, companies that succeed aren’t the ones that reject what their competitors are doing. The companies that perform best watch their competitors, listen, learn, improve and become better.

Like it or not, West Virginia is competing with other states in many areas. But West Virginia won’t become better by rejecting ideas and concepts that succeed elsewhere. We need to listen and learn from smart people, wherever they are from.

Justice Signs Bill Expanding Computer Science Education at West Virginia Schools

The Free Press WV

Governor Jim Justice held a ceremonial bill signing today for Senate Bill 267 at Cranberry-Prosperity Elementary School in Beckley, WV. The new law makes West Virginia the first state in the nation to require that students receive computer science education before graduating high school.

“I’ve said all along that we need to make education our centerpiece here in West Virginia,” Governor Justice said. “For a long time, our state was 50th in just about everything. That’s why I’m so proud that we’re the first state to make sure all of our students get a top-notch education in a subject as important as computer science. This will help us attract even more technology companies to our state and encourage our brightest young minds to build their careers right here at home.”

Signing SB 267 into law accomplishes one of the goals Governor Justice highlighted during his 2019 State of the State address. In that speech, he called for West Virginia to become the first state to offer computer science education in every school within the state. The bill passed unanimously in the Legislature.
West Virginia Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Steven Paine, emphasized the importance of such training for students.

“I commend Governor Justice for endorsing a bill to ensure all West Virginia students graduate with a knowledge of computer science,” Paine said. “We collectively recognize that computer science is fundamental for students’ success in future careers and receiving this instruction will assist them in the transition to industry credentialing and college degrees.”

The bill requires the State Board of Education to adopt a policy detailing the appropriate level of computer science instruction for students at each educational level. It also requires the Department of Education to develop and offer appropriate professional development opportunities to teachers providing computer science instruction.

Governor Justice’s support for this bill follows his education agenda in the Mountain State since he took office.

The ceremonial signing coincided with the state’s celebration of Digital Learning Day — a national event highlighting instructional technology and innovative teachers. Governor Justice presented a proclamation at the ceremony proclaiming today Digital Learning Day in West Virginia and classrooms across West Virginia participated in the annual celebration to illustrate best technology practices that enhance teaching and learning. Students statewide participated in a creative and diverse range of activities that highlight various technology tools, applications and teaching approaches used throughout West Virginia classrooms and around the country.

The Free Press WV

WVDEP Now Accepting Make It Shine Applications

The Free Press WV

Applications are now available for the 2019 West Virginia Make It Shine Statewide Cleanup.

This annual event is sponsored by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP).
During the first two weeks of April, the Make It Shine program will provide resources such as cleanup materials, waste hauling and landfill fees to community groups volunteering to conduct litter cleanups on state streams or public lands.
More than 4,885 West Virginia citizens participated in last year’s statewide cleanup.

These volunteers removed nearly 120 tons of litter, including over 1400 tires, from our state’s landscape.
The application deadline for those wishing to participate this year is March 08, 2019.

Applications are available through contacting Terry Carrington, Make It Shine Program Coordinator, at 1.800.322.5530, or by email at: ‘Terry.R.Carrington@wv.gov’.

Applications may also be downloaded at: www.dep.wv.gov on the Make It Shine page.
This event is completely dependent upon volunteers, so sign up today and help make West Virginia shine!

Could Fast-Moving Tax-Cut Proposal Blow WV Budget?

The Free Press WV

Critics of a proposal rushing through the House of Delegates say it could blow a hole in West Virginia’s state budget by using one-time money to pay for permanent tax cuts that mostly help those who are well off.

House Bill 3137 would create a fund where new money, including out-of-state online sales taxes, would go. Then, each time that fund reached a certain level, it would trigger compounding cuts in state income taxes.

Ted Boettner, executive director of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, said some lawmakers may not realize they could end up using one-time money to offset tax cuts that continue for years and build on top of each other.

The Free Press WV
The tax cuts in House Bill 3137 overwhelmingly would go to the well-to-do.


“This bill was pushed out of the Finance Committee without a fiscal note, without any understanding of what its impact would be on tax revenues or the state budget,“ he said. “It’s a poorly designed tax cut that will not only lead to large revenue losses but also further exacerbate income inequality in West Virginia.“

Supporters have said now that the state can collect the online sales taxes, it can afford to cut income taxes. However, Boettner said progressive income taxes hit the rich harder, while sales taxes take a larger portion of lower-income families.

Since the cuts as outlined in the bill build over time, Boettner said, they eventually could dent the state budget by from $200 million to as much as $1 billion a year. He said the new revenue might offset one year’s tax cut, “but since the tax holes continue year to year, the proposal would eventually lead to large compounding revenue losses and budget holes that would likely require more cuts to schools, colleges and other budget priorities, or tax increases likely to fall on working families.“

HB 3137 originated in the House Finance Committee a week ago. It did not go through a second committee, but could reach final passage in the House today.

More information from the center is online at wvpolicy.org, and the text of HB 3137 is at wvlegislature.gov.

~~  Dan Heyman ~~

Haven’s Law Increases Penalties for Passing a Stopped School Bus

The Free Press WV

Senator Stephen Baldwin (D- Greenbrier) introduced Senate Bill 238 this year, a bill that doubles fines for motorists passing stopped school buses.

“After an incident in Indiana this fall involving the death of three children exiting a school bus, local drivers approached me,” said Baldwin. “They said people pass their stopped buses every day, endangering kids. They said we’re lucky more children aren’t injured or killed, and we must do something about it. Today, we are doing something about it.“

Monday, the Senate passed S.B. 238 unanimously.

“If drivers don’t take children’s safety seriously, they will face serious consequences. These are among the stiffest penalties in the nation not only in terms of fines but also license forfeiture,“ said Baldwin. The bill raises first-time offense penalties to a fine of $500-$1,000 (from $250) and license suspension for 60 days; second offense penalties to a $1,000-1,500 fine and license suspension for 180 days; and three or more violations would now carry a penalty of a $2,000 fine, at least 48 hours’ jail time, and loss of license for one year.

These penalties may seem tough, said Baldwin, but they need to be tough—children are dying because of negligent and impatient drivers. “We call this ‘Haven’s Law,‘ in honor of Haven McCarthy, who died getting off a school bus in Lincoln County in 2007. We owe it to children and their families to keep our little ones safe.“

“Bus drivers have a tough job,” said Baldwin. “From dealing with mountainous terrain to weather to maintaining order on the bus, they do it all. But they can’t take care of kids and catch offenders who pass their stopped buses at the same time.” To aid drivers in reporting violations to law enforcement, the bill provides that all new buses will be equipped with front and rear facing cameras. The cameras will be paid for by the WV Department of Education using federal funding.

The bill has been received by the House of Delegates and referred to the House Judiciary Committee.

WVDA Offers Tips in Lieu of Hay Shortage

The Free Press WV

Due to recent concerns of a potential hay shortage in West Virginia, the West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA), Farm Service Agency (FSA) and WVU Extension Services are offering cattle farmers tips on how to maintain a healthy herd.

“Odds are we still have six weeks left of winter, if not more. With being halfway through the winter feed season, farmers must take stock if they have enough hay to keep a well-fed and healthy herd,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Kent Leonhardt. “If hay is in short supply, farmers will want to avoid turning cattle out too early as it could have affects on pasture feeding for next summer.”

A potential hay shortage is most likely due to an unusually wet 2018. The increased rainfall lead to ruined and reduced hay crops. The WVDA is working with FSA county offices and WVU County Extension agents to help farmers locate hay supplies or work through alternative feeding methods.

“Producers seeking hay or those selling hay are encouraged to contact their Farm Service Agency county office, located within their local USDA Service Center,” said FSA State Executive Director Roger Dahmer. “These lists are available to the public and can help connect sellers, buyers and those in need.”

The WVDA, FSA and WVU Extension Services are offering the following tips:

  • Inventory the hay supply on hand and compare it to feed demand. Cattle prefer to eat about 2.5% of their body weight in hay dry matter. That is about 28 lbs. of air-dry hay per 1000 lbs. body weight.

  • Locate available hay, straw or corn fodder for purchase. This could mean trucking in feed from other states. Hay is generally the least costly feed for beef cattle.

  • Consider limiting the hay to the animal’s nutritional requirement. But be careful in doing so as cows need to be in a body condition score of 5 or 6 at calving, if they are to conceive the next calf on time.

  • Keeping the body condition up on cows in cold weather helps reduce feed demand for maintaining body heat. Fat provides insulation from the cold and helps reduce shivering.

  • Alternative sources of feed are soybean hull pellets, wheat midds, whole cotton seed or cotton seed hulls. These fibers are high in protein and should be available in West Virginia depending on your location in the state.

  • Other good sources of protein include dry distiller’s grain, corn gluten feed or soybean. These feeds provide good energy without any starch that would limit the digestibility of hay.

  • Corn is often the go-to feed when hay supply is limited. However, corn is high in starch. If adequate protein is not mixed with the corn, this ends up reducing the digestibility of fiber in hay. A 14 percent crude protein feed made from commodity by-products without any corn (limiting the starch) is another good option.

“Farmers need to wait to turn out their herds until around April 15 in low elevations and May 10 in higher evaluations. Proper planning and working with your fellow farmers are ways to keep the heard healthy until that time,” Leonhardt said.

To locate your local county FSA office: http://offices.usda.gov 

G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia’s 55-county education system

The Free Press WV
The Free Press WV

West Virginia’s public-school education system is under the microscope and while there has been great debate over how to improve the student results there are very few concrete answers that most can agree on.

For a state with a population of only 1.8 million people, West Virginia has an impressive number of individual school districts.

Each of the state’s 55 counties runs its own school system. West Virginia is the only state in the country with its education system based solely on county lines. That means there are 55 county school superintendents and 55 county central office staffs with all of the costs associated with those positions.

“The politically correct thing for me to tell you is that I support a 55-county structure, from county units of government to boards of education and so on. But I can tell you in practical application with the population declining as we are is there a lot of duplication of services in the current structure? Absolutely, I don’t think anyone could argue that fact,” Sen. Paul Hardesty (D-Logan) said.


“We have a lot of things that moved us toward centralization. And centralization is efficient and it is efficient by covering geography. But it’s not efficient in innovation. It’s not efficient in counties really being able to meet the identified needs of their students as they would meet those,” West Virginia School Board Association Executive Director Howard O’Cull said.

This school year, West Virginia’s county superintendents are making more than $6.7 million, with the highest paid administrator in Berkeley County at $192,270, and the lowest in Roane at $85,000.

“At some point of time in this state there will not be 55 county boards of education, there will not be 55 county commissions, 55 assessors and other elected officials. Not trying to knock no one out of a job, but the population loss, the geographic of this, it just doesn’t work. Someday it will have to be changed, I don’t know when that day is. And I’d say there’s very few people sitting in this building that I sit today that wants to even touch or get near it. But I think it’s just a real grim reality that something’s going to have to be done,” Hardesty said.

West Virginia’s spending per student is among the highest in the nation. Last school year, on average, it was $11,485. But all of that money doesn’t go into the classroom. Right off the top, a couple thousand is taken away to help retire the enormous Public Employees Insurance Agency debt.

“Previous legislatures made promises they didn’t fund. And we’re going to be good fiscal stewards of the taxpayer dollars, position ourselves for success and give our students a world class education,” Senate President Mitch Carmichael (R) said.

Administrative costs also whittle away at what we spend on students. This year, 652 administrators are pulling in $56.1 million in salaries.

“The taxpayer of West Virginia has invested in education and shows the value of it such that we’re in the top quartile in the nation in terms of per student expenditures. So, how does that correlate to low teacher pay and low performance in our classrooms? It doesn’t. And that money is being dissipated throughout a 55-county board system and a top heavy public education department,” Carmichael said.

According to the state department of education, West Virginia’s 667 schools now have a total enrollment of 265,755 students. That’s down nearly 5000 students from the previous year. But the numbers vary wildly over the state’s 55 counties. Only one has more than 20-thousand students, that’s Kanawha. Only seven are over the 10,000-student mark.

“Our county school systems are too numerous. I think by any stretch of the imagination, 1.8 million people, 260,000 public school children, 55 county boards of education is maybe too top heavy. So, we want to look at methods or methodologies to provide incentives for counties to work across county borders. To erase those arbitrary county lines so that, again, the student is first,” Carmichael said.

The fact is most districts have very low enrollment. So low, that the entire student populations of 14 different West Virginia counties could fit inside the state’s largest high school. Each of those 14 counties all have fewer students than the 1,887 who attend Cabell Midland.

“There’s no other way to say this, we have got to think about different models. We have a low birth rate in this state. We have an extreme exodus of students, school-age students who are leaving the state. We have an opioid crisis. We have a lot of grandparents raising children. All these things converge to mean we’ve got to have a different school system. The only trouble we have here is we have people who don’t want to start looking at that vision. That vision is the vision we will have to have at some time in this state. It’s probably only ten years off,” O’Cull said.

While West Virginia is the only state in the country using county lines to define the entire school system, it hasn’t always been like this.

Next week, the Eyewitness News iTeam will take a look at how West Virginia used to divide its school districts and offer some possible solutions to questions surrounding the 55-county system and what it might take to make major changes.

~~  WCHS/WVAH ~~


EducationNewsWest VirginiaPolitics | Government | ElectionState-WV

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~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

Yes, West Virginia spends a LOT of money on education.
But where does it go?  Is it wasted?  Down the drain hole of bureaucracy?

We spend 7th highest per student and what to show for it?
Being 49th or 50th in ratings?

By where does the money go?  on  02.27.2019

It amazes me that the so-called “experts” think more and more centralization will improve anything.  Public school education is in terrible condition and doing more consolidation will only make it worse and more expensive.  With all the technology today, there is NO reason for busing children for miles and miles, spending more and more hours under the control of public schools.  The idea that parents are not capable of deciding how to educate their children is insulting.  There was never any good reason for governments to get involved in education.

By Karen Pennebaker  on  02.28.2019

Pennybaker is correct.
WV educators keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

Whats the definition of insanity?

By Gilmer  on  03.02.2019

A major cause of WV’s dismal record with K-12 education is the lack of choice regarding a parent’s right to decide on the school for a child to attend.

The elite get around that by using private schools for their kids.

Under existing conditions what chance do the rest of us have? The answer is none!

Our kids are victimized because competition and accountability do not exist and that is exactly what WV’s entrenched education establishment and the unions want.

By Save WV's School Children  on  03.02.2019

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In West Virginia, the Politicians Fail, and the Teachers Rise

The Free Press WV

The rolling hills of West Virginia, where I grew up, are home to some of my fondest memories. But time and time again, I’ve watched them serve as a backdrop to injustice and negligence by those who lead, often at the expense of a vulnerable population.

This time, it’s our schoolchildren.

At $45,622, West Virginia teachers are the 48th lowest earning in the nation, according to the National Education Association. The minimum salary is just over $32,000. After months of tension over issues including salaries and health insurance costs, the state’s public schoolteachers went on strike February 22.

On Friday, our state legislators refused to take action on a bill that would, over time, give West Virginia teachers a proposed 5 percent raise, and so the statewide work stoppage continued for a seventh day, with 250,000 students out from school as a result.

Despite the loss in critical class time, the fight cannot end prematurely.

As students remain at home, and families struggle to find alternative forms of child care, teachers have to trust that West Virginians will do what West Virginians do best; lean on each other.

We’ve seen it happening already. Students turn to classmates to study for Advanced Placement exams. Neighbors offer up their homes as oases while parents are at work. But it will take more than an internal, neighborly effort to realize what the work stoppage is all about: long-term, systematic change.

It’s easy to feel like West Virginia’s teachers are gaining national momentum when the state’s name has appeared in national headlines this week. But the coverage has merely scratched the surface of a complex issue that predates these school closings. It is rooted in a history of West Virginia politicians putting the interests of outsiders looking to make a quick buck off the state’s beautiful land before the needs of the people who live on it.

We’ve seen it in flimsy safety and environmental regulations, which have resulted in the deaths of countless miners, and in the chemical spills that have plagued surrounding populations, leaving citizens without drinking water and living on poisoned land. We’ve seen it in the opioid crisis, too, where powerful drug companies made sure that pills were plenty, but options for treatment continue to be scarce.

And now we see it in education, where teachers, the single most valuable resource available to children in this state, and therefore the most powerful influence in guiding us toward a prosperous future, were presented with a health insurance plan that amounted to a pay cut, all while senators, who receive hefty checks from gas and energy companies, could have funded education needs had they passed a modest tax increase on these companies.

This isn’t the first time West Virginia teachers have demonstrated statewide unity. In 1990, an 11-day work stoppage over similar issues led to better wages, but the increase was temporary.

That’s why when James C. Justice, our Republican governor, announced Tuesday that he had reached an agreement with union leaders and told teachers to go back to work, with nothing more than a good-faith handshake, those on the ground thought better of it.

Despite top-down orders from their union leaders to return to classes, county by county, teachers got together. They met in public spaces and communicated diligently with their neighbors, and on Wednesday night, the teachers of all 55 counties made the decision, collectively, to extend the work stoppage on their own terms.

They kept schools closed on Thursday and Friday, and say they will continue the strike until the Senate passes the proposed raise; 55 counties united, shouting “this time will be different.”

“Over the course of Wednesday, you saw every single county in the state just clawing to get back together, and we did it,” said Kat Devlin, an English teacher at University High School in Morgantown. “This is the prime example of a grass-roots movement. It’s the teachers and the people on the ground making this happen.”

This is about more than livable wages. It’s about haves and have-nots, it’s about workers’ dignity, and it’s going to set the bar for labor organizers everywhere.

The teachers of West Virginia are leading the way with a conviction that should be a national example for challenging inequity.

When they get back into their classrooms, hopefully sooner rather than later, they must talk to their students about how, under intense pressure, and with little more than the support they found in each other, they fought for what was right, and they were heard.
Sign up for Frank Bruni’s newsletter

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Lauren Peace (@LaurenMPeace) is a reporter at the Democrat and Chronicle in Rochester.


EducationNewsWest VirginiaOpinions | Commentary | G-LtE™ | G-Comm™ | G-OpEd™Politics | Government | ElectionState-WV

(2) Comments

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~~~ Readers' Comments ~~~

The principal reason for opposition to 451 is fear by union chiefs that public charter schools could outshine performances of non-participating schools to embarrass WV’s entrenched K-12 education establishment.

To attempt to scare the public, there were claims that the underlying motive for opposition to charter schools is the sinister plan to privatize them to permit the rich and powerful to make money off education at the expense of WV’s children.

It is alarming that unions failed to propose comprehensive plans, inclusive of meaningful accountability mechanisms, designed to improve WV’s schools.

Their objective seems to be to protect the status quo instead of being effective partners in improving education for the State’s children.

There are examples in the USA where charter schools resulted in significant K-12 education improvements. Of course some failed.

Why is it irrational to establish a limited few charter schools in WV as demonstration projects to incorporate approaches applied in highly successful charter schools while avoiding mistakes of the schools that failed?

Nothing else has worked in getting WV out of being near the bottom with K-12 education quality—-so why continue with business as usual while expecting better outcomes?

By Unions Failed WV Education  on  02.21.2019

Seeing the president of the WV AFT shaking his raised clinched fist in disrespect for the WV legislature tells it all.

WV’s teacher unions are allowed to function as separate branches of government with veto power over WV’s elected officials and their only role is to get more benefits for their members.

Where is the evidence that unions have done anything recently in any WV school system to help create an educational show piece? Can anyone cite an example?

Furthermore what have unions done to develop innovative plans for moving the State’s k-12 education system forward to pry us off our bottom rung rankings? The answer is—nothing exists. 

Conditions will not change for the better until the day our legislators quit pandering to unions to end k-12 decision-making driven by mob rule and raw emotions.

By Unions Failed WV's Children  on  02.26.2019

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WV’s Education Strike to Continue Today

The Free Press WV

Hours after the West Virginia House of Delegates moved to indefinitely postpone action on the education omnibus bill, union leaders announced their strike will continue to a second day.

Representatives of the state’s American Federation of Teachers chapter, the West Virginia Education Association and the West Virginia School Service Personnel Association called for the strike’s continuation Tuesday evening outside of the House chamber. WVSSPA president Joe White said local union members do not believe Republican lawmakers are moving on from the bill.

“As we heard loudly from our members as we had our conference call, the trust is not there,” he said to cheers. “Our friends within the House of Delegates have sent a clear message to the Senate leadership, and so are we.”

The House approved a motion in a 53-45 vote to put off votes on the education legislation, which included a 5-percent pay raise as well as establishing charter schools and education savings accounts among other provisions.

The House passed an altered version of Senate Bill 451 which limited the charter schools pilot program to two institutions from the original six and eliminated education savings accounts. The Senate amended the measure to expand the number of charter schools to a maximum of seven institutions while including the creation of 1,000 education savings accounts.

The House’s motion is considered a death sentence to the legislation, but legislators could revive the bill Wednesday under House rules.

The Free Press WV


West Virginia Education Association president Dale Lee told the crowd there was a “minute opportunity” of something happening.

“With that being said, all 55 counties will be closed again tomorrow,” he said.

Schools were closed in 54 counties on Tuesday; Putnam County Schools remained open, but only 25 percent of the system’s professional staff reported and more than 660 of the 9,000 students attended classes.

Some school systems in mountainous counties canceled classes before the announcement because of impending winter weather.

“We want to make it perfectly clear that our trust has been somewhat restored in the House because we have heard from the House today in a positive way. We need to let the members of the House of Delegates know we appreciate their vote today,” said Fred Albert, president of AFT-West Virginia.

“It’s also very clear that we cannot trust the leadership in the Senate,” he added, with some in attendance chanting, “Move, Mitch,” a reference to Senate President Mitch Carmichael, R-Jackson.

Governor Jim. Justice said during a press conference after the House’s vote he wanted teachers and other education personnel to return to work, adding House members told him they would not reconsider the motion. The House Finance Committee will consider legislation Justice supports to give education staff a pay raise at its Wednesday meeting.

~~  Alex Thomas ~~

New Congress Presses Interior on Cancellation of Strip-Mine Health Study

The new Democratic leadership in Congress is investigating why the Department of the Interior stopped a major study of the health impacts of mountaintop removal and other surface mines.

After researchers found much higher rates of cancer, birth defects and other health problems near surface mines, the U.S. Interior Department directed the National Academy of Sciences to run a thorough study. Interior stopped that study in 2017 after Donald Trump became president.

But West Virginia University’s Michael McCawley, assistant professor of occupational and environmental health sciences, said it’s important to find out what’s causing the serious health problems for people living near the strip mines.

The Free Press WV
According to the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee,
countries with mountaintop removal mines have a more than
40 percent higher rates of birth defects.


“That seems to be an epidemic of cancer cases, as well as a number of other diseases,” McCawley said. “That’s important to the people in the southern portion of West Virginia; it’s important to the people of the state of West Virginia.“

At the time, Interior said canceling the study was a cost-saving move. Press reports suggest it came after meetings with coal-industry lobbyists. Last week, the new chair of the House Natural Resources Committee and the Energy and Mineral Resources Subcommittee formally requested Interior turn over all documents related to the cancellation.

Interior has said ending the study saved a little more than $500,000, after having already spent nearly as much on the study prior to its cancellation. To McCawley, the cancellation looked a lot like politics getting in the way of badly-needed scientific research.

“People say, ‘Well I don’t want to hear the answer to that,‘ or, ‘I don’t want to discuss this as a possibility,’” he said. “Science needs to be done in the public interest and given the opportunity to find the truth.“

According to McCawley, the best existing theory is that surface mining releases micro-particles - one-thousandth the size of a human hair or smaller - into the air. He said these cause inflammation in the tissues of people who breathe or absorb them. And he said they may well be a problem far beyond the coalfields.

“I have served on the World Trade Center Study Commission and seen many of the same sets of diseases in that population that we were seeing in southern West Virginia,” he said.

More information from the House Natural Resourse Committee is available here.

~~  Dan Heyman ~~

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Readers' Recent Comments

After the ipads were purchased what measurable benefits resulted from having them at the GCHS to improve student learning? Does anyone know?

Was a formal plan followed to maximize benefits from the equipment to include provisions for measuring before-and-after results to evaluate if the equipment did any good?

Another case of throwing money at a problem and after spending it taxpayers have no idea if there were any meaningful benefits for students?

More than likely competitive bidding was not used to purchase the ipads to add another wrinkle.

By Did The ipads Improve Learning Results? on 03.13.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Where oh where did the 200 Gilmer County I-pads go?
Were they bought with federal money?
Attorney General Morrisey are you looking into this?
Someone should get the ball rolling?

By where oh where? on 03.12.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

They is not no flood plane there the water dont get up there i know i catch musk rats in the river

By THE TRUTH WATCHER on 03.08.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Gilmer County’s school board has full authority to demand a comprehensive accounting for every dime spent on everything leading up to site selection and construction of the LCES and the GCES.

Where did the money go and who got it to include naming names and companies on the receiving end?

Stop hiding behind the excuse that the State “did it to us” and assemble the true facts for taxpayers!

What is the defensible rational for failure of the school board to follow up on this?

By Disclose Financial Facts on 03.07.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

What was in the school board’s 451 resolution? As important as education is more effort should be taken to flesh out what actually happens at school board meeting. Bare minimum information and lack of transparency skirt accountability. Who is responsible for writing up the minutes?

By Transparency and Accountability Needed on 03.07.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The new Gilmer County Elementary school was built
in a flood plane.  Education fail.

By YOU FORGET on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

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Roads are a mess.
Population continues the 50+ year decrease.

But for deep gas, no new employment.

Education system total failure.
Legislature impotent.

Grand finale in Charleston.
We have a brawl in the Capitol Building.

That out-of-control delegate needs to resign!

By WV continues the slow death on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Major Broadband Investment in West Virginia'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Broadband coming?  Think we heard this before?
How many times?  I’ve lost count.  You remember?

This will be like JimmyBoys “roads to prosperity” program?
Take the citizens money?  Give ‘em nothing.

Republicans. Democrats. All the same political bs from both.
Voters believe them.  Keep bringing back the old mules so they can give us a repeat performance.

By Just More Dog n Pony Show 4 U on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Major Broadband Investment in West Virginia'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Jimmy D, Gilmer County needs a full accounting for every dime spent on school site planning and studies, site preparation, all school construction work, and purchases while the State had us intervened.

For one example of many we do not have an itemized accounting for how our funds were spent on the botched LCES project.

How much more was wasted on the auction barn site, the dropped Cedar Creek site, and the GCES in comparison to what could have been done with our money with full transparency, competent planning, competitive bidding, and proper project oversight?

The fact that the GCES was built too small and the LCES was built too large is one facet of the waste and mismanagement that occurred.

Do not expect valid investigations because WV’s standard approach is cover up when the State is involved.

By Jimmy D--Don't Expect Sunshine on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Saw the GFP video (citizens refer to it as the ambush video) at the school board meeting at which the pitch was made for the new computers.

The GCHS principal and staff talked about wonders to expect if the 200 computers would be purchased.

Promises were made that if the kids got them they would learn to do advanced math and to make other marvelous learning advances. Any evidence of the promises being kept?

Were the computers purchased through competitive biding? Wanna bet that they were not?

Is this another example of throwing money at technology with no meaningful plan for how to use the equipment to maximize learning benefits without evidence of any before-and-after testing to accurately determine if they did any good?

Could the 200 computers be located and what condition are they in if they could be found?

The new school board is encouraged to check on the issues and to report on the findings.

By Accountability For New GCHS Computers on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Since the local prosecutor is good for nothing, why doesn’t the federal prosecutors look into all the theft by Gabe DeVano and his buddies during the time Gilmer county was under state control? They stole money, equipment from schools which closed, as well as technology equipment. for example where did the 200 iPads go which gilmer county paid for?

By Jimmy D on 03.04.2019

From the entry: 'Former West Virginia school superintendent going to prison'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

A major cause of WV’s dismal record with K-12 education is the lack of choice regarding a parent’s right to decide on the school for a child to attend.

The elite get around that by using private schools for their kids.

Under existing conditions what chance do the rest of us have? The answer is none!

Our kids are victimized because competition and accountability do not exist and that is exactly what WV’s entrenched education establishment and the unions want.

By Save WV's School Children on 03.02.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Pennybaker is correct.
WV educators keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

Whats the definition of insanity?

By Gilmer on 03.02.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

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An off grid system works great if you want to live like a hippie. One can cover their entire roof and it will barely power your lighting and a few electronics, let alone our transportation and industrial needs. The humaniacs now complain that the giant windmill blades kill the little birdies, and they have never solved the overpass problem in putting windmills on out autos.

By Vern Windsong on 03.01.2019

From the entry: 'Need for Atlantic Coast Pipeline Falls'.

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It amazes me that the so-called “experts” think more and more centralization will improve anything.  Public school education is in terrible condition and doing more consolidation will only make it worse and more expensive.  With all the technology today, there is NO reason for busing children for miles and miles, spending more and more hours under the control of public schools.  The idea that parents are not capable of deciding how to educate their children is insulting.  There was never any good reason for governments to get involved in education.

By Karen Pennebaker on 02.28.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

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Pat, your information is outdated. Solar and wind are increasingly outcompeting fossil fuels, despite the heavy subsidies fossil fuels (and nuclear power) get. They also are getting steadily cheaper, while fossil fuels can be expected to rise as supply diminishes—the pipelines are going in so fast because of the NEED of the gas companies to get their product out to where they HOPE to find better prices—the drillers have been steadily losing money for the whole decade of the fracking “miracle.“ Wall Street is becoming skeptical. The thing about solar and wind is that once they’re built, the fuel keeps arriving, free. Of course, there isn’t much of a wind resource in our area. But there is in the mountain heights, and off the Virginia coast. And solar works fine here—I’ve had an off-grid system for ten years, works great.

By Mary Wildfire on 02.28.2019

From the entry: 'Need for Atlantic Coast Pipeline Falls'.

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Yes, West Virginia spends a LOT of money on education.
But where does it go?  Is it wasted?  Down the drain hole of bureaucracy?

We spend 7th highest per student and what to show for it?
Being 49th or 50th in ratings?

By where does the money go? on 02.27.2019

From the entry: 'G-ICYMI™: iTeam Investigation: West Virginia's 55-county education system'.

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Seeing the president of the WV AFT shaking his raised clinched fist in disrespect for the WV legislature tells it all.

WV’s teacher unions are allowed to function as separate branches of government with veto power over WV’s elected officials and their only role is to get more benefits for their members.

Where is the evidence that unions have done anything recently in any WV school system to help create an educational show piece? Can anyone cite an example?

Furthermore what have unions done to develop innovative plans for moving the State’s k-12 education system forward to pry us off our bottom rung rankings? The answer is—nothing exists. 

Conditions will not change for the better until the day our legislators quit pandering to unions to end k-12 decision-making driven by mob rule and raw emotions.

By Unions Failed WV's Children on 02.26.2019

From the entry: 'In West Virginia, the Politicians Fail, and the Teachers Rise'.

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The principal reason for opposition to 451 is fear by union chiefs that public charter schools could outshine performances of non-participating schools to embarrass WV’s entrenched K-12 education establishment.

To attempt to scare the public, there were claims that the underlying motive for opposition to charter schools is the sinister plan to privatize them to permit the rich and powerful to make money off education at the expense of WV’s children.

It is alarming that unions failed to propose comprehensive plans, inclusive of meaningful accountability mechanisms, designed to improve WV’s schools.

Their objective seems to be to protect the status quo instead of being effective partners in improving education for the State’s children.

There are examples in the USA where charter schools resulted in significant K-12 education improvements. Of course some failed.

Why is it irrational to establish a limited few charter schools in WV as demonstration projects to incorporate approaches applied in highly successful charter schools while avoiding mistakes of the schools that failed?

Nothing else has worked in getting WV out of being near the bottom with K-12 education quality—-so why continue with business as usual while expecting better outcomes?

By Unions Failed WV Education on 02.21.2019

From the entry: 'In West Virginia, the Politicians Fail, and the Teachers Rise'.

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If passed when will this take effect? I’m a single mother who has a drug felony from another state. I can’t get food stamps to help me because I a drug felon. I work so my income is to much for one person. I have a son whom him and I barley survive. Cause of my record. I’ve held the job I am at now for 5 years. But since they can’t use me. They use my income. But not me and doing it that way I make to much money.

By Kayla on 02.21.2019

From the entry: 'Bill to Let Drug Felons Get Food Stamps Passes WV Senate'.

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John & Family,  Sorry to hear of Nyla’s passing!  GOD will take care of you!!  GOD BLESS EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU IN THIS SAD TIME !!!  RIP Nyla !

By Anita L. Adams - New Concord, Ohio on 02.15.2019

From the entry: 'Nyla Leah Frymier Poole'.

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“But Cathy Kunkel, an energy analyst with the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, said utility filings in those states now show the outlook has changed dramatically - in part because of competition from cheap, renewable energy.“

That is utter rubbish.  There is no “cheap, renewable energy.“  Solar and wind are more expensive, even taking subsidies into consideration.  Hydro is more expensive, nuclear is more expensive.

Claiming otherwise is at best fake news, and at worst deliberate misdirection and lying.  Merely claiming renewable energy is less expensive doesn’t make it so.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 02.15.2019

From the entry: 'Need for Atlantic Coast Pipeline Falls'.

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It was brought to my attention there was an article published in the Gilmer Free Press under Reader’s Comments dated 2-11-19.
This was written by Tammy White which many think it was me (Tammy Foster).  Twenty years (or more) “White” was my last name.
My son does take daily medication at the high school (which somehow this is quite a coincidence).  I want to clarify that I DID NOT write that article!
Now that I have straighten this out….. please read what I have say about this situation at Gilmer County High School:
The secretary or secretaries that were mentioned have never been rude to me or my son in person or by phone.  It is actually the opposite!  They are kind, caring, professional and thorough with distributing my son’s meds.
Not only do they make sure he gets the correct dosage daily but they keep a close inventory on the meds and call me when I need to restock them.
It broke my heart to read the negative article written last week and I was appalled my (old) name was on it.
My son and I trust and depend on these wonderful ladies.  We would like to take this opportunity to THANK them for taking excellent responsibility and care of our child and other students.

By Tammy Foster (not White) on 02.13.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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I’m sorry for your loss.

By Danny Nicholson on 02.12.2019

From the entry: 'Vera Marlene Lyons'.

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There is some issues going on at GCHS. I’m starting here in Hope’s that it will be addressed and corrected.  The secretary was rude when I turned in medicine for my son to be taken on a daily basis. Nor is it her business why he takes it, or how often. Anyway, is she certified in giving meds out.  I thought that the school employed a nurse. Maybe she should answer the phone or should I say message on her cell. She had no idea how many I handed in she didnt count them. Talks about her co workers. Then she gets upset nobody talks to her. She is 2 face. Talking about them is very unprofessional.
I hope this is taken care of or my next step is to the state department. Your choice

By Tammy white on 02.11.2019

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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It is welcomed news as reported in the Democrat that Gilmer’s GCES students are making progress in learning math and English Learning Arts.

The principal, teachers, and all staff deserve high praise for the progress. Let’s not forget efforts of students too plus their parents who encourage them at home.

In addition to rates of increase for learning progress it would be helpful to be informed of percentages of students in the different grades who are at grade level for math and ELA.

Nothing was reported about learning progress at the GCHS and the LCES bi-county school. When are reports for those schools going to be given?

By Positive School News on 02.08.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The lights are up at the Linn school.
Often flashing nights and weekends when NO ONE is on school property.

And you expect lights to work….???
when the WVDE, the WVBE built the school with FIVE TOO MANY CLASSROOMS !!??

*** The WVBE is incapable of meaningful education.
Why do you think the WV Legislature created the current ‘education overhaul’ bill without consulting the WV State Board of Ed? ***

By you are joking I guess? on 02.07.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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“The Environmental Protection Agency issued regular updates for about 100 water pollutants almost four years ago ... “

That would have been the Obama EPA, and the intention wasn’t to provide better water, it was an attempt to control business activity through the use of regulation.

In other words, a power-grab by a politician obsessed with it.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pay McGroyne on 02.06.2019

From the entry: 'One Charleston Manufacturer Pressing for Delay of Water Rules'.

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Would the County’s school board take action to help improve safety conditions at the LCES?

The way it is now it can be uncertain if children are present at the school to require a reduction of speed to 15 mph while on Rt. 33.

It would eliminate uncertainty if a flashing lights system were to be installed so the lights could be turned on when children are present.

By LCES Safety Concern on 01.31.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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Why is it that on Gilmer County’s school system web site biographical information including education backgrounds for all school board members and their pictures are not posted?

Other counties have the information. Why not us?

By School Board Member Backgrounds? on 01.23.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The only reason for our not using a version of the goal-driven Kentucky method would be a veto by controlling elitists opposed to establishing meaningful accountability for Gilmer County’s school system.

Without using the method it would be easier to continue to pawn off information that cannot be used to accurately document progress with student proficiencies for reading, math, science, and college and career readiness.

By School System Accountability Needed on 01.20.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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The KY approach would be valuable to Gilmer County for use in disclosing progress of our two schools in contributing to better lives for our children.

For goals for which progress would be off schedule, the tracking approach would be an objective basis for making mid-course adjustments in our school system to get better results.

By using the approach school board members could be more effective with goal-driven governing, and getting results would be the responsibility of the County’s Superintendent of Schools and school principals.

Overall,the approach would establish meaningful accountability which is sorely lacking in WV’s school systems.

By Establish School System Accountability on 01.18.2019

From the entry: 'Building A Path to Brighter Future'.

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Accomplished communicators have a knack for reducing complex information to its simplest form for effectiveness in getting messages across.

WV’s convoluted strategic plans for schools must follow the State’s rigid guidelines. The plans are confusing and inadequately designed for establishing accountability for getting results.

Kentucky is making progress with improving K-12 education outcomes and one reason is the clarity of specific goals for its schools and the job being done with tracking results.

Google—-2018 Prichard Committee Update to glean what is being done in Kentucky. The approach could be used for Gilmer’s two schools with a single sheet of paper for each school.

The beauty of the Prichard approach is that instead of relying on confusing and lengthy written out material with undefined abbreviations, technical jargon, and head scratching generalities, specific goals and annual results in achieving them are presented graphically.

Perfect real world example of a picture being worth a thousand words.

Board of Education members why couldn’t the Prichard approach be used for Gilmer County? It would be inexpensive, it could be updated easily on an annual basis, and everyone in the County would know how the school system is being administered to achieve measurable results.

Perhaps Mr. David Ramezan could post Prichard material on the GFP to show its simplicity.

By Advocate For Clarity on 01.17.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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The scandal of the too small school?
Don’t forget…
The scandal of the too big school is half of the whole state intervention mess.  FIVE rooms more than needed at the Linn, Lewis County school.

Results are from nepotism, cronyism, and educational stupidity….as well as scoffing at those who attempted to sound the alarm.

Bloated egos was the frosting on the Litter Box Cake Mix.

By School Truth is in the Litter Box on 01.17.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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During intervention the State had dictatorial control of our school system to include all decisions related to the GCES.

One result is that the GCES was built too small.

An investigation is needed to determine who was responsible for the bad decision, and what role the no-bid architectural firm had in designing and constructing the school.

Something major happened to cause the GCES to be built too small. Was something dropped at the expense of adequate class room space as a result of having to spend extra money because a poor site was selected?

Minimally, gross incompetency on the State’s part is the explanation for the disaster foisted onto the County.

A question pertains to the new gym. Lots of effort was taken by the State to try to convince the public that a competition gym instead of a regular gym was needed.

Did the competition gym cost extra money at the expense of needed classroom space? If the answer is affirmative who was responsible for deciding on the more expensive gym?

What about the enormous pit at the GCES? Was money spent on it at the expense of classrooms because something was wrong with the school’s site that was selected by the State?

Nothing similar to the pit has been seen at other sites where new WV schools were built.

Why has there been a failure for a thorough investigation to have occurred to expose the facts?

The obvious explanation is that powerful elitists in control do not want tracks leading to them, and they have veto power over a meaningful investigation including one done by a leading newspaper.

By GCES Built Too Small Scandal on 01.15.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Pat McGroyne is spot on.
High speed internet is simply another failure of WV state government.

If the elected in our state, were doing the job expected by voters….we should have very few problems or issues?

By Gilmer resident on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Muddling has another distinct symptom. It is the tendency for administrators in control to emphasize processes and procedures while avoiding disclosure of progress, or the lack thereof, in achieving learning results.

The purpose is another way to avoid personal accountability for school system failures.

By Muddling Epidemic In WV School Systems on 01.14.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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West Virginia is number one!
Our politicians are the best that can be had.
They are also the lobbyers dream come true.
No one—-can out-muddle our elected reps !

By we know it on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Suggestion after reading strategic plans for the GCHS and the GCES.

How about the school board requiring that for each school an informative executive summary be written to include——where each school stands on reading, math, and science proficiency, what the term proficiency means to eliminate the confusion, student proficiency goals for the two school, target time to expect goals to be achieved, and a statement to commit to keeping the public informed of progress in achieving the goals at designated intervals (e.g. quarterly) during a school year.

Omit confusing abbreviations and technical terms understood only by a select few in the education field, and written for comprehension by reasonable persons.

Leave it up to the County’s professional educators to determine how to get the job done with continual laser-like focus on getting results.

By Student Learning at GCHS and GCES on 01.13.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Muddling infects federal, state, and local government entities where personal accountability for top officials to get measurable results rarely exists.

Muddling practitioners are famous for passing off information unrelated to measurable proof that effective problem-solving has occurred. A common example is emphasizing how much public money is being spent to attempt to convince tax payers that magnitudes of expenditures are always directly correlated to levels of problem-solving successes.

Muddling by an organization is characterized by the existence of thick planning documents replete with vagueness and lack of clarity, undefined technical terms, and mysterious acronyms.

Muddling thrives on intentional ambiguity and confusion designed to protect muddlers and their organizations.

By Muddling 101 on 01.11.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Gilmer County is not the only place in the USA that has been faced with its students failing to meet proficiency standards for science, reading, and math.

The difference here is that evidence is lacking to conclusively demonstrate that Gilmer County’s officials in control have exerted proper efforts to profit form powerful lessons learned elsewhere to use that knowledge to help solve learning deficiencies in our schools.

In fact, a convincing argument could be made that the approach in the County has been the one professional planners designate as muddling through.

Classic symptoms of muddling through include failure to thoroughly analyze categories of causes contributing to problems followed up by using the information to develop a comprehensive plan to do the most good in getting better results by treating key causes instead of symptoms.

Muddling typically involves officials assigning blame for lack of progress to outside forces e.g., the “culture”, the State did it to us, and poverty. Haven’t we heard plenty of that?

Muddling must be eliminated if we want progress in solving non-performance problems within the County’s school system. Does anyone disagree?

By End School System Muddling on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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It is unclear after reading school board meeting minutes what progress if any is being made by GCHS and GCES principals in improving student proficiency in reading, math and science.

Why not allocate a few sentences in the minutes to summarize what the two principals reported to the school board?

All it would take to get the critical information out to citizens would be for the new school board to act on this.

Does anyone have a problem with the suggested change to keep Gilmer’s bill paying public informed?

By Need Specifics For Principal's Reports on 01.09.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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“High speed broadband – a necessity for today’s homes, businesses and other institutions – remains a huge unmet need for rural residents, despite promises by a succession of Governors from both parties (a contributing factor in why we’re losing population at a rate higher than any other state).“

I disagree with much of what Mr.Boggs believes.  That said, high-speed broadband is the single most important step the State of WV could take to improve the business climate and provide more opportunities for its citizens.

Sincerely

Pat McGroyne

By Pat McGroyne on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Conversation at local eatery.
Shortly after election.
Individuals were educators.

‘You think we have school problems now, wait until these new folks take the steering wheel’.

‘Students, parents, staff are all going to be in the soup’.

Sounds as if Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving vacation-deer season times have all taken a big hit.  If that is true, the union teachers need to come together, stand their ground, along with parents, and hold this new board accountable.

Have a local strike if need be.
Request resignations.
Vote of no confidence.

Schools employees can win.
You have done it before.
Just stick together.

By overheard conversation on 01.08.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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Scholarship must be the most important focus in Gilmer County’s schools.

Brought up the ZOOMWV Data Dashboard site to review the most recent State achievement test results for GCHS’s 11th grade.

Folks, Gilmer is in serious trouble. Proficiency for math=24%, reading=41%, and science=24%.

On an A through F grading scales the GCHS gets an F for all three subject areas.

What does the new school board have to show for inroads it has made since last July to make critically needed proficiency improvements at the HS? Citizens deserve answers to the question.

By ZOOMWV Data Dashboard on 01.07.2019

From the entry: 'IOGAWV Scholarship Program'.

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A thorough accounting for where all the public money went could be easily achieved by a competent accountant.

Isn’t there a special account at the County’s school board office for expenditures related to all bills paid and who got the money?

Following the money trail always gets results along with verification of means, motives, and access.

By Let An Accountant Dig It Out on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If central office financial records for all public money paid out for everything from site planning, site studies and development, and everything else to get to completion of the GCES and the LES—- what is the reason?

It is known that money was spent on the Arbuckle site and Cedar Creek, and public money was paid out for the LES too.

Were County records for the spending purged and if that happened who ordered the action? The records are either in the County’s central office or they aren’t.

By End Financial Secrecy on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Hasn’t the time come to finally start naming names and making people accountable?

By Get It Done on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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How about the “BIG WV WINDFALL”....?

For 3 or 4 months now we keep hearing about the millions of dollars of tax revenue collected.

Millions and millions above ‘estimates’.  Were those ‘estimates’ honest, or fudged to begin with, so as to request higher tax rates?

Well, Justice and the Legislature now have our dollars, what will become of this windfall? Will we see tax rates lowered?  Doubt full, but we should.

Likely this windfall, created by “over-taxation”, will simply create a “party atmosphere” of legislative spending. Watch the Charleston ‘gangsters’ get their wish lists ready this coming session.

By taxpayers always lose on 11.21.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Yes.  The blame Does seem to fall to ‘local’ people. In small places like Gilmer County, it’s just a poker game, boys, and the deep pockets win.  Money speaks volumes where ‘officials’ stay silent.  Go ask for the records, see what they’ve got.

By CheatersNeverWin on 11.20.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Teachers and staff knew from the beginning that the GCES was going to be too small. They were ordered by the State to keep quiet about the shortfall and other serious concerns too.

A sixth grader could understood how many rooms were needed by dividing total student numbers to attend the school by how many students should be in a classroom.

Under sizing was the State’s fault and it cannot be rationalized any other way including to assign the blame to local people. Same applies to the over sized LCES.

By Corrupt State Intervention on 11.19.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There will never be a full, public accounting of the gross mishandling of tax dollars during WVDOE intervention.
Too many local jobs and too many embarrassments of both elected and appointed bureaucrats.
These types cover dirt for each other.

Any local whistle blowers?  Doubtful.

One school built short 4 classrooms and another built with 5 too many.  Can it get more stupid than that?
Mr. Degree and Ms. Common Sense seldom travel together.

By Full accounting will never be revealed. Never. on 11.18.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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GCBOE when the two principals give reports at board meeting could the gist of what they said be summarized in minutes to keep the County informed?

It was a welcomed development by the Board to require principals to give reports particularly if there are required updates on progress designed to improve student learning for reading, math, and other subjects.

We still have not been informed about the status of science proficiency at the GCHS based on the latest testing. Why has the State failed to release the data? Were results too dismal?

By More Specifics For Principal's Reports on 11.17.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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If it is going to cost extra money to eliminate over crowding at the GCES the financial information referenced by Do It Ourselves should be presented to Charleston and the press too.

That would help frame a solid case that crowding problems were not caused by Gilmer County because all decisions related to facilities were dictated by officials over whom the County had no oversight authority during the State’s intervention.

By Follow The Money on 11.16.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is assumed that all records for spending to include money paid out for the LCES, dropped Arbuckle site, dropped Cedar Creek site, and all bills for the GCES are in the Gilmer Schools central office.

The new GCBOE has authority to get to the truth by demanding a thorough accounting for all the spending.

Afterwards the financial officer in the central office could easily access existing computerized records and to use the information for a report to the GCBOE and the public.

By Do It Ourselves on 11.15.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Notice that most of the ‘officials’ in Gilmer County also hold regular day jobs - sometimes working on more than one paying ‘job’ at a time in the same office space. This common practice is concerning for many reasons, and it needs to be talked about when so many go without.

By QuestionablePractice on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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There are two views in the County related to the under built GCES. Although the State built the school with inadequate classrooms one group believes that we should move on to let go of the past.

Isn’t this a form of advocacy for a coverup to prevent accountability for the State’s incompetence and mismanagement?

The other group believes that there should be a full accounting for all public money spent up to the time the GCES was completed to include disclosure of recipients of the public money. 

The accounting should be done for all public money spent at the LCES, the Arbuckle site, Cedar Creek, and finally the GCES.

Reasons for the under built GCES should be fully disclosed too. When the State was in control this information was kept secret from the public with loud claims that there was adequate space at the GCES.

Now it is known that there is inadequate space at the GCES and the problem is left to Gilmer County to fix. Only in WV!

By Citizens For Financial Disclosure on 11.14.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Unprofessional issues,rude commentsand rolling eyes at the high school has become an issue. Being on cell phone talking to boyfriends,when parents etc.going into the office. Since the teachers were ask not to be on them while students in the classroom. The one in the office should not be allowed to talk personal to her boyfriend, or whoever. Also, I hope this is corrected, the personal days, etc that the board provides to staff shouldn’t be allowed to use to work or operate a second job. Let’s get the priorities straight.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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GULMER COUNTY BOE. It is time for me to let you know some issues that is going on at the High school.  I’m hoping this will be addressed at the next board meeting. 1. It should not matter if an employee has a second job or run a business. The priority job is for the board. One should not be allowed to use any time from the board to run your business. There is going on
If they want to run your business than go but not on the boards time. I would like for all employees be treated the equal. They should not be allowed to use the time the board gives them for other jobs.

By Jo Ann conrad on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'Gilmer County Board of Education Regular Meeting Minutes'.

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While at it there should be an investigation of why the LES was build with too many classrooms and the GCES was built with too few. At the very least what happened is a WV horror story example of the State’s waste and mismanagement.

By Where Is The Investigation? on 11.11.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It is obvious that the GCES has a major space problem.

What options for dealing with the State’s mismanagement to cause the serious blunder are being considered by the Board of Education?

Could the original architectural design for the dropped Cedar Creek site be compared to what resulted at the GCES to accurately determine the extent of classroom space alterations?

If the architectural design at the GCES is different than the original plan for Cedar Creek the next step should be to determine reasons for the changes and where the money originally planned for needed classrooms went.

By INFO REQUEST TO GCBOE on 11.09.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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It’s long been known that Justice doesn’t happen in Gilmer County “because it all comes down to money”. And for those in charge of handling it and making decisions, it comes down to being competent to do the job,  keep accurate books and accounts and I’m sorry to say, that is seriously lacking in Gilmer County.

By Follow the Paycheck(s) on 11.06.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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What is GSC’s BOG’s plan for getting money for the next payment on the $38,000,000 bond loan the Gilmer County Commission approved?

Will the State pay or will the money come from private donations?

Money will have to come from somewhere to avoid a default.

By Where Is The Money? on 11.05.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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So sorry to hear of Kendall’s passing. I have fond memories of him at Uncle Paul’s store and the family reunions. I’m sure he will be missed greatly by those closest to him.
Please accept condolences from me and my family.

By Steve Lewis on 11.04.2018

From the entry: 'Kendall Goodwin'.

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GSC’s present plight is no secret and its future existence is in question.

Instead of expressing attitudes that GSC is being picked on could the Blue Ribbon Commission reveal why the College “tested out” as it did to fail to get more State money?

Was the “grading system” based on student enrollment trends, retention, time taken to get a degree, academic reputation, inept governance and administration, and other factors to block more funding? Informative specifics were not disclosed.

Teachers know that concerned students who want to do better always seek advice on what needs to be done to get better grades.

Similar to concerned students GSC’s supporters should be informed of what needs to be done to position the College for improved chances for survival to include eligibility for more State funding.

Saying that GSC is being picked on does nothing to help solve its nagging problems.

By What Was The Grading System? on 10.30.2018

From the entry: 'WV Legislative Update'.

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Well thank you, Details Please,  for asking!  So many problems in Gilmer and education is just one.  Look at the town, take a good look around.  Remember who runs unopposed at election time.  Vote.  Make a difference.  Hold authority figures responsible.  Allow videos, minutes and more to be shared on GFP again, for transparency.  Know your neighbors, help a friend.  Be good to each other. Amen.

By Reader7 on 10.29.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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I will truly miss my Uncle Stephen.  Telling me so much information about from gardening to canning. Just to listening to him talk with such passion for everything that he does… he had a sense of humor that always warms my heart.. listening to him play the banjo sometimes even when he didn’t feel good. he is always willing to share his recipes and his ways of doing things… his solar information he was always studying something ... I’m remember one time we asked him where he got his blackberries when it wasn’t Blackberry season and he go there’s a store down the road it’s called Walmart they have everything… He was so funny.  I love you.. xoxo.

By Robin Nunez on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Sorry for your loss. He sure did look like his father.

By Buck Edwards on 10.28.2018

From the entry: 'Stephen Blair Marks'.

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Reader 7, please give details for your suggested solutions to the County’s concerns you addressed.

The information would be helpful for consideration by school system administrators and the general public.

By Details Please on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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There is speculation that the plan is for GSC to convert to an education center for low risk federal inmates. Is this something the County and central WV needs?

By GSC's New Mission? on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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Dr. Pellett’s commentary in the 10/26/2018 issue of the Gazette includes a statement that GSC is responsible for injecting $28,000,000 into the local economy.

If GSC were to close loss of the money would cause the County to have more severe poverty than it has now.

The pressing challenge is for GSC’s administrators including its Board of Governors to exercise effective leadership to prevent closure.

Why can’t GSC take action on the long standing suggestion for it to be an innovator by establishing a five year teacher education program to enable students to earn a masters degree by graduation time?

Something must be done in WV to deal with the 700 positions for which certified teachers including those for math, science and special education are not in the classrooms.

Dr. Pellett and GSC’s Board of Governors why is a new teacher education program at the College not a viable option? Nothing else seems to be working.

The need exists, a similar program of excellence does not exist anywhere in the State, and GSC’s status would be elevated by having a masters degree program.

By GSC Alumni on 10.26.2018

From the entry: 'Paine: Plan to improve math scores to focus on algebra where a third of teachers aren’t certified'.

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GSC could make a valuable contribution to WV by doing a study to report on how grade and elementary schools with excellent results in math and reading did it.

Then, other schools could use the information as guidance instead of going it alone to reinvent the wheel.

With the Ed.D. expertise at GSC it would be a natural to take on the assignment. Dr. Pellett, would you back the initiative?

By Opportunity for GSC on 10.23.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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There is reference to signing an agreement with the State for math4life for all WV school districts. What has Gilmer County agreed to do to fix our problems?

By Agreements Matter on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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This important news has potential for making significant progress in improving math and reading outcomes in WV.

It hinges on how quickly advantage can be taken from lessons learned in schools that excelled.

The WVBE could do an analysis of reasons for excelling and to quickly provide guidance information to other schools.

That is the way the private sector approaches problem-solving because chronic failures have consequences and the unfit are weeded out.

Dr. O’Cull could help if the WVBE is not responsive. There could be panels of individuals from excelling schools to make presentations at WV School Board Association meetings to explain what their schools did to make the achievements.

By Why Reinvent The Wheel? on 10.22.2018

From the entry: 'InMyOpinion™: Balanced Scorecard -- Where do we go from here?'.

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A characteristic of a good strategic plan is to simplify language to enable a clear understanding of all its details.

Regarding the comment about abbreviations, a simple fix for them and terms (e.g. lexile) would be to insert an asterisk or a footnote symbol the first time one of them is used to refer readers to a section at the end of the documents where the entries are defined.

This comment is not intended to be a criticism. All specialty fields have a language of their own including the teaching profession.

Suggested clarity improvements in the plans would not be time consuming for principals at the County’s two schools.

By Clarity Is Always Good on 10.18.2018

From the entry: 'Balanced Scorecard Released Outlining School Performance In Gilmer County'.

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