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UC Sweeps Men’s & Women’s Golf Titles

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Men’s Golf: Charleston Wins Second-Straight Title

Led by medalist Eoin Cunniffe, the University of Charleston took home its second-straight Mountain East Conference Men’s Golf Tournament championship.

Charleston shot 298 on the final day to hold off all challengers and win the title. In addition to a 1-under 71 from Cunniffe, Mitch Hoffman shot 74, Ritwik Jain scored 75 and Adam Jordan shot 78 for the Golden Eagles.

UC posted a three-day total of 906, besting runner-up West Liberty by six shots. The Hilltoppers closed with a 296 on the final day to move from fourth to second. Fairmont State finished third (915), followed by Concord (924), Shepherd (928) and UVa-Wise (940). Shepherd had the best round of the tournament on Wednesday with a 294.

Cunniffe entered the final day tied for the lead with West Liberty’s Sean Trapp, and fired a 1-under 71 to earn medalist honors and finish the three-day tournament at -1 (215). He had three birdies and two bogeys on his card on Wednesday. Trapp shot his third-straight 72 to finish in second. Trapp’s teammate Alex Easthom had a 71 on Wednesday to take third (222), and Urbana’s Luc Toupin was fourth after a 72 (224). Fairmont State’s Ben Knight and Wheeling Jesuit’s Gian Franco Morassutti tied for fifth with a three-day score of 225.


Women’s Golf: UC Holds Off Notre Dame

Charleston held off Notre Dame on the final day of play to take the 2018 Mountain East Conference Women’s Golf Tournament title on Wednesday afternoon at the Cobb Course at Glade Springs.

Charleston came into the final day with an 11-shot lead, and gave back just one stroke to the field on the final day of play. UC finished Wednesday with a score of 332 for a three-day total of 997. Elizabeth Karsten led UC on the final day with an 80, while Sarah Feizal added an 82. Alyssa Wrozier shot 84 and Aleigha Hodges rounded out hte scoring with an 86.

Notre Dame had the best round of the day with a 331 to finish securely in second with a score of 1,007. Wheeling Jesuit was third (1,092), followed by West Virginia Wesleyan (1,128), Concord (1,130) and Fairmont State (1,163).

Notre Dame’s Macie Hysell held off Karsten to take medalist honors. Hysell came into the third round with just a three-shot lead and had a pair of triple bogeys on her opening nine holes, but finished strong over the last nine with a 37 to shoot 81. Her three-day total of 239 was two shots better than Karsten (241). UVa-Wise’s Katie Pritchett took third after shooting the lowest round of the day (77) to finish with a thre-day score of 243. Sarah Feizal was fourth (245) and Notre Dame’s Armani Shepherd was fifth (245).

MEC Men’s & Women’s Golf Championship Roundup (October 09, 2018)

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West Liberty’s Sean Trapp,

Men’s Golf: Golden Eagles Move To Top Of The Leaderboard

Charleston shot 302 to move to the top of the leaderboard after the second round of the MEC Men’s Golf Championship on Tuesday afternoon at The Resort at Glade Springs.

Eoin Cunniffe led UC on day two with a 73 and is at even after two rounds with 144. Ritwik Jain carded a 74 on the second day, and Robin Haesslich (77) and Mitch Hoffman (78) also posted scores for UC. Charleston’s two-day total sits at 608.

Fairmont State also shot 302 on day two to move into a tie for second place at with first round leader Concord at 614. West Liberty is just two strokes back in fourth after posting 307 on Tuesday. UVa-Wise (630) and Shepherd (634) also advanced to the final round by rounding out the top six.

Individually, Cunniffe shares the lead with West Liberty’s Sean Trapp who shot matching 72s in the first two rounds. Concord’s Jared Porter is in third (148), and Fairmont State’s Chase Voithofer shot 73 on Tuesday to move into fourth at 150. West Liberty’s Alex Easthom and Fairmont State’s Ben Knight are tied for fifth with 151.

Also advancing individually for the final round is Colby Cunningham of Glenville State, Luc Toupin of Urbana and Gian Franco Morassutti.

The final round concludes today.


Women’s Golf: Charleston Takes The Lead On Day Two

 

The Free Press WV
Charleston’s Elizabeth Karsten


The University of Charleston fired the low round of the tournament to take an 11-shot lead after two rounds at the MEC Women’s Golf Championship at The Resort at Glade Springs.

UC got a pair of 77s from Elizabeth Karsten and Sarah Feizal to shoot 324 on Tuesday. Alyssa Wrozier added an 83, and McKenzie Dietz shot 87.

The Golden Eagles, looking for their second MEC women’s golf title, trailed by 11 after the first day, but now holds an 11-shot lead over Notre Dame, 665-676. Wheeling Jesuit (724), West Virginia Wesleyan (751), Concord (753) and Fairmont State (768) round out the top six and advance to the final round of competition at the Cobb Course.

Notre Dame’s Macie Hysell, who matched a tournament record 72 on the first day of play, remained in the lead despite shooting 86 on Tuesday. Her two-day total of 158 is three shots better than Karsten (161) and five better than Feizel (163). Katie Pritchett of UVa-Wise is fourth (166) and Wrozier and Notre Dame’s Armani Shepherd are tied for fifth at 167.

The final round of the championship begins this morning at the Cobb Course.

EC Men’s & Women’s Golf Round 1 Summaries

Men’s Golf: Concord Surges To Day 1 Lead

Concord had all four players score in the 70s to take the lead on the first day of the Mountain East Conference Men’s Golf Tournament.

The Mountain Lions posted a day one score of 302, four shots better than Charleston (306). West Liberty is in third with a score of 309, followed by Fairmont State (312), UVa-Wise (316) and Shepherd (316). Wheeling Jesuit (317) and West Virginia Wesleyan (318), Urbana (323) and Glenville State (324) are within six shots of the top six. The top six teams advance to the final day of competition after 36 holes.

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Concord’s Brett Laxton


UC’s Eoin Cunniffe was the lone player under par on the day carding a 1-under par 71. West Liberty’s Sean Trapp shot a 72 to stand in second after 18 holes, and teammate Alex Easthom is in a tie for third with Concord’s Jared Porter with a score of 73. Glenville State’s Colby Cunningham and Concord’s Noah Clark rounded out the top five after shooting 75 on day one.


Women’s Golf: Hysell Leads NDC To Day 1 Lead

Macie Hysell shot an even par 72 to help Notre Dame take the lead on the first day of play at the MEC Women’s Golf Tournament at The Resort at Glade Springs.

Hysell birdied both par 5s on the back nine to get back to even on the day. She leads the individual race by 12 shots over Charleston’s Elizabeth Karsten and Alyssa Wrozier who each shot 84. Carleigh Boyd (WVWC), Melinda Goda (CU), Amani Shepherd (NDC) and Katie Pritchett (WISE) all shot 85.

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Notre Dame’s Macie Hysell


Notre Dame finished with a first day total of 330, 11 shots better than Charleston (341) and 34 shots better than Wheeling Jesuit (365). Fairmont State (376), West Virginia Wesleyan (380) and Concord (382) round out the top six. The top six teams after two rounds advance to the final day of competition.

Phil Mickelson Gets Into Bizarre Trouble at U.S. Open

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Phil Mickelson intentionally hit a moving putt on the 13th green Saturday, then asked the USGA to explain the ruling after hearing suggestions that he should be disqualified from the US Open. His bogey putt from above the hole ran by the cup and was headed down a slope when he trotted over and swatted it back toward the hole with the ball still in motion. He was assessed a two-stroke penalty, scored a 10 on the hole—the highest number anyone has managed in this tournament—and wound up shooting 81, reports the AP. Later, after acknowledging he was using Rule 14-5 to his advantage, Mickelson called USGA officials. “Phil really did want to understand how the rule operates because he didn’t want to—frankly, as he said to me: ‘I don’t want to play in this championship if I should have been disqualified,‘“ said Mike Davis, the USGA’s chief executive.

“That’s where we clarified that, ‘Phil, you actually made a stroke at a moving ball, and so we have to apply that rule.‘ “That’s different than if he had deliberately just stopped the ball or whacked it in another direction or something like that. So it’s ... us applying the rules.“ Mickelson’s shocking display in the third round stunned playing partner Andrew Johnston, who called it “a moment of madness.“ “I’ve had multiple times where I’ve wanted to do that,“ Mickelson said, explaining he preferred the 2-stroke penalty to having to play the ball from off the green. “I just finally did.“ As he walked off the green, he could be seen smiling. Asked if people would find his actions on No. 13 disrespectful, Mickelson said: “It’s meant to take advantage of the rules as best as you can. ... I would gladly take the two shots over continuing that display.“ As for walking off the green chuckling, he insisted: “How can you not laugh? It’s funny.“

PGA Tour’s Greenbrier Classic in West Virginia Changes Name

The Free Press WV

The PGA Tour has approved a name change for The Greenbrier Classic in West Virginia.

The Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur Springs says in a statement the tournament will now be known as A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier.

The eight-year-old tournament has typically been held around the Independence Day holiday.

This year’s event is set for July 05-08 on the Old White TPC Course.

West Virginia Governor Jim Justice, who owns the resort, says current and past veterans will be admitted to the tournament for free and have access to a private seating area.

Justice says “we want the world to know that the military comes first, and our focus is on those men and women above everything else.“

Stonewall’s Palmer Course

The Free Press WV

West Virginia State Park golf passes for the 2018 season are now available and may be used for reciprocal play at Cacapon Resort, Canaan Valley Resort, Pipestem Resort and Twin Falls Resort golf courses.

Passes purchased before December 22 will include a 5 percent discount and other extras, like complimentary overnight lodging at Cacapon, Pipestem or Twin Falls, a 20 percent room rate discount at Canaan Valley Resort, and green fees discounts that may be used by non-passholders who wish to golf with a passholder.

“Buying a West Virginia State Park golf pass is a great investment for golfers of all skill levels,” said Stan Beafore, superintendent at Canaan Valley Resort State Park. “In addition to reciprocal play at our park courses, pass add-ons offer many benefits, like golf play for a friend or overnight opportunities that encourage playing at different courses.”

All passes include reciprocal play as well as a discount greens fee at the Arnold Palmer Signature Course at Stonewall Resort, Monday through Friday after 1 p.m. Junior passes for golfers 18 and younger include outdoor swimming at any of the four state parks with golf courses. Passes make a great gift and can be purchased at Cacapon, Canaan Valley, Pipestem or Twin Falls. Seven versions of the pass are available.

“These passes give golfers another reason to get out on state park golf courses throughout the year,” said Tom Boyle, golf pro at Cacapon Resort State Park. “It’s good golf strategy when golfers play different courses and experience the diversity of course design, topography and hospitality.”


Seven golf pass options

“Snow Birdie” is a new pass for unlimited reciprocal play at any of the four courses on any day, from September 01 - December 31, 2018.

Any-day Annual Season Pass may be used by the passholder for unlimited reciprocal play at the four courses.

Any-day Annual Season Add-on may be purchased and used for unlimited reciprocal play for a spouse or adult dependents (over 18) living in the pass-holder’s household.

Mid-week Annual Season Pass may be used by the passholder for unlimited mid-week reciprocal play at Pipestem, Twin Falls and Cacapon on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Mid-week at Canaan is Sunday, after 1 p.m., through Thursday. This pass does not include national holidays that occur mid-week.

Mid-week Annual Season Pass Add-on may be purchased and used for a spouse or adult dependents (over 18)  living in the pass-holder’s household with the same restrictions as the Mid-week Season Pass.

Any-day Junior (18 or younger) Annual Season Pass may be used for unlimited reciprocal play at the four courses.

Any-day Summer Pass may be used for unlimited reciprocal play at the four courses, June 1 through August 31, 2018.

Sports News

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►  Want to clean up college athletics? Pay the players

The University of Louisville basketball program had just put Stripper-gate in the rearview mirror. Assistant Coach Andre McGee was fired; everyone agreed that the illicit sex parties in Billy Minardi Hall occurred without the knowledge of any higher-ups. Bullet dodged.

Then came the FBI’s bribery and fraud investigation. The inquiry, which led to the arrests of 10 people last week connected to the world of college basketball, identified Louisville as having paid $100,000 to Brian Bowen, an incoming recruit. Last Wednesday, Louisville effectively fired legendary coach Rick Pitino and placed Athletic Director Tom Jurich on paid leave. Indications are that these arrests may be the tip of the iceberg.

Given that both scandals emerged from attempts to work around the ban on paying players, and after decades of trying to police such behavior, will the NCAA finally conclude that only one step can truly clean up college athletics’ seedy underbelly? Paying players.

After all, the cause of paying players had been gaining steam even before the Louisville fallout. Articles and opinion pieces trumpeting the cause have been published by the dozens over the past few years.

Yet, that response would make the current scandal markedly different from countless past instances of illegal payments. In the 1980s, Southern Methodist University boosters illicitly paid dozens of football players. A University of Kentucky envelope mailed to the father of recruit Chris Mills in the late 1980s had $1,000 cash fall out in transit, sparking an NCAA investigation. The University of Colorado admitted in 2004 that it used sex and alcohol to lure prospective student athletes into signing with the school. Michigan’s Fab Five took under-the-table payments.

None of these scandals led to a change in the NCAA’s amateur model.

Instead, over the past century, protest against unpaid student athletes has been docile and inefficient, almost always a low-risk, low-commitment cause. Talk about compensation has rarely been accompanied by actual change, because a strange elixir exists in college athletics: a still-pervasive belief in amateurism by many university leaders is coupled with billions of dollars in annual revenue. This money pays the salaries of thousands of athletic coaches and administrators. Paying the college athletes who generate revenue (and most don’t) requires them to take money out of their own pockets - something that’s possible only if the movement for change is a lot less talk and a lot more action.

The idea of paying college athletes is really old. In 1905, Harper’s Magazine published an editorial (subsequently reprinted in newspapers nationwide) addressing the “Pay of College Athletes.“ Harper’s saw the issue as one of visible inequity. The popularity - and profitability - of college athletics made the problem of “how to make athletes work for nothing” - or to put it another way, “how to keep the athletes from drawing salaries” - increasingly difficult for university administrators to manage. Harper’s concluded that unless a more transparent and fair compensation system arose, college athletes would continue to be paid “surreptitious wages.“

In 1915, the University of Chicago Daily Maroon upended the college football community by pushing the matter further. Given that the editor of the college newspaper and the tuba player in the marching band received compensation from the university, the Maroon argued, why not the college athletes? “They work hard for the university organization known as the football team, which is a money making enterprise, the receipts from football being something like $20,000 [roughly $478,000 today] more than expenditures for the sport. Why not give the players a share of the profits accruing from their hard and faithful labors?“

The University of Chicago was only one year removed from a national championship in football; its voice on the subject mattered.

In 1929, Major W.H. McKellar of the University of the South (Sewanee) proposed that his school’s conference - the Southern Conference - embrace open, above-board payments to college athletes. Actually, the Major preferred universities doing away with charging admission to college football games. But recognizing that this was crazy talk, McKellar argued that “his proposal to openly pay college athletes in the Southern conference” was the only reasonable way forward.

Even the nation’s most beloved humorist at the time - Will Rogers - provided flyby support for the pay-for-play model. He was the John Oliver of his day, just pithier. “There is only one fair way to ever arrange amateur athletics in any line in the country,“ Rogers declared, “and that’s let the athletes work on commission of what they draw at the gate then make them pay their own schooling expenses.“

Every few years the compensation issue resurfaced, usually in response to some sort of scandal. Then it went away.

Which is not to say that there haven’t been any changes along the way. In 1956, the NCAA voted to allow full athletic scholarships. In 1972, Title IX began pushing some of that athletic scholarship revenue to young women. Beginning in 2015, a new cost of attendance provision added several thousand dollars to athletic awards. But direct compensation has remained out of reach. In each case, after the bluster of a pay the players episode died down, the same thing happened: nothing.

That’s because activism on the issue has always been about words - passionate editorials, enthusiastic speeches and well-constructed research projects - rather than actions. There has never been an ethos of change or else among critics of college athletics.

No one expects commentator Jay Bilas to quit his work for ESPN because of his strong objections to the NCAA structure that he is covering. Similarly, it is not uncommon for faculty members at major football or basketball universities to rage against the inequity of the NCAA (using social justice theory, Marx, the whole nine yards) - and then take full advantage of their discounted athletic tickets.

This activism hasn’t gone further because paying college athletes is a collective action problem, a situation where members of a group might benefit from or support a certain action, but the individual costs make it difficult for the crowd to band together toward that end. In essence, someone says, “I could forfeit going to college football games because student athletes should be paid, but that would just result in me sitting at home on Saturday afternoon while everyone else is at the game.“ What good would that do?

And of course there’s the money involved. CBS recently extended its contract to televise the annual NCAA March Madness tournament for $8.8 billion over eight years. Nick Saban makes $11 million annually coaching the University of Alabama football team. The Big Ten conference just awarded Jim Delany more than $20 million in bonuses for his leadership. The status quo is working quite well for many of the parties involved.

Given that financially significant collective action problems are notoriously difficult to solve, what’s next?

Allowing athletes to control and profit from their names, likenesses and athletic abilities seems reasonable. Even for YouTubing, cross-country studs. Allowing college athletes open access to agents would be a start. Perhaps the NCAA, as ESPN’s Jay Williams suggests, is about to crumble.

But I doubt major changes will occur anytime soon. History tells us that we’ll continue to talk about this problem. We’ll debate it. We’ll write about it. We’ll even argue and fight about it.

And then things will die down, and we’ll go back to the way it has always been.

Ryan Swanson is associate professor of history in the honors college at the University of New Mexico and author of “When Baseball Went White: Reconstruction, Reconciliation and Dreams of a National Pastime.“


►  Analysis: What’s the end game for NFL and protesting players? Right now, there isn’t an answer

The conversations are taking place all over the NFL, in various settings and between different combinations of players, coaches, owners and league leaders. On Sunday in Baltimore, it was Ravens Coach John Harbaugh talking to Pittsburgh Steelers offensive tackle Alejandro Villanueva and DeMaurice Smith, the executive director of the NFL Players Association, before the Ravens and Steelers played at M&T Bank Stadium.

“Coach Harbaugh has done a lot of things for the military. . . . It was just a very friendly conversation regarding all the events that have transpired and how we as sort of players, coaches and the union can make this right,“ Villanueva, the former Army Ranger who has been a high-profile figure in the recent national debate about patriotism, unity and protests by NFL players during the national anthem, said later Sunday.

The NFL spent much of last week trying to figure out how to move forward on the issue. Commissioner Roger Goodell met with a group of players and owners on Tuesday night in New York. But as the league attempts to orchestrate its end game to all of this, here’s the problem: There is no quick and easy solution, because the interests of the league and the players who are protesting are divergent.

“At this point, this whole kneeling [or] standing up is a much bigger issue than the things that we’re asking for as a league,“ Villanueva said Sunday. “We’re trying to be conscious of social issues. We’re also trying to be very respectful of the flag. And how it’s being demonstrated has taken a much larger stage than the actions on the field.“

The NFL just played its second Sunday of games since Trump intensified the controversy over players taking a knee during the anthem by using crass language to say that those who do so should be fired. This week, fewer players knelt.

On Sunday in Baltimore, Villanueva was joined by his Steelers teammates on the sideline, standing for the anthem. A week earlier in Chicago, the Steelers had decided not to be on the sideline for the anthem, although Villanueva stood at the front of a tunnel leading to the field, with his hand over his heart.

The Ravens seemed to seek a compromise solution Sunday, with their players taking a knee before the anthem. The crowd was asked to join the players and the Ravens organization in a prayer to embrace kindness, unity, equality and justice for all Americans. The Ravens then, like the Steelers across the field, stood for the anthem. The Ravens’ display drew boos, with some cheers mixed in, from the crowd.

“I’ve heard people say that my colleagues and I are un-American and unpatriotic,“ Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins wrote in a Washington Post opinion piece. “Well, we want to make America great. We want to help make our country safe and prosperous. We want a land of justice and equality. True patriotism is loving your country and countrymen enough to want to make it better.“

The Ravens’ gesture Sunday was in line with the Dallas Cowboys’ attempt last Monday night in Arizona to blend the interests of players who wanted to kneel for the anthem and those who wanted to stand for it. Owner Jerry Jones joined Cowboys players and coaches in locking arms and taking a knee on the field before the anthem. The Cowboys then stood and returned to their sideline and remained standing for the anthem.

It raises the question: Is a protest still a protest if it’s a compromise? Protest is, by definition, necessarily provocative. Some players have concerns that the original message of the movement started last season by quarterback Colin Kaepernick, then with the San Francisco 49ers, has been lost. Kaepernick took a knee to protest what he viewed as racial inequality in the U.S. and police brutality toward African Americans.

Those who took exception to the form of the players’ protests, including Trump, have made the national debate about patriotism. NFL owners reacted to Trump with statements of support for players and shows of unity in which some locked arms with players on the field. Players said they appreciated the support. But is it all about inequality, patriotism or unity?

“I think these conversations make people uncomfortable, and I think that’s a way for them to deflect from the issues that we really want to talk about and steer the narrative in a different direction,“ 49ers safety Eric Reid, who protested alongside Kaepernick last season, told ESPN last week.

The league has a business to run, and it must run that business while avoiding alienating fans on both sides of this polarizing, emotionally charged issue. At least for now, the league is drawing the ire of both those angry about the players’ protests, as well as those supportive of them and upset that Kaepernick remains without a job. The league is acutely aware of this.

The volume undoubtedly will be turned down at some point, though perhaps not soon. One former NFL general manager expressed wariness in recent days that any team contemplating signing Kaepernick must fret that Trump will return to the issue at some point and, the next time, that team would find itself bearing the brunt of the president’s scorn. But there is a country for Trump to run, after all. Surely the NFL won’t remain so prominent on Trump’s agenda forever.

The NFL, which dealt last season with sagging TV ratings, ultimately will be left to assess whether its business model has suffered lasting damage - and, if so, to what extent. Some players, meanwhile, have urged the league to become more involved in supporting their activism. And that, Jenkins argues, is the ultimate end game in all of this.

Jenkins wrote in The Post that he appreciated the support of a white teammate, Chris Long. He wrote about taking Long around Philadelphia to speak to police and community leaders, of going to bail hearings and talking to public defenders.

“This is where we need to point our attention now,“ Jenkins wrote. “Not to guys demonstrating but to the issues and work to be done in cities across the country.“


►  The MLB playoff bracket is set

The Colorado Rockies clinched the final playoff spot in Major League Baseball when the Milwaukee Brewers lost to the St. Louis Cardinals. With that result, we now know all the matchups when the Major League Baseball playoffs begin on Tuesday.

The Minnesota Twins will take on the New York Yankees in the Bronx on Tuesday in the 1-game American League Wild Card game. On Wednesday, the Rockies will take on the Diamondbacks in Arizona in the National League Wild Card game. The winners of those games will take on the top seeds in each league’s League Division Series, the Cleveland Indians and the Los Angeles Dodgers, respectively.

The other ALDS will begin on Thursday between the Boston Red Sox and Houston Astros. The other NLDS will have the Chicago Cubs facing the Washington Nationals and will begin on Friday.

Here is the playoff bracket, via Major League Baseball:

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Sports News

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►  GSC Softball to Host Showcase Camp

Glenville State Head Softball Coach Kristen Tunno is pleased to announce that they will be hosting a Showcase Camp with several other college coaches on Sunday, October 1, 2017.

The location of the camp is in Danville, WV at 824 Lick Creek Road with a rainout location at 8181 Six Mike Road which is also located in Danville, WV

Middle and High schoolers are permitted to attend. Cost of the camp is $50 per person for a team of eight or more, $60 per person if pre-registered before September 20th, and $75 per person registering after September 20th.

The camp will feature quality instruction from active college coaches, evaluations provided by the coaching staff through the instructional process, and a discussion on college athletics for both players and parents. The first two hours will be skill and fundamental work while the second two hour session will be simulated games with a college coach in charge of each team. There are two fields at this location so the athletes will be broken up by grade level. The camp is open to all middle and high school athletes.

The camp will run from 12:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. and several college coaches will be on hand along with GSC Head Coach Kristen Tunno in, University of Charleston coach Kimberly Stiles, Davis & Elkins coach Jordan Olson, Wheeling Jesuit’s Sara Pelegreen, and Alderson Broaddus’s Rachael Mack.

All players will receive: Instruction from all coaches attending the event, opportunities to ask questions about their skills and get to know the college coaches, one-on-one and small group instruction, and an open discussion about the NCAA recruiting process, rules, and regulations (parents are encouraged to either stay or come back for this segment. Questions are encouraged as to help answer questions and bust myths about the recruiting process.)


►  GSC Golf Places Eighth at Malone University Fall Classic

The GSC men’s golf team finished in eighth place over the weekend at the Malone University Fall Classic.

The Pioneers shot a total of 665 in the tournament with the team shooting a 335 on day one and a 330 on day two.

Alex Lytle led GSC as he shot a 160 placing 34th overall while Dylan Montgomery finished 50th as he shot a 167.

Also for the Pioneers Colby Cunningham and Brandon Smith tied for 53rd with a score of 170 and Jacob Arden placed 57th with a score of 173.

The Pioneers will return to the course on Monday, September 25th in the Wally Edgell Collegiate Tournament hosted by Davis & Elkins College at Canaan Valley Resort in Davis, West Virginia.


►  WVSSAC playoff ratings

The WVSSAC playoff ratings are calculated using a points-based system, factoring in each team’s wins and strength of schedule.

Class AAA

Rank School Rating Won Lost Tied Scored Allowed Points Bonus
T-1 MUSSELMAN 12.33 3 0 0 113 31 33 4
T-1 UNIVERSITY 12.33 3 0 0 117 47 36 1
3 HUNTINGTON 11.67 3 0 0 94 51 33 2
4 MARTINSBURG 11 3 0 0 157 29 33 0
T-5 CAPITAL 9 2 1 0 104 66 24 3
T-5 RIVERSIDE 9 2 1 0 92 79 24 3
T-7 CABELL MIDLAND 8.33 2 1 0 131 87 24 1
T-7 RIPLEY 8.33 2 1 0 91 52 24 1
T-7 SPRING MILLS 8.33 2 1 0 76 78 24 1
T-7 WHEELING PARK 8.33 2 1 0 87 60 24 1
11 HEDGESVILLE 8 2 1 0 106 46 24 0
12 HURRICANE 6.67 2 1 0 69 69 15 5
T-13 BUCKHANNON-UPSHUR 6 1 1 0 27 54 12 0
T-13 HAMPSHIRE 6 1 1 0 45 54 12 0
T-13 PARKERSBURG 6 1 1 0 70 50 12 0
T-13 SPRING VALLEY 6 1 1 0 46 21 12 0
17 WOODROW WILSON 4.33 1 2 0 32 97 12 1
T-18 GREENBRIER EAST 4 1 2 0 64 76 12 0
T-18 JOHN MARSHALL 4 1 2 0 68 84 12 0
T-18 MORGANTOWN 4 1 2 0 37 83 12 0
T-18 SOUTH CHARLESTON 4 1 2 0 58 102 12 0
T-22 GEORGE WASHINGTON 3.33 1 2 0 43 55 9 1
T-22 ST. ALBANS 3.33 1 2 0 55 95 9 1
T-24 BROOKE 0 0 2 0 21 58 0 0
T-24 JEFFERSON 0 0 3 0 25 139 0 0
T-24 PARKERSBURG SOUTH 0 0 3 0 46 108 0 0
T-24 PRESTON 0 0 3 0 51 91 0 0
T-24 PRINCETON 0 0 2 0 19 82 0 0
T-24 WASHINGTON 0 0 3 0 50 143 0 0

Class AA

Rank School Rating Won Lost Tied Scored Allowed Points Bonus
1 BLUEFIELD 12 3 0 0 124 27 33 3
T-2 BRIDGEPORT 10.67 3 0 0 104 34 30 2
T-2 WEIR 10.67 3 0 0 128 32 30 2
4 FAIRMONT SENIOR 10.33 3 0 0 114 36 27 4
T-5 MINGO CENTRAL 10 3 0 0 148 84 27 3
T-5 SISSONVILLE 10 3 0 0 92 44 27 3
7 ELKINS 9.5 2 0 0 41 3 18 1
8 NICHOLAS COUNTY 8.67 3 0 0 116 36 24 2
9 LIBERTY (Harrison) 8.5 2 0 0 105 49 15 2
T-10 JAMES MONROE 7.67 2 1 0 102 61 21 2
T-10 OAK HILL 7.67 3 0 0 113 42 21 2
12 NORTH MARION 7 2 1 0 83 67 21 0
T-13 POINT PLEASANT 6.67 2 1 0 108 57 18 2
T-13 WINFIELD 6.67 2 1 0 114 53 18 2
T-15 GRAFTON 6.33 2 1 0 45 49 18 1
T-15 ROBERT C. BYRD 6.33 2 1 0 94 68 18 1
T-17 PHILIP BARBOUR 6 2 1 0 83 56 15 3
T-17 SCOTT 6 2 1 0 94 75 15 3
T-17 WESTSIDE 6 2 1 0 63 19 18 0
T-20 LINCOLN COUNTY 5.33 2 1 0 60 61 15 1
T-20 PIKEVIEW 5.33 2 1 0 60 26 15 1
T-22 BRAXTON COUNTY 5 1 1 0 46 48 9 1
T-22 CLAY COUNTY 5 2 1 0 70 52 15 0
T-22 PETERSBURG 5 2 1 0 80 64 15 0
25 KEYSER 4.5 1 1 0 49 59 9 0
26 WYOMING EAST 3.67 1 2 0 31 90 9 2
27 WAYNE 3.5 1 1 0 58 53 6 1
T-28 HERBERT HOOVER 3.33 1 2 0 40 98 9 1
T-28 INDEPENDENCE 3.33 1 2 0 21 65 9 1
T-28 LINCOLN 3.33 1 2 0 89 108 9 1
T-28 SHADY SPRING 3.33 1 2 0 68 58 9 1
T-32 CHAPMANVILLE 3 1 2 0 73 91 9 0
T-32 LOGAN 3 1 2 0 60 101 9 0
T-32 NITRO 3 1 2 0 39 74 9 0
T-32 OAK GLEN 3 1 2 0 56 136 9 0
T-36 FRANKFORT 2 1 2 0 74 80 6 0
T-36 POCA 2 1 2 0 59 70 6 0
T-38 BERKELEY SPRINGS 0 0 3 0 43 122 0 0
T-38 EAST FAIRMONT 0 0 3 0 23 73 0 0
T-38 LIBERTY (Raleigh) 0 0 3 0 21 101 0 0
T-38 LEWIS COUNTY 0 0 3 0 16 102 0 0
T-38 MAN 0 0 3 0 38 85 0 0
T-38 RIVER VIEW 0 0 2 0 40 66 0 0
T-38ROANE COUNTY0030147100

Class A

RankSchoolRatingWonLostTiedScoredAllowedPointsBonus
1FAYETTEVILLE7.6730010060212
2ST. MARYS7.5200936123
T-3EAST HARDY7.333009634211
T-3MIDLAND TRAIL7.333009022211
T-5SOUTH HARRISON7206812122
T-5WEBSTER COUNTY73009461183
T-7CAMERON6.52009022121
T-7CLAY-BATTELLE6.52009720121
T-7MADONNA6.52006212121
10POCAHONTAS COUNTY6.3330010933181
11MOUNT VIEW62107685180
12SUMMERS COUNTY5110453791
T-13TUG VALLEY4.672107836122
T-13VAN4.672108558122
T-15MAGNOLIA4.3321010644121
T-15MONTCALM4.332107068121
T-17SHERMAN42107724120
T-17WIRT COUNTY42107467120
19RAVENSWOOD3110344660
T-20TUCKER COUNTY2.33120547961
T-20TYLER CONSOLIDATED2.331209911561
T-20VALLEY (Wetzel)2.33120288061
T-20WILLIAMSTOWN2.331209812661
T-24DODDRIDGE COUNTY2120956160
T-24NOTRE DAME21208714260
T-24RICHWOOD21201107260
T-24RITCHIE COUNTY2120387660
T-24TOLSIA2120436960
T-24TYGARTS VALLEY2120648460
T-30BUFFALO0030129100
T-30CALHOUN COUNTY0030613800
T-30GILMER COUNTY00304012900
T-30GREENBRIER WEST0030298400
T-30HANNAN003069400
T-30HUNDRED00303016100
T-30MEADOW BRIDGE0030612400
T-30MOOREFIELD0030710900
T-30PADEN CITY0020309100
T-30PARKERSBURG CATHOLIC002007400
T-30PENDLETON COUNTY00307813300
T-30VALLEY (Fayette)0030388900
T-30WAHAMA0030338100
T-30WHEELING CENTRAL0020214500

Sports News

The Free Press WV

►  GSC Softball to Host Showcase Camp

Glenville State Head Softball Coach Kristen Tunno is pleased to announce that they will be hosting a Showcase Camp with several other college coaches on Sunday, October 01, 2017.

The location of the camp is in Danville, WV at 824 Lick Creek Road with a rainout location at 8181 Six Mike Road which is also located in Danville, WV.

Middle and High schoolers are permitted to attend. Cost of the camp is $50 per person for a team of eight or more, $60 per person if pre-registered before September 20th, and $75 per person registering after September 20th.

The camp will feature quality instruction from active college coaches, evaluations provided by the coaching staff through the instructional process, and a discussion on college athletics for both players and parents. The first two hours will be skill and fundamental work while the second two hour session will be simulated games with a college coach in charge of each team. There are two fields at this location so the athletes will be broken up by grade level. The camp is open to all middle and high school athletes.

The camp will run from 12:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. and several college coaches will be on hand along with GSC Head Coach Kristen Tunno in, University of Charleston coach Kimberly Stiles, Davis & Elkins coach Jordan Olson, Wheeling Jesuit’s Sara Pelegreen, and Alderson Broaddus’s Rachael Mack.

All players will receive: Instruction from all coaches attending the event, opportunities to ask questions about their skills and get to know the college coaches, one-on-one and small group instruction, and an open discussion about the NCAA recruiting process, rules, and regulations (parents are encouraged to either stay or come back for this segment. Questions are encouraged as to help answer questions and bust myths about the recruiting process.)

For more information on the camp please call Kristen Tunno at 304.462-.6229 or email her at .


►  GSC Golf Places Eighth at Malone University Fall Classic

The GSC men’s golf team finished in eighth place over the weekend at the Malone University Fall Classic.

The Pioneers shot a total of 665 in the tournament with the team shooting a 335 on day one and a 330 on day two.

Alex Lytle led GSC as he shot a 160 placing 34th overall while Dylan Montgomery finished 50th as he shot a 167.

Also for the Pioneers Colby Cunningham and Brandon Smith tied for 53rd with a score of 170 and Jacob Arden placed 57th with a score of 173.

The Pioneers will return to the course on Monday, September 25th in the Wally Edgell Collegiate Tournament hosted by Davis & Elkins College at Canaan Valley Resort in Davis, West Virginia.


►  GSC Volleyball Drops Two Games

The Glenville State Lady Pioneer Volleyball team dropped two games on Saturday at the Gannon/Mercyhurst Tournament.

In the first game of the day the Lady Pioneers took on the Lakers of Mercyhurst. The Lakers would take set one 25-14 as they had five more kills than GSC 10 to five. However the Lady Pioneers bounced back in the second set as they took it 25-22 as this time they had 10 kills to the Lakers five kills.

Despite Glenville State playing well Mercyhurst would go on to defeat the Lady Pioneers 25-14 in the third set and 25-13 in the fourth set as GSC fell 3-1.

Jazaray Clark-Casto led the team in kills with six and also had a block in the game. Madison Gargus racked up nine assists while Allison Parski finished with eight assists. Ai Miyazaki led the team in digs with 17.

In game two of the day GSC took on Hillsdale College, which was the second matchup between the schools this season.

Glenivlle State only committed four errors and had eight kills but fell in set one to Hillsdale, 25-15. Hillsdale then went on to take the second set 25-16 and the third set 25-10 as they defeated the Lady Pioneers, 3-0.

GSC finished the match with 22 kills and 22 errors while Hillsdale had 34 kills and 10 errors.

Bailey Brawner had six kills to lead GSC while Madison Gargus led the team in assists with 12 and Ai Miyazaki finished with 12 digs in the game.

Glenville State (0-7) will hit the road on Friday, September 22nd as they travel to take on Cavaliers of UVa-Wise at 7:00 p.m.

Stonewall Resort to Host Arnold Palmer Birthday Celebration Golf Event

Stonewall Resort State Park will celebrate what would be golf legend and Stonewall Resort golf course designer Arnold Palmer’s 88th birthday this Sunday, September 10, with a special golf event.

Palmer, whose career spanned more than six decades, is considered one of the greatest professional golfers in the sport’s history, having won 62 PGA titles during his career. Arnie’s Army, a charitable organization Palmer started to help children, along with Stonewall Resort will kick off the “Life Well Played” Challenge at the event.

The Free Press WV
Arnold Palmer attended the dedication of the
Palmer Golf Course at Stonewall Resort in 2002


“Join us as we celebrate everything that made Palmer a beloved sports icon – from his bold yet unassuming charm to his overwhelming drive to help his fellow man – by showcasing how you’re making a positive impact in the lives of those around you,” said Stonewall’s PGA Golf Professional Randy Hernly.

The event will begin at 11 a.m. with a shotgun start. Hernly will welcome participants and explain what Palmer meant to Stonewall Resort and the legacy he left in north central West Virginia.

The cost to participate for each person is $60 and includes lunch and range and green fees. Birthday cake will be provided, and prizes will be awarded. The event is limited to the first 60 entrants. Registration is required and can be made by contacting the Golf Shop at 304.269.8885 or visit www.stonewallresort.com.

For more information about the “Life Well Played” Challenge, visit www.arniesarmy.org.

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