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The Free Press WV

►  Want to clean up college athletics? Pay the players

The University of Louisville basketball program had just put Stripper-gate in the rearview mirror. Assistant Coach Andre McGee was fired; everyone agreed that the illicit sex parties in Billy Minardi Hall occurred without the knowledge of any higher-ups. Bullet dodged.

Then came the FBI’s bribery and fraud investigation. The inquiry, which led to the arrests of 10 people last week connected to the world of college basketball, identified Louisville as having paid $100,000 to Brian Bowen, an incoming recruit. Last Wednesday, Louisville effectively fired legendary coach Rick Pitino and placed Athletic Director Tom Jurich on paid leave. Indications are that these arrests may be the tip of the iceberg.

Given that both scandals emerged from attempts to work around the ban on paying players, and after decades of trying to police such behavior, will the NCAA finally conclude that only one step can truly clean up college athletics’ seedy underbelly? Paying players.

After all, the cause of paying players had been gaining steam even before the Louisville fallout. Articles and opinion pieces trumpeting the cause have been published by the dozens over the past few years.

Yet, that response would make the current scandal markedly different from countless past instances of illegal payments. In the 1980s, Southern Methodist University boosters illicitly paid dozens of football players. A University of Kentucky envelope mailed to the father of recruit Chris Mills in the late 1980s had $1,000 cash fall out in transit, sparking an NCAA investigation. The University of Colorado admitted in 2004 that it used sex and alcohol to lure prospective student athletes into signing with the school. Michigan’s Fab Five took under-the-table payments.

None of these scandals led to a change in the NCAA’s amateur model.

Instead, over the past century, protest against unpaid student athletes has been docile and inefficient, almost always a low-risk, low-commitment cause. Talk about compensation has rarely been accompanied by actual change, because a strange elixir exists in college athletics: a still-pervasive belief in amateurism by many university leaders is coupled with billions of dollars in annual revenue. This money pays the salaries of thousands of athletic coaches and administrators. Paying the college athletes who generate revenue (and most don’t) requires them to take money out of their own pockets - something that’s possible only if the movement for change is a lot less talk and a lot more action.

The idea of paying college athletes is really old. In 1905, Harper’s Magazine published an editorial (subsequently reprinted in newspapers nationwide) addressing the “Pay of College Athletes.“ Harper’s saw the issue as one of visible inequity. The popularity - and profitability - of college athletics made the problem of “how to make athletes work for nothing” - or to put it another way, “how to keep the athletes from drawing salaries” - increasingly difficult for university administrators to manage. Harper’s concluded that unless a more transparent and fair compensation system arose, college athletes would continue to be paid “surreptitious wages.“

In 1915, the University of Chicago Daily Maroon upended the college football community by pushing the matter further. Given that the editor of the college newspaper and the tuba player in the marching band received compensation from the university, the Maroon argued, why not the college athletes? “They work hard for the university organization known as the football team, which is a money making enterprise, the receipts from football being something like $20,000 [roughly $478,000 today] more than expenditures for the sport. Why not give the players a share of the profits accruing from their hard and faithful labors?“

The University of Chicago was only one year removed from a national championship in football; its voice on the subject mattered.

In 1929, Major W.H. McKellar of the University of the South (Sewanee) proposed that his school’s conference - the Southern Conference - embrace open, above-board payments to college athletes. Actually, the Major preferred universities doing away with charging admission to college football games. But recognizing that this was crazy talk, McKellar argued that “his proposal to openly pay college athletes in the Southern conference” was the only reasonable way forward.

Even the nation’s most beloved humorist at the time - Will Rogers - provided flyby support for the pay-for-play model. He was the John Oliver of his day, just pithier. “There is only one fair way to ever arrange amateur athletics in any line in the country,“ Rogers declared, “and that’s let the athletes work on commission of what they draw at the gate then make them pay their own schooling expenses.“

Every few years the compensation issue resurfaced, usually in response to some sort of scandal. Then it went away.

Which is not to say that there haven’t been any changes along the way. In 1956, the NCAA voted to allow full athletic scholarships. In 1972, Title IX began pushing some of that athletic scholarship revenue to young women. Beginning in 2015, a new cost of attendance provision added several thousand dollars to athletic awards. But direct compensation has remained out of reach. In each case, after the bluster of a pay the players episode died down, the same thing happened: nothing.

That’s because activism on the issue has always been about words - passionate editorials, enthusiastic speeches and well-constructed research projects - rather than actions. There has never been an ethos of change or else among critics of college athletics.

No one expects commentator Jay Bilas to quit his work for ESPN because of his strong objections to the NCAA structure that he is covering. Similarly, it is not uncommon for faculty members at major football or basketball universities to rage against the inequity of the NCAA (using social justice theory, Marx, the whole nine yards) - and then take full advantage of their discounted athletic tickets.

This activism hasn’t gone further because paying college athletes is a collective action problem, a situation where members of a group might benefit from or support a certain action, but the individual costs make it difficult for the crowd to band together toward that end. In essence, someone says, “I could forfeit going to college football games because student athletes should be paid, but that would just result in me sitting at home on Saturday afternoon while everyone else is at the game.“ What good would that do?

And of course there’s the money involved. CBS recently extended its contract to televise the annual NCAA March Madness tournament for $8.8 billion over eight years. Nick Saban makes $11 million annually coaching the University of Alabama football team. The Big Ten conference just awarded Jim Delany more than $20 million in bonuses for his leadership. The status quo is working quite well for many of the parties involved.

Given that financially significant collective action problems are notoriously difficult to solve, what’s next?

Allowing athletes to control and profit from their names, likenesses and athletic abilities seems reasonable. Even for YouTubing, cross-country studs. Allowing college athletes open access to agents would be a start. Perhaps the NCAA, as ESPN’s Jay Williams suggests, is about to crumble.

But I doubt major changes will occur anytime soon. History tells us that we’ll continue to talk about this problem. We’ll debate it. We’ll write about it. We’ll even argue and fight about it.

And then things will die down, and we’ll go back to the way it has always been.

Ryan Swanson is associate professor of history in the honors college at the University of New Mexico and author of “When Baseball Went White: Reconstruction, Reconciliation and Dreams of a National Pastime.“


►  Analysis: What’s the end game for NFL and protesting players? Right now, there isn’t an answer

The conversations are taking place all over the NFL, in various settings and between different combinations of players, coaches, owners and league leaders. On Sunday in Baltimore, it was Ravens Coach John Harbaugh talking to Pittsburgh Steelers offensive tackle Alejandro Villanueva and DeMaurice Smith, the executive director of the NFL Players Association, before the Ravens and Steelers played at M&T Bank Stadium.

“Coach Harbaugh has done a lot of things for the military. . . . It was just a very friendly conversation regarding all the events that have transpired and how we as sort of players, coaches and the union can make this right,“ Villanueva, the former Army Ranger who has been a high-profile figure in the recent national debate about patriotism, unity and protests by NFL players during the national anthem, said later Sunday.

The NFL spent much of last week trying to figure out how to move forward on the issue. Commissioner Roger Goodell met with a group of players and owners on Tuesday night in New York. But as the league attempts to orchestrate its end game to all of this, here’s the problem: There is no quick and easy solution, because the interests of the league and the players who are protesting are divergent.

“At this point, this whole kneeling [or] standing up is a much bigger issue than the things that we’re asking for as a league,“ Villanueva said Sunday. “We’re trying to be conscious of social issues. We’re also trying to be very respectful of the flag. And how it’s being demonstrated has taken a much larger stage than the actions on the field.“

The NFL just played its second Sunday of games since Trump intensified the controversy over players taking a knee during the anthem by using crass language to say that those who do so should be fired. This week, fewer players knelt.

On Sunday in Baltimore, Villanueva was joined by his Steelers teammates on the sideline, standing for the anthem. A week earlier in Chicago, the Steelers had decided not to be on the sideline for the anthem, although Villanueva stood at the front of a tunnel leading to the field, with his hand over his heart.

The Ravens seemed to seek a compromise solution Sunday, with their players taking a knee before the anthem. The crowd was asked to join the players and the Ravens organization in a prayer to embrace kindness, unity, equality and justice for all Americans. The Ravens then, like the Steelers across the field, stood for the anthem. The Ravens’ display drew boos, with some cheers mixed in, from the crowd.

“I’ve heard people say that my colleagues and I are un-American and unpatriotic,“ Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins wrote in a Washington Post opinion piece. “Well, we want to make America great. We want to help make our country safe and prosperous. We want a land of justice and equality. True patriotism is loving your country and countrymen enough to want to make it better.“

The Ravens’ gesture Sunday was in line with the Dallas Cowboys’ attempt last Monday night in Arizona to blend the interests of players who wanted to kneel for the anthem and those who wanted to stand for it. Owner Jerry Jones joined Cowboys players and coaches in locking arms and taking a knee on the field before the anthem. The Cowboys then stood and returned to their sideline and remained standing for the anthem.

It raises the question: Is a protest still a protest if it’s a compromise? Protest is, by definition, necessarily provocative. Some players have concerns that the original message of the movement started last season by quarterback Colin Kaepernick, then with the San Francisco 49ers, has been lost. Kaepernick took a knee to protest what he viewed as racial inequality in the U.S. and police brutality toward African Americans.

Those who took exception to the form of the players’ protests, including Trump, have made the national debate about patriotism. NFL owners reacted to Trump with statements of support for players and shows of unity in which some locked arms with players on the field. Players said they appreciated the support. But is it all about inequality, patriotism or unity?

“I think these conversations make people uncomfortable, and I think that’s a way for them to deflect from the issues that we really want to talk about and steer the narrative in a different direction,“ 49ers safety Eric Reid, who protested alongside Kaepernick last season, told ESPN last week.

The league has a business to run, and it must run that business while avoiding alienating fans on both sides of this polarizing, emotionally charged issue. At least for now, the league is drawing the ire of both those angry about the players’ protests, as well as those supportive of them and upset that Kaepernick remains without a job. The league is acutely aware of this.

The volume undoubtedly will be turned down at some point, though perhaps not soon. One former NFL general manager expressed wariness in recent days that any team contemplating signing Kaepernick must fret that Trump will return to the issue at some point and, the next time, that team would find itself bearing the brunt of the president’s scorn. But there is a country for Trump to run, after all. Surely the NFL won’t remain so prominent on Trump’s agenda forever.

The NFL, which dealt last season with sagging TV ratings, ultimately will be left to assess whether its business model has suffered lasting damage - and, if so, to what extent. Some players, meanwhile, have urged the league to become more involved in supporting their activism. And that, Jenkins argues, is the ultimate end game in all of this.

Jenkins wrote in The Post that he appreciated the support of a white teammate, Chris Long. He wrote about taking Long around Philadelphia to speak to police and community leaders, of going to bail hearings and talking to public defenders.

“This is where we need to point our attention now,“ Jenkins wrote. “Not to guys demonstrating but to the issues and work to be done in cities across the country.“


►  The MLB playoff bracket is set

The Colorado Rockies clinched the final playoff spot in Major League Baseball when the Milwaukee Brewers lost to the St. Louis Cardinals. With that result, we now know all the matchups when the Major League Baseball playoffs begin on Tuesday.

The Minnesota Twins will take on the New York Yankees in the Bronx on Tuesday in the 1-game American League Wild Card game. On Wednesday, the Rockies will take on the Diamondbacks in Arizona in the National League Wild Card game. The winners of those games will take on the top seeds in each league’s League Division Series, the Cleveland Indians and the Los Angeles Dodgers, respectively.

The other ALDS will begin on Thursday between the Boston Red Sox and Houston Astros. The other NLDS will have the Chicago Cubs facing the Washington Nationals and will begin on Friday.

Here is the playoff bracket, via Major League Baseball:

The Free Press WV

Sports News

The Free Press WV

►  GSC Softball to Host Showcase Camp

Glenville State Head Softball Coach Kristen Tunno is pleased to announce that they will be hosting a Showcase Camp with several other college coaches on Sunday, October 1, 2017.

The location of the camp is in Danville, WV at 824 Lick Creek Road with a rainout location at 8181 Six Mike Road which is also located in Danville, WV

Middle and High schoolers are permitted to attend. Cost of the camp is $50 per person for a team of eight or more, $60 per person if pre-registered before September 20th, and $75 per person registering after September 20th.

The camp will feature quality instruction from active college coaches, evaluations provided by the coaching staff through the instructional process, and a discussion on college athletics for both players and parents. The first two hours will be skill and fundamental work while the second two hour session will be simulated games with a college coach in charge of each team. There are two fields at this location so the athletes will be broken up by grade level. The camp is open to all middle and high school athletes.

The camp will run from 12:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. and several college coaches will be on hand along with GSC Head Coach Kristen Tunno in, University of Charleston coach Kimberly Stiles, Davis & Elkins coach Jordan Olson, Wheeling Jesuit’s Sara Pelegreen, and Alderson Broaddus’s Rachael Mack.

All players will receive: Instruction from all coaches attending the event, opportunities to ask questions about their skills and get to know the college coaches, one-on-one and small group instruction, and an open discussion about the NCAA recruiting process, rules, and regulations (parents are encouraged to either stay or come back for this segment. Questions are encouraged as to help answer questions and bust myths about the recruiting process.)


►  GSC Golf Places Eighth at Malone University Fall Classic

The GSC men’s golf team finished in eighth place over the weekend at the Malone University Fall Classic.

The Pioneers shot a total of 665 in the tournament with the team shooting a 335 on day one and a 330 on day two.

Alex Lytle led GSC as he shot a 160 placing 34th overall while Dylan Montgomery finished 50th as he shot a 167.

Also for the Pioneers Colby Cunningham and Brandon Smith tied for 53rd with a score of 170 and Jacob Arden placed 57th with a score of 173.

The Pioneers will return to the course on Monday, September 25th in the Wally Edgell Collegiate Tournament hosted by Davis & Elkins College at Canaan Valley Resort in Davis, West Virginia.


►  WVSSAC playoff ratings

The WVSSAC playoff ratings are calculated using a points-based system, factoring in each team’s wins and strength of schedule.

Class AAA

Rank School Rating Won Lost Tied Scored Allowed Points Bonus
T-1 MUSSELMAN 12.33 3 0 0 113 31 33 4
T-1 UNIVERSITY 12.33 3 0 0 117 47 36 1
3 HUNTINGTON 11.67 3 0 0 94 51 33 2
4 MARTINSBURG 11 3 0 0 157 29 33 0
T-5 CAPITAL 9 2 1 0 104 66 24 3
T-5 RIVERSIDE 9 2 1 0 92 79 24 3
T-7 CABELL MIDLAND 8.33 2 1 0 131 87 24 1
T-7 RIPLEY 8.33 2 1 0 91 52 24 1
T-7 SPRING MILLS 8.33 2 1 0 76 78 24 1
T-7 WHEELING PARK 8.33 2 1 0 87 60 24 1
11 HEDGESVILLE 8 2 1 0 106 46 24 0
12 HURRICANE 6.67 2 1 0 69 69 15 5
T-13 BUCKHANNON-UPSHUR 6 1 1 0 27 54 12 0
T-13 HAMPSHIRE 6 1 1 0 45 54 12 0
T-13 PARKERSBURG 6 1 1 0 70 50 12 0
T-13 SPRING VALLEY 6 1 1 0 46 21 12 0
17 WOODROW WILSON 4.33 1 2 0 32 97 12 1
T-18 GREENBRIER EAST 4 1 2 0 64 76 12 0
T-18 JOHN MARSHALL 4 1 2 0 68 84 12 0
T-18 MORGANTOWN 4 1 2 0 37 83 12 0
T-18 SOUTH CHARLESTON 4 1 2 0 58 102 12 0
T-22 GEORGE WASHINGTON 3.33 1 2 0 43 55 9 1
T-22 ST. ALBANS 3.33 1 2 0 55 95 9 1
T-24 BROOKE 0 0 2 0 21 58 0 0
T-24 JEFFERSON 0 0 3 0 25 139 0 0
T-24 PARKERSBURG SOUTH 0 0 3 0 46 108 0 0
T-24 PRESTON 0 0 3 0 51 91 0 0
T-24 PRINCETON 0 0 2 0 19 82 0 0
T-24 WASHINGTON 0 0 3 0 50 143 0 0

Class AA

Rank School Rating Won Lost Tied Scored Allowed Points Bonus
1 BLUEFIELD 12 3 0 0 124 27 33 3
T-2 BRIDGEPORT 10.67 3 0 0 104 34 30 2
T-2 WEIR 10.67 3 0 0 128 32 30 2
4 FAIRMONT SENIOR 10.33 3 0 0 114 36 27 4
T-5 MINGO CENTRAL 10 3 0 0 148 84 27 3
T-5 SISSONVILLE 10 3 0 0 92 44 27 3
7 ELKINS 9.5 2 0 0 41 3 18 1
8 NICHOLAS COUNTY 8.67 3 0 0 116 36 24 2
9 LIBERTY (Harrison) 8.5 2 0 0 105 49 15 2
T-10 JAMES MONROE 7.67 2 1 0 102 61 21 2
T-10 OAK HILL 7.67 3 0 0 113 42 21 2
12 NORTH MARION 7 2 1 0 83 67 21 0
T-13 POINT PLEASANT 6.67 2 1 0 108 57 18 2
T-13 WINFIELD 6.67 2 1 0 114 53 18 2
T-15 GRAFTON 6.33 2 1 0 45 49 18 1
T-15 ROBERT C. BYRD 6.33 2 1 0 94 68 18 1
T-17 PHILIP BARBOUR 6 2 1 0 83 56 15 3
T-17 SCOTT 6 2 1 0 94 75 15 3
T-17 WESTSIDE 6 2 1 0 63 19 18 0
T-20 LINCOLN COUNTY 5.33 2 1 0 60 61 15 1
T-20 PIKEVIEW 5.33 2 1 0 60 26 15 1
T-22 BRAXTON COUNTY 5 1 1 0 46 48 9 1
T-22 CLAY COUNTY 5 2 1 0 70 52 15 0
T-22 PETERSBURG 5 2 1 0 80 64 15 0
25 KEYSER 4.5 1 1 0 49 59 9 0
26 WYOMING EAST 3.67 1 2 0 31 90 9 2
27 WAYNE 3.5 1 1 0 58 53 6 1
T-28 HERBERT HOOVER 3.33 1 2 0 40 98 9 1
T-28 INDEPENDENCE 3.33 1 2 0 21 65 9 1
T-28 LINCOLN 3.33 1 2 0 89 108 9 1
T-28 SHADY SPRING 3.33 1 2 0 68 58 9 1
T-32 CHAPMANVILLE 3 1 2 0 73 91 9 0
T-32 LOGAN 3 1 2 0 60 101 9 0
T-32 NITRO 3 1 2 0 39 74 9 0
T-32 OAK GLEN 3 1 2 0 56 136 9 0
T-36 FRANKFORT 2 1 2 0 74 80 6 0
T-36 POCA 2 1 2 0 59 70 6 0
T-38 BERKELEY SPRINGS 0 0 3 0 43 122 0 0
T-38 EAST FAIRMONT 0 0 3 0 23 73 0 0
T-38 LIBERTY (Raleigh) 0 0 3 0 21 101 0 0
T-38 LEWIS COUNTY 0 0 3 0 16 102 0 0
T-38 MAN 0 0 3 0 38 85 0 0
T-38 RIVER VIEW 0 0 2 0 40 66 0 0
T-38ROANE COUNTY0030147100

Class A

RankSchoolRatingWonLostTiedScoredAllowedPointsBonus
1FAYETTEVILLE7.6730010060212
2ST. MARYS7.5200936123
T-3EAST HARDY7.333009634211
T-3MIDLAND TRAIL7.333009022211
T-5SOUTH HARRISON7206812122
T-5WEBSTER COUNTY73009461183
T-7CAMERON6.52009022121
T-7CLAY-BATTELLE6.52009720121
T-7MADONNA6.52006212121
10POCAHONTAS COUNTY6.3330010933181
11MOUNT VIEW62107685180
12SUMMERS COUNTY5110453791
T-13TUG VALLEY4.672107836122
T-13VAN4.672108558122
T-15MAGNOLIA4.3321010644121
T-15MONTCALM4.332107068121
T-17SHERMAN42107724120
T-17WIRT COUNTY42107467120
19RAVENSWOOD3110344660
T-20TUCKER COUNTY2.33120547961
T-20TYLER CONSOLIDATED2.331209911561
T-20VALLEY (Wetzel)2.33120288061
T-20WILLIAMSTOWN2.331209812661
T-24DODDRIDGE COUNTY2120956160
T-24NOTRE DAME21208714260
T-24RICHWOOD21201107260
T-24RITCHIE COUNTY2120387660
T-24TOLSIA2120436960
T-24TYGARTS VALLEY2120648460
T-30BUFFALO0030129100
T-30CALHOUN COUNTY0030613800
T-30GILMER COUNTY00304012900
T-30GREENBRIER WEST0030298400
T-30HANNAN003069400
T-30HUNDRED00303016100
T-30MEADOW BRIDGE0030612400
T-30MOOREFIELD0030710900
T-30PADEN CITY0020309100
T-30PARKERSBURG CATHOLIC002007400
T-30PENDLETON COUNTY00307813300
T-30VALLEY (Fayette)0030388900
T-30WAHAMA0030338100
T-30WHEELING CENTRAL0020214500

Sports News

The Free Press WV

►  GSC Softball to Host Showcase Camp

Glenville State Head Softball Coach Kristen Tunno is pleased to announce that they will be hosting a Showcase Camp with several other college coaches on Sunday, October 01, 2017.

The location of the camp is in Danville, WV at 824 Lick Creek Road with a rainout location at 8181 Six Mike Road which is also located in Danville, WV.

Middle and High schoolers are permitted to attend. Cost of the camp is $50 per person for a team of eight or more, $60 per person if pre-registered before September 20th, and $75 per person registering after September 20th.

The camp will feature quality instruction from active college coaches, evaluations provided by the coaching staff through the instructional process, and a discussion on college athletics for both players and parents. The first two hours will be skill and fundamental work while the second two hour session will be simulated games with a college coach in charge of each team. There are two fields at this location so the athletes will be broken up by grade level. The camp is open to all middle and high school athletes.

The camp will run from 12:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. and several college coaches will be on hand along with GSC Head Coach Kristen Tunno in, University of Charleston coach Kimberly Stiles, Davis & Elkins coach Jordan Olson, Wheeling Jesuit’s Sara Pelegreen, and Alderson Broaddus’s Rachael Mack.

All players will receive: Instruction from all coaches attending the event, opportunities to ask questions about their skills and get to know the college coaches, one-on-one and small group instruction, and an open discussion about the NCAA recruiting process, rules, and regulations (parents are encouraged to either stay or come back for this segment. Questions are encouraged as to help answer questions and bust myths about the recruiting process.)

For more information on the camp please call Kristen Tunno at 304.462-.6229 or email her at .


►  GSC Golf Places Eighth at Malone University Fall Classic

The GSC men’s golf team finished in eighth place over the weekend at the Malone University Fall Classic.

The Pioneers shot a total of 665 in the tournament with the team shooting a 335 on day one and a 330 on day two.

Alex Lytle led GSC as he shot a 160 placing 34th overall while Dylan Montgomery finished 50th as he shot a 167.

Also for the Pioneers Colby Cunningham and Brandon Smith tied for 53rd with a score of 170 and Jacob Arden placed 57th with a score of 173.

The Pioneers will return to the course on Monday, September 25th in the Wally Edgell Collegiate Tournament hosted by Davis & Elkins College at Canaan Valley Resort in Davis, West Virginia.


►  GSC Volleyball Drops Two Games

The Glenville State Lady Pioneer Volleyball team dropped two games on Saturday at the Gannon/Mercyhurst Tournament.

In the first game of the day the Lady Pioneers took on the Lakers of Mercyhurst. The Lakers would take set one 25-14 as they had five more kills than GSC 10 to five. However the Lady Pioneers bounced back in the second set as they took it 25-22 as this time they had 10 kills to the Lakers five kills.

Despite Glenville State playing well Mercyhurst would go on to defeat the Lady Pioneers 25-14 in the third set and 25-13 in the fourth set as GSC fell 3-1.

Jazaray Clark-Casto led the team in kills with six and also had a block in the game. Madison Gargus racked up nine assists while Allison Parski finished with eight assists. Ai Miyazaki led the team in digs with 17.

In game two of the day GSC took on Hillsdale College, which was the second matchup between the schools this season.

Glenivlle State only committed four errors and had eight kills but fell in set one to Hillsdale, 25-15. Hillsdale then went on to take the second set 25-16 and the third set 25-10 as they defeated the Lady Pioneers, 3-0.

GSC finished the match with 22 kills and 22 errors while Hillsdale had 34 kills and 10 errors.

Bailey Brawner had six kills to lead GSC while Madison Gargus led the team in assists with 12 and Ai Miyazaki finished with 12 digs in the game.

Glenville State (0-7) will hit the road on Friday, September 22nd as they travel to take on Cavaliers of UVa-Wise at 7:00 p.m.

In Sports….

The Free Press WV

►  Pittsnogle, 7 Others Selected for WVU Sports Hall of Fame

Former basketball standout Kevin Pittsnogle is among eight people selected for induction into the West Virginia University Sports Hall of Fame.

WVU athletic director Shane Lyons announced the class of 2017 on Sunday, May 28.

The 6-foot-11 Pittsnogle played at WVU from 2003 to 2006. He helped WVU to a pair of deep runs in the NCAA Tournament and averaged 19.3 points and 5.5 rebounds per game in his senior season.

Others in the induction class are football wide receiver and kicker returner Willie Drewrey and center Dan Mozes, women’s soccer All-American Chrissie Abbott Bolan, basketball standout Eddie Becker, swimmer John Havlik, retired athletic trainer and coordinator of athletic medical services John Spiker, and the late baseball player and coach Charles Hickman.

Induction ceremonies are scheduled for September 16 in Morgantown.

MEC Announces 2017 Baseball Awards

The Free Press WV

The Mountain East Conference today announced its top individual award winners for the 2017 season with Concord’s Chad Frazier taking Player of the Year honors, while Shepherd ace Ryan Pansch earned Pitcher of the Year accolades. UVa-Wise’s Nate Thompson was tabbed as the MEC Freshman of the Year, and Fairmont State’s Phil Caruso was selected as the league’s Coach of the Year.

Frazier, a junior from Roanoke, VA, is the league’s Player of the Year after leading the MEC in hits (79), batting average (.425) and runs (72). He had 19 extra-base hits and drove in 43, while also stealing 15 bases. Frazier was also stellar defensively leading starting shortstops in fielding percentage (.949) committing just 11 errors.
 
Pansch, a junior from Charles Town, WV, is the MEC Pitcher of the Year after going a perfect 8-0 with a 2.55 ERA. He tossed three complete games and opponents batted just .228 against him. Pansch struck out 58 and allowed just 11 walks in 60.0 innings of work.

Thompson, a native of Wise, VA, did it all for the Cavs in his freshman season playing first and in the outfield, as well as serving as a relief pitcher and designated hitter. He hit .328 on the year with 22 RBI and 16 runs scored. As a pitcher he made nine appearances with four starts posting a 2-2 record with two saves and a 1.65 ERA. In addition to being the league’s Freshman of the Year, Thompson was named to the All-MEC second team as both a utility player and relief pitcher.

Caruso is the MEC Coach of the Year after leading the Fighting Falcons to a 28-22 overall record. FSU went 20-12 in the MEC to earn its first MEC Tournament berth. After inheriting a program that went 9-34, he has led Fairmont State to back-to-back 20-win seasons and its first winning record in over a decade.

The All-MEC teams and awards are selected by a vote of the league’s coaches.

All-MEC First Team
Pos. Name School Cl. Hometown
C Paul Williams Concord Jr. Vinton,VA
1B Trevor Wiersma Concord So. Vancouver, British Columbia
2B Vincent Haddox West Liberty Jr. Newell, WV
SS Chad Frazier Concord Jr. Roanoke, VA
3B Chase Hoffman Shepherd Jr. Middletown, MD
Utility Jacob Carney Shepherd Sr. Stephens City, VA
DH Johnny Kesling Fairmont State Jr. Fairmont, WV
OF John Koon WV Wesleyan Sr. Bridgeport, WV
OF Austin Norman Fairmont State Jr. Fairmont, WV
OF J.J. Sarty Shepherd Sr. Purcellville, VA
OF Evan Webb Concord So. Whitby, Ontario
SP Troy Beckner Concord So. Roanoke, VA
SP Yale Hughes West Liberty Sr. Cortland, NY
SP Ryan Pansch Shepherd Jr. Charles Town, WV
SP Michael Stout Fairmont State So. St. Mary’s, WV 
RP Chris Metrick WV Wesleyan Jr. Beckley, WV
All-MEC Second Team
Pos. Name School Cl. Hometown
C John Peloro Glenville State So. Weeki Wachee, FL
1B Brent West Urbana Sr. Mechanicsville, VA
2B Zach Bacon Glenville State So. Seminole, FL
SS Lee Carneal Charleston Sr. Charlottesville, VA
3B Nathan Neff Concord Fr. Fredericksburg, VA
Utility Nate Thompson UVa-Wise Fr. Wise, VA
DH Jordan Clark Concord So. Scott Depot, WV
OF Brenton Doyle Shepherd Fr. Warrenton, VA
OF Austin Hathaway Charleston So. Fredericktown, Ohio
OF Yale Hughes West Liberty Sr. Cortland, NY
OF Austin Keene WV Wesleyan Fr. Largo, FL
SP Michael Finch Wheeling Jesuit Jr. Norwalk, Ohio
SP Adam Guay Urbana Sr. Carrollton, Texas
SP Austin Henrich Charleston Fr. Poca, WV
SP Adam Jafine Charleston Jr. Toronto, Ontario
SP Greg Stagani West Liberty Sr. Richmond, Ohio
RP Nate Thompson UVa-Wise Fr. Wise, VA
All-MEC Honorable Mention
C: Tyler Hill (FSU); 1B: Phil Mandt (WVSU); 2B: Austin Barnhart (NDC); SS: Isac Franklin (UU), 3B: Jack Brunetti (UC); Utility: Jacob Whitmore (FSU); DH: Mike Adams (WLU); OF: Danny Beaver (NDC), T.J. Lett (NDC), Ben Myers (FSU)
SP: John Bentley (SU), Colby Gainer (WVSU), Jeff Stover (NDC), Nate Werner (CU); RP: Tori Fuscardo (WLU)
Top Honors
Freshman of the Year: Nate Thompson (WISE)
Player of the Year: Chad Frazier (CU)
Pitcher of the Year: Ryan Pansch (SU)
Coach of the Year: Phil Caruso (FSU)

GSC Softball Falls at St. Andrews

The Free Press WV

The Glenville State Lady Pioneers softball team dropped their season opening double-header at the hands of the St. Andrews University Knights on Saturday.

In game one Glenville State would strike first in the top of the fourth as Taylor Gilliland scored on an RBI from Miranda Cropp and later Dallas Kilgore scored as GSC went up 2-0.

St. Andrews tied it up in the bottom of the fifth inning at 2-2. The Knights then added another run in the bottom of the sixth as they went on to steal the game 3-2 from the Lady Pioneers.

GSC finished with three hits and had one error while St. Andrews had five hits and committed two errors.

Ally Brown went 2-for-2 while Miranda Cropp had an RBI.

Ally Brown pitched 6.0 innings allowing five hits, three runs, and three strike outs.

In the second game of the day the Knights would score a run in the second, a run in the third, and a run in the fifth as they took a 3-0 lead over GSC.

The Lady Pioneers had a big sixth inning as they tied it up at 3-3 as Hannah Wright brought in McKenzie Edmonds and later Mackenzie Smith hit a double scoring Hannah Wright and Ally Brown.

Glenville State then took their first lead of the game in the seventh inning as McKenzie Edmonds hit an RBI single scoring Taylor Gilliland as the Lady Pioneers went up 4-3.

However GSC would give up two runs in the bottom of the seventh as St. Andrews stole another win from the Lady Pioneers 5-4.

Both teams had nine hits in the game.

Mackenzie Smith went 1-for-3 with two RBI’s while McKenzie Edmonds and Hannah Wright both had RBI’s in the contest.

Tori Ward pitched 4.2 innings allowing six hits, three runs, and had just one strike out.

Glenville State (0-2) will return to action tomorrow Sunday, February 12th as they take on Pfeiffer University at 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.

NCAA DII Men’s Basketball Final: Glenville State 83 - Charleston 77

The Free Press WV

The Glenville State Pioneers (8-6, 5-5) held on for a nice win Monday night as they overcame a late surge from the University of Charleston winning by six, 83-77.

Glenville State dominated most of the first half as they headed into halftime leading the Golden Eagles by 11 points, 43-32.

In the second half the Pioneers would continue their good play as they pushed their lead to 17 points, 68-51 with 8:39 to play. However the Golden Eagles then went on a late run as they cut the Pioneers lead to just three points 74-71 with 1:52 left on the clock.

GSC then went on a 9-6 run to end the contest as they held onto the victory.

The Pioneers scored 20 points off of 15 turnovers by the Golden Eagles. GSC also had a great night shooting as they shot 53 percent from the floor and 40 percent from deep.

Jalon Plummer scored 22 points off the bench to lead the Pioneers while Brett Morris chipped in with 15 points and three blocks. Jon Dunmyer scored 14 points and
Terry Davis Jr. scored 12 points and grabbed a team high six rebounds.

Charleston (9-7, 3-7) was led by Elliott Coles’ game high 24 points.

Glenville State hits the road on Thursday, January 19th as they travel to West Virginia Wesleyan for a 7:30 p.m. tip-off with the Bobcats.

MEC Announces Women’s Weekly Basketball Honors

The Free Press WV

Wheeling Jesuit’s Jaana Motton has been named the Mountain East Conference Women’s Basketball Player of the Week.

Motton, a senior from Columbus, Ohio, had two double-doubles last week as WJU went 2-0, including a key conference win over Glenville State. Motton had 22 points and 10 rebounds against the Pioneers, and then scored 18 and pulled down 11 rebounds in a win over Concord. She shot 61 percent from the field in the two games.



Other Top Performances

Makenzie Cluesman (WISE) averaged 12.5 points, 6.5 rebounds and 5.0 assists in a 2-0 week for the Cavs ...

Erika Toney (GSC) scored 19 points in both of Glenville State’s games last week ...

Sylvia Hudson (UU) had a career-high 27 points in a win over Concord last week ...

Mari Stewart (WVWC) averaged 16 points in a 1-1 week for the Bobcats ...

Kelsey Miller (NDC) had 23 points in a loss to UVa-Wise and then had 13 points in a win over Fairmont State ...

Amanda Ruffner (FSU) averaged 22.5 points and 4.5 rebounds in a 1-1 week for the Falcons ...

Marissa Brown (WLU) had 25 points in a win over West Virginia Wesleyan ...

Danielle Catron (CU) had over 20 points in both games last week and averaged 3.5 rebounds.

2016-17 MEC Players of the Week
November 14 Monica Burns (WJU)
November 21 Kayla Carey (WISE)
November 28 Deidra Combs (FSU)
December 05 Jordyn Peck (UC)
December 12 Aurreshae Hines (WVSU)
December 19 Paris McLeod (GSC)
January 09 Paris McLeod (GSC)
January 16 Jaana Motton (WJU)

MEC Men’s Basketball Roundup (January 14, 2017)

The Free Press WV

No. 2 Fairmont St. 97, Notre Dame 77

SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio- No. 2 Fairmont State downed Notre Dame 97-77 on Saturday in Murphy Gymnasium. The Fighting Falcons remain undefeated with a 15-0 overall record and 9-0 mark in MEC play while Notre Dame moves to 12-3 on the year and 6-3 in league action.

Matt Bingaya drained 32 points and hauled in 12 rebounds in the win with D’Ondre Stockman chipping in 22 points. Vonte Montgomery added 14 points followed by Thomas Wimbush with 13 points.

Ja’Sean Lewis netted 17 point for Notre Dame with Kyauta Taylor and Kobie Johnson contributing 16 points apiece. Will Vorhees rounded out the list of double-digit performers with 12 points.

Fairmont State scored 30 points off of 20 Notre Dame turnovers and shot 52% from the floor in the victory.


No. 4 West Liberty 98, UVa-Wise 71

WEST LIBERTY, WV- No. 4 West Liberty used a strong second half to run away with a 98-71 win over UVa-Wise on Saturday evening. The Hilltoppers post a 14-1 overall record and hold an 8-1 mark in MEC play while the Cavaliers drop to 3-12 on the year and 1-8 in league action.

David Hoehn led the charge for West Liberty with 24 points. James Griffin netted 14 points and grabbed 10 rebounds with Clay Guillozet and Dan Monterso chipping in 13 points and 11 points, respectively.

Michael Seals led the effort for UVa-Wise with 22 points. Taiwo Badmus recorded 15 points with Yesid Mosquera-Perea draining 11 points in the setback.

The Hilltoppers shot 53% from the floor and scored 27 second chance points in the victory.


No. 6 Wheeling Jesuit 83, Concord 80

WHEELING, WV- No. 6 Wheeling Jesuit survived a late rally by Concord to secure an 83-80 win on Saturday. With the victory, the Cardinals run their record to 14-1 overall and 8-1 in MEC action while the Mountain Lions slip to 5-10 on the year and 1-8 in league play.

Haywood Highsmith paced the Cardinals with 22 points and 11 rebounds. Kyle Ritz notched 16 points in the victory with Kyle Ritz adding 13 points and 10 rebounds. Preston Boswell chipped in 11 points to aid the effort.

Michael Sanchez scored a team-high 18 points in the setback with Patrick Eugene, Stephen Thompson, and Aaron Miller all tallying 12 points over the course of the contest. Cam Shannon netted 11 points for Concord.

Wheeling Jesuit overcame 13 lead changes and 14 ties to earn the victory.


Shepherd 84, Urbana 77

URBANA, Ohio- Shepherd took home an 84-77 win over Urbana on Saturday evening to improve to 9-6 overall and 6-3 in MEC play. The Blue Knights slide to 8-7 on the year and 3-6 in league action with the setback. The Rams took control of the momentum right from the start and held on down the final stretch of the second half to secure the victory.

AJ Carr drained 18 points and grabbed 11 rebounds in the win with Winston Burgess and Steffen Davis tallying 15 points and 14 points, respectively. Skyler Roman notched 13 points followed by Naim Muhammed with 11 points.

Jahmere Howze paced Urbana with 21 points. DeQuan Abrom added 16 points with Carlas Jackson chipping in 15 points.


Glenville St. 92, West Virginia St. 76

GLENVILLE, WV - Glenville State captured a 92-76 victory over West Virginia State on Saturday evening. The Pioneers move to 7-6 overall and 4-5 in MEC play with the win while the Yellow Jackets move to 5-10 overall and 2-7 in the league after the setback.

Glenville State came out firing at the start of the first half and never looked back on their way to the win. Terry Davis Jr. scored 22 points and hauled in 10 rebounds with Jon Dunmeyer notching 19 points. Brett Morris netted 13 points over the course of the contest with Micah Thomas and Brook Ely scoring 11 points and 10 points, respectively .

DeQuan Doyle drained 21 points and grabbed 16 points for the Yellow Jackets in the setback. Terrance Jenkins chipped in 14 points followed by Tyrie Elliott with 12 points. Ernest Jenkins rounded out the list of double-digit performers with 11 points.


West Virginia Wesleyan 86, Charleston 84 (Overtime)

CHARLESTON, WV- West Virginia Wesleyan overcame an eight point deficit (77-69) with 36 seconds left in regulation to force the Golden Eagles into overtime on Saturday. The Bobcats refused to back down after the late rally, resulting in an 86-84 win in the new H. Bernard Wehrle Sr. Athletic Arena. West Virginia Wesleyan improves to 6-9 on the year and 3-6 in MEC action. The Golden Eagles slip to 9-6 overall and 3-6 in the league race.

Mo Berchie drained a team-high 34 points while Kevin Kangni and Clay Todd chipped in 15 points and 11 points, respectively.

Elliott Cole led all players in the game with 39 points including a school record 12 three-pointers. Keir Anderson tallied 13 points over the course of the contest with LeJavius Johnson adding 12 points. Jonathon Tshibuy recorded 11 points for Charleston in the setback.

In Sports….

The Free Press WV

►  Saints to Keep Training Camp in West Virginia Despite Floods

The New Orleans Saints are planning to keep their training camp in West Virginia after recent flooding in the state killed at least 23 people.

The team says in a statement it has been in contact with officials at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs and it still plans to hold training camp at the facility beginning on July 27.

In Monday night’s statement attributed to team executives Dennis Lauscha and Mickey Loomis, the Saints say they “will continue to monitor the situation and look for ways that our team/organization can contribute in a positive way while we are there this summer.“

The team also says it is working with United Way to provide assistance for victims of the flooding.


►  MEC Male Scholar-Athlete Of The Year


BRIDGEPORT, WV—University of Charleston men’s soccer standout Conor Branson has been named again as the Mountain East Conference Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Branson, who was selected among the 12 finalists for the award announced last week, was also the MEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year in 2014-15.

Branson, a native of Pontefract, England, earned consensus first team All-America playing honors and first team Capital One Academic All-America accolades for a second-consecutive season. He also repeated as the MEC Defensive Player of the Year while helping the Golden Eagles to the MEC regular season and tournament titles, as well as return trip to the NCAA semifinals. At the championship, Branson received the Elite 90 Award given to the student-athlete with the highest cumulative grade-point average participating at the finals site for each of the NCAA’s 90 championships. He finished the 2015 campaign with four goals and four assists and helped lead the UC defense to 14 shutouts.

Branson maintained a 3.98 grade-point average during the season while pursuing a graduate degree in Business Administration. He is currently playing professionally with the Pittsburgh Riverhounds of the United Soccer League (USL).

The MEC Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year is selected by a vote of institutional administrators and the conference office. The Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year will be announced tomorrow.


2015-16 MEC Award Winners

Male Sports Coach of the Year: Monte Cater (Shepherd, Football)

Female Sports Coach of the Year: Christy Benner (Wheeling Jesuit, Volleyball)

Male Athlete of the Year: Seger Bonifant (West Liberty, Men’s Basketball)

Female Athlete of the Year: Courtney Iacobacci (Fairmont State, Softball)

Male Scholar Athlete of the Year: Conor Branson (University of Charleston, Soccer)


►  Female Scholar-Athlete Of The Year

BRIDGEPORT, WV —Notre Dame College women’s basketball player Lauren Langenderfer has been named as the Mountain East Conference Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Langenderfer was selected among the 12 finalists for the award announced last week.

Langenderfer became the first Academic All-American in the history of the program during the 2015-16 season after averaging 14 points and five rebounds for the Falcons while also maintaining a perfect 4.0 grade-point average in chemistry. She was the recipient of the Notre Dame College President’s Award for Academic and Athletic Excellence and the St. Mary Agnes Bosche Award given to a traditional undergraduate student who demonstrates honesty and trustworthiness, a commitment to excellence and selfless service to Notre Dame and the larger community.

Langenderfer was a second team All-MEC selection in 2016 helping the Falcons to a 20-10 record and a third place finish in the MEC. Off the court, she was also an active member of the Executive Board of the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC), which became heavily involved with the Make-A-Wish Foundation and TEAM IMPACT, an organization that partners children with special needs with NDC athletics programs.

The MEC Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year is selected by a vote of institutional administrators and the conference office.


2015-16 MEC Award Winners

Male Sports Coach of the Year: Monte Cater (Shepherd, Football)

Female Sports Coach of the Year: Christy Benner (Wheeling Jesuit, Volleyball)

Male Athlete of the Year: Seger Bonifant (West Liberty, Men’s Basketball)

Female Athlete of the Year: Courtney Iacobacci (Fairmont State, Softball)

Male Scholar Athlete of the Year: Conor Branson (University of Charleston, Soccer)

Female Scholar Athlete of the Year: Lauren Langenderfer (Notre Dame College, Women’s Basketball)


►  Ex-NFL Player Fatally Shoots Self While Moving Duffel Bag

A former NFL running back accidentally and fatally shot himself Tuesday at a car dealership outside Detroit while moving a duffel bag containing two guns, WJBK reports. According to the Indianapolis Star, Zurlon Tipton brought his Jeep to the dealership to be serviced. He was moving personal items from his trunk into the duffel bag when one of the guns went off. Tipton was shot in the stomach. Police initially thought the 26-year-old Tipton would be OK as he was talking before being taken to the hospital. No other injuries were reported.

Tipton appeared in 16 games in two seasons with the Indianapolis Colts, the AP reports. He was released in December. “He loved to have fun,“ former teammate Frank Gore tells the Star. “He was always loud and acting crazy in the locker room. That’s just who he was.” Tipton’s alma mater, Central Michigan University, calls his death “shocking and tragic.“ Tipton was arrested in late 2015 for allegedly firing a gun. Police say he fled the scene after reports of shots fired with a handgun and AR-15 assault rifle in his Jeep. Charges were never filed. Both guns in the duffel bag were registered to Tipton, and he had a concealed pistol license.

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