GilmerFreePress.net

In Sports….

The Free Press WV

►  Cyclist Tried Poop Doping, and It May Have Worked

It probably won’t ever become the focus of a hit sports movie—not even if they call it Poosiers—but “poop doping” is a real thing and could possibly give competitive cyclists an edge. That’s according to microbiologist and mountain biker Lauren Petersen, who tells Bicycling magazine that after being sick for more than a decade with Lyme Disease, in 2014 she gave herself an at-home fecal transplant from somebody who happened to be another racer. Petersen says she not only felt much better after the stool transplant, she upped her training to five days a week and was winning races within months, though her experience proves correlation, not causation. “I wondered if I had gotten my microbiome from a couch potato, not a racer, if I would I be doing so well,“ says PeterSenator

Petersen—who says the procedure was “not fun” but “pretty basic”—says she started collecting stool samples from top racers and found that a microorganism called Prevotella was found in almost all top racers but less than 10% of the general population. She is now doing more research into Prevotella, which is believed to help muscle recovery. Other experts, however, are skeptical, telling the Washington Post that it is far too early to draw conclusions—and warning that “bacterial doping” at home could be very dangerous. (Petersen herself acknowledges the risk and isn’t endorsing it.) At the Big Lead blog, Tully Corcoran argues that if poop doping is what cyclists really want to do, we should “all just go ahead and let them, for crying out loud.“

This Date in Sports History

The Free Press WV

June 26

1910 — For the second consecutive year, Hazel Hotchkiss wins the singles, doubles and mixed doubles titles at the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championships.


1959 — Ingemar Johansson knocks out Floyd Patterson in the third round at Yankee Stadium to win the world heavyweight title.


1990 — Jennifer Capriati, 14, defeats Helen Kelesi 6-3, 6-1 in the first round to become the youngest winner of a match in Wimbledon history.


1995 — The U.S. Supreme Court upholds a random drug-testing program in Vernonia, Ore. The 6-to-3 decision allows public high school officials to require student-athletes to submit to random urinalysis as a condition of being allowed to play interscholastic sports.


1998 — Jamaica becomes the first Caribbean nation to win a World Cup soccer match since Cuba beat Romania in 1938. Theodore Whitmore scores in the 40th and 54th minutes as the Jamaicans beat Japan 2-1.


2000 — Vince Spadea ends an ATP-record 21-match losing streak, upsetting 14th-seeded Greg Rusedski of Britain 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-7 (8), 9-7 in four hours at Wimbledon. Spadea last won in Lyon, France, in October 1999.


2002 — Seven-time champion Pete Sampras, 1992 winner Andre Agassi and No. 2-seeded Marat Safin all lose at Wimbledon. For the first time in the Open era, five of the top-eight seeded men’s players are eliminated before the third round.


2005 — Birdie Kim holes a 30-yard bunker shot to birdie the 18th hole and win the U.S. Women’s Open. The 23-year-old South Korean finishes at 3-over 287 for a two-shot win over 17-year-old Morgan Pressel and 19-year-old Brittany Lang.


2005 — Justin Gatlin cements his status as America’s fastest human by winning the 200 meters, becoming the first man in 20 years to sweep the sprints at the U.S. track and field championships. A day after winning the 100, Gatlin wins the 200 in 20.04 seconds. The last man to win both races at the U.S. meet was Kirk Baptiste in 1985.


2008 — Two stunning second-round upsets happen at Wimbledon as former champion Maria Sharapova and two-time runner-up Andy Roddick are ousted. Sharapova loses 6-2, 6-4 to 20-year-old Alla Kudryavtseva, a 154th-ranked Russian. Roddick goes out 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-4, 7-6 (4) to 40th-ranked Janko Tipsarevic of Serbia.


2011 — Top-ranked Yani Tseng wins the LPGA Championship by 10 strokes and, at 22, becomes the youngest player to win four LPGA Tour majors. Tseng betters Se Ri Pak, who was 24 when she won her fourth major.


2012 — Major college football finally gets a playoff. A committee of university presidents approves the BCS commissioners’ plan for a four-team playoff to start in the 2014 season. The new format creates a pair of national semifinals. No. 1 will play No. 4, No. 2 will play No. 3.


2013 — Seven-time champion Roger Federer is stunned by 116th-ranked Sergiy Stakhovsky in the second round of Wimbledon, his earliest loss in a Grand Slam tournament in 10 years. The 27-year-old Ukrainian outplays Federer on Centre Court, winning 6-7 (5), 7-6 (5), 7-5, 7-6 (5) in one of the biggest upsets in Grand Slam history.


2014 — The United States reaches the knockout stage of consecutive World Cups for the first time. Germany beat the U.S. 1-0 to win Group G, but the Americans held onto second place when Portugal defeats Ghana 2-1 in a game played simultaneously.


2014 — FIFA bans Uruguay striker Luis Suarez for four months for biting an opponent at the World Cup, ruling him out of the rest of the tournament and the start of the upcoming Premier League season.

This Date in Sports History

The Free Press WV

June 24


1911 — John McDermott becomes the first American-born winner of the U.S. Open when he beats Michael Brady and George Simpson in a playoff. McDermott finishes two strokes better than Brady and five better than Simpson.


1928 — John Farrell beats Bobby Jones by one stroke in a 36-hole playoff to win the U.S. Open.


1947 — Jim Ferrier wins the PGA championship by defeating Chick Harbert 2 and 1 in the final round.


1956 — Marlene Bauer Hagge beats Patty Berg in a sudden-death playoff to take the LPGA championship.


1968 — Canada’s Sandra Post beats Kathy Whitworth by seven strokes in a playoff to become the first non-U.S. player and rookie to win the LPGA championship.


1968 — Joe Frazier stops Mando Ramos in the second round at Madison Square Garden in New York City for the world heavyweight title.


1990 — Criminal Type becomes the first horse to win consecutive $1 million races after capturing the Hollywood Gold Cup. He had previously won the $1 million Pimlico Special on May 12.


1991 — The NHL’s Board of Governors adopts instant replay.


1995 — The New Jersey Devils complete a four-game sweep with a 5-2 win over the Detroit Red Wings for their first Stanley Cup title.


2000 — Rick DiPietro is the first goalie drafted No. 1 when the New York Islanders select the 18-year-old star from Boston University at the NHL Draft.


2001 — Karrie Webb, 26, captures the LPGA Championship by two strokes to become the youngest woman to complete the Grand Slam. Webb has won her last four majors — including consecutive U.S. Opens — by a combined 25 strokes. The Australian joins Juli Inkster, Louise Suggs, Pat Bradley and Mickey Wright as winners of the LPGA’s four majors.


2010 — John Isner outlasts Nicolas Mahut in the longest match in tennis history. Isner hits a backhand winner to win the last of the match’s 980 points, and takes the fifth set against Mahut, 70-68. The first-round match took 11 hours, 5 minutes over three days, lasting so long it was suspended because of darkness — two nights in a row. Play resumed at 59-all and continued for more than an hour before Isner won 6-4, 3-6, 6-7 (7), 7-6 (3), 70-68.


2011 — Nineteen-year-old UCLA star Patrick Cantlay shoots a course-record 10-under 60 — the lowest PGA Tour round ever by an amateur — to take a four-stroke lead in the Travelers Championship. Cantlay ties the tournament record set by Tommy Bolt when the event was played in Wethersfield in 1954.


2013 — In one of Wimbledon’s greatest upsets, an ailing Rafael Nadal is knocked out in straight sets by a player ranked 135th — the Spaniard’s first loss in the opening round of a Grand Slam event. Steve Darcis of Belgium stuns the two-time champion 7-6 (4), 7-6 (8), 6-4.


2013 — Bryan Bickell and Dave Bolland score 17 seconds apart in the final 1:16 of the third period and the Chicago Blackhawks win the Stanley Cup with a stunning 3-2 comeback victory in Game 6 over the Boston Bruins.

This Date in Sports History

The Free Press WV

June 23

1917 — In baseball’s greatest relief effort, Ernie Shore of the Boston Red Sox retires 26 batters for a 4-0 victory over Washington. Shore relieves Babe Ruth with nobody out and a man on first, who was cut down stealing.


1917 — Molla Bjurstedt win the women’s U.S. Lawn Tennis Association title for the third straight year with a 4-6, 6-0, 6-2 victory over Marion Vanderhoef.


1963 — Julius Boros wins a three-way playoff to take the U.S. Open. Boros beats Jacky Cupit by three strokes and Arnold Palmer by six.


1969 — Joe Frazier stops Jerry Quarry in the eighth round at Madison Square Garden in New York City for the world heavyweight title.


1972 — President Nixon signs the Higher Education Act of 1972. Title IX of this congressional act bars sex bias in athletics and other activities at colleges receiving federal assistance.


1974 — Sandra Haynie wins the LPGA championship by two strokes over JoAnne Carner.


1975 — Lou Graham beats John Mahaffey by two strokes in a playoff to win the U.S. Open.


1991 — A Mazda becomes the first Japanese car to win the Le Mans 24 hours race, overtaking a Mercedes in the last three hours. Bertrand Gachot of Belgium, Johnny Herbert of Britain and Volker Weidler of Germany are the winning drivers of the rotary-powered Mazda.


1996 — Michael Johnson breaks the world record in the 200 meters, running 19.66 seconds at the U.S. track and field trials in Atlanta. The previous mark of 19.72 was set by Italy’s Pietro Mennea in 1979 in Mexico City.


2002 — Hall of Fame jockey Chris McCarron finishes his career with his 7,141st trip to the winner’s circle, his final ride a victory on Came Home in the $107,500 Affirmed Stakes.


2005 — Tim Duncan comes up huge in the second half and is chosen finals MVP and Manu Ginobili has another breakthrough performance to lead the San Antonio Spurs past the Detroit Pistons 81-74 in Game 7 of the NBA Finals.


2012 — Ashton Eaton breaks the world record in the decathlon, finishing with 9,039 points at the U.S. Olympic trials in Eugene, Ore., to beat the Roman Sebrle’s 11-year-old mark by 13 points. Eaton opened the decathlon the previous day with world-best marks for the decathlon in the 100 and long jump. Eaton needed a time of 4 minutes, 16.37 seconds in the finale, the 1,500 meters, to break the mark. He finished in 4:14.48.


2013 — Courtney Force claims a Funny Car victory against her father at the Auto-Plus NHRA New England Nationals. In their first final round matchup, Courtney Force earns her second victory of the year and third in her career. She improves to 4-2 against her father, John Force, a 15-time Funny Car world champion.


2015 — The NHL’s Board of Governors approve the proposed 3-on-3 overtime change.

In Outdoors….

The Free Press WV

►  Canoeing, Surfing Orgs Fight Over Stand-Up Paddleboarding

Ending an argument we’re sure has happened at least once on a slow afternoon in a bar somewhere, a court will finally decide whether stand-up paddleboarding is closer to surfing or canoeing. The New York Times reports the Court of Arbitration for Sport has been asked to settle a dispute between the International Surfing Association and International Canoe Federation, both of which are fighting for control of the increasingly popular sport of stand-up paddleboarding, or SUP. The battle for control of SUP has become more urgent as the Olympics is considering adding it to future games.

The ISA argues SUP is performed on a board, like surfing; it also claims it’s been holding SUP competitions for years, Deadspin reports. The ICF counters that SUP uses a paddle. “Propulsion using a paddle is basically conoeing,“ the ICF secretary general says. “Standing up or sitting down is irrelevant.“ But the ISA claims the ICF is trying to jump on the bandwagon. “We have a track record of doing this,“ Reuters quotes the ISA president as saying. “At the ICF now there is an interest of how they can be part of the popularity of the sport.“ The ISA calls itself “the historical rightful custodian” of SUP, and the ICF claims its opponent has rejected all offers of compromise. No date has been set for the court’s decision.


►  Former UFC Fighter Dies After Boxing Match

The world of mixed martial arts is mourning former Ultimate Fighting Championship fighter Tim Hague, who was fatally injured in a boxing match in Edmonton Friday. His sister, Jackie Neil, confirmed Sunday that the 34-year-old, who was knocked out and suffered a brain hemorrhage, had died, the CBC reports. “It is with incredible sadness, sorrow, and heartbreak to report that Tim has passed away today,“ she said. “He was surrounded by family, listening to his favorite songs. We will miss him so greatly.“ Hague, who fought in the UFC as “The Thrashing Machine” between 2009 and 2011, was active in MMA for 10 years but had been focusing on boxing since last year, according to Bleacher Report.

Hague was hospitalized in critical condition Friday after the KO79 match against former Edmonton Eskimos player Adam Braidwood, the Edmonton Journal reports. Edmonton Combative Sports Commission executive director Pat Reid says an official review will include reports from referees, ringside judges, physicians, and others. Gym owner Alicia Landry tells the CBC that Hague, who had a day job as an elementary school English teacher, was a local icon who had planned to lead a summertime sports camp. “The students just adored him,“ she says. “He’s a big teddy bear, that guy.“

This Date in Sports History

The Free Press WV

June 21

1919 — Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman wins the women’s U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championship with a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Marion Zinderstein.


1932 — Jack Sharkey scores a 15-round split decision over Max Schmeling to win the world heavyweight title in New York.


1960 — Armin Hary of West Germany becomes the first man to run 100 meters in 10.0 seconds at a meet in Zurich, Switzerland.


1964 — Jim Bunning of the Philadelphia Phillies pitches a perfect game against the New York Mets. The no-hitter gives Bunning one in each league, and the Phillies’ Gus Triandos becomes the first catcher to handle no-hitters in both leagues.


1965 — Gary Player becomes the third man to win golf’s top four pro titles when he captures the U.S. Open. Player beats Kel Nagle by three strokes in a playoff round. Gene Sarazen and Ben Hogan had won the U.S. and British Opens, the Masters and the PGA.


1970 — Tony Jacklin becomes the first English golfer in 50 years to win the U.S. Open, beating Dave Hill by five strokes.


1971 — Lee Trevino tops Jack Nicklaus by two strokes in a playoff to win the U.S. Open.


1992 — Tom Kite wins the U.S. Open by two strokes over Jeff Sluman. Playing in 35 mph wind, Kite shoots a par 72 for a 3-under 285 total.


1994 — Lori McNeil upsets five-time champion Steffi Graf 7-5, 7-6 (7-5) in the first round of Wimbledon. Graf becomes the first reigning women’s champion to lose in the first round.


1998 — Marion Jones becomes the first athlete in 50 years to win the women’s 100 and 200 meters and long jump at the U.S. Track and Field Championships. Jones wins the 200 in 22.24 seconds.


2002 — Lance Deal wins his ninth U.S. hammer championship. He joins Hal Connolly as the only nine-time winners in the event.


2003 — Lennox Lewis retains his heavyweight title when a cut stops Vitali Klitschko after six brawling rounds. All three ringside judges had Klitschko winning 58-56, but ring doctor Paul Wallace orders referee Lou Moret to stop the fight.


2005 — French Open winner Justine Henin-Hardenne loses in the first round at Wimbledon. The Belgian becomes the first Roland Garros women’s champion since 1962 to lose her opening match at Wimbledon when she’s beaten by Eleni Daniilidou.


2012 — Miami’s LeBron James caps his title bid with 26 points, 13 assists and 11 rebounds, Chris Bosh adds 23 points, Dwyane Wade scores 20 points and the Heat finish off the Oklahoma City Thunder in Game 5 of the NBA Finals, winning 121-106. Mike Miller scores 23 points on 7-for-8 shooting from 3-point range for Miami, which adds this title to the one it claimed in 2006.


2015 — Jordan Spieth becomes the sixth player to win the Masters and the U.S. Open after Dustin Johnson three-putts from 12 feet on the final hole at Chambers Bay with a chance to win the championship himself. The 21-year-old Spieth becomes the youngest player to win two majors since Gene Sarazen in 1922 and was the youngest U.S. Open champion since Bobby Jones in 1923.

This Date in Sports History

The Free Press WV

June 19

1867 — Ruthless, ridden by J. Gilpatrick, wins the inaugural Belmont Stakes at Jerome Park in the Bronx. The filly earns $1,850 for her victory.


1914 — Harry Vardon wins his sixth and final British Open by shooting a 306, three strokes ahead of J.H. Taylor at Prestwick Club.


1936 — German heavyweight boxer Max Schmeling knocks out previously unbeaten Joe Louis in the 12th round. Schmeling’s victory sets off a propaganda war between the Nazi regime and the United States on the eve of World War II.


1954 — Ed Furgol edges Gene Littler by one stroke to win the U.S. Open, the first golf tournament to be televised nationally.


1955 — Jack Fleck beats Ben Hogan by three strokes in a playoff round to win the U.S. Open.


1977 — Hubert Green wins the U.S. Open by one stroke over Lou Graham.


1986 — Len Bias, the second pick in the NBA draft made by the Boston Celtics two days before, dies of a heart attack induced by cocaine use.


1992 — Evander Holyfield wins a unanimous decision over Larry Holmes to remain unbeaten and retain the undisputed heavyweight title.


1999 — Dallas wins its first Stanley Cup, as Brett Hull’s controversial goal at 14:51 of the third overtime gives the Stars a 2-1 victory over the Buffalo Sabres in Game 6.


2005 — Michael Campbell answers every challenge Tiger Woods throws his way for a two-shot victory in the U.S. Open. Campbell has clutch par saves and a 20-foot birdie putt on the 17th hole that proves to be the knockout punch. Retief Goosen, the two-time U.S. Open champion, turns in a collapse that ranks among the greatest in major championship history. He loses his three-shot lead in three holes and closes with an 81 to tie for 11th at 8 over.


2006 — Cam Ward stops nearly everything giving the Carolina Hurricanes their first Stanley Cup title with a 3-1 victory over Edmonton in Game 7.


2011 — Rory McIlroy runs away with the U.S. Open title, winning by eight shots and breaking the tournament scoring record by a whopping four strokes. McIlroy, who finishes with a 16-under 268, is the third player in U.S. Open history to break 70 in all four rounds.


2015 — Alex Rodriguez homers for his 3,000th career hit as the New York Yankees beat the Detroit Tigers 7-2.


2016 — Dustin Johnson atones for his past mishaps in the majors winning the U.S. Open by three shots. Shane Lowry, who began the final round with a four-shot lead, Jim Furyk and Scott Piercy finish tied for second. Johnson plays the final two hours without knowing where he stood when the USGA questions whether he should be penalized one stroke for his ball moving on the fifth green. The USGA ends up penalizing him, turning that 68 into a 1-under 69 to finish at 4-under 276, the lowest winning score in nine U.S. Opens at Oakmont.


2016 — LeBron James and his relentless Cavaliers pulls off an improbable NBA Finals comeback to give the city of Cleveland its first title since 1964. The Cavs become the first team to rally from a 3-1 finals deficit by beating the defending champion Golden State Warriors 93-89.

In Sports….

The Free Press WV

►  Michael Phelps’ Next Opponent Has Never Heard of Him

Is he high>? Mashable reports Michael Phelps will race a great white shark for Discovery Channel’s inescapable Shark Week. The mechanics of the race are unclear—Mashable is concerned the shark won’t understand it’s supposed to race the Olympian, not eat him—and a press release for the special, Phelps vs. Shark: Great Gold vs. Great White, states such a race has never before been attempted. Discovery is billing it as a battle between “one of the fastest and most efficient predators on the planet” and “our greatest champion to ever get in the water.“ And sure, Phelps has 23 Olympic gold medals and 39 world records, but a great white shark has approximately 300 teeth.

For the Win reports Phelps has already completed a week of filming in South Africa for Shark Week, so apparently they figured out that whole don’t-get-an-American-sport-hero-eaten-for-ratings thing. And Phelps seems to have had a pretty great time, saying: “Sharks are like my no. 1 favorite animal in the world; being able to see them face to face was pretty cool.” He added on Instagram that he’s “always wanted” to get “in a cage and dive with great white sharks.“ Phelps vs. Shark: Great Gold vs. Great White airs July 23 on Discovery. A second special, Shark School with Michael Phelps, in which the Olympian gets real close to a hammerhead shark, will air July 30.


►  After 41 Years, McDonald’s Makes a Change

The year 2018 will mark the first time since 1976 that you won’t see the McDonald’s logo plastered across Olympic venues, reports USA Today. That’s because McDonald’s has negotiated an early end to its corporate sponsorship agreement with the International Olympic Committee, which was scheduled to run through the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Effective immediately, McDonald’s is no longer one of the IOC’s top sponsors, though it signed an eight-year sponsorship extension in 2012, per the AP. The company is believed to have paid about $25 million per year to call itself the Olympics food retail sponsor, reports Reuters.

It’s not cutting ties completely, however. Under the change announced Friday, McDonald’s will keep domestic marketing rights in South Korea for the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, per a release. It will also keep restaurants in the Olympic Park and Olympic Village in 2018. Last year, McDonald’s announced it would review its Olympic sponsorship deal, citing a new advertising rule that allowed non-official sponsors to benefit. In a statement, the company says it will “focus on different priorities … as part of our global growth plan.“ The BBC notes Budweiser, Hilton, and AT&T have also ended Olympic partnerships recently.

This Date in Sports History

The Free Press WV

June 17

1954 — Rocky Marciano scores a 15-round unanimous decision over Ezzard Charles at New York to retain the world heavyweight title.


1961 — Gene Littler shoots a 68 in the final round to edge Doug Sanders and Bob Goalby in the U.S. Open.


1962 — Jack Nicklaus beats Arnold Palmer by three strokes in a playoff to win the U.S. Open.


1973 — John Miller shoots a 63 in the final round to win the U.S. Open over John Schlee.


1976 — The 18-team NBA absorbs four of the six remaining ABA teams: the New York Nets, Indiana Pacers, San Antonio Spurs and Denver Nuggets.


1979 — Hale Irwin wins the U.S. Open over Gary Player and Jerry Pate.


1990 — Fifty-year-old Harry Gant becomes the oldest driver to win a NASCAR race as he posts a 2.4-second victory over Rusty Wallace in the Miller 500 at Pocono International Raceway.


1991 — Payne Stewart escapes with a two-stroke victory over Scott Simpson in the highest-scoring U.S. Open playoff in 64 years.


1995 — Claude Lemieux snaps a tie at 3:17 of the third period as the New Jersey Devils open the Stanley Cup finals with a 2-1 victory over the Detroit Red Wings. The victory, the ninth on the road, breaks the NHL playoff record for road wins.


2001 — Retief Goosen misses a 2-foot putt on the 18th green, tying him with Mark Brooks and setting up a playoff for the U.S. Open.


2006 — Rookie David Gilliland becomes the first non-Nextel Cup driver to win a Busch Series race this season, passing J.J. Yeley with 10 laps to go and holding on to take the Meijer 300 at Kentucky Speedway.


2007 — Angel Cabrera holds off Tiger Woods and Jim Furyk by a stroke to capture the U.S. Open. Cabrera shoots a 1-under-par 69 in the final round at brutal Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club.


2007 — Kate Ziegler breaks swimming’s oldest world record, shattering the 1,500-meter freestyle mark by 9 1/2 seconds at the TYR Meet of Champions Mission Viejo, Calif. Ziegler wins the 30-lap race in 15:42.54, easily erasing Janet Evans’ 1988 mark of 15:52.10 set in Orlando, Fla. At the time, Evans was the first woman to break 16 minutes.


2008 — The Boston Celtics win their 17th NBA title with a stunning 131-92 blowout over the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 6. Kevin Garnett scores 26 points with 14 rebounds, Ray Allen scores 26 and Paul Pierce, the finals MVP, adds 17. The Celtics, a 24-win team a year ago, wrap up their first crown since 1986.


2010 — The Los Angeles Lakers beat Boston for the first time in a Game 7 to repeat as NBA champions. Kobe Bryant scores 23 points despite 6-of-24 shooting and the Lakers win their 16th NBA championship, dramatically rallying from a fourth-quarter 13-point deficit to beat the Celtics 83-79.


2011 — Rory McIlroy becomes the first player in the 111-year history of the U.S. Open to reach 13-under par, and despite a double bogey into the water on the final hole, his 5-under 66 is enough set the 36-hole scoring record at 131.


2012 — Webb Simpson wins the U.S. Open outlasting former U.S. Open champions Jim Furyk and Graeme McDowell.

In Sports….

The Free Press WV

►  A First: Boxing Great Will Fight Mixed Martial Arts Great

Lovers of sports spectacles can rejoice: The long-rumored super-fight between undefeated boxing great Floyd Mayweather Jr. and mixed martial arts champion Conor McGregor has been made official. Yahoo Sports reports the two men will face each other in a boxing match on August 26 in Las Vegas. The 40-year-old Mayweather will end a 23-month retirement to face McGregor, the 28-year-old Irishman who went from being a rookie in the Ultimate Fighting Championship to the biggest star in the history of mixed martial arts in just a few years. According to ESPN, McGregor first suggested the idea of a cross-sport superfight with Mayweather on Conan O’Brien’s talk show back in 2015. It wasn’t until McGregor won the UFC lightweight belt last November, however, that the fantasy started to become a reality.

Mayweather is considered the heavy favorite going into the fight, though regardless of the outcome McGregor’s paycheck promises to be by far the biggest of his career. According to the New York Times, Mayweather’s 2015 fight with Manny Pacquiao drew nearly 4.5 million viewers through pay-per-view. McGregor’s biggest pay-per-view draw to date drew 1.6 million. Forbes reports each fighter could take home more than $100 million for the fight. The two men will meet at the light-middleweight limit of 154 pounds, which bodes well for McGregor, who is currently the UFC’s 155-pound champion. Mayweather, meanwhile, won one of the biggest fights of his life when he jumped up in weight to fight Oscar de la Hoya for the 154-pound belt in 2007. Mayweather walked into that fight 10 pounds lighter than his opponent.

Click Below for More Sports...

Page 1 of 377 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »




The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVII The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved