GilmerFreePress.net

PRODUCER PRICE INDEXES - NOVEMBER 2018

The Free Press WV

The Producer Price Index for final demand edged up 0.1 percent in November, seasonally adjusted, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Final demand prices advanced 0.6 percent in October and 0.2 percent in September. (See table A.) On an unadjusted basis, the final demand index moved up 2.5 percent for the 12 months ended in November.

In November, the rise in the final demand index can be traced to a 0.3-percent increase in prices for final demand services. In contrast, the index for final demand goods decreased 0.4 percent.

The index for final demand less foods, energy, and trade services moved up 0.3 percent in November, the third consecutive increase. For the 12 months ended in November, prices for final demand less foods, energy, and trade services advanced 2.8 percent.


Final Demand

Final demand services: The index for final demand services moved up 0.3 percent in November, the third straight rise. The broad-based November advance was led by a 0.3-percent increase in the index for final demand trade services. (Trade indexes measure changes in margins received by wholesalers and retailers.) Prices for final demand transportation and warehousing services climbed 1.2 percent, and the index for final demand services less trade, transportation, and warehousing inched up 0.1 percent.

Product detail: Most of the November advance in prices for final demand services can be traced to margins for fuels and lubricants retailing, which jumped 25.9 percent. The indexes for health, beauty, and optical goods retailing; cellular phone and other wireless telecommunications services; airline passenger services; food wholesaling; and truck transportation of freight also moved higher. Conversely, prices for guestroom rental fell 3.5 percent. The indexes for machinery and equipment wholesaling and for portfolio management also declined.

Final demand goods: The index for final demand goods moved down 0.4 percent in November, the largest decrease since falling 0.5 percent in May 2017. The November decline was the result of a 5.0-percent drop in the index for final demand energy. In contrast, prices for final demand goods less foods and energy climbed 0.3 percent, and the index for final demand foods advanced 1.3 percent.

Product detail: Leading the November decrease in the index for final demand goods, gasoline prices dropped 14.0 percent. The indexes for liquefied petroleum gas, electric power, fresh fruits and melons, jet fuel, and primary basic organic chemicals also moved down. Conversely, the index for pharmaceutical preparations rose 1.5 percent. Prices for fresh and dry vegetables and for residential

JOB OPENINGS AND LABOR TURNOVER – OCTOBER 2018

The Free Press WV

The number of job openings was little changed at 7.1 million on the last business day of October, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the month, hires edged up to 5.9 million, and separations were little changed at 5.6 million. Within separations, the quits rate was little changed at 2.3 percent and the layoffs and discharges rate was unchanged at 1.1 percent. This release includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the nonfarm sector by industry and by four geographic regions.


Job Openings

On the last business day of October, the job openings level was little changed at 7.1 million. The job openings rate was 4.5 percent in October. The number of job openings was little changed for total private and for government. Job openings increased in information (+45,000), real estate and rental and leasing (+38,000), educational services (+20,000), and state and local government education (+17,000). The number of job openings decreased in state and local government, excluding education (-38,000) and transportation, warehousing, and utilities (-33,000). Job openings were little changed in all four regions.


Hires

The number of hires edged up to 5.9 million (+196,000) in October, nearly matching its series high in August. The hires rate was 3.9 percent in October. The number of hires was little changed for total private and for government. Hires increased in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+90,000) and durable goods manufacturing (+43,000), but decreased in mining and logging (-11,000). The number of hires was little changed in all four regions.


Separations

Total separations includes quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations. Total separations is referred to as turnover. Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee. Therefore, the quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or ability to leave jobs. Layoffs and discharges are involuntary separations initiated by the employer. Other separations includes separations due to retirement, death, disability, and transfers to other locations of the same firm.

The number of total separations was little changed at 5.6 million in October. The total separations rate was 3.7 percent. The number of total separations was little changed for total private and for government. Total separations increased in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+37,000). The number of total separations was little changed in all four regions.

The number of quits was little changed in October at 3.5 million. The quits rate was 2.3 percent. The number of quits was little changed for total private and unchanged for government. Quits increased in health care and social assistance (+33,000), transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+30,000), and educational services (+12,000). The number of quits decreased in other services (-39,000). Quits decreased in the Northeast region.

The number of layoffs and discharges was little changed in October at 1.7 million. The layoffs and discharges rate was 1.1 percent. The number of layoffs and discharges was little changed for total private and for government. The number of layoffs and discharges was little changed in all industries and regions.

The number of other separations was little changed in October at 351,000. The other separations level was little changed for total private and for government. Other separations increased in construction (+18,000). The number of other separations decreased in a number of industries, with the largest decreases in health care and social assistance (-17,000) and arts, entertainment, and recreation (-6,000). The number of other separations was little changed in all four regions.


Net Change in Employment

Large numbers of hires and separations occur every month throughout the business cycle. Net employment change results from the relationship between hires and separations. When the number of hires exceeds the number of separations, employment rises, even if the hires level is steady or declining. Conversely, when the number of hires is less than the number of separations, employment declines, even if the hires level is steady or rising. Over the 12 months ending in October, hires totaled 67.8 million and separations totaled 65.3 million, yielding a net employment gain of 2.5 million. These totals include workers who may have been hired and separated more than once during the year.

Want a Burger King Whopper for a Penny? Go to McDonald’s

The Free Press WV

Adweek is calling Burger King’s new ad campaign “clever” and “irreverent” because of its unusual premise. It requires customers to go to McDonald’s—if not inside one, at least within 600 feet of one. At that point, they open the Burger King app, which reroutes them to the nearest BK to get a Whopper for a penny (see the ad HERE). As Ad Age notes, it has the added bonus for the chain of giving people an incentive to download the app and actually use it. The ad is the brainchild of FCB New York, and it required Burger King to “geofence” every McDonald’s in the country. That would be roughly 14,000, about double the number of Burger Kings. The offer begins Tuesday and runs through Dec. 12, reports USA Today.

U.S. Market Weekly Summary – Week Ending 12.07.2018

The Free Press WV

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index started the final month of 2018 on a negative note, falling 4.6% this week in a slide led by the financial, industrial and materials sectors.

The market benchmark ended the week at 2,633.08, down from last week’s closing level of 2,760.16. The market had been up 1.8% for the year to date as of last week’s closing level thanks in part to a 4.8% jump last week, but this week’s drop erased most of that gain, pulling the index back into the red for 2018. With just a little more than three weeks remaining this year, the S&P 500 is now down 1.5% for the year to date.

This week’s drop came over the course of only four sessions as the market was closed Wednesday to observe the funeral for former US President George H.W. Bush, who died Nov. 30.

The decline was fairly broad, with all but two sectors closing in the red versus last Friday’s close. The financial sector logged the largest percentage drop, down 7.1%, followed by a 6.3% drop in industrials and a 5.2% decline in the materials sector. The two sectors that managed to eke out gains were utilities, up 1.3%, and real estate, up 0.3%.

The slide came as investors looking ahead to 2019 are continuing to question the strength of the economy and worry about the potential impact of trade issues. US November employment data released Friday showed a mixed picture, with hiring slowing to its lowest three-month growth rate in a year even as wage growth continued at the highest rate in nearly a decade while unemployment remained at 3.7%, its lowest level since December 1969.

The financial sector’s decliners included JPMorgan Chase (JPM), down 7.1% on the week, Bank of America (BAC), down 10%, and Wells Fargo (WFC), off 7.4%.

In the industrial sector, shares of aerospace company Boeing (BA) shed 6.8% this week as Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer (ERJ) said a federal court in Brazil issued a ruling preventing its board from approving its merger with Boeing. Embraer said it will appeal the decision. American depositary shares of Embraer fell 6.2%.

On the upside, meanwhile, the utilities sector’s gain came as investors sought safety in the shares of companies whose services are typically seen as more likely to be in demand regardless of the state of the economy.

Gainers in the utilities sector included NextEra Energy (NEE), up 0.6% this week as the clean-energy company said it completed its acquisition of Southern Co.‘s (SO) indirect ownership interests in the Stanton and Oleander natural-gas power plants in Florida.

Click Below for More Financial News...

Page 1 of 521 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »



The Gilmer Free Press

Copyright MMVIII-MMXVIII The Gilmer Free Press. All Rights Reserved