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The ‘Queen of Soul’ Died at 76

The Free Press WV

Aretha Franklin, the undisputed “Queen of Soul” who sang with matchless style on such classics as “Think,“ ‘'I Say a Little Prayer,“ and her signature song, “Respect,“ and who stood as a cultural icon around the globe, has died at age 76 from advanced pancreatic cancer. Publicist Gwendolyn Quinn tells the AP that Franklin died Thursday at 9:50am at her home in Detroit. Franklin, who’d battled undisclosed health issues in recent years, had in 2017 announced her retirement from touring. A professional singer and accomplished pianist by her late teens, and a superstar by her mid-20s, Franklin had long ago settled any arguments over who was the greatest popular vocalist of her time. Her gifts were a multi-octave mezzo-soprano, gospel passion, and training worthy of a preacher’s daughter.

She recorded hundreds of tracks and had dozens of hits over the span of a half-century, including 20 that reached No. 1 on the R&B charts. But her reputation was defined by an extraordinary run of top 10 smashes in the late 1960s, from the morning-after bliss of “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,“ to the wised-up “Chain of Fools,“ to her unstoppable call for “Respect.“ Her records sold millions of copies and the music industry couldn’t honor her enough. Franklin won 18 Grammy Awards. In 1987, she became the first woman inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. In a 2004 interview, Franklin was asked whether she sensed in the ‘60s that she was helping change popular music. “Somewhat, certainly with ‘Respect,‘ that was a battle cry for freedom and many people of many ethnicities took pride in that word,“ she answered. “It was meaningful to all of us.“

‘Queen of Soul’ Aretha Franklin dies at 76

Aretha Franklin, the undisputed “Queen of Soul” who sang with matchless style on such classics as “Think,” ″I Say a Little Prayer” and her signature song, “Respect,” and stood as a cultural icon around the globe, died Thursday at age 76 from pancreatic cancer.

She died at her home in Detroit — “one of the darkest moments of our lives,” her family said, in a statement released to The Associated Press by publicist Gwendolyn Quinn. 

“We have been deeply touched by the incredible outpouring of love and support we have received from close friends, supporters and fans all around the world ,” the family said, adding that funeral arrangements would be announced in coming days.

Franklin, who had battled undisclosed health issues in recent years, announced her retirement from touring last year.

A professional singer and accomplished pianist by her late teens, a superstar by her mid-20s, Franklin had long ago settled any arguments over who was the greatest popular vocalist of her time . Her gifts, natural and acquired, were a multi-octave mezzo-soprano, gospel passion and training worthy of a preacher’s daughter, taste sophisticated and eccentric, and the courage to channel private pain into liberating song.

“She was truly one of a kind,” said Clive Davis, the music mogul who brought her to Arista Records and helped revive her career in the 1980s. “She was more than the Queen of Soul.  She was a national treasure to be cherished by every generation throughout the world.”

She recorded hundreds of tracks and had dozens of hits over the span of a half century , including 20 that reached No. 1 on the R&B charts. But her reputation was defined by an extraordinary run of top 10 smashes in the late 1960s, from the morning-after bliss of “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,” to the wised-up “Chain of Fools” to her unstoppable call for “Respect.”

Her records sold millions of copies and the music industry couldn’t honor her enough. Franklin won 18 Grammy awards. In 1987, she became the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Fellow singers bowed to her eminence. Said Smokey Robinson, who grew up with her in Detroit: “This morning my longest friend in this world went home to be with our Father. I will miss her so much but I know she’s at peace.”

Political and civic leaders treated her as a peer.  Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was a longtime friend, and she sang at the dedication of King’s memorial, in 2011. She performed at the inaugurations of Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, and at the funeral for civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks. Clinton gave Franklin the National Medal of Arts. President George W. Bush awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, in 2005.

Bill and Hillary Clinton issued a statement mourning the loss of their friend and “one of America’s greatest treasures.” For more than 50 years, they said, Franklin “stirred our souls. She was elegant, graceful, and utterly uncompromising in her artistry.”

Franklin’s best-known appearance with a president was in January 2009, when she sang “My Country ’tis of Thee” at President Barack Obama’s inauguration. She wore a gray felt hat with a huge, Swarovski rhinestone-bordered bow that became an internet sensation and even had its own website. In 2015, she brought Obama and others to tears with a triumphant performance of “Natural Woman” at a Kennedy Center tribute to the song’s co-writer, Carole King.

Franklin endured the exhausting grind of celebrity and personal troubles dating back to childhood. She was married from 1961 to 1969 to her manager, Ted White, and their battles are widely believed to have inspired her performances on several songs, including “(Sweet Sweet Baby) Since You’ve Been Gone,” ″Think” and her heartbreaking ballad of despair, “Ain’t No Way.” The mother of two sons by age 16 (she later had two more), she was often in turmoil as she struggled with her weight, family problems and financial predicaments. Her best known producer, Jerry Wexler, nicknamed her “Our Lady of Mysterious Sorrows.”


Franklin married actor Glynn Turman in 1978 in Los Angeles but returned to her hometown of Detroit the following year after her father was shot by burglars and left semi-comatose until his death in 1984. She and Turman divorced that year.

Despite growing up in Detroit, and having Robinson as a childhood friend, Franklin never recorded for Motown Records; stints with Columbia and Arista were sandwiched around her prime years with Atlantic Records. But it was at Detroit’s New Bethel Baptist Church, where her father was pastor, that Franklin learned the gospel fundamentals that would make her a soul institution.

Aretha Louise Franklin was born March 25, 1942, in Memphis, Tennessee. The Rev. C.L. Franklin soon moved his family to Buffalo, New York, then to Detroit, where the Franklins settled after the marriage of Aretha’s parents collapsed and her mother (and reputed sound-alike) Barbara returned to Buffalo.

C.L. Franklin was among the most prominent Baptist ministers of his time. He recorded dozens of albums of sermons and music and knew such gospel stars as Marion Williams and Clara Ward, who mentored Aretha and her sisters Carolyn and Erma. (Both sisters sang on Aretha’s records, and Carolyn also wrote “Ain’t No Way” and other songs for Aretha). Music was the family business and performers from Sam Cooke to Lou Rawls were guests at the Franklin house. In the living room, the shy young Aretha awed friends with her playing on the grand piano.

Franklin occasionally performed at New Bethel Baptist throughout her career; her 1987 gospel album “One Lord One Faith One Baptism” was recorded live at the church.

Her most acclaimed gospel recording came in 1972 with the Grammy-winning album “Amazing Grace,” which was recorded live at New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in South Central Los Angeles and featured gospel legend James Cleveland, along with her own father (Mick Jagger was one of the celebrities in the audience). It became one of the best-selling gospel albums ever.

The piano she began learning at age 8 became a jazzy component of much of her work, including arranging as well as songwriting. “If I’m writing and I’m producing and singing, too, you get more of me that way, rather than having four or five different people working on one song,” Franklin told The Detroit News in 2003.

Franklin was in her early teens when she began touring with her father, and she released a gospel album in 1956 through J-V-B Records. Four years later, she signed with Columbia Records producer John Hammond, who called Franklin the most exciting singer he had heard since a vocalist he promoted decades earlier, Billie Holiday. Franklin knew Motown founder Berry Gordy Jr. and considered joining his label, but decided it was just a local company at the time.

Franklin recorded several albums for Columbia Records over the next six years. She had a handful of minor hits, including “Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With a Dixie Melody” and “Runnin’ Out of Fools,” but never quite caught on as the label tried to fit into her a variety of styles, from jazz and show songs to such pop numbers as “Mockingbird.” Franklin jumped to Atlantic Records when her contract ran out, in 1966.

“But the years at Columbia also taught her several important things,” critic Russell Gersten later wrote. “She worked hard at controlling and modulating her phrasing, giving her a discipline that most other soul singers lacked. She also developed a versatility with mainstream music that gave her later albums a breadth that was lacking on Motown LPs from the same period.

“Most important, she learned what she didn’t like: to do what she was told to do.”

At Atlantic, Wexler teamed her with veteran R&B musicians from Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, and the result was a tougher, soulful sound, with call-and-response vocals and Franklin’s gospel-style piano, which anchored “I Say a Little Prayer,” ″Natural Woman” and others.

Of Franklin’s dozens of hits, none was linked more firmly to her than the funky, horn-led march “Respect” and its spelled out demand for “R-E-S-P-E-C-T.”

Writing in Rolling Stone magazine in 2004, Wexler said: “There are songs that are a call to action. There are love songs. There are sex songs. But it’s hard to think of another song where all those elements are combined.”

Franklin had decided she wanted to “embellish” the R&B song written by Otis Redding, whose version had been a modest hit in 1965, Wexler said.

“When she walked into the studio, it was already worked out in her head,” the producer wrote. “Otis came up to my office right before ‘Respect’ was released, and I played him the tape. He said, ‘She done took my song.’ He said it benignly and ruefully. He knew the identity of the song was slipping away from him to her.”

In a 2004 interview with the St. Petersburg (Florida) Times, Franklin was asked whether she sensed in the ’60s that she was helping change popular music.

“Somewhat, certainly with ‘Respect,’ that was a battle cry for freedom and many people of many ethnicities took pride in that word,” she answered. “It was meaningful to all of us.”

In 1968, Franklin was pictured on the cover of Time magazine and had more than 10 Top 20 hits in 1967 and 1968. At a time of rebellion and division, Franklin’s records were a musical union of the church and the secular, man and woman, black and white, North and South, East and West. They were produced and engineered by New Yorkers Wexler and Tom Dowd, arranged by Turkish-born Arif Mardin and backed by an interracial assembly of top session musicians based mostly in Alabama.

Her popularity faded during the 1970s despite such hits as the funky “Rock Steady” and such acclaimed albums as the intimate “Spirit in the Dark.” But her career was revived in 1980 with a cameo appearance in the smash movie “The Blues Brothers” and her switch to Arista . Franklin collaborated with such pop and soul artists as Luther Vandross, Elton John, Whitney Houston and George Michael, with whom she recorded a No. 1 single, “I Knew You Were Waiting (for Me).” Her 1985 album “Who’s Zoomin’ Who” received some of her best reviews and included such hits as the title track and “Freeway of Love.”

Critics consistently praised Franklin’s singing but sometimes questioned her material; she covered songs by Stephen Sondheim, Bread, the Doobie Brothers. For Aretha, anything she performed was “soul.”

From her earliest recording sessions, she defied category. The 1998 Grammys gave her a chance to demonstrate her range. Franklin performed “Respect,” then, with only a few minutes’ notice, filled in for an ailing Luciano Pavarotti and drew rave reviews for her rendition of “Nessun Dorma,” a stirring aria for tenors from Puccini’s “Turandot.”

“I’m sure many people were surprised, but I’m not there to prove anything,” Franklin told The Associated Press. “Not necessary.”

Fame never eclipsed Franklin’s charitable works, or her loyalty to Detroit.

Franklin sang the national anthem at Super Bowl in her hometown in 2006, after grousing that Detroit’s rich musical legacy was being snubbed when the Rolling Stones were chosen as halftime performers.

“I didn’t think there was enough (Detroit representation) by any means,” she said. “And it was my feeling, ‘How dare you come to Detroit, a city of legends — musical legends, plural — and not ask one or two of them to participate?’ That’s not the way it should be.”

Franklin did most of her extensive touring by bus after Redding’s death in a 1967 plane crash, and a rough flight to Detroit in 1982 left her with a fear of flying that anti-anxiety tapes and classes couldn’t help. She told Time in 1998 that the custom bus was a comfortable alternative: “You can pull over, go to Red Lobster. You can’t pull over at 35,000 feet.”

She only released a few albums over the past two decades, including “A Rose is Still a Rose,” which featured songs by Sean “Diddy” Combs, Lauryn Hill and other contemporary artists, and “So Damn Happy,” for which Franklin wrote the gratified title ballad. Franklin’s autobiography, “Aretha: From These Roots,” came out in 1999, when she was in her 50s. But she always made it clear that her story would continue.

“Music is my thing, it’s who I am. I’m in it for the long run,” she told The Associated Press in 2008. “I’ll be around, singing, ‘What you want, baby I got it.’ Having fun all the way.”

Partial list of nominees for annual Primetime Emmy Awards

The Free Press WV

Partial list of nominees for the annual Primetime Emmy Awards, announced Thursday by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. For the complete list, visit Emmys.com :

1. Comedy Series: “Atlanta,” ″Barry,” ″black-ish,” ″Curb Your Enthusiasm,” ″GLOW,” ″The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” ″Silicon Valley,” Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”

2. Drama Series: “The Americans,” ″The Crown,” ″Game of Thrones,” ″The Handmaid’s Tale,” ″Stranger Things,” ″This Is Us,” ″Westworld.”

3. Actor, Drama Series: Jason Bateman, “Ozark”; Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”; Ed Harris, “Westworld”; Matthew Rhys, “The Americans”; Milo Ventimiglia, “This Is Us”; Jeffrey Wright, “Westworld.”

4. Supporting Actor, Drama Series: Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, “Game of Thrones”; Peter Dinklage, “Game of Thrones”; Joseph Fiennes, “The Handmaid’s Tale”; David Harbour, “Stranger Things”; Mandy Patinkin, “Homeland”; Matt Smith, “The Crown.”

5. Actress, Drama Series: Claire Foy, “The Crown”; Tatiana Maslany, “Orphan Black”; Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”; Sandra Oh, “Killing Eve”; Keri Russell, “The Americans”; Evan Rachel Wood, “Westworld.”

6. Supporting Actress, Drama Series: Alexis Bledel, “The Handmaid’s Tale”; Millie Bobby Brown, “Stranger Things”; Ann Dowd, “The Handmaid’s Tale”; Lena Headey, “Game of Thrones”; Vanessa Kirby, “The Crown”; Thandie Newton, “Westworld”; Yzonne Strahovski, “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

7. Actor, Comedy Series: Anthony Anderson, “black-ish”; Ted Danson, “The Good Place”; Larry David, “Curb Your Enthusiasm”; Donald Glover, “Atlanta”; Bill Hader, “Barry”; William H. Macy, “Shameless.”

8. Supporting Actor, Comedy Series: Louie Anderson, “Baskets”; Alec Baldwin, “Saturday Night Live”; Tituss Burgess, “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt; Brian Tyree Henry, “Atlanta”; Tony Shalhoub, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”; Kenan Thompson, “Saturday Night Live”; Henry Winkler, “Barry.”

9. Actress, Comedy Series: Pamela Adlon, “Better Things”; Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”; Allison Janney, “Mom”; Issa Rae, “Insecure”; Tracee Ellis Ross, “black-ish”; Lily Tomlin, “Grace and Frankie.”

10. Supporting Actress, Comedy Series: Zazie Beetz, “Atlanta”; Alex Borstein, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”; Aidy Bryant, “Saturday Night Live”; Betty Gilpin, “GLOW”; Leslie Jones, “Saturday Night Live”; Kate McKinnon, “Saturday Night Live”; Laurie Metcalf, “Roseanne”; Megan Mullally, “Will & Grace.”

11. Limited Series: “The Alienist,” ″The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” ″Genius: Picasso,” ″Godless,” ″Patrick Melrose.”

12. Actor, Limited Series or Movie: Antonio Banderas, “Genius: Picasso”; Darren Criss, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”; Benedict Cumberbatch, “Patrick Melrose”; Jeff Daniels, “The Looming Tower”; John Legend, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”; Jesse Plemons, “USS Callister (Black Mirrior)”

13. Supporting Actor, Limited Series or Movie: Jeff Daniels, “Godless”; Brandon Victor Dixon, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”; John Leguizamo, “Waco”; Ricky Martin, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”; Edgar Ramirez, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”; Michael Stuhlbarg, “The Looming Tower”; Finn Wittrock, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.”

14. Actress, Limited Series or Movie: Jessica Biel, “The Sinner”; Laura Dern, “The Tale”; Michelle Dockery, “Godless”; Edie Falco, “Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders”; Regina King, “Seven Seconds”; Sarah Paulson, “American Horror Story: Cult.”

15. Supporting Actress, Limited Series or Movie: Sara Bareilles, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”; Penelope Cruz, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”; Judith Light, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”; Adina Porter, “American Horror Story: Cult”; Merritt Wever, “Godless”; Letitia Wright, “Black Museum (Black Mirror).”

16. Guest Actor in a Comedy Series: Sterling K. Brown, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”; Bryan Cranston, “Curb Your Enthusiasm”; Donald Glover, “Saturday Night Live”; Bill Hader, “Saturday Night Live”; Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Curb Your Enthusiasm”; Katt Williams, “Atlanta.“:

17. Guest Actress in a Comedy Series: Tina Fey, “Saturday Night Live”; Tiffany Haddish, “Saturday Night Live”; Jane Lynch, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel; Maya Rudolph, “The Good Place”; Molly Shannon, “Will & Grace”; Wanda Sykes, “black-ish.”

18. Guest Actor in a Drama Series: F. Murray Abramson, “Homeland”; Cameron Britton, “Mindhunter”; Matthew Goode, “The Crown,” Ron Cephas Jones, “This Is Us”; Gerald McRaney, “This Is Us”; Jimmi Simpson, “Westworld.”

19. Guest Actress in a Drama Series: Viola Davis, “Scandal”; Kelly Jenrette, “The Handmaid’s Tale”; Cherry Jones, “The Handmaid’s Tale”; Diana Rigg, “Game of Thrones”; Cicely Tyson, “How to Get Away With Murder”; Samira Wiley, “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

20. Television Movie: “Fahrenheit 451,” ″Flint,” ″Paterno,” ″The Tale,” ″USS Callister (Black Mirror).”

21. Variety Talk Series: “The Daily Show With Trevor Noah,” ″Full Frontal With Samantha Bee,” ″Jimmy Kimmel Live!,” ″Last Week Tonight With John Oliver,” ″The Late Late Show With James Corden,” ″The Late Show With Stephen Colbert.”

22. Variety Sketch Series: “At Home With Amy Sedaris,” ″Drunk History,” ″I Love You, America With Sarah Silverman,” ″Portlandia,” ″Saturday Night Live,” ″Tracy Ullman’s Show.”

23. Structured Reality Program: “Antiques Roadshow,” ″Fixer Upper,” ″Lip Sync Battle,” ″Queer Eye,” ″Shark Tank,” ″Who Do You Think You Are?

24. Unstructured Reality Program: “Born This Way,” ″Deadliest Catch,” ″Intervention,” ″Naked and Afraid,” ″RuPaul’s Drag Race: Untucked,” ″United States of America with Kamau Bell.”

25. Reality-Competition Program: “The Amazing Race,” ″American Ninja Warrior,” ″Project Runway,” ″RuPaul’s Drag Race,” ″Top Chef,” ″The Voice”

Slain Rapper XXXTentacion Attends His Own Funeral in the Posthumous ‘Sad!‘ Video

One day after more than 8,000 people attended the rapper’s open-casket memorial at the Florida Panthers’ stadium, a posthumous video for XXXTentacion’s “Sad!“ has been released. The 20-year-old rapper, born Jahseh Dwayne Onfroy, was shot and killed on June 20 in South Florida. Before his death, Tentacion wrote and directed the “Sad!“ video, which shows him attending his own funeral and fighting his own resurrected self. A message at the end of the video reads: “You have done well battling yourself.”

The timing is eerie for the rapper, who became the first solo artist to get a posthumous No. 1 since Notorious B.I.G. when “Sad!“ skyrocketed on the charts last week. Shortly after he was declared dead by Florida police, old videos circulated of Tentacion talking about his own death, which led to speculation and rumors from his fans. Certainly, the timing of this video will only fuel some of these theories.

On June 21, police arrested 22-year-old Dedrick D. Williams in what police believe was a random robbery gone wrong.

Williams’s charges include first-degree murder, a probation violation for theft of a car motor vehicle, and driving without a valid license. The rapper was outside a motorsports store on Monday in Miami when two armed men approached him in what is believed to be a robbery. After the shooting, the men fled in an SUV.

Mourning the embattled rapper has been controversial in light of his 2016 arrest on various charges, which include “witness tampering and aggravated battery of a pregnant woman,“ according to the New York Times.

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